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The Ubyssey Nov 15, 2016

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Array CONTRACEPTIVES
,'»*«»y«imi<iiinn>ni<M,|(»WiHttMM,#pp«n.iW(iMH>.M,
P06 PAGE 2
YOUR GUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
NOVEMBER 16,2016 WEDNESDAY
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 15-17
////
FOOD FOR THOUGHT 11A.M.-4P.M. @ THE NEST
A booth in the Nest run by the AMS Food Bank will be
highlighting issues related to food security.
FREE
?(Mkw4/?iW>t
MAKE ART. DRINK WINE.
DAY, NOV 17     7:30-10:30     HATCH ART GPL1
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 17
////
PASTELS AND PINOT 11:30 A.M. @ THE HATCH
Warm vibes, good wine and creativity!
$5
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 20
////
CYCLE-A-THON 12:30-5:30 P.M.
@ CADENCE CYCLING STUDIO
Alpha Gamma Delta will run 20 stationary bikes for five hours
to raise money and for the Canadian Diabetes Association.
ON THE COVER
PHOTO BY
Joshua Medicoff
DESIGN BY
Aiken Lao
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 16, 2016 | VOLUMEXCVIII| ISSUEXVI
EDITORIAL
Photo Editor
Josh Medicoff
photos@u byssey.ca
Coordinating Editor
Jack Hauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca  Our Campus
Coordinator
Design Editor LeoSoh
Aiken Lao
printed itor@ ubyssey.ca
Business Manager
Ron Gorodetsky
President
Tanner Bokor
business@ubyssey.ca     president@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer
ourcamp us® ubyssey.ca Peter Siemens
peter® ubyssey.ca
Operations Assistant
Aine Coombs
operations® ubyssey.ca
News Editors
SruthiTadepalli&
Samantha McCabe
news@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Samuel Du Bois
culture ©ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor Office Administrator
Miguel Santa Maria       Olivia Law
copyeditor@ubyssey.ca   advertising ©ubyssey.ca
Sports +
t- Rec Editor
e Olaniyan
sports@u byssey.ca
Video Producer
KateColenbrander
video@ubyssey.ca
Opinions + Blog Editor
Bailey Ramsay
opinions® ubyssey.ca
Science Editor
Koby Michaels
science@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Natalie Morris, Matt
.angmuir, Bill Situ, Gabey
_ucas,Julia Burnham,
Sophie Sutcliffe, Rache
Ong, Lucy Fox, Emma
Hicks, Jeremy Johnson-
Silvers, Diana Oproescu,
Stephanie Wu, Emmanue
v'illamejoi. Moira Wyton,
Patrick Gillin, Mischs
Mil ne, Sebastian Men do,
sabelle Commerford,
Katharina Friege, Han a
Go lightly, Lauren Kearns,
3enGeisberg,Joshus
Azizi, Sarah Pribadi,
ZubairHirji
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is theofficial student
newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is published every
Tuesday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all studentsare encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
by the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of thestaff.anc
do not necessarily reflectthe views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property
of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding
member of Canadian University
=>ress (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
The Ubyssey accepts opinion
articles on any topic related to the
Jniversityof British Columbia (UBC;
and/ortopics relevant to students
attending UBC. Submissions must
be written by UBC students, professors, alumni, orthose in a suitable position (as determined by
the opinions editor) to speak on
JBC-related matters. Submissions
must not contain racism, sexism,
homophobia, transphobia, harassment or discrimination. Authors and/
or sub miss ions will notbepreclud-
ed from publication based solely
on association with particular ideologies or subject matter that some
may find objectionable. Approva
for publication is, however, dependent on thequality of the argument
and The Ubyssey editorial board's
judgment of appropriate content.
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
SUB 2208
604-822.2301
Business Office:
SUB 2209
ADVERTISING 604.822.2301
INQUIRIES 604.822.2301
The New Student Union
Building 6133 University
Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
Online: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: @ubyssey
Submissions maybesentbyemail
to opinion@ubyssey.ca. Please in-
cludeyourstudentnumberorother
oroofofidentification.Anonymous
submissions will be accepted on
extremely rare occasions. Requests
for anonymity will begranted upon
agreement from four fifths of the
editorial board. Full opinions pol-
cy may be found at ubyssey.ca/
submit-an-opinion
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an errorin the ad occurs
the liability of the UPS will not be
greater than the price paid for the
ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
Debbie Harvie has directed the UBC
Bookstore since before you were born
Harvie has directed the Bookstore for over 25 years.
