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The Ubyssey Feb 23, 2016

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Array FEBRUARY23,2016 | VOLUME XCVII | ISSUE XX
PARTYING IN LASINCE 1918
P/04
P/08
P/09
P/ll
//
//
//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
Sustainability report
highlights
UBC's green campus
Grammy winners
at the
Chan Centre
The BoG needs to act
on climate change
investment risk
Meet the UBC
2016 Hall of Fame
Inductees // PAGE 2
YOUR GUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2016
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
la
Bands //Raffle
The Pit // Thurs, Feb 25 //19*
5$ // 3$ for CiTR, FilmSoc,
THURS25
////
CiTR FUNDRIVE 6 P.M. @ THE PIT
Come byto party, celebrate, and raise money to help CiTR continue providing great content and opportunity for students.
$5
noo
Undergraduate
Society
(3%e \Ztefdefmia(j \dala
PRESENTED BY THE SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY OF UBC
27 FEBRUARY 2016   I   5 30 PM - 3:00 PM   I   THE GREAT HALL, AMS STUDENT NEST
A
SAT 27
////
THE CENTENNIAL GALA 5:30 A.M. @ THE NEST
You are cordially invited by the Science Undergraduate Society
to participate in the gala held in the Great Hall. Look nice.
$35
F5XE
VOLUTIQ
feNDURANCE DANCE CHALLEf
t«" NAftu
1
MARCH 4
////
EVOLUTION 8:30 P.M. @ THE NEST
Not a dance competition, not a marathon but a DANCE-A-
THON. Look nice, party and drink lots of beer.
$10/SPECIAL PRICES FORTEAMS
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Kosta Prodanovic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
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Gunjan Mhapankar wins Queen's Young Leaders
Award for community service video project
3H0T0 COURTESYGUNJAN MHAPANKAR
Gunjan Mhapankar moved to Vancouver from Mumbai when she was 15.
Andrea Gonzalez
Staff Writer
When they arrived in Vancouver
from Mumbai, Gunjan Mhapankar —
15 at the time — and her family came
face to face with the lack of social
support for immigrant groups in the
city. Now a fourth-year microbiology
and immunology student,
Mhapankar devotes herself to
bringing about social change to help
vulnerable groups in Vancouver that
are disconnected from community
support
From fundraising for the
Greater Vancouver Food Bank and
volunteering for organizations
like Science World and YWCA,
to initiatives addressing
unemployment, mental health and
LGBTQ+ rights, Mhapankar has
collaborated with over 20 different
community-based organizations and
non-profits in the Greater Vancouver
region since her arrival in Canada.
"When I moved here from
Mumbai, what struck me the most
was not the cultural shock, but just
the lack of social support," recalled
Mhapankar. "There's a social
network that you rely on and that
you take for granted when you have
it. So when you're taken away from
that and you're put in a completely
different city, it really makes you
think about the importance of them
and the role they play."
This new perspective, alongside
Vancouver's stark economic
inequality, motivated Mhapankar
to become involved in community
service. Her most recent venture
— a digital storytelling project
showcasing the essential community
services offered by various local
non-profit organizations — has
received international recognition.
Mhapankar is one of only two
Canadians awarded the 2016 Queen's
Young Leaders Award, which
celebrates exceptional people aged
18-29 from across commonwealth
countries who are taking the lead in
their communities and using their
skills to transform lives.
The digital storytelling
project began with Mhapankar's
involvement in a reading break
project with the non-profit
organization BC211, which provides
people with information and referral
to community, government and
social services in BC.
"I started working with [BC211]
for a small, three-day youth
engagement project in which we
were just going out and interviewing
youth, especially youth who were
underprivileged and multi-barrier —
struggling with issues like addiction
or homelessness — and asking them
what they need to feel helped," said
Mhapankar.
Mhapankar acknowledged
that while services are often made
specifically for youths, decisions
about them tend to occur without
the youths' involvement With this
in mind, Mhapankar and her team
of 10 UBC students sought to go out
into the community to find out how
young people really wanted to be
helped.
Along with her team, Mhapankar
went to five organizations —
including the Vancouver Mental
Health Centre — and spoke to young
people struggling with illnesses such
as anorexia. They interviewed and
filmed 10 people over the course
of the three-day project Having
identified an existing need in the
community to generate awareness
and digital marketing content about
social services in BC for youth,
Gunjan decided that she was not
ready to close the door on the video
project.
"It was such a great project that
I wanted to take it a bit further. I
went to BC211 and I proposed that
we expand the scope of the project,"
said Mhapankar. "We applied for the
Chapman Innovation grant, a grant
up to $10,000 given to UBC students
who want to do a project in the
community."
In partnership with BC211 and
with the Chapman Innovation grant
funding, Mhapankar interviewed
members of nine different local
organizations performing essential
work in the community, including
QMUNITY, Richmond Youth
Service Agency, Seniors Come
Share Society, Big Brothers and
Big Sisters, and Positive Living BC,
among others. Many of these nonprofit organizations lack funding for
outreach and awareness building,
especially via newer avenues of
digital outreach. Mhapankar's videos
offered a new venue to highlight the
important work they were doing to
support the local community.
"Despite not coming from a film
making background, the digital
storytelling project and the small
pilot project during reading week
really opened up the gate to using
digital video content as a way to
empower social change," said
Mhapankar. "Having created these
videos, I think that social media and
digital media can service as a really
powerful catalyst for social change,
but [only] if it is channeled in the
right direction."
As part of the Queen's
Young Leaders Award package,
Mhapankar will go to London for
a one-week residential program
in June. There, she will receive
the award from the Queen
herself in Buckingham Palace. In
addition, Mhapankar will have
the opportunity to network with a
cohort of 60 other award-winners
from around the world and meet
global leaders and heads of social
enterprises. There is also a training
component in the form of an
online training course, provided
by the University of Cambridge,
focused on fostering leadership and
personal development.
"It's really quite humbling.
I think this program is going to
give me the opportunity to take
this work that I have been doing
with the community further and
also allow me to gain access to
resources that I can connect people
to," explained Mhapankar. "If it
was just a piece of paper, it would
have been so much less valuable
than the rich experience that we
are gaining right now." 'Bl
PLAY A NEIGHBOURHOOD
DESIGN GAME
Come and test urban design tools
and have a chance to win a 2016
iPad.
Sign up at http://blogs.ubc.ca/
playaneighbourhooddesigngame/
Workshops will be 2.5 hours and
run in March. See the schedule on
our website.
All UBC students may participate
so please invite your friends.
You'll be fed!
