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Array MARCH 22,2016 | VOLUME XCVII | ISSUE XXIV
LIVING ATTHECOURTSINCE1918 //PAGE 2
YOUR GUIDE TO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016
r
EVENTS
*
OUR CAMPUS
*\
FRIDAY 25
////
UBCHOLIUA.M.@UBC
Welcome spring with the Hindu celebration of HOLI! Throw
colours at one another and enjoy some delicious food.
FREE
m
ggjpffrai
SATURDAY 26
////
SAKURA LIGHTS7 P.M. @QUEEN ELIZABETH PARK
Lots of pretty twinkling things will be hung on the trees. Come
and take a new Tinder profile picture.
FREE
APRIL3
////
PSIUPSI0-RUN5K NOON @ UBC
Take a break from your Netflix marathons and start training for this
one. Money raised goes to The Wanted Children Foundation.
$10/person
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Jerry Yin
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printed itor@ ubyssey.ca
% THE UBYSSEY
Coordinating Editor        Features Editor
Will McDonald Vassl Sharlandjieva
coordinating@u byssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Copy Editor
Aiken Lao Bailey Ramsay
pri nteditor@u byssey.ca    featurss@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
MolraWarburton&
Emma Partridge
news@ubysseyca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
cultu re@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports ©ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
TlmHoggan
video ©ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
photo@ubysseyca
Opinions + Blog Editor
JackHauen
opinions@ubysseyca
STAFF
Malt Langmuic JoshAzel BillSita Efera
■  ii.:. - e n ivJohnsDn-Sllreis.
JutQnYu.SnjthiTadepsltl Karen Wang.
Jesse Stirling. Vic (y Huang. Olamids
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Mg uel Santa (Vers. Swan Specbc
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Samantha (VcCabe. Ben CocK Avri I
Hwang. Ben Geebeig. Lilian Ctiera,
Ctiera, Emma Hicks Ben Geebeig.
Helen Zhou. NaljQ Rahman. Boris
Bosnptovc. A den Qualeza. Jeny Y in.
'  ah Fechec T ena D3sg upta.
Izirrl. E'l-dliridTjfetvWi.
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1 Itoberge. Rachel Lau.
David Deng.Terdayi Ivo/o
LEGAL
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Symphony orchestra conductor Jonathan
Girard revived music banned by the Nazis
PHOTO TENDAYI MOYO/THE UBYSSEY
Lacking a mentor until hestarted university, Girard taught himself to conduct bystudying musicscores and watching other conductors.
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Features Editor
For the first time since 1933, the
sound of Hungarian composer
Emmerich Kalman's tone poem
Endre es Johanna filled a concert
hall on March 11 at UBC.
It was Jonathan Girard, the
conductor ofthe Symphony
Orchestra, who revived the piece
ofthe Jewish composer whose
music had been banned by the
Nazi regime.
"The Nazis would label music,
label visual art as 'degenerate'
if they felt that it didn't have a
certain aesthetic that was pleasing
to them or perhaps if it was
written by someone who was not
in favour with them," explained
Girard. "Unfortunately, Jewish
composers from the time were
shunned."
Kalman was an exception —
he was Adolf Hitler's famous
composers.
Fearing his safety amid the rise
of Nazism, Kalman fled to Paris.
However, Hitler sent a general to
return Kalman to Germany where
he would be made an "honourary
Aryan." Kalman refused and fled
to New York with his family. After
he denounced Nazism, his music
was banned.
A friend of Girard's connected
him with Kalman's son — the
composer Charles Kalman —
who gave Girard the original
manuscripts ofthe tone poem.
Girard studied the score, trying
to understand Kalman's intentions
for pitches and he even enlisted
the help of native Hungarians to
decipher Kalman's Hungarian
notes. He then constructed every
orchestra part by inputting each
note ofthe 25-minute piece into his
computer.
Although Girard acknowledged
that the historical context informed
him, his musical direction was
not directly influenced by the
composer's story.
"I think this is an interesting
aspect ofthe history of Kalman.
But I'm only thinking about how
to make music as beautiful as
possible."
The sound of music filled
Jonathan Girard's home since he
was a child. Both his parents and
his grandparents played the piano
and at the age of four, he gravitated
toward the instrument too.
He then learned to play the
viola and the saxophone. But as
he learned each new instrument,
Girard felt he really wanted to
become a conductor.
Without access to a mentor
until the start of his undergraduate
degree, Girard taught himself
how to conduct by studying
music scores, reading books and
watching conductors at concerts
and rehearsals.
"I always loved watching
rehearsals of orchestras and
seeing what the conductor would
say, how they would approach
rehearsing and how their gestures
would get specific sound," said
Girard. "I was always trying to put
together the correlation of gesture
and sound, and trying to learn how
orchestras really function."
His exploration into conducting
started in middle school and when
in fifth grade, Girard conducted
the middle school band.'T can only
imagine how terrible it was," he
said with a laugh.
Once in university, Girard
assembled his own small orchestras
and wind ensembles — "Anything
I could get my hands on," he said
— to conduct. His diverse career
saw him conduct the Rochester
Philharmonic Orchestra, The Ohio
Light Opera and even delved into
conducting church music and
playing the organ.
Girard said that although
there is a universal "grammar of
conducting" — a set of gestures all
conductors use to communicate
with their ensembles — it is also an
intensely personal art.
"The general public may
think that conducting is really
a choreographed thing and it
isn't," Girard explained. "True
conducting comes from honest
inner-music making where the
body finds a way to externalize
what is inside. Whatever I do in
terms of movement comes from
how I hear the music inside. So I'm
always thinking from the inside out
and never form the outside in."
"The performance is the tip of
the iceberg, the rest ofthe work is
underwater where no one can see
it," said Girard, explaining how
a big part of his job is carefully
studying the music he will bring
to the stage, analyzing each
individual phrase for its rhythm
and tone.
"For me, analysis is asking lots
of questions ofthe music. What
does [the composer] want? How
do we honour that? How do we
turn what's written on this page
into something that's temporal,
something that the audience hears,
something that speaks to them, that
touches their heart?" tl
In its next concert on April 9, the
Symphony Orchestra will perform
Hector Berlioz's Overture "Le
corsaire," Sergei Prokofiev's Violin
Concerto No. 1 and Franz Schubert's
Ninth Symphony. //NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRA WARBURTON
TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2016
GREEN //
UBC-held climate conference gives climate change Vancouver percepective
Andrea Gonzalez
Staff Writer
In an effort to generate a space
for dialogue around the issue of
climate change, the UBC Centre
for Community Engaged Learning
(CCEL) recently brought together
community partners, local
organizations, students, staff and
faculty to take part in a three-part
series and local discussion on
climate change.
The talks were inspired by
Canadian author and social
activist Naomi Klein's recent
book, This Changes Everything,
where Klein argues that the
current era of capitalism and
neoliberal market fundamentalism
makes it difficult to address the
climate change crisis as there is
an inherent drive in capitalism
towards constant consumption
and economic growth.