Leo Soh
Our Campus Coordinator
Debbie Harvie is profoundly
experienced in bookstore
management. Having directed the
UBC Bookstore for over 25 years,
she has had a measurable impact
on the student experience at UBC.
In 2008, she became the managing-
director of University Community
Services and since then, has
overseen a diverse portfolio
servicing the community.
Although she also directs
Campus Security and parking and
access services, the Bookstore
remains the focus of Harvie's role.
"Of course I have to look after
all the units in my portfolio, but
I think the Bookstore is still the
largest. It's also probably the key
function in connectivity with
students — obviously supplying
academic materials influences
how students do in their courses
and it ties us very closely to the
faculty," she said.
Initially, Harvie aspired to be
a grade school teacher, but when
she graduated from the University
of Alberta in 1979, the job market
for teaching jobs was incredibly
depressed. This motivated Harvie
to enter the book industry,
becoming a manager for Classic
Bookshops at just 23 years old.
She then entered collegiate retail
as the SFU Bookstore manager in
1985 and moved to UBC in 1990,
becoming the UBC Bookstore
director.
During Harvie's tenure, the
Bookstore has experienced many
significant changes. For one, books
have become much less popular.
She explained that pressure from
competitors, such as Chapters,
Amazon and eBook readers, forced
collegiate retail to adapt to a more
competitive marketplace.
"When I started in the book
industry ... trade books would
do incredibly well — when a
bestseller would come out in
paperback or hardcover, you'd
sell hundreds of them and the
stores were thriving. The [UBC
Bookstore], when I came here,
sold over $4 million worth of
general books [in one year]. Today,
we sell about $900,000," she said.
Collegiate stores are also
responsible for providing
course materials to students.
When compared to trade books,
Harvey says that this sector of
the Bookstore's commerce has
changed even more dramatically.
"[In the 1980s and 1990s], lots
of books were selling — for a class
of a hundred, we'd sell 99 books
because books were really used in
a different way in courses. There
were less choices, there wasn't
the internet, so students just used
their learning materials very
efficiently and effectively, I think."
Since then, much has changed,
Harvie explained.
"Students have a lot more
choices. Sometimes, students
choose not to buy anything at
all, and that's fair. We're very
supportive of open educational
materials and if that's the right
thing for the class, we want to
support that."
According to Harvie, these
changes have skyrocketed the
difficulty of the book buying
process. Once a faculty member
chooses the course materials,
the Bookstore's buyers have
to estimate the demand from
students, making predictions
based off past records and
the textbook's status as either
recommended or required.
"The challenge in this
marketplace is we at the Bookstore
don't choose the textbook — the
faculty member does," said Harvie.
"If a faculty member goes to the
class and says, 'You don't actually
need that book,' now we're the bad
guy because we brought them in
and the student doesn't need it. All
we want is that a faculty member
chooses a great book, the student
uses that in the class and gets
value out of it. Then we all win."
PHOTO JACK HAUEN/THE UBYSSEY
Despite the Bookstore's core
identity as a book retailer, books
make up less than half of its sales.
Harvie does not view this as a
negative, but rather as a sign of
the Bookstore's growing role as
an economic hub on the UBC
campus.
"We're not only a bookstore.
And I don't mean that to be a
diminutive, but we are more than a
bookstore — we have a lot of other
products. Some people, if they
don't come in to buy a book, may
never think that we have pens and
pencils, or other things," she said.
For example, the Bookstore
is one of the few places where
students, faculty, staff and visitors
can purchase UBC branded
clothing. Harvie plays a big role
in marketing branded clothing.
She argues that UBC clothing
shouldn't be a uniform.
"UBC's clothing is blue and
gold, but quite honestly, it's not
the most popular colour that
we sell. I've been to [Harvard's]
bookstore — you walk in and
everything is burgundy and grey
or white. But as a customer, that's
not what I want — I would like
some choice," she said.