A light lunch or dinner \
provided.
be // NEWS
SUPPORT //
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRA WARBURTON
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY23,2016
New communication strategies in the
works to help resource groups to expand
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The AMS is developing a set of strategies to help resource groups reach more people.
= ILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
Joshua Azizi
Senior Staff Writer
The AMS is developing a
communications model for
resource groups to use that will
help the groups reach out to
students in order to expand their
memberships.
Resource groups are on-campus
collectives within the AMS that
are based around social justice
issues. The groups' intent is to
provide supportive and respectful
communities for students with
identities, backgrounds or
beliefs that have historically and
systemically been discriminated
against. Examples include Pride
UBC, the Women's Centre and
Colour Connected.
The idea for the AMS to
develop a model which various
resource groups could use
to promote themselves came
about when one group — Colour
Connected Against Racism
UBC — wanted to expand its
membership.
Colour Connected offers
support and information to
students who feel disempowered
due to discrimination based on,
but not limited to, racism.
According to Colour
Connected President Hussain
Khan, there's a communal aspect
to the group as well.
"It's also supposed to be like
a space where students of colour
or their allies can just come
and chill," he said, noting that
although he frequently receives
help from Colour Connected
alumni, he's currently the only
official member of the group.
Khan is now working with
the AMS to create a set of new
communication strategies meant
to attract students to the group.
These strategies will serve as a
model for other resource groups
to follow if they would like to
use it.
Although it's currently a work
in progress, the model that's
being considered consists of
three pillars. The first of these
pillars is focused on visual media
outreach to students, in which
Colour Connected and any
other groups that wish to can be
promoted through social media,
posters or AMS newsletters.
The second pillar is in-person
outreach, which will focus on
boothing and events that can
engage students on the campus.
AMS Events Coordinator Asad
Ali — who is working with Khan
on setting up booths for Colour
Connected — hopes to make
this part of the outreach more
interactive than just handing
out pamphlets to people on
the street. One activity he's
considering doing with Colour
Connected, which got a positive
response from students on
previous occasions, is called Pop
the Stigma.
"We wrote a stigma down
[on a balloon] and then you
popped it," he said. "You felt very
empowered after that and we just
thought we'd bring in something
like that to make it more
interactive."
The final pillar involves long-
term structural planning, in which
involved parties will discuss how
to ensure the future success and
stability of each group. Although
this model is offered to groups,
they will not be obligated to use
it.
"I really think it's important
to respect the autonomy for our
resource groups and ensure that
they have the freedom to operate
in whatever capacity and form
that they choose," said AMS VP
Admin Ava Nasiri. "[But] any time
the resource groups or any specific
resource group has an appetite
or expresses a need for a certain
type of support, we're more than
happy to go above and beyond." U
You don't have to
sit in school to stand
among greatness.
Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved on to invent a
little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else, or have a scheduling conflict,
come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized online courses, then move on to bigger
successes.Talkabouta light bulb moment. NEWS    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2016
PRANKINGS //
A look back at UBCs infamous engineering pranks
Emma Partridge
News Editor
At UBC, engineering pranks
are nothing short of legend. In
part, this is because of how long
engineering pranks have been
happening.
According to hEUStory, a
website devoted to the pranks,
1956-57 was a good year for
pranking. That academic year,
horses were rented and rode down
Main Mall —one Arts student was
"sacrificed" at the end in honour
of the procession. A Volkswagen
Beetle also made an appearance —
lodged between two columns of an
engineering building.
According to Hans Seidemann,
an engineering student at
UBC from 2009 to 2014, the
entertainment value has to be
mixed with the right amount of
practicality. Executing a prank
isn't always as clean as it looks by
a perfectly positioned car at a high
altitude.
"The one on the clock tower
was three years in the making — a
year of planning, a failure and then
another year to re-do," said Bill
Richardson, engineering student
at UBC in the early '80s, who
noted that his knowledge is simply
hypothetical and the EUS can't
be considered responsible for the
incidences.
According to Richardson, the
car-on-the-clock-tower succeeded
a second time by taking it apart,
hoisting everything up and
reassembling it all once in place.
Richardson has sorted
engineering pranks into three
categories — the car on top of
the clock tower is category one.
Number two is leaving something
= ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Pranks are an integral part of engineering culture at UBC.
that can't be removed. Then, his
personal favourite is called "switch
and bait. That is where something
appears to be very wrong, but it
isn't."
A good example of the latter is
the "statue stunt." Engineers built
a number of ugly statues which
were then left around campus. Once
everyone had a chance to notice the
additions, a letter writing campaign
began, asking that the statues be
removed. The arts community
on campus was horrified and
equally so when they found out the
engineers had then gone ahead and
destroyed them anyway.
Some pranks never quite come
to fruition. Seidemann said it's just a
process of figuring out the limitations
once work has begun on a project.
Some of the ideas that were thrown
out remain just as entertaining in the
realm of possibility.
One idea was to paint a sheet of
plywood black and attach Christmas
lights to reflect the time so the
contraption appeared as a massive,
digital clock. The hope was then
to hoist the "clock" over the analog
clock face of our clock tower, but
unfortunately wind kept snagging
the contraption and smashing the the
mechanics.
Some that may have faded to
distant memory are the Omar
pranks.
According to Richardson,
Forestry had a car nicknamed Omar,
which was ceremoniously destroyed
every year in some way or another.
One year, Omar was placed outside
of a main library and covered with
concrete with two rubber gloves
poking out to give the impression
someone was buried underneath.
"It just stayed there all year ...
because it was so heavy. But then
during Engineering Week, some
people came and opened the door,"
said Richardson. "[They] smashed
the very thin layer of concrete that
was there and shovelled all the dirt
out, inflated the tires, started it up
and drove away."
However, does the pranking
represent more than a disruption
someone's day? According to
Seidemann, yes.
"The best value of the pranks
is they demonstrate in a really
tangible way what you are doing
when you're getting an engineering
degree," he said. 'M
AGGRESSIVELY GREEN //
Study and's
GOABROADJ
STUDY    TRAVEL    WORK    VOLUNTEER
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FEB 25
VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER
CONVENTION
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3 pm - 7 pm
SEMINARS start at 2 pm
VICTORIA VANCOUVER
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www. studyandgoabroad com
UBCs campus is committed to sustainability.
= ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
UBC releases annual
sustainability report
Aidan Qualizza
Staff Writer
UBC has released its 2014-2015
sustainability report. This report
is used as a benchmark for future
initiatives on campuses across the
globe, as UBC is at the forefront of
sustainability research and action.