"Naomi Klein makes a call for
social movements to unite and
work together," said Kyle Nelson,
community-based experiential
learning officer in CCEL. "We
saw our role as a facilitator and
connector, to create a place to talk
about climate change and support
our stakeholders to expand their
networks and find new pathways
of dealing with climate change."
The three-part event opened
up with a two-hour facilitated
conversation discussion where 40
participants, including students,
community partners, faculty and
Naomi Klein spoke in Vancouver last week about her new book, This Changes Everything.
^HOTOVIAFACEBOOK
staff were encouraged to situate
themselves in relation to the issue
of climate change.
The talks were then followed
by the SFU-hosted Naomi Klein
talk and documentary screening
at the Vogue Theatre. For the last
segment ofthe event, participants
congregated at the Groundswell
Cafe on March 15 to listen to local
perspectives on climate change
and try to ground the challenging
concept of climate change into
a concrete and local issue based
around Vancouver and Canada.
"This conversation is a bit
of a wake-up call. Hopefully
it lights a fire in people and
it gets them to appreciate the
magnitude ofthe issue and the
urgency," said Julian Zelazny,
a biology professor at UBC and
the Sustainability Pathway and
Capstone coordinator. "As stated
by Naomi Klein in her talk, we are
way behind what we have to do to
address climate change right now.
While the COP 21 conference in
Paris was groundbreaking and
the biggest international climate
agreement ever signed, we're so
late to come to address the issues
that even the measures we agreed
to are nowhere near keeping us to
1.5-2 degrees of warming."
Zelazny hopes that the
conversation series will encourage
students, faculty members and
staff at UBC to take active steps to
inform others about how climate
change influences their lives and to
take part in the political avenues at
our disposal to voice our concerns
regarding climate change.
"As an instructor and a member
ofthe UBC community, I think we
need to do more in terms of our
own activism and being influential
in the public process. You have to
get out there and start telling the
decision makers what it is we're
thinking and what it is they need to
do and use the processes that exist to
make that happen," added Zelazny. ?&
GOVERNANCE //
Greg Peet resigns from UBC Board of Governors
Greg Peet, above, speaking at a Board of Governors meeting.
Emma Partridge and Moira Warburton
News Editors
Last week saw the latest in a series of
scandals at the Board of Governors
level, once again culminating in the
resignation of aboard member after
incriminating documents were put
on display.
It was discovered last week
through a UBC Insiders investigation
that Greg Peet, a provincially-
appointed member ofthe UBC Board
of Governors and chair ofthe board's
finance committee, is currently in
court appealing a December 2015
ruling which found that a company
he owned dodged over $1 million in
provincial taxes in 2002
That year, A.L.I. Technologies,
of which Peet was CEO, was being
acquired by a much larger company.
To avoid the high income taxes
he and his family would have to
pay in light ofthe profit made
by selling their company shares,
he consulted a tax company who
advised him to create a company
in Quebec and shuffle the money
between the two to avoid provincial taxes in either province.
"This is a simple case of a tax
not being paid anywhere which
ought to have been paid somewhere," said Justice George
Macintosh in the court decision
published online. That tax totals
over $1 million.
The day after these revalations,
it was announced that Peet would
be stepping down from his membership on UBCs Board of Governors
(BoG) and his role as chair ofthe
finance committee.
The academic year was already
laden was a series of resignation at
the board level. The first departure was the president himself,
Arvind Gupta, who left his position after an ad hoc committee
was formed and told Gupta he
had lost their confidence. Following this, former board chair
John Montalbano stepped down
to remove himself from a scandal
surrounding his possible breach of
academic freedoms.
The university has declined
to comment, stating in an email
from UBC managing director of
Public Affairs Susan Danard that
"because his appointment is made
by the government and they have
=1 LE PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
the authority for his appointment,
we are deferring to them for comment."
"He is doing this out ofthe
best interests ofthe university as
he does not want to be a distraction from the essential academic
missions of UBC in teaching and
research," said the provincial
Minister for Advanced Education
Andrew Wilkinson in an emailed
statement to The Ubyssey.
According to The Globe and
Mail, Peet notified the government
ofthe fact of this continuing court
case before he was appointed to
the board ofthe university.
It is not known at this time
who will replace him both on the
board and as chair ofthe finance
committee. "<1
FEMINISM //
F-Word Conference
on April 30
v°
V
. -r'-
X
FILE PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
The F-Word conference returns to discuss Feminist Futures,
Sofia Shamsunahar
Contributor
A day of dialogue and discussion
about feminism returns on April
30. The annual F-Word Conference
will be put on for the seventh
year running by the Gender,
Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
Undergraduate Student Association
and the Social Justice Institute.
This year's theme is "Theory
to Practice: Imagining Our
Feminist Futures." Students across
disciplines and faculties will
present their own original work
that explores subjects such as
intersectionality, resisting settler
colonialism, transfeminism and
more.
Students will present in panels
of three. The conference also
includes keynote speakers and
workshops done by the AMS
Sexual Assault Support Centre.
This year, one ofthe speakers will
be a community activist from out of
the country, whose name has yet to
be announced by the committee.
"I think that the culture of
UBC, in terms of feminism and
social justice, can be quite cold and
apathetic, and at times anti-social
justice and anti-feminist," said
Alison Watts-Grant, a member of
the F-word Conference organizing
committee.
The conference provides a
space for people to discuss and
learn about social justice issues.
"When people talk about these
issues in other spaces, like science
classes and art classes, they might
get shut down. I think it is vitally
important to have an open space on
campus for people to talk and think
about different views and share
their ideas others with each other,"
said Watts-Grant.
The audience last year had 120
people in the UBC First Nations
Longhouse — the committee is
hoping for 175 in their new venue in
the Nest this year.
"[The conference] is so much
fun. It's difficult to put together
and extremely time consuming, but
seeing everything come together the
day of is the most amazing feeling,"
said Watts-Grant.
The F-Word Conference will take
place on April 30 at the Nest's Great
Hall at 8:45 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. ^ NEWS    |   TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2016
BC//
Provincial government in support of legislating
sexual assault policies at universities
LLUSTRATION AIKEN LAO/THE UBYSSEY
The BC goverment is behind mandating
sexual assault policies,
Joshua Azizi
Senior Staff Writer
BC Premier Christy Clark has
announced that the provincial
government will either pass
or develop similar legislation
to a recently-proposed private
members' bill that requires post-
secondary institutions in BC to
address the issue of sexual violence
on campus.
The Post-Secondary Sexual
Violence Policies Act, proposed
by Oak Bay-Gordon Head MLA
and Green Party leader Andrew
Weaver, would create a legal
obligation for colleges and
universities in British Columbia to
develop sexual violence policies
that outline how they will respond
to reports of sexual violence and
aim to prevent future sexual
violence from occurring.
Weaver's bill comes just after
a number of post-secondary
institutions in BC — including
UBC, the University of Victoria
and Thompson Rivers University
— were accused of mishandling
reported cases of sexual assault.
"Right now across British
Columbia, we have a number
of very high profile cases of
sexual violence occurring on
campuses where there have been
inconsistencies in reporting and
a lack of reporting," said Weaver.