Harvie speaks from experience
— decreasing chromatic variation
has depressed sales in the past. "A
couple of years ago, the athletics
department wanted us to have all
blue and gold clothing, and our
sales plummeted. Especially the
young women on campus, they
wanted us to have more fashion
pieces, so when we were able to
bring those back, sales rose up
again."
For the remainder of her
career, Harvie wants to continue
serving UBC. She said, "I've
been very fortunate to be in this
industry. I don't know if this is the
peak of my career, but I'm always
looking for new opportunities on
campus to take on projects and see
if I can help make UBC a better
place for students. As long as I'm
adding to that, I'm quite happy." Vi V,
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FOLLOW US (SAMS UBC FOR A WEEK-LONG CELEBRATORY SPECIAL
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CLINICAL PROFESSOR Vi
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211
HIRING
PERSONAL ASSISTANT
Part-time Opportunity
16 hours per week
$25 per hour
Needed to start work as soon as possible
Apply by email with a cover letter and resume
y   Vancouver
neiljfehr17@gmail.com
This is not an opportunity with The Ubyssey or any affiliated entity. NOVEMBER 16, 2016 WEDNESDAY I   CULTURE   I   11
BOOKS //
Review: The News is a
powerful meditation on
birth and empathy
The poems were written over the weeks of his wife's pregnancy.
DHOTO COURTESY ROBTAYLOR
Curtis Seufert
Contributor
Rob Taylor — who graduated from
UBC with an MFA in creative
writing — has released his second
full-length book of poetry entitled
The News. It is comprised of a poem
for nearly every week of his wife's
pregnancy, conveying his thoughts
about their unborn child and the
world in which they will grow up. It
also reflects a period of growth for
Taylor himself — in his views on the
world, and in discovering whether
his beliefs, as well as our own, are
rooted in ideas or in people.
For Taylor, the idea of writing a
poetry book with a concept like this
was a surprise to him, perhaps even
more of a surprise than the news of
the baby itself. He noted that while
"the baby was on purpose, [the] book
was an accident."
Taylor noted that writing is how
he processes big events in his life
— "I write a poem about it, just as a
way to think about it."
When Taylor first presented his
the idea to Professor Karen Solie,
under whom he was completing his
directed studies in creative writing
at UBC, they were both a little
skeptical. In fact, he initially thought
that it was "a terrible idea."
"When I tell people [the idea],
people's eyes recede to the back of
their heads — but when I handed
her some of the poems, she was
more receptive. That gave me
enough encouragement to try a few
more. The momentum built, and
once I had a fuller sense of what I
was doing, it became easier to write
[them]."
The direction that Taylor took
was in dedicating the poems not to
the child itself, but to "the idea of
a child," as he puts it, emphasizing
how important it was not to write
any of the poems after the child was
born.
At least on the surface, The
News is a kind of poetic journal of a
parent — touching on the headlines
and politics of the day, observing
the surrounding world in daily life
and how that can affect the world in
which the child grows up.
The multiple interpretations of
the title parallel the many meanings
people might take out of the
book itself. But the most obvious
meanings come from the news that
is most immediately relevant to
Taylor, his wife and those close to
them.
At times, Taylor does more
than hint at his worry, at one point
likening bringing the child into the
world to "digging [its] grave." But
don't be mistaken — there is much
more to The News than journal
entries of a worrying parent.
The poems are in the order in
which they were written. As the
weekly entries continue and the
baby grows, so too does Taylor's
perspective on life — entering a
new phase, gaining a more nuanced,
empathetic, and inter-personal
understanding of the world and its
peoples' news.
"I think that's part of the
maturation process [of your 30s],
and part of the exploration the
book is doing — understanding
that nothing is as straightforward
as I liked to believe that it was, and
asking whether our values and
virtues are locked into ideas or
locked into people. I think this book
involves a shift in my mind about the
core of life."
Taking the reader through
the "headlines" of his week,
Taylor artfully synthesizes the
meaningfulness of stories around
the world, and reflexively considers
his own life and the lives of those he
encounters. It creates a reflective
take on the human condition itself,
one that is both immensely personal,
but also inherently relatable in its
humanity.