The university has made a
commitment to reduce their
greenhouse gas emissions
through a series of goals which
the director of Communication
and Community Engagement of
the UBC Sustainability Initiative,
Victoria Smith, described as
"aggressive" — 33 per cent by
2015, 67 per cent by 2020 and
100 per cent by 2050. Each year,
the UBC Sustainability Initiative
releases a report that summarizes
gains towards these goals.
The last academic year marked
significant gains in productivity
of the community's sustainable
initiatives.
"We took [the report] to the
board in December and I think
we keyed in on a couple of very
significant achievements from
our previous year," said Smith,
citing the university's reduction
in greenhouse gas emissions,
sustainability-related for-
credit courses and the scholars'
program, which allow more
hands-on learning opportunities
for graduate students.
The community is on track
to accomplishing their goals,
thanks in part to LEED-certified
construction across campus and
the steam-to-hot water heating
conversion process occurring in
130 of UBCs buildings, among
other initiatives. The new hot
water heating systems will reduce
the university's total greenhouse
gas emissions by 22 per cent,
energy use by 24 per cent and
operation cost by $5.5 million per
year.
All of UBCs faculties
have made a commitment to
integrating sustainability-related
course material into their
existing curriculum. The goal
is to give every undergraduate
student enrolled at UBC the
opportunity to take a minor in
sustainability, regardless of their
faculty, department or academic
discipline. As of the 2014-2015
academic year, there are 636
courses, up from 500 the year
before available to every student.
"Many other universities will
have a dedicated sustainability
college or a degree program,"
said Smith. "But we think
that everyone should be
contemplating and thinking
about sustainability, regardless
if they are taking mechanical
engineering or medieval history."
The graduate student
internship program is an
opportunity for graduate
students from any faculty
to work on issues related
to the city of Vancouver's
sustainability initiatives. The
program encourages dialogue on
sustainability issues in the city
through new emerging applied
research opportunities for
students.
"We have expanded our
thinking and our available
internship opportunities for grad
students. We have grown the
number of student opportunities
with the city ... and diversified
the opportunities to work with
folks like BC Hydro, Fortis and
the Musqueam Nation," said
Smith.
This program allows the
UBC community to contribute
to research and action on
sustainability issues that are
larger than the Point Grey
campus, but those which affect
the entire Vancouver region.
"The dominant narrative
surrounding sustainability over
the past few decades has been
... that we have a limited planet
with limited resources and the
more we use, the more it becomes
inherently unsustainable." said
Smith. UBC is attempting to make
this narrative more accessible
through the three pillars of
the new sustainability report
— teaching learning research,
operations infrastructure and
community — all of which
encompass social, economics and
environmental sustainability.
The narrative at UBC is
being changed from focusing
on exclusively nature-based
preservation towards a more
holistic, humanist narrative —
even if students are not aware
of it. The UBC Sustainability
Initiative is "getting beyond
natural resources and damage
limitation," said Smith. "As a
global leader of sustainability ...
we get to push the thinking on
this a bit and it's exciting." ^ //CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY FEBRUARY212016
TECH//
New glove technology helps skiiers stay safe
Paula Duhattchek
Sen br Staff Writer
There are a million ways to ruin your
phone while skiing or snowboarding.
You can drop it on the chair lift, lose
it in deep snow, crack the screen) get
it wet or drain the battery in sub-
zer o temp eratur e s.
Ramin Sahebj avaheri veteran
skier and co-founder of Yodel TECH
Inc., knew there had to be abetter
way.
"Right nowj me and my brother
ski and snowboard alot. [This
company] came out of our own
frustrations that we felt on the
m ountain. After we felt tho se
frustrations for manyyearsi we
finally decided to do something
about it and that's when we started
YodelTECH,"hesaid.
The company's first pro duct is
Yodel Up, an on-glove wearable that
acts as a sort of hybrid cell phone
and walkie-talkie. The device
connects to users' cellphones
using Bluetooth technology
allowing skiers andsnowboarders
t o se ami e ssly pi ay music and chat
while on the mountain. Best of all|
winter is cold and Yodel Up lets
you keep your gloves on while you
use it.
While the pro duct is mostly just
for funi better communication can
also mean better safety for skiers
and snowboarders.
" Imagine you're flying down the
mountain and someone's behind
The devise's Kickstartercampaqn bagins this month.
you. You're both listening to this
device and you've j ust bar ely m ade
it past a really big rock —you can
immediately warn your friendsi" he
said. "Imagine taking your glove off
and trying to call them — there's no
guar ante e they'll he ar that. S 0 thi s
opens up alot of possibilities to
improve safety."
Ramin holds a PhD in
engineering from UBC and
previously worked with
UmbraCityi the umbrella sharing
service that launched on campus
this fall. He's be come a bit of a.
serial entrepreneur! having already
established a consulting firm that
sp e cialize s in automati on, me di cal
devices and electronics.
After leaving UmbraCity this
summer 1 Ramin began working on
YodelTECH Inc with his brother,
Darius. The brothers are still
running on savings and adrenaline
— in true start-up fashion, the
company headquarters are
cur r ently 1 ocate d in their p ar ents'
garage.
Nowthe pair need cash to keep
m oving forward with pr 0 ducti on.
Although they had h op e d to fund
th e pr oj e ct entir ely on their own,
the material costs associated
with the device soon made that
impossible. Instead, they've turned
to crowdfunding. The brothers are
launching a Kickstarter campaign
on February 2 4 that aims to raise
FHIiTDOILRTESA'COEU.F
$60,000 for up-front tooling and
manufacturing costs.
" If we'r e succe ssful 1 we 11
have the money to basically start
manufacturing right away and we'll
be able to ship by next ski season,"
said Ramin,
Ramin also hopesto build
hype for the product via an online
yo deling competition, Participants
can enter to win a variety of ski
prizesby uploading a video of
themselvesyodelingtothe YodelUp
Facebookpage.
Those interested in the
competition are encouraged to
revisit the goatherd scene from The
Sound of Music and to 1 earn mor e
online. H
THEATRE//
Sharing secrets online, onstage
HJJTO CttKTESYfOSFSttSEr
Wa rren has bee n co ntacted by the FBI ove r'confessions' tou nd on h is site.
Miguel Santa Maria
Sen br Staff Writer
For some students, visiting
Facebook pageslike UBC
Confessions can be addictive,
especially with the variety of
anonymous admissions and the
crazy comments section that
follows. Long before any of that
though, Frank Warren was already
inviting people to share their
anonymous confessions through
good old-fashioned snail mail.