"Why [colleges and universities]
have a built-in incentive to
underreport is because ofthe
institution's reputation. The
institutions want to be viewed
as a safe place for students to be.
Ifyou report high incidences of
sexual assault, then these might
be perceived as not safe places.
So rather than trying to cover up
incidents that may or may not
occur, it's better to prevent them
from occurring in the first place."
Weaver's bill is based off of
similar legislation that recently
passed in Ontario. Manitoba is
currently moving forward with a
similar bill as well.
"The University of Ottawa
just did a survey of its female
students and found that 44 per
cent of them during their time
on campus experienced either
unwanted sexual assault or
sexual touching," said Weaver.
"This kind of stuff has to end.
In a modern society, we have to
recognize and respect people
on campuses and not continue
down with these inappropriate
approaches to sexual violence."
UBC is currently in the
midst of developing its own
sexual assault policy while
members ofthe AMS and the
university have been working
with the government to develop
a framework for sexual violence
policies.
According to Sara-Jane Finlay,
UBC vice-president of equity and
inclusion, the bill will work best
if universities strongly implement
education and prevention.
"It includes processes for
dealing with sexual assault. But
in essence, a sexual assault policy
comes into play after a sexual
assault has happened and the work
of education and prevention really
needs to happen more broadly and
more widely to support the policy,"
she said.
Although she wants to see
BC's post-secondary institutions
develop sexual violence policies,
AMS VP Academic Jenna Omassi
raised some concerns about the
potential outcomes of any possible
legislation. In particular, she is
worried that the government
may give schools too short of a
timeframe to develop an effective
policy.
"When something similar was
brought forward in Ontario, there
was essentially a timespan in
which you had to do it — which I
get — but it causes a lot of issues
when you have a timespan to do
something brand new," she said.
"Something like this can do a lot of
harm if it's not applied in the right
way."
She was also concerned
about how those working on the
legislation will be political figures.
"We have to realize that those
people who are creating [this
legislation] are not the content
experts. So making sure that they
know that and that they rely on
those experts is really important,"
said Omassi. ^1
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 16008
Public Open House
Eton - Lot 15 Wesbrook Place
Join us on Tuesday, April 5 to view and comment on the proposed residential development proposal
for Eton on Lot 15 in Wesbrook Place. Plans will be displayed for the proposed new market residential project comprising 272 units within a 20 storey highrise, 5 storey low-rise, and townhomes.
Date:
Place
Khorana
Park
4:30-6:00 PM
Tuesday, April 5,2016 4:30 - 6:1
Wesbrook Welcome Centre, 3378 Wesbrook Mall
Academy
Pathways
Public Open House
Wesbrook   Location
Keenleyside
Tapestry
/
•
Larkspur
House
Spirit
Wesbrook Mall
MBA  ,„
House 3    Pacific        Ultima Bahlla
Magnolia
House
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be on hand to discuss and
answer questions about this project.
The public is also invited to attend the upcoming
Development Permit Board Meeting for this project.
Date/Time: April 27, 5:00 - 6:30PM
Location:     Wesbrook Community Centre
3335 Webber Lane
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca  604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be accepted until April 12,2016.
To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #*|^ Slf* n|S 4= &!^ §afl SM7r »o| 5U£M^.
9£!* *lsH n. 3d* Si^sfe M^S S2|SW7| uhSM^K
a place of mind
campus+community planning
EQUALITY//
Students create award to honour
20th-century female psychologist
Some American Psychologists at Cambridge, Hass. Dee. 29. 1919
°odge Calkins Ogden Hollingsworth Baldwin
Warren Wooiworth Seashore Soott langfe
3CREENSHOTVIAPSYCH.YORKU.COM
Calkins is the only woman featured in the above photo.
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Helen Zhou
Staff Writer
On International Women's Day,
an award commemorating Mary
Whiton Calkins was announced by
the UBC psychology department.
The fact that the name Mary
Whiton Calkins doesn't ring a
bell to most people is the reason
that 12 students and their history
of psychology professor decided
to establish a student award.
The award celebrates Calkins'
achievements as one ofthe
pioneers of psychology at the turn
ofthe 20th century.
"When you think about
psychology, it's not a very old
science and she was there during
its infancy in North America. She
was there with William James,
whom we consider the father
of American psychology as we
know it," said Katie McCloskey
a fourth-year psychology student
involved in the project.
Despite her accomplishments
and meeting all ofthe
requirements for a PhD at
Harvard, Calkins was not given
the doctorate degree on the basis
that she was a woman.
"I think we were all a bit
confused, frustrated and maybe
a little angry that she was not
awarded a PhD," said McCloskey.
With that feeling in mind, they
created this award to honour the
top undergraduate student in
psychology and philosophy.
They hope to present the
award to someone who exuded
the same qualities that Calkins did
— "that persistence, that integrity
and just that sheer intelligence,"
explained Martina Frackiewicz, a
fifth-year psychology student also
involved in the process.
The recipient will be asked
to write a short essay about how
they relate to Calkins' story
in their own lives. The award
includes a several hundred dollar
scholarship.
While many ofthe details of
the award are still in the works,
the message and motivation
behind it is clear.
"It's not really about being
a woman because a man or
woman can get this award. It's
about people denying you things
and overcoming that," said
Alan Kingstone, professor of
psychology. "She did many things
in her field with a lot of integrity.
She held her head up high and
just went with it. The hope is that
people would be able to resonate
with that story in their own
selves."
Both Kingstone and the
students were surprised and
pleased at the willingness ofthe
department of psychology and
the Faculty of Arts to help create
the award. In fact, Frackiewicz
said that after a few quick phone
calls and informal meetings, they
had been able to secure annual
funding.
She cites the universality of
Calkins' story to be a contributing
factor to the ease ofthe process.
"You put all this effort in and
you're trying to adhere to their
standards and they're still saying
no. I feel like that [kind of
story] goes for more than just
women as well — it happens
across the board and I feel like
lots of people have encountered
something similar."
While attempts to petition
Harvard to give Calkins her PhD
have failed in the past, some
ofthe students also hope to
"pick up the torch" on lobbying
Harvard. "Ifyou try hard enough
and make enough noise, you
never know what will change,"
said McCloskey.
They are also creating a
website where Calkins' work and
research can be archived.
"I think what the students
want is to make this a website
where we can also start to
archive her work, her materials,
her life so that it's not just about
Harvard denying her," said
Kingstone. "I think they feel
like it's offensive that that's her
branding — that she's known for
what someone didn't give her."
Kingstone and the students
expressed their excitement in
moving forward in ironing out
the final details ofthe award
and in getting Calkins her PhD
awarded posthumously.
"People have tried so many
times in the past 120 years and
nothing has really stuck. But
hopefully, with what we've
gathered and the infrastructure
that's available to us, something
will stick and be passed on," said
Frackiewicz. tl //CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016
CLUBS//
UBC Signs encourages voiceless
environment in meetings
DHOTO COURTESY UBC SIGNS
UBC Signs want to push the university in a more Deaf-friendly direction.