It is by placing himself in the
context of the world that Taylor
allows himself to empathize with
happiness and suffering of those he
has never met. Whether it is wishing
to meet a lady in the park in her
dying days, or seeing the many soon-
to-be mothers and fathers — like
himself — in birthing class.
Unlike the Mother's Day cards he
writes off as being both impersonal
and marketed to many, The News is a
work of emotion and empathy that is
much more genuine and profound.
While other works might
choose either to be only a
personal journal, or simply
a critique of the state of the
world and humanity, it is in
Taylor's journey towards a more
empathetic perspective that
allows him to transcend both. He
accomplishes his goal of growing
into a better parent for his child,
becoming a more appreciative
human and encouraging the
reader to see those things as
one in the same, in this deeply
personal work. Vi
THEATRE //
Brendan McLeod tackles mental
illness with humour in Brain
The monologue will dive deep into personal issues.
PHOTO COURTESYMIKE SAVAGE
Mischa Milne
Staff Writer
Brendan McLeod's monologue
Brain will be performed at the Chan
Centre on November 17 at 7:30
p.m. Addressing issues of mental
illness, relationships, and McLeod's
experience of battling obsessive-
compulsive disorder and psychosis,
the one-man show was awarded Pick
of the Fringe in the 2015 Vancouver
Fringe Festival.
Part of the Chan Centre's Beyond
Words series this year, Brain will be
amongst a group of performances
that aim to initiate conversations
about important topics through
multidisciplinary works.
Discussing very personal issues
of mental health in front of an
audience was terrifying at first for
McLeod, but he notes that the nature
of performing itself tends to be
cathartic.
"I wanted to do a really personal,
nuanced exploration about mental
health because just like any
experience in life, it is in some parts
the same for everyone, but it's also
incredibly different and there's
different manifestations for each
person. It's a very specific rendering
of my experience," said McLeod.
Finding that personal voice
proved to be a challenge in itself
during the year-long writing process.
He began the monologue in the
summer of 2014, and first performed
it at the Vancouver Fringe Festival
in 2015. However, striking a balance
between relatability and honesty was
something that came with its own set
of worries and doubts.
"You kind of tend to want to be
general all the time because you
want to keep it real for everybody
— you want to speak to everyone's
experiences. I kind of kept lying or
not telling the full truth, or I would
try to talk about my experiences in a
way that made it more generalized...
It's hard to be totally, totally honest
and not filter it," he said.
McLeod noted that it was once
he focused on his own specific story
that the piece really came together.
Despite the specificity, there were
people that approached him after
his performances to tell him that his
experiences had really resonated
with them.
"You're always worried about
relatability when you're trying to
perform for other people," he said.
McLeod himself is no stranger
to storytelling in its many different
forms. He has created spoken word
poems, plays, monologues, novels
and music throughout the course of
his career. Additionally, he teaches
at Langara College and works with
various youth mentorship programs
in order to help reduce stigma
around mental health.
In utilizing comedy to discuss
the difficult issues of mental illness
throughout Brain, McLeod aims
to reduce stigma and approach
sensitive subjects from a different
perspective.
"Humour is a way to get people
to lower their defences... You don't
want to just go up there and hit
people with really dark stuff for
55 minutes. Part of life is finding-
something to laugh about in the
tougher moments." Vi
A UNIQUE JOB
AN ICONIC LOCATION
AN UNFORGETTABLE SUMMER
Become a PARLIAMENTARY GUIDE
Applications due January 13, 2017
This summer, be part of the action at the Parliament of Canada.
Find out more and apply online at
parl.gc.ca/guides
.iotheque du Parle Vi
Vi V    =*H  ©        "<
TEACH IN KOREA
with the support of the Korean government!
Ge£ a transformative cultural
experience through TaLK!
website for m°re information
^w.ta\k.go.kr
Contact information:
Consulate General of the Republic of Korea
TEL: 604-681-9581 / vanedu@mofa.go.kr "We use this
amount. It's good
for us to come
and interact a little
more. I think it
opens things up
to a different part
of town."
-CANUCKS
GOALTENDERRYAN
MILLER 15
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The UBC
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nine shots in
the match,
making seven
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For more comics visit FilbertCartoons.com

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