Warren is the founder of
Post Secret — an online blog
where anyone is invited to
anonymously send their secrets
through traditional, decorated
postcards. These secrets can be
lighthe arted one s such as a barista
confessing to serving decaf to
rude customers. They can also be
very serious ones that deal with
suicide and beyond, which has
led to police and even the FBI
contacting Warren multiple times,
Afterwards, said confessions are
eventually poste d onto his blog.
This all started an entire
decade ago and| at the time, the
website blew up in the popular
me dia. Although the blog is
not nearly mentioned as much
nowadays, this has not stopped
the mail from coming in.
" Ten y e ar s 1 ater 1 th ey haven't
stopped. I feel like I accidentally
tapp ed into something that had
been there the whole time ...
and I don't think there's any
way to turn it off|" said Warren.
He added that this likely stems
from a combination of elements
including the "true anonymity"
within postcards compared to a
digital footprint online and the
way the website re spectfully
approaches these admissions.
"I treat everybody's secret
with respect. I use my home
address, not a P.O. box, and I think
all those things help me earn
the trust of pe ople that tell me
the deepest stories, the funniest
confessions and the deepest
admissions."
Right now, Warren is currently
on tour with Post Secret: The Show
— an on-stage iteration of the
concept where sent secrets are
re-enacte d or r ead out through
actors. Audiences are also
invited to participate, whether
through acting within these skits
themselves or sending their own
secrets right before the show
starts. The show itself is already
running here in Vancouver and
will be until e arly next month.
Among those vast amounts
of secrets he's collected, Warren
has also seen his fair share of
ones he believes come from
young students. It is within these
particular postcards that he sees
recurring trends of anxiety and
hopefulness.
"I get alot of secrets from
young people especially and one
of the most frequent seer ets I get
is one that de scribes a se arch for
that one person who they can tell
their secrets to and be their full
and true selves," said Warren.
"I also get hopeful seer ets like
marriage proposals [and] hidden
acts of kindness that people have
done for each other."
With that sai d, Warr en
j frequently provides talks
j to students in colleges and
j univer si ti es ar ound North Am eri ca,
j He v/aspreviously aguest speaker
! in a UBC Student Leadership
! Conf er ence back in 2013. During
j that talk 1 Warren discussed a
j number of important elements
j reg ar ding se cret s that student s can
j use as a learning experience. This
j includes secrets as a "currency
1 of intim acy" that brings a wi de
j range people together and how
j the internet itself has become an
j integr al p art of catalyzing th at.
Warr en e sp e ci ally se e s the s e
j element sin terms of Facebook
! pageslike UBC Confessions
j bringing university students
j together.
" I think that's the natural
j progressioni" he said. "It's just like
I howthe Post Secret show is a way
j to bring the community out into
! the phy sical worl d. [Th e] show...
j brings together people who are
j fans of the website and book, and
j all ows them to inter act and shar e
j some of (these stories]."
Overall, whether through his
I websites, his shows or the various
I university pages out there 1 Warren
! hopes the value of secrets —
j whether keeping or sharing them
! — isfurther recognized.
"There [are] the secrets that we
j keep from others and the secrets
I that we hide from ourselve S|" he
I said." If we can find the courage
j to share some of our secrets to
i people we trust, I think that
j all ows us to not just form deeper
j relationships, but understand
! ourselves better." "51
AWARDS//
UBC filmmaker
wins at festival
PHJTO COLRTESTRl 1.1 KXIZ
The film literally expbies lg ht.
Cecilia Me squita
Contributor
The winner for the second week of
February's Reel 13 online short film
festival was director and producer
Rami KatZ| a current master's
student at UBC.
The idea for the short film
surged a year ago when Katz teamed
up with a group of friends for a
chall enge that pr e sent s opp ortuniti es
to writei direct, shoot and edit a short
documentary in five days base don
the criteria given by the organization.
The short documentary. An
Exploration cf Light, consists of
interweaving sd entifi c interviews
with philosophical quips. The short
film explores the different ways
humans perceive and inter act with
light.
Katz said his co-producer and
composer, Ben Leyland, came up
with the idea
"[The original concept was to]
do something about light, the way it
work s and how it is per ceive d," said
Katz.
Making a science-based
documentary gave him and the
team the opportunity to interview
physicists and learn something, but
also to try to and create something
cool and visual.
The original documentary was re-
editedfor an entire year before the
second version, which is the one that
won the Reel 13 short film festival.
The festival is an online submission
contest. The organization picks up
to three finalists every week and lets
people vote online on their favourite
short film for five days
As An Exploration of Light
won the online votingi the short
documentary was screened on 13 — a
PBS flagship station in New York
City — on February 13.
Katz said that he was not
exp ecting the short film to go that
far. When questioned as to why,
he said that his film gained the
appreciation of the public largely due
to all the work that was put into it
over a year in re-editing the film and
being satisfied with the final product.
The re-edition was technical
as the team shot more scenes
for the final version with clearer
and smoother effects. In the first
version, a third interviewee had to
be completelytakenouttokeep the
film visual.
Katz is in the process of
working on hi s master' s the sis film
documentary about the life and
work of Jack O'Dell. O'Dell, an
influential figure in the African-
American Civil Rights Movement,
isnow 92 years of age and lives
in Vancouver, BC. In this project,
O'Dell tells his story and reflects
on current civil rights issues. Katz
said that this proj ect would be
completed in 2 017. ^  DO STUDY DRUGS WORK AS
STUDENTS THINK THEY DO?
ARE THE RISKS WORTH IT?
•
WHATSTHEDRAW?
NO EFFECTS WITHOUT SIDE
EFFECTS
WHAT DO UNIVERSITIES THINK
ABOUT IT?
# 8   |   CULTURE   |   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2016
MOVIES //
Finding significance in sneaky hobbitses
ILLUSTRATION JULIANYU/THE UBYSSEY
Studies show we can find meaning in almost anything.
Paula Duhatschek
Senior Staff Writer
In 2015, the year's highest grossing
films were Star Wars: The Force
Awakens, Jurassic World and The
Avengers: Age ofUltron. Each of
these movies were alot like the
other two — they were all in the
fantasy or sci-fi genre, they were
disgustingly profitable and they had
been produced as part of previously
established film franchises. It can be
easy to interpret this trend as the end
of moviemaking and the emergence
of a film industry that produces only
easily digestible blockbusters and
feature-length toy commercials.
However, Dr. Ernest Mathijs,
associate head of UBC's Department
of Theatre and Film, has a surprising
counterpoint — it's not that big of a
deal.
For the past year, Dr. Mathijs has
been conducting the world's largest
audience research survey based on
Peter Jackson's The Hobbit trilogy.