Karen Wang
Staff Writer
Officially founded this year,
UBC Signs grew out of a desire
of several linguistics students to
learn American Sign Language
(ASL), the primary sign language in
Canada and the United States.
"There's about 200 sign
languages in the world and that's
just something people don't know,"
said David Danos, founder and
president of UBC Signs. "Sign
languages and Deaf culture are
unique cultures that people don't
know about and our club is trying
to tackle that."
The club runs two main
programs — weekly ASL lessons
that are led by Danos and Honing
ASL for New and Developed
Signers (also known as HANDS),
an ASL conversation group that
meets biweekly. Although the
club touches on the other sign
languages used in Canada, the
focus is currently on ASL as it is
native to this region ofthe country.
"Our ASL lessons are not
classes. They're not meant to bring
people to a level of fluency," said
Danos. "What we are teaching is
how to be in a Deaf environment,
which is very different."
Whereas "deaf" is often used
to describe a level of hearing loss,
the term "Deaf" describes those
who identify with other members
ofthe Deaf community — a cultural
distinction rather than a medical
one. Unlike learning another
spoken language, picking up a
sign language and switching to an
unfamiliar mode of communication
can be a more difficult skill to
grasp.
As the lessons are held in a
Deaf environment, no voicing
is enforced starting from the
second lesson onward. The intent
ofthe lessons is to help ease a
learner's transition to a voice-off
environment, introducing basic
question words such as who, what,
when, where and why as well as
syntax and finger-spelling - using
various hand shapes to represent
letters ofthe alphabet.
"It's more concept-driven," said
Danos.
According to Danos, students
have joined the club for a variety
of reasons, ranging from pure
curiosity to wanting to be able to
interact with Deaf family members
or clients.
Rafael Ruiz, a second-year
student entering the BFA acting
program, has had previous signing
experience in high school and
discovered the club after having a
conversation with a Deaf person at
the bus stop.
"I met some really great people
in the club," said Ruiz. "Some are
hearing and we sign to each other
at school sometimes ... but the club
allowed me to make connections
with the Deaf community in
Vancouver."
On the other hand, Marie
Shuman, a fourth-year linguistics
and French major as well as the
club's newest addition, was initially
intimidated entering the club last
month - something that quickly
changed.
"It's really good for beginners
— everyone is so accepting,"
said Shuman. "I came in going,
'Oh no, my knowledge of ASL
is so minimum [sic].' But I feel
comfortable signing in front of
other people."
"It's really awesome seeing
learners clicking on an idea or
starting to understand," said Danos.
Danos, who is graduating this
year, hopes that the club will
continue to grow. He envisions
holding an annual symposium
on the different sign languages
used in Canada as well as
potentially collaborating with
UBC researchers and the linguistic
department.
"Our goal as a club is to push
UBC in a more Deaf-friendly
direction," said Danos. tl
SUSTAINABILITY//
Over 1.5 million disposable cups are used on campus every year.
= ILE PHOTO PETERWOJNAR/THE UBYSSEY
Mugshare helps campus coffee
addicts save the environment
Yael Boyd
Contributor
According to the UBC SEEDS
Sustainability Program, at least
1.5 million disposable coffee cups
are generated on campus each
year. In 2015, UBCs largest and
most active student sustainability
organization, Common Energy,
conducted a waste audit on the
old SUB.
They found similarly
discouraging results. In the one
day of data collection, 490 coffee
cups were found with only 17
per cent correctly sorted into the
proper waste bins. Although UBC
coffee cups are recyclable, the
quantity of cups consumed and the
level of incorrect sorting is highly
unsustainable.
This sustainability concern
led Common Energy's campaign
team to come up with the idea of a
Mugshare program. After a year of
brainstorming, Common Energy
recently launched a Mugshare
pilot project, funded by the AMS
Sustainability Project Fund.
The program has a simple and
effective set up. An interested
student can sign up and pay a
five dollar deposit fee at one of
Seedlings, Sprouts or Agora Cafe
— the three participating cafes
— and receive a Mugshare card.
Students can take the card to the
participating cafes and receive a
hot beverage in a reusable travel
mug. They can take the mug to go
and within three days, return the
mug to any ofthe cafes where the
staff will wash it for them.
According to George Radner,
campaign team director, signing up
for this Mugshare pilot program
provides a "convenient, money
saving, environmentally friendly
alternative to buying so many
disposable coffee cups."
Alison Fung, fourth-year
environment and sustainability
program student and another team
director, also believes that the
Mugshare program will help target
behavioural changes towards only
using reusable mugs. She also notes
that starting the program with
Seedlings, Sprouts and Agora could
encourage participants to go to
these sustainability-focused cafes.
Coffee and tea at Seedlings/
Sprouts is also only 75 cents and
at Agora only $1.25 — cheaper
alternatives to many other coffee
and tea sources on campus. Ernielly
Leo, a third-year international
relations and geography student as
well as promotions and outreach
coordinator at Sprouts, is especially
enthusiastic that the Mugshare
program promotes Sprouts' values of
convenient and accessible options for
acting and consuming sustainably On
top of these short term benefits from
the pilot program, Common Energy
has even grander long-term goals.
The long term goal of Common
Energy's pilot program is to test the
project's viability and ideally one
day see a campus-wide mug-share
system. The AMS for example,
according to Fung, has expressed
interest in the program as long as
they see feasible results from the
pilot project. To make the project
successful, Common Energy has
teamed up with the UBC SEEDS
Sustainability Program, which has
connected them with the Applied
Science (APSC) 262 class on society
and technology.
According to Courtney Collins, a
second-year computer engineering
student in the APSC 262 class, her
group's main contribution will be
"working with Common Energy to
do research into life cycle analysis of
disposable versus reusable cups and
technical solutions to keeping track of
mugs being lent out."
Collins believes that the biggest
challenges will be getting students
on board with the program as well as
scaling the program up while keep it
convenient and feasible.
Nevertheless, Liska Richer,
manager ofthe UBC SEEDS
Sustainability Program, believes
that this pilot — and the eventual
campus wide program — has the
potential to help UBC reach its
zero-waste goals more quickly
by reducing the amount of waste
produced on campus. It also
offers a new vision of how waste
reduction can be performed
within the bounds ofthe emerging
sharing economy. Finally, it has
the potential to blaze a trail for
innovative solutions that start and
are tested on campus, but can help
solve real world challenges, tl
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.talk.go.kr 6    I    FEATURES    I    TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016 TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2016   |    FEATURES
As I took off my last remaining
piece of clothing in a small room
in the heart of Gastown, I had to
remind myself why I was about
to try "floating" for the first time. For 90
minutes, I would lie in complete darkness
— on my back — in 12 inches of salty water,
very carefully set at 34 degrees Celsius —
a temperature which I imagine to be the
precise definition of "tepid." The water is
supersaturated with over 1,200 pounds of
Epsom salts, added for their therapeutic
effects and their ability to dramatically
increase the buoyancy of the floater. My
senses were about to receive almost zero
inputs for the next hour and a half.