The World Hobbit Project was
done in collaboration between 146
scholars from around the world who
distributed the survey to over 35,000
respondents in 45 countries and 30
languages.
The study's primary goal was
to find out what fantasy movies
mean to people today. In sifting
through the results, Dr. Mathijs
found that people strongly believe
that these movies help to enrich the
imagination.
"That surprised us because
Hollywood, when it adopts the
fantasy world, is often accused of
narrowing the imagination. Well, our
audiences disagree with that. We saw
that audiences make connections
between terrorism, what happens in
the world, the things that are in the
news and what you see in fantasy,"
he said.
Mathijs believes that humans
are "meaning-seeking creatures,"
who will find significance in
whatever material they're given.
Although watching The Hobbit
or Harry Potter may not feel like a
particularly stimulating activity, he
says that people may in fact work
harder when watching a fantasy
movie to develop a sophisticated
interpretation.
"It's the opposite of what we
usually say, that fantasy dumbs
down. No. In this case, fantasy gives
you the opportunity to show off just
how smart you are."
Nevertheless, it can feel
unfortunate that the film industry
has become dominated by a handful
of glossy franchises. Mathijs says
that, in recent years, the selection of
widely available films has shrunk to
a few "must-see" movies that come
out in the summer, the early fall and
at Christmastime. By monopolizing
the industry, these blockbusters have
squeezed out just about everything
else.
"Fantasy blockbusters in
particular have proven that they can
return an investment. They make
profits, so that's what Hollywood
will do. It seems like you cant make
them for less than 200,300 million
dollars and that means that that
money isnt going to other films," he
said.
Still, Dr. Mathijs isnt one for
lamentation.
"There's a worry there. But you
know what? If audiences through
that limited supply can still feel that
their imagination is enriched, maybe
it's not too big of a problem." *3l
m Regent
□j College
GOD
THE BRAIN
& PARADOX
THE
LAING LECTURES
2016
CONCERT//
The duo are taking audiences back in time.
PHOTO COURTESY CHAN CENTRE
Grammy award-winning
artists coming to Chan Centre
Jaenna Calingasan
Contributor
Get ready to dance. Get ready to
sing. Get ready to jazz.
On February 27, the Chan
Centre for the Performing Arts
welcomes Dee Dee Bridgewater,
Irvin Mayfield and the New
Orleans Jazz Orchestra This era's
world-renowned jazz vocalist
(Bridgewater) and bandleader/
trumpeter (Mayfield) will take us
back to the musical history of New
Orleans, the birthplace of jazz,
giving us the party of another era
"We try to bring in some of the
best artists in the world and reflect
a lot of the values of UBC through
performing arts and music," said
Joyce Hinton, the co-managing
director of the Chan Centre, who
is excited to present this concert
as part of their series. "I've always
wanted to present Dee Dee
Bridgewater, who's played with
so many great jazz artists. When
I heard that she's going to be
with Irvin Mayfield and the New
Orleans's Jazz Orchestra, I just
jumped on it right away."
As a Tony award and multi-
Grammy award winning singer,
Dee Dee Bridgewater has
performed with the big jazz greats
such as Sonny Rollins, Dizzy
Gillespie, Dexter Gordon and Max
Roach, to name a few. Born in
Memphis and raised in Michigan,
this performer has re-envisioned
jazz classics for over four decades.
"She uses her voice in such
different ways. She's very playful
on stage and has this incredible
connection with Irvin," said
Hinton.
Hailing from New Orleans,
Mayfield, a Grammy and
Billboard music award winner, is
a brilliant trumpeter, composer
and bandleader is credited with
15 albums. After he founded the
New Orleans Jazz Orchestra in
2003, Mayfield wanted to lift
people's spirits post-Katrinaand
celebrate the origins and futures
of jazz. After opening avenue in
New Orleans that focused on jazz
and jazz education, he invited
Bridgewater to the opening. It
was there that they put together
the album, Dee Dee's Feathers.
"The album is so well done, so
joyful," said Hinton. "This music
is going to be accompanied by
all these great instrumentalists
and to have this fabulous singer
and, of course, the phenomenal
trumpeter is such a great
opportunity for a memorable
Saturday night."
The New Orleans Jazz
Orchestra's includes five trumpets,
five saxophones (alto, tenor and
baritone), three trombones and
the powerful play of the piano,
banjo, guitar and the bass drum-
Led by the musical styling of
Mayfield and Bridgewater will
surely be a soul-reaching jazz
experience.
"They take the well-loved
songs of New Orleans and put
their own spin on it," adds
Hinton. "The album just grabs
you."
First-time jazz listeners as
well as jazz veterans can be
excited for this concert. There is
no doubt that this performance
is a great opportunity for people
in the UBC community to be
introduced to jazz. A Night
in New Orleans captures the
playful vocals of Bridgewater in
collaboration with Mayfield's
jazz orchestra and connects
traditions of the old and modern
musings of the new.
"They really wanted to lift up
people's spirits and bring alot of
joy — that's what this music is."
The Chan Centre also offers
pre-concert talks that are free to
anyone who purchases a ticket.,
Nou Dadoun, the host of CFRO's
A-Trane Radio Program, will
give a talk this year about jazz
and its unique sound, walking
us through the history of jazz
all the way towards the New
Orleans performance later in
the evening by Bridgewater and
Mayfield.
Hinton said, "I know
on February 27, people will
stand because it is going to be
impossible to sit down." t! //OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2016
DIVESTMENT//
It's time for the Board of Governors to
act on climate change investment risk
FILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC
HAMISH STEWART
Letter
The UBC Board of Governors
(BoG) appears to be ignoring the
advice of its own lawyers on the
need to assess the investment risks
linked to climate change and the
transition to low carbon energy
systems. A December legal memo
to the BoG from national law firm
Koskie Minsky advises that "[at]
the security selection or investment
decision-making level, all factors
relevant to risk and return must
be considered; if climate change is
relevant to an investment and not
too remote, it must be considered."
Koskie Minsky lawyers are experts
on the issue and published a report
on climate change and fiduciary
duty last year. This report concludes
that "in making investment
decisions, climate change denial is
not an option, climate change risks
must be taken into account..."
BoG members should be
assessing and managing climate-
related investment risks to the
endowment
The BoG is brimming with fossil fuel
industry expertise, which should be
brought to bear on their analysis of
climate risks to the endowment.
First, there is Chancellor Lindsay
Gordon, former president and CEO
of HSBC Bank Canada, who should
be familiar with the legal parameters
of the fiduciary duty of prudence.
HSBC has written extensively on
carbon asset risk, including a 2015
report analyzing "How investors can
manage increasing fossil fuel risks."
The HSBC report provides details
on how fossil fuel assets and related
infrastructure investments may
become stranded - rapidly lose value
- as a result of three factors: climate
change regulation, changing energy
economics and energy innovation.
Then there is Martha Piper, the
interim BoG president. Piper was
formerly on the board at Transalta, a
heavily coal-exposed Alberta power
utility whose management team has
been pushed by investors to provide
a plan for transitioning its business
model to focus on renewable energy.
The BoG members'
apparent decision
to ignore material
risks to carbon-exposed companies in
their endowment
investment strategy indicates that
perhaps: (a) they
know something
giant global investors like Blackrock
and Aviva do not; or
(b) that they are not
doing their jobs as
fiduciaries."
BoG member David Sidoo maybe
living a stranded assets nightmare -
his CEO role with junior exploration
company East West Petroleum and
past work with American Oil and
Gas means that he should have
the pulse of the oil and gas sector
and would therefore be aware of
the risks to the endowment from
overexposure to declining industries
and high-cost fossil fuel producers.
The BoG members' apparent
decision to ignore material risks
to carbon-exposed companies
in their endowment investment
strategy indicates that perhaps: (a)
they know something giant global
investors like Blackrock and Aviva
do not; or (b) that they are not doing
their jobs as fiduciaries.
BoG members' primary fiduciary
duties to endowment beneficiaries
are twofold: they have a duty to
act prudently and a duty of loyalty.
The fiduciary duty of loyalty
requires BoG members to act in the
long-term interests of the fund, to
disclose relevant information and
to keep beneficiaries informed of
emerging risks to fund assets. The
question now is: have Mr. Gordon
and the other BoG members met
the legal standard of care required
of them under BC law in relation
to climate risk assessment at the
endowment?
Fiduciary duty after Paris - wilfiil
blindness is no longer an option
for BoG members
As the BoG's own lawyers stressed in
their legal memo:
"...in British Columbia, the Trustee
Act requires a trustee to exercise the
care, skill, diligence and judgment
that a prudent investor would
exercise in making investments
... trustees are required to make
decisions on an informed basis,
after conducting appropriate
due diligence including retaining
specialized advice..."
Under current circumstances
with Lindsay Gordon's own bank
acknowledging that high-cost fossil
fuels and coal companies in OECD
economies are in terminal decline, a
"prudent investor" would be able to
clearly articulate a portfolio climate
and carbon risk strategy to preserve
scheme assets in the best interests of
their beneficiaries. Many are already
doing so.
The BoG appears to have failed
to undertake even basic due
diligence on climate risk, in
apparent breach of the duty of
prudence.
In addition to the duties of loyalty
and prudence, BoG members have
a duty of impartiality. According to
their lawyers:
"[At] a minimum, the duty of
impartiality implies that short-term
interests ought not to be privileged
over long-term interests, requiring
sufficient attention to systemic
risks."
In their apparent decision
to ignore climate risks to the
endowment fund, and to instead
take short-term bets on carbon-
exposed investments that will
almost certainly lose value as 195
countries implement the Paris
Agreement emissions reductions
targets, the BoG members appear
to be in breach of the duty of
impartiality. tJ
Hamish Stewart is a UBC
alumnus and concerned donor.
TRANSPARENCY//
Re: "we were not bullied or
pressured" broadcast email
NASSIF GHOUSSOUB
Letter
Dear elected members of the UBC
Board of Governors,
Last Tuesday, more than 50,000
faculty, students and staff members
at UBC received an email signed by
the eight of you. We are grateful that
you have decided to join this new
era of transparency and openness
at UBC. Your letter, however, raises
more questions than answers. It
feels, like so many recent broadcast
emails, both selective and defensive.
I am curious who has given you
the go-ahead — and why now? —
to break, though selectively, the
confidentiality agreements you
protected yourselves behind so
vehemently last fall. Why have you
spoken to some aspects of what
happened last year and not others?
In trying to understand what
your vote really meant, we can forgo
the possibility that the president
resigned voluntarily as otherwise
your votes would be immaterial.
Instead, it appears, based on recently
released documents, that he was
coerced into resignation by a small
group of governors. Did you know
about this coercion? One can only
hope that those trying to drive him
out didn't use a "we have the votes"
type of argument before you had
even fully discussed the issue and
voted. Did you actively question the
lack of due and legal process? If not,
then you are complicit in having
voted in support of an illegitimate
process, no matter what you felt to
be the merits of the case.
Your colleagues are interested
in due process, accountability and
transparency. These are not only
demands from the curious among
us. These are legal requirements
specifically designed to avoid
secret meetings and Star Chamberlike proceedings. And you,
yourselves, have given us reasons
to think that unconscionable things
were going on.
This was amply spelled out by
this AMS statement: "That duly
elected student representatives
from both campuses appear to
have not been rightfully involved
in key conversations leading to Dr.
Gupta's resignation." How should
we understand the contradiction
between this conclusion and
your broadcast email? Should
we conclude from this that the
other five elected members
were involved in these key
conversations? Or perhaps concern
about the statement from the
AMS, with its potentially serious
legal implications, is behind this
broadcast email?
Also troubling are the two
"mea culpas" in as many days by
board member, Professor Richard
Johnston. Why did he wait until the
release of your broadcast to share
his doubts about the "pattern of
meetings on short notice, meetings
not advertised, meeting off-cycle
and so on"? Some are saying that he
should have asked more questions
and not have voted in favour in
light of what he himself describes
as irregularities. Similarly, Johnson
now admits that certain groups
were deliberately excluded from
a lacklustre consultation process
about divestment while again
attributing the lack of consultation
and committee minutes to "different
circumstances at the time."
It's clear from the recent strong
support for a vote of non-confidence
in the board that The Times They
Are A-Changin'. To those of us still
wondering whether board members
were briefed enough to decide what
was in "the best interest" of the
university, the (unintentional) leaks
were providential. We now know
what and how the prosecution,
led by the previous board chair,
presented their case against the
previous president — "The low
employee morale on campus,
the relationship challenges with
your key stakeholders and the
simmering external reputational
risks developing as a result of these
challenges." It appears to many
of your colleagues on campus
that these were not the realities
prior to last August, but are what's
happening right now.
In the "best interests of the
university," we ask that you support
the call for an external review of
board procedures and structures,
and a suspension of the presidential
search pending this review. Only
then can we move forward, "3J
NassifGhoussoub is a professor of
mathematics at UBC.
Be heard.