According to preliminary research
and the testimonials from enthusiastic
members of the floaters community,
floating can yield extraordinary benefits. I
reminded myself of this and turned toward
the darkness of the floatation tank. As I
closed the lid, my final sensory input was
the sound ofthe tank's heavy door closing,
sealing me away from the outside world.
Floating — known in academia as
Restricted Environmental Stimulation
Therapy (REST) - is not a new
phenomenon, but it appears as though
the once-fringe therapy is having its
mainstream moment Floatation centres
are popping up all across Vancouver and
are appealing to many people, including
the large local student population. It's not
difficult to imagine why this experience
of near-nothingness is being sought
out. In our hyper-connected world of
smartphones and social media, it is rare to
find a few moments of silence, let alone 90
minutes of near-total sensory deprivation.
Peter Suedfeld, a professor emeritus
in UBCs psychology department, is the
pioneer of REST research. A quick search
shows studies authored in part or in
whole by Suedfeld, claiming that floating
positively affects memory, creativity,
athletic performance and more. Scientific
claims range from a Nature article claiming
REST helped Alzheimer's patients, to an
article in the Journal of Substance Abuse
Treatment showing benefits for those
suffering from substance-induced mood
disorders. One study shows therapeutic
results for autistic children. Another
shows that REST was successfully used to
help smokers end their dangerous habit. Is
floating a magic bullet? If so, why is it not a
mainstream medical treatment?
REST therapy has a long history of
research and experimentation. Research
dates back to the 1960s, a time when REST
researchers such as Suedfeld encountered
a difficult academic environment. Isolation
tanks were believed to be dangerous,
leading to "hallucinations, emotional
upheaval, intellectual deterioration and
temporary psychosis," according to the
1961 publication Sensory Deprivation;
a symposium held at Harvard Medical
School. Although this was later shown
to be untrue, this sentiment still exists
among some people today. Researchers
have found, however, that with the right
setting and in modest time intervals, REST
therapy is not only safe, but in fact appears
to confer benefits to the floater.
"[REST] enhances intellectual
processes... it has been used successfully as
atool in stress management and atreatment
for chronic pain, insomnia, premenstrual
syndrome, cigarette addiction, overeating,
phobia and compulsive self-injury" wrote
Suedfeld in 1997.
Not all academics are as enthusiastic
about    REST    research    as    Professor
Suedfeld.
"There's a fairly wide range of claims
from the industry, but they're not always
based on the most rigorous science,"
explained Mark Holder, a professor at UBC
Okanagan. The psychology researcher lists
small sample sizes and a lack of control
groups as examples of methodological
errors in much of the existing scientific
literature addressing floating. In light
of lacking rigorous science, Holder is
conducting his own study. The premise is
simple — to what degree do people self-
report well-being after a 90 minute REST
session? A group of 126 floaters were
asked to fill out a questionnaire before
and after their float session, as well as
follow up studies 24 hours and one week
later. The studies showed that happiness
and life satisfaction did, in fact, improve
significantly after a floating session
while anxiety and depression decreased,
even when controlling for expectation
of supposed benefits. Holder's research
is encouraging, but it is — as opposed to
and shares. Instead of filling their time
with technology and 24-7 entertainment,
our ancestors were used to spending time
in silence and solitude.
The brain is affected by reduced
environmental stimulation in powerful
ways, argues Paul Maclean, the former
chief of the Laboratory of Brain Evolution
and Behavior at the National Institute
of Mental Health. Our "three brains" —
the reptile brain, the paleomammalian
brain and neocortex — are all strongly
affected by reduced sensory activity. In
moments of silence, our brain functions
differently and we can harness the fruits
of these differences such as increased
creativity and self awareness to improve
our lives. Maclean's theory is supported by
floaters' anecdotal claims. Regular floaters
self-report their minds becoming more
creative and introspective, and many claim
they leave with the feeling of having spent
quality time with themselves — a valuable
experience in our never-a-dull-moment
society. Floaters report feeling like their
brains "switch gears" and their emotional,
earlier, more exciting and controversial
claims — a little bland. The need remains
to replicate earlier studies conducted
by Suedfeld and his colleagues to find
out whether or not their claims can be
backed by more rigorous science. Can
something as simple as floating really help
people with autism, Alzheimer's, mental
illnesses and more? "How could that be?"
asks my inner scientist and skeptic — and
hopefully yours too — and what could the
mechanism of action possibly be?
To understand the benefits of silence
and solitude on the brain, we have to
understand that our evolutionary relatives
were spectacularly connected with their
natural environment. People today live
a sedentary lifestyle and are constantly
bombarded by sensory stimulation.
Compared to today, silence and solitude
was much more likely to be a common
experience for your average hunter-
gatherer and an important part of their
psychological life.
This offers one reason why floating
might be good for us. Our brains and bodies
have evolved to use moments of silence
and solitude. Lying awake at night in the
forest, listening to nothing but the leaves
blowing in the wind was commonplace,
as were hours of focused silence while
hunting game or gathering food. This
environment is vastly different from our
modern online landscape of views, likes
cognitive and spiritual abilities are able
flourish in response to the new neural
environment. How a restricted sensory
environment actually leads to these effects
remains an enigma, but the scientific
consensus — at the moment at least — is
that floating is healthy for the human
psyche.
At first, my time in the floatation
chamber was enjoyable. Although the
space was barely larger than a hot tub,
I felt no claustrophobia. I tried playing
around with the idea of falling asleep
and drowning, but felt comfortable that
I would be safe even if I happened to fall
asleep. I remained a bit anxious at facing so
much time alone with my thoughts, but the
water, salt and the general experience of
nothingness quickly dismissed these fears.
As the float continued, I contemplated
what to do with my mind.
The advice given to me was to simply
be present and to let whatever wants to
unfold to unfold. I did my best to follow
this advice and did in fact feel more
present. As the minutes went by, I started
to feel as though I was merging with my
surroundings, a sense of becoming one
with my external reality, unsure where my
body ended and the world began.
After the first hour of my float, the
initial calm and relaxation started to turn
towards boredom. I too am a member of
our information-driven society after all
and am used to being constantly inundated
with sensory stimulation. Instead of
having a profound inner experience as
many floaters report, I opted to play with
the sides ofthe tank, even sitting up cross-
legged for a few minutes. I was relieved
to hear the music start to play which
signaled that I had 15 minutes to exit the
tank, shower, put on my clothes and head
to the "post-float" room for some tea and
relaxation.
As I exited the room, reality came
surging back at me. Colours seemed
more vivid than usual and I was in a great
mood. My girlfriend Emma and I exited
Float House and made our way to a fancy
Gastown cafe for $4 drip coffees while we
reflected on our first floating experience.
I certainly felt better than I did going into
the float as though I had gone through
a psychological cleanse. Emma did not.
Instead, she felt tired and nauseous.
Perhaps our expectations played a role in
this discrepancy or perhaps the difference
was due to the way we managed our time
in the tank. Or maybe Emma just shouldn't
have ordered the bang bang shrimp the
night before.
"A lot of cool things can happen in this
environment," said Nathan Navetto, the
marketing and communications manager
for Float House, a Vancouver-based
business that offers float tank rentals.