Send rants / arguments / love letters to
opinions@ubyssey.ca
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EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY23,2016 ■II
BASKETBALL//
PH OTO KOBY Ml CHA ELS/TH E U BYSS EY
Lee and Parkin both graduate thisyear and only have the playoffs left with the 'Birds.
Lee and Parkin are not
finished with the 'Birds yet
graduation life just yet. Saturday
was all about winning just one
more game and qualifying for the
playoffs.
"I try not to think about it too
much — I'm just going out there
and playing. It's starting to hit
me now that it is senior night and
I've had to write a speech and do
all those different things. For the
most part, I try to keep it out of my
mind," said Lee. "We're not done
yet. We want to go as far as we
can."
Between the two 'Birds, they've
spent 10 years playing collegiate
basketball in two countries, played
two years on the Canadian Junior
National Team and won a Canadian
national championship with the BC
provincial team.
One of their favourite memories
together was winning the Canada
West championship at home in
2015.
"If you were at that game, it
was insane," recalled Lee. "War
Memorial was packed, we were
down by four [points] with under a
minute left."
"She passed me the ball," said
Parkin.
"She shot a three to put us down
by one. We fouled [and] the girl
missed both of her free throws. We
got the ball back and Kris Young
scores a layup and we win the
game. We led that whole game for
maybe a total of two minutes. It
was just an outrageous... memory
for me," finished Lee.
Parkin is unsure of whether she
will give professional basketball
in a Europe a go, and is looking
into going back to graduate school
in kinesiology or heading to law
school. Lee wants to coach, though
not professionally and isn't certain
about her future plans.
"This weekend, it really kind
of got to me. We've been playing
basketball since before grade eight
and to think now that we're not
going to be playing in a month is
crazy and exciting — and also a
little bit scary." tl
The women's basketball team
won 86-38 and qualified for the
Canada West Playoffs. Lee had 18
points and Parkin 13.
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
For you, Saturday might have
just been your last night of
the homework-free bliss of
reading week. For Diana Lee and
Adrienne Parkin, it was so much
more.
Lee and Parkin are both fifth-
year athletes on the Thunderbirds
women's basketball team and
Saturday was senior night.
If things hadn't gone well, it
could have been the pair's last
basketball game ever. But, thanks
to Lee and Parkin, the team
will be playing for at least one
more week in the Canada West
Championships.
Friday, Lee netted 32 of UBC's
77 points to beat the University of
Winnipeg. Saturday's win secured
the 'Birds a spot in the playoffs
and a loss would have meant the
end of Lee and Parkin's careers.
"We want to focus on the
game, then we can focus on the
event afterwards. We have to get
this win — or else."
Lee and Parkin have taken very
different paths to find their place
with the T-Birds. Both are from
the Greater Vancouver area, but
Lee — a Master's of Kinesiology
student — played for Boise
State University for three years,
finishing her degree in a fourth.
"I had a little injury in there
for about a year and came back,"
explained Lee.
"A little?" Parkin interjected.
"I had two herniated discs in
my back. I tried to rehab it, but
it didn't really work. So I ended
up getting surgery," said Lee.
"I moved back home [to North
Vancouver], decided I wanted to
give basketball another shot, gave
Deb [Huband] a phone call and
ended up here."
Parkin, who played for
Kitsilano Secondary before
coming to UBC, has been a
T-Bird for her whole collegiate
career. She will be graduating
with an undergraduate degree in
kinesiology.
But both athletes aren't
thinking about graduation or post-
SOFTBALL//
Mackenzie Siddall on family,
Softball and overcoming adversity
Siddall and the 'Birds, are 0-5 after Concordia University Northwest Cup.
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
"I was actually a walk-on to
the team. I wasn't recruited or
anything like that. I just thought
I'd try out and I ended up making
it"
Now Mackenzie Siddall, a
second-year kinesiology student
from Windsor, Ontario, plays
the outfield and pitches for the
Thunderbird softball team.
Siddall didnt come to UBC with
a plan to play softball, she came
because of the academics and the
city.
"When I was younger, I sort
of did all of the sports and then
softball and hockey stuck for a
while. Coming into university,
mainly I was focusing on my
education, but I thought I could try
out for softball because I was a bit
better at that than hockey."
It shouldn't be too surprising
that Siddall ended up playing
softball. Her father, Joe Siddall,
played catcher for the Montreal
Expos, Florida Marlins and Detroit
Tigers. Over four seasons, he played
73 major league games. He also
worked on the Toronto Blue Jays
radio and television broadcast.
"He definitely had a big
influence," said Siddall. "I love the
game. I've been playing my whole
life."
Siddall's path to UBC has been
far from certain As well as being a
walk-on, Siddall learned to play the
game with one hand.
Siddall said a lot of people ask
her if playing softball is a challenge,
but to her it's second nature and
she has't let anything slow her
down. She played in 26 of the
'Birds' 41 games last season, had
a fielding percentage of .966 and
allowed just three runs in her six
innings pitched.
"I don't really see myself as
different or having disadvantages
on the field. I chose to play this
sport," said SiddalL "I don't totally
remember how I taught myself to
transfer my glove and all that. That
was a longtime ago, it's just become
a habit now"
A teammate recently confessed
to Siddall that she hadn't even
noticed Siddall only had one hand
until the second day of tryouts, a
testament to Siddall's prowess on
the diamond.
"If you have your mind set
on something, do it. You can do
anything you set your mind to. It
might take a little more work, but
at the end of the day, you can do
anything you want to do."
With a laugh, Siddall says
people have told her that her
parents should have made her play
soccer.
"I like the challenge. It's
normal for me now."
Siddall and the team have been
training all year for their season
that starts next weekend when
they take on Concordia University
in Portland, Oregon. The team
practices four days a week and
has three sessions a week in the
weight room.
PHOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
February 19 marks the first time
the team will take the field since
their 4-0 exhibition only season in
the fall.
"Practice is good, but we are
excited to play."
The softball team, which
recently sued UBC to regain its
varsity status, had home games in
White Rock last year. Of the only
two home games, both were in
Delta.
Siddall and the 'Birds don't let
their lack of presence on campus
get in the way of their training or
playing, though.
"It would be cool to have a
fan bus or something to come out
and support us because we are so
excited to have home games this
year. I mean, we were on the road
the whole time."
"It's going to be very interesting
this year." tl
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nomination is now open and will close February 12,
2016. Campaigning period starts 12:00am on February
22, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016. Voting starts on
February 29th, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016.
Nomination forms are available at the Nest, room 2209
between 11:00am - 3:00 pm daily.
This is not an editorial position. Members of The
Ubyssey Publications Society Board of Directors are
responsible for overseeing the finances and
administrative operations of the newspaper.
Responsibilities include attending board meetings,
tending to business as it arises and overseeing
personal projects.
For further details please email
fpereira@ubyssey.ca TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2016   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
VARSITY//
Meet the athletes inducted into the 2016 UBC Hall of Fame
PHOTO COURTESY UBC ATHLETICS
QuarterbackJordan Gagner, runner Jeff Schiebler and basketballer Erica McGuinness.
Lucy Fox
Staff Writer
UBCs athletics department
announced six new inductees to the
UBC Sports Hall of Fame last week
— three athletes, one team and two
"builders." Among those inducted
into the athletes category were track
and cross country star Jeff Schiebler,
quarterback Jordan Gagner and
women's basketball career scoring
leader Erica McGuinness.
"I'm very excited, it's a fantastic
honour," said McGuinness about
her induction into the Hall of Fame
this year. "I was... a bit struck when
I found out. I definitely wasn't
expecting this."
"It's very humbling at this age to
even be mentioned this many years
later. It's pretty cool," said Gagner.
"When you have kids and they never
had a chance to see you play, it's the
only connection they have to your
playing career. It's really awesome to
be recognized this way and for the
family to be able to share in it."
ERICA MCGUINNESS -
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL (2004-
2008)
In her five years with the women's
basketball team at UBC, McGuinness
led the team to three CIS National
Championships and still holds the
school's record for most career
points scored in women's basketball
with 2,523 points.
"Over the five year period going
from an 18-year-old to a 23-year-old,
it's a big change in anyone's life," said
McGuinness when asked about her
time with the team. "Individually,
there was a ton of growth. But from
a program standpoint, we went from
not having won a championship
since the '70s to, in my first year,
being the underdogs and bringing
home a national championship to
UBC."
"That era was... UBC basketball
returning to the forefront of women's
basketball across the country. It was
neat to be a part of that and see how
that developed over time too," said
McGuinness.
When she got to UBC after high
school graduation, McGuinness
was immediately placed into a small
category of students playing both
varsity sports and working towards
a degree at Sauder. The combination
posed its own challenges as there
weren't many student athletes at
Sauder at the time. As McGuinness
explained, players were forced to
really find a balance between school
and sport.
For example, McGuinness recalls
having to run to her coach's office
to write an exam after winning the
Canada West Final in her last year.
"I had to start the exam before
everyone had finished writing theirs,
which meant I basically had to go up
to the office in my uniform."
"I was happy we won because I
was in a good mind frame and felt
like I could tackle anything at the
time," said McGuinness. "If it had
gone the other way, it would've been
a tough thing to force myself to do,
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Post graduation, McGuinness
continued her basketball career in
the Czech Republic for a season
before getting settled into a business
career here in Vancouver.
When asked if she had any
advice for current varsity athletes,
McGuinness said the biggest thing is
making the most of the experience.
"The teammates you meet, the
other individuals you meet in the
athletics program, they're going to
be lifelong connections of yours,"
McGuinness said. "Make the most
of it and try to build as many great
relationships as possible while
competing for UBC."
JORDAN GAGNER - FOOTBALL
(1984-1988)
Winner of the Hec Crighton Award
for most outstanding player in
university football in Canada, Jordan
Gagner spent five years on the
T-Birds team and led them to back-
to-back Vanier Cup matches in 1986
and 1987, winning the title in '86. He
also set 12 passing records and was
drafted into the CFL.
When asked what his most
memorable moment was with the
team, Gagner said, "Winning the
Vanier Cup — for sure 1986. To go
undefeated in Canadian play, run
the table and cap it off with a Vanier
Cup, I have to say that had to be the
highlight of the career."
"Back in those days, students
would pelt you with snowballs and
ice-balls while you were trying to
play. It was quite the environment,"
Gagner said about the 1986 Vanier
Cup win. "For us to pull out a last
minute win... it was probably one
of the most exciting games that's
[been] played in Canadian university
history."
After UBC, Gagner moved on to
play with the Calgary Stampeders,
playing both on the special teams
and as a quarterback for them before
settling into a business career, much
like McGuinness.
"I had fun, I learned a lot and
I'm glad to say I'm one of the few
Canadian quarterbacks that got
drafted into the CFL. But for me, it
just wasn't the time to stay in the
CFL and it was more about getting
my life going at that point."
Today, Gagner continues to
follow the team online from Phoenix,
Arizona. He is incredibly proud to
be a T-Bird and see the current team
doing so well.
"On the one hand, I'm so excited
for where the team is going to go, but
I realize that four years from now
any records I hold are long going to
be forgotten and Michael [O'Connor]
is going to be the beneficiary of all
those passing records," said Gagner.
"I'm glad that my kids are old
enough to see those in print, but he
is something special. He is going to
break every record that UBC has at
this point if he just stays healthy and
continues to lead the team." t8
Jeff Schiebler could not be reached for
comment. 12    |   GAMESAND COMICS   |   TUESDAY,FEBRUARY23?20l6
Want your name on this shiny paper too? Volunteer for us.
ubyssey.ca/volunteer
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5-Badmood;
9-Collide;
14-Dimensions;
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19- Sharp;
20- Drunken;
21- Hit with an open hand;
23-Univ. aides;
24- Short essays;
26-Asian inland sea;
28- Pertaining to the kidneys;
30- And others, in Latin;
34-Average;
37-Kill;
39-Rat- ;
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43- Needed to borrow books;
48- -mo;
49-Tight swim suit;
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68- Big name in copiers;
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71- Wynonna's mother;
72-Trigonometric function;
73- Wentthrough.asthe paper;
DOWN
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2-Embroidery loop;
3-Alchemist's mercury;
4-Asexual;
5-Makes sorrowful;
6- Neither here there;
7- Supermodel Sastre;
8-1 cannot lie;
9- Pancakelike bread of India;
10-VCR button;
11- Sometimes you feel like ...;
12-Mex. miss;
13-Hastens;
18-Where Hercules slew the lion;
122- Son of Zeus in Greek
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j 27-Actress Turner;
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165-CD follower;
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life-on-campus.wikia.com
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FEESANSWERS
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ON-CAMPUS PUBLIC LECTURE
"   SAINT MARK'S COLLEGE presents;
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The European Migrant Crisis -
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Wednesday February 24, 2016 at 7:00 p.m
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How should, we respond, to the growing refugee crisis worldwide?
Join Church Historian Dt. Agnes de Dteuzy as she outlines Pope Francis massage of
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Light refreshments will follow.
Limited seating. Register Now!
www.stmarkscollege.ca   |  604-822-4463

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