"People come out knowing exactly
what they need to do in their lives,
whether it's to start a business, work on
a relationship or make improvements to
their selves. There's just so many cool
things that can come from floating."
Float House now has four locations
across Vancouver and Victoria, and are
currently building two more in Langley
and Edmonton. The commercial floatation
centres are flourishing and the people
at Float House couldn't be happier to be
bringing floating to the world. Challenges
remain for the company, the biggest being
the task of getting people to try floating
more than once. Floating is a practice much
like meditation or yoga and it's impossible
to get all the benefits of floating by just
trying it once. That said, keep in mind the
floatation centre has a business model that
depends on that rate of returning floaters.
While it's probably good for the floater to
float regularly, it's also good for business.
After having tried floating firsthand and having reviewed the scientific
literature, I have come to believe that
this therapy belongs among the ranks of
alternative practices such as meditation,
yoga, intermittent fasting, connection with
nature and holistic nutrition as practices
that have strong merit as performance-
enhancing and healing modalities — even
as radical tools of self transformation.
Years of future innovation or coupling the
experience with other treatments such
as psychedelic-assisted therapy could
provide floaters with more impressive
results.
In a world full of quackery, it is
wise to approach all such supposedly
beneficial activities with a skeptical —
but genuinely — open mind. Floating is
backed by (some) encouraging science
and appears to be safe. Stepping out
of your comfort zone and going for a
float — or better yet, a series of floats
— could prove to be one of your better
decisions of 2016. At least better than
your decision to take linear algebra as a
"breadth elective."
So, would you give floating a try? 'M 8    |    CULTURE    |    TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016
FASHION //
A Legendary moment: the first fashion and art expo at the Nest
PHOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
Alaie and Nik D. are the powerhouses behind the event.
Jaenna Calingasan
Contributor
When the two worlds of art and
fashion collide, streetwear brand
Legendary X and artist Nik D. are
no strangers.
Legendary X and Nik D.
collaborated together for the
first time at the Nest's UBC
performance theatre. The event
was filled with a blend of colourful
pieces on canvas, fashion shows
and special guest performances
by local Vancouver artists such
as TWest, Up Since Tuesday and
the tap dancing styling of Matisse,
among many others.
Before now, Legendary X was
just an idea.
"I was talking to a friend
before I started making any
clothing," said Ashkan Alaie,
a fourth-year political science
student at UBC and CEO and
designer ofthe line. "I told him
I want to capture legendary
moments."
Since 2014, exactly two years
since its inception, four collections
have been designed and produced
by Alaie, who is the powerhouse
behind the brand. He recently
showcased his spring/summer
2016 collection through a fashion
show at the expo. In addition to
featuring the new designs, his
other collections (the fall/winter
2015 collection) were shown and
sold at a discounted price.
A piece that was featured from
the fall/winter collection 2015
was the "Bandana Tall Tee." With
our world moving towards gender
neutrality, the diffusion of a dresslike t-shirt and the detail ofthe
bandana creates a statement in the
fashion world.
"I started to focus more on
quality, fit and still being able to
stand out. Because that is what
my brand is about — appreciating
people being different and being
able to stand out," said Alaie. "I'm
happy that's accepted now and
people wear it and it's like a trend."
On the other side ofthe
expo, Nik D., a fourth-year art
history major at UBC, debuts his
paintings during the event. His
work focused on vibrant colours
as imprints for his images,
stunning visuality, while also
keeping simplicity present in his
work.
"Whatever feels right at the
moment is going on the canvas.
It focuses on the feeling and
what happens becomes the most
prominent thing," he said.
After a lot of planning, what
started with just Nik D. and Alaie
became something bigger.
"I felt surprised that the
turnout was so great. I didn't
expect to see so many familiar
and new faces," said Alaie. "I'll
for sure be doing more events like
this in the future with new and
more art collaborations."
He plans to finalize the pieces
for the spring/summer collection
for the upcoming look book,
which will be available online. "3I
THEATRE //
The supporting cast were standouts in UBC Theatre's final production of the year.
PHOTO COURTESY EMILY COOPER
The Arabian Nights is "sexy, humorous and beautiful"
The Ubyssey Publications Society
ANNUAL
GENERAL
MEETING -
WHEN
April 1st, 2016-11 A.M
Michael Kingsmill Forum in the I
HE AGM, EDITORIAL CANDIDATES WILL BE
INTERVIEWED FOR THE FOLLOWING YEAR'S
ilTIONS. VOTING WILL TAKI
dL 4 TO APRIL 8 AT 5PM.
WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT 5PM APRIL 8
Hannah Kahn
Staff Writer
Sexy, humorous and beautiful,
UBCs Theatre department
has undoubtedly lived up to
expectations cast by Eurydice and
The Tenant ofWildfellHa.il with
their last production ofthe season,
The Arabian Nights.
As always, the costume and
scenery were enchanting. This is
particularly important in the story of
The Arabian Nights which is centred
on the court ofthe Khalifa, Shahryar
(Francis Winter). At the beginning
ofthe piece, the audience is greeted
by glowing rustic lanterns against
a deep purple cloth background
like stars in the sky. It is these same
lanterns that glitter farewell to the
audience at the end ofthe play,
framing the story like the covers of
a book.
Scheherezade (Elizabeth
Willow) artfully spins her stories
both for the Khalifa and the
audience. Interestingly, the actors
never leave the stage. Instead they
paint colours on Scheherazade's
palate, allowing themselves to be
manipulated by her words.
When called upon to play a
role, they act out her stories. When
absent from a scene, they sit around
the periphery ofthe stage and
participate through performing
music or whispering lines to those in
the main action as a group.
This use of voice and sound was
a strong point in the production.
Music placed the production in
Arabia and the use of dance with
this music brought changes of pace
to the play.
The physical acting in the piece
is superb, bringing the comedy
from the plot to the production.
Aspects of farce acted as a foil to
the moments of terror as after
many ofthe stories, the audience
would fear for Scheherazade's
life. Playing many different roles,
many ofthe actors aside from
those playing Scheherazade and
Shahryar stood out.
Mariam Barry was obviously
in her element, expertly playing
multiple roles and most notably
that of Harun Al-Rashid.
Cassandra Phillips-Grande was
enchanting, artfully teasing the
men around her left, right and
centre. Making foolish their
masculinity, she was masterfully
coy.
Parmiss Sehat was a standout,
playing not only the sister of
Scheherezade, but multiple smaller
roles. She was mesmerizing in all
she did and made us forget the many
characters she'd portrayed over the
course ofthe night. Every role she
played felt like her first.
Finally, Riley Bugaresti had
perhaps the most challenging role
of all. Although many women
played men over the course of
the play, no gender swap was as
intricate as Bugaresti's. It takes
talent to be a man playing a woman
playing a man.
Bugaresti carefully switched
genders over the course ofthe
production multiple times. His
finest moment perhaps was in one
ofthe most humorous scenes of
the play where he plays a blushing
bride whose wedding is ruined
by a farting husband. Surrounded
by a chorus of, "should not have
eaten those chickpeas," and "oh
what an enormous fart," while her
almost-husband runs away to India
in shame, Bugaresti succeeds in
looking so effeminate and so very
much like a disappointed womam
on the day of her marriage that one
almost forgets he is not in fact a
woman.
Finally, the play leaves the
audience to wonder about the
futures ofthe characters and what
the end ofthe production truly
meant. For while one wants a
happy ending, amid sirens there
is a sinking feeling that something
ominous has been left unsaid. "3I //OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY. MARCH22,2016
DIVESTMENT//
FLEFH'jrO'rSOFFlGTQ-i'TWEi.iEiiiEi'
The BoG's perplexing "obligations"
Donnlt Pawl Icri and Jocolyn Stacey
Allaid Law Faculty
Last month, the University
of British Columbia Board of
G overnor s r ej e cte d a student
and faculty pr op osal that woul d
have required UBC to forgo
future investments in fossil fuel
companies and divest from existing
fossil fuel holdings within five
years Instead|the board approved
the creation of anew Sustainable
Future Fund that will stand
alongside the university's existing
endowment funds. Underlying
this decision is a misleading and
ill-informed understanding of the
university's legal obligations with
r e sp e ct to its endowm ent funds.
Thi s misr epr e sentation of the
university's legal obligations only
serves to enhance the mounting
transparency and accountability
i ssue s curr ently f adng the b oar d.
Criti cism of the b oar d's r ej e ction
of the fossil fuel divestment
pr op osal has f o cuse d on its 1 ack
of environmental leadership and
shaky financial merit. What has
gone largely unremarked up on is
the perplexing statement made by
The problem with
sloppy phrasing is
that it becomes a
sound-bite mantra
for purportedly
justifying what
may be unwarranted,,,"
the UBC finance committee in the
text of its r e comm endation that
the bo ar d rej e ct the pr op o sal. The
finance committee stated thatthe
proposal "would not be consistent
with the board's fiduciary
obligation to endowment donors."
Thi s st atement is p erpl exing
because the university doe snot owe
such a legal obligation. We focus
our criticism on this aspect ofthe
reasoning for the decision by the
b oar d to r ej e ct di vestm ent in fossil
fuels.
As trustee of charitable purpose
trusts (the endowment funds), if
UB C owe s fi dud ary oblig ations to
anybody, it surely has to be to be
those persons intended to benefit
from the purposes of the trust —
namely students and faculty. The
finance committee's statement
and the b oar d's guiding p oli cy
on divestment thus misrepresent
its stated "fidudary obligation"
Divestment dedsions are guided
by the Endowment Responsible
Investment Policy in which the
board asseverates its primary
"fiduciary responsibility of acting
in the best interest of the university
and its stakeholders... which
include students, faculty, staffi
alumnii donor s, the government
and taxpayers?'
In private law, a fidudary
obligation cannot legally and
meaningfully extend to such
a broad (and in some cases
amorphous) group. If anything,
the duty can be stretched to cover
only tho se actual p er sons who ar e
the b enefi ct si i e s of the pur p ose s
of the charitable trust — students
and faculty. Donors and other
stakeholder individuals outside
the purview of the declared
purposes of the trust (for examplei
scholarships and areas of research)
are not| from a legal perspective,
beneficiaries under the charitable
trust. At best, the policy sits as
rhetoric.
The university doesnot owe a
fidudary duty to its donors unless
they are under the trust made
by beneficiaries. To make them
b enefici ari e s woul d j e op ar cfize
the charitable status of their tax
deduction.
Given the brevity ofthe
reasons for the board's decision
t o r ej e ct the divestment
proposal, it is difficult to know
whether a misunderstanding
of the university's private law
fi dud ary duti e s influence d the
final dedsion. But the problem
with sloppy phrasing is that it
becomes a sound-bite mantra
for purportedly justifying what
m ay b e unwarr ante d and under
the pretense of legal obligation.
In our viewj this renders the
commitment elsewhere in the
policy to "ESG" (Environment al|
Social and Governance)
principles somewhat hollow.
Good governance at a university
adumbrates academic freedom
in the pursuit of knowledge.
Anomalous as it may se em to
some, this place s the views of
faculty and students at the core of
academic dedsion making —not
the university's donors. 3
ADVICE//
FlLEFHCTCnISCfF USTEF^THEIJEl'SSEI'
Ask Natalie: housing horror
Natal la Morr I *
AoVce columnist
"Dear Natalie,
Myroommate is beinga total
pain inmyass. He's inconsiderate,
rude, has people over att the
time without asking and leaves
anyroom he enters a mess. It's a
disaster zone in here and it's all
his crap! Pm living in rez-and Pm
leavingat the end of April and
(thanli God) Ineverhave to see
him again, but howcan I malie it
to tfte end witho ut throw inga 11 of
his stuff out tfte window?"
I don't know ab out yoU| but when
I was in residence, my RAs were
weirdly concerned with people
putting things out the window.
Pr ob ably be cause it was fir st y e ar
and fir st-ye ar s tend to have the type
of thought process that ends up
with someone scaling the side of
Totem.
Talk to your RA. There might
only be amonth or so left with this
guyi but you can definitely try to
make that month a little easier for
yourself. Ask your RA if they canbe
there during a house meeting. Don't
feel weird about inducting them —
this is what they get p ai d for.
If you've talked to him and
brought your RA in on the drama,
then it's time to just suck it up. I
know it sucks and I know you think
you should get a petty revenge story
from all of this, but that's not going to
help anyone.
You have a month left. Just a few
weeks. You can power through this.
Ignore him andhismesses. dean the
messes you make and don't make a
big deal when he's rolling around in
his own dirt. Just get through this
month and you can move in with
someone who actually minds the
state of their home.
"Dear Natalie,
Imoved into this oldhouseat
the beginningofthe year$ but
now we're noticingweird stuff
happening Things are moving
without us touchingthem, chills
onthe bacfiofournecfis, lights
fiicfiering. It's startingto creep
me out..."
Congr at s on your new gho st.
Or you know, an old house with
draughts.
But in all seriousness, who you
gonna call?
"Natalie,
Pm afrst-yearwho didntget on-
campus housing next year. Ifound
some friends to live with, but Pm
worried about somethings. Ifeel
I Hie Pm not rea dytoa dult yet —
how do I even adult?"
Congratulations! You're making the
fir st step in be coming an adult! You
thought it was living on your own for
the fir st time, but face it, fir st-y ear
residence is pretty much summer
camp with booze. You don't have
to dean, cook or get cheques or do
anythingi but move in and pay once
a term.
Actually living on your own —
now that's an adventur e. If you pi ay
your cards right, it's amazingly fun
You can cookyour ownfoodi
pick your own r oomm ate s and have
a bed that's bigger than tiny. You
can live near the beach, downtown)
parks, hiking trails, shopping malls —
anything. Vancouver is now your s to
play with.
Fir st off i find a place to live. Make
sure you see the place before you
give them any money. Chances are
there will be others looking at the
house or apartment too — thank you
Vancouver housing market — so if
you all agree i move as fast as you
can. At the same time, don't feel
pressured into getting a place you
dont really like because your friends
ar e worrie d about not getting a
place. Make sure you're comfortable.
And then there is a. bunch of
little things. Find out if you need
or want renter's insurance. I have
it, but my roommates don't. It'sup
to you. How will you p ay r ent? I s
it fumi she d? D o you have access
to a car to move your stuff? How
often can you have people over?
H ow e arly is i s too e arly to use the
vacuum? Will there be quiet hours?
Actual M ari o p ar tie s?
It may seem like a bunch of
little things that make a big pile
of anxi ety, but it's r e ally just small
things that canbe figured out in one
house meeting. Your RA is now your
landlord andyouhave less drunk
people who can't figure out what
room they're supposed to be sleeping
in
On thatnotei check to see if your
new door has a lock.
Deep breath, it'sless scary than
you think. 3
Need advice? Contact Natalie
a nonymoaslyat asktiato lie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions
answered in an upcoming issue. // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016  HI TUESDAY, MARCH 22,2016   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
JBC 93 OTTAWA 76 [FIFTH:
OAFHOUSIE 66 CARLETON 76
OAFGARY 98 RYERSON 87
:IE 78 RYERSON 85 [BRONZE;
7 79 CARFETON101
FINAL 8
w VJ
PHOTOS JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS, KOSTA
PRODANOVIC, KOBY MICHAELS
Ben Gardiner, Jackson Runkle,
Matt Langmuir and Koby Michaels
Sports Staff
Despite their best performance of
the year, the Thunderbirds men's
basketball team lost in overtime
to the first-seeded Ryerson
University Rams on Thursday
evening.
Throughout the opening
period, the crowd at Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird Sports
Centre was swelling with UBC
pride. Huge cheers for the
T-Birds' hustle gave the team a
noticeable boost during several
key moments.
UBC started the game strong,
up 8-2 in the opening minutes.
Buoyed by an emphatic two-
hand dunk from Conor Morgan,
UBC led 14-7 at the five minute
mark in the first quarter.
Ryerson's full-court pressure
gave UBC some trouble
advancing the ball up the court,
but it was the Rams' shooting
that narrowed the scoring gap.
Despite never having led in
regulation time, Ram Jean-
Victor Mukama scored a late
three-pointer, tying the game at
90 and forcing overtime.
In overtime, Ryerson quickly
built momentum as guard
Roshane Roberts nailed a three-
pointer while Mukama added
a steal and dunk to to put the
Rams ahead 99-92 with under
two minutes in the extra period.
Ryerson's Adika Peter-
McNeilly led his team's scoring
with 25 points and nine
rebounds. Ammanuel Dressa
and Mukama each chipped in
19 points, while Mukama was
awarded Player of the Game for
the Rams.
"We got 11 guys strong
coming back next year and it's
good to have all of those guys get
in the game at one point and be
able to show what they can do.
Hopefully that motivates us this
summer to work a little harder
and next year we'll come back
even stronger as a team," said
Jordan Jensen-Whyte.
Even though the team lost,
the St. Patrick's day game was a
huge success for UBC Athletics.
It was a record setting crowd,
an unreal environment and one
ofthe best — and most exciting
— games of basketball I've ever
seen.
The made the crowd fall in
love with them which is quite a
feat after losing a playoff game.
And when — after the final
whistle — they turned around
and applauded the fans, the
stadium went wild.
UBC, on Saturday, then
beat the fifth-seeded McGill
University Redmen 69-68 in the
consolation B game. While the
crowd was more modest than
UBCs previous matchup, there
were still plenty of Thunderfans
sporting their blue and gold.
The thrilling final minutes ofthe
game kept fans on the edge of
their seats, cheering the T-Birds
in their second game ofthe
tournament.
UBC was quick to start the
scoring with David Wagner
posting up twice in the opening
two minutes ofthe first quarter.
A pair of three-pointers from
Conor Morgan put the T-Birds
up 11-0 just three minutes in.
A string of turnovers from
both sides late in the frame was
characterized by quick back-
and-forth transition basketball.
Morgan knocked down a pair
of free throws to keep UBCs
lead at 58-46 entering the final
quarter.
McGill's offensive frustration
came in the form of an
increasingly scrappy defence
as the Redmen picked up an
unsportsmanlike foul on Phil
Jalalpoor and a reaching foul in
the same possession.
Then, for the third time in
three days, a tired and beat up
UBC team hit the court for the
CIS Final 8 Championship. The
'Birds beat the University of
Ottawa Gee-Gee's to capture
fifth place.
Ottawa held the game close
throughout the first half, but
three games in as many days
caught up with them in the
second half.
Morgan had a game high
25 points and picked up eight
rebounds. Jalalpoor finished
with 19 points of his own and
WillOndrickhadll.
This game also marked
Wagner's last with the team. The
fifth-year player tallied up 11
points and three rebounds. He
earned a standing ovation from
the crowd at Doug Mitchell
when he was subbed out with
two minutes left in the game.
On the other half of the
bracket, the tournament heated
up on Saturday as the Dalhousie
University Tigers were edged by
the reigning champions Carleton
University, 76-66. In the final,
the University of Calgary Dinos
upset the number one seeded
Ryerson University Rams by a
score of 98-87.
The game between Dalhousie
and Carleton was a low-scoring
affair due to both teams'
defensive style of play. The
teams seemed evenly matched
in the first half with the halftime
score being 24-23 for Carleton.
Carleton forward Ryan Ejim's
20-point performance was a
difference maker. Despite an
explosive second half effort by
Kashrell Lawrence, who earned
18 points on the night, the margin
was too large to overcome and
Dalhousie was ultimately defeated
by the defending champions by a
score of 76-66.
Due to the offensive style
of play of the Calgary Dinos
and Ryerson Rams, the
second semifinal matchup
featured an exciting end-
to-end high-scoring affair.
Calgary's Thomas Cooper was
phenomenal, registering a
whopping 30 points.
With Cooper, David
Kapinga and Jasdeep Gill all
scoring more than 20 points,
the Dinos were able to get by
the Rams with ease.
The energy was lacking
at tip-off. But by the end of
the first quarter, the crowd's
volume had picked up.
Attendance of 4,450 added to
the tournament total of 24,754
spectators.
Carleton easily polished of
the Dinos,101-79, to claim their
sixth-straight national title and
12th in the last 14 years. 1 12    |    GAMES AND COMICS    |   TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2016
STAY CONNECTED WITH THE UBYSSEY.
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21-Yearly celebration;
23-"Am not!" rejoinder;
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JNI/THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 15 ANSWERS
Are you looking for close convenient storage?
EHkitsilano
TIM MINI STORAGE
We have two locations available minutes from the UBC campus and offer student discounts year-round.
■ 1850 York Avenue 604.731.0435 york@kitsministorage.com
604.736.2729 w11th@kitsministorage.com
■ 2034 West 11th Avenue
We also have limited space available for on campus storage, please contact w11th@kitsministorage.com
for details.

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