UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 30, 1970

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0304623.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0304623.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0304623-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0304623-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0304623-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0304623-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0304623-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0304623-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0304623-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0304623.ris

Full Text

Array On page 3 are the latest developments
in the upcoming referendum asking whether
students want a voluntary student society.
The Ubyssey will print a full story Tuesday covering all arguments for and against
the referendum, and will accept articles from
both sides for that paper.
Vol. LI, No. 29
VANCOUVER, B.C.. FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1970
228-2305
Considerable upheaval   over tenure refusal
ENGLISH HEAD ADMITS CRISIS
English department head Dr.
Robert Jordan admitted
Wednesday that a crisis exists in
the department.
Jordan, who until now has
been reluctant to comment on the
refusal of tenure to six English
department faculty members,
made the admission to a
departmental meeting Wednesday
night.
"This kind of irresponsible
exhitition (letters, leaflets and
press releases issued by
concerned faculty) not only
embarrasses the whole
department, including,
deplorably, our students, but
shows a petulant disregard for
proper university procedure."
With Jordan's comments, the
issue    seems   to   have    become
"I recognize that the modes of
scholarship are many, but the
primary emphasis in the
(departmental) guidelines, which I
endorse, is upon scholarship, he
said.
"I say this in full recognition
that good teaching represents a
strong scholarly component, but
the phrase "scholarship in the
classroom" to me is an indication
Students are invited to send' The Ubyssey their comments on the issues raised by the
English department tenure issue, including the tenure concept and criteria, teaching and research as dominant factors in building a department, and the question oi democracy in the
departments.
Address them to the editor and leave them in the office — SUB, second floor, northeast
corner.
The six were refused tenure by
the department's promotions
committee. According to Jordan,
this is the first tenure refusal in 15
years in the department.
Of the six, two - assistant
profs Brian Mayne and David
Powell - are appealing the
decision to the faculty of arts'
tenure committee.
Newspaper reports have
characterized the issue as
"bloodletting" in the department,
although a press release from arts
dean Douglas Kenny earlier this
"week denied that there was a
"purge" in the department or
indeed anything out of the
ordinary.
But, said Jordan in his speech
to the department: "As we all
know, the department has been
suffering considerable upheaval
for the past several weeks...
because of recommendations from
the promotion committee.
- He also criticized members of
the promotions committee who
have disagreed with him in public,
although he did not name them.
"As I have made clear, such
decisions (tenure and promotion)
are my responsibility, and public
attacks upon a consultative
promtions committee are
gratuitous as well as malicious."
He had even stronger words for
those t%gt have attempted to
bring the. issues in the English
departmer£ current conflict to the
public.       ■
clearer. English department
sources say the decisions made in
the present tenure case will
determine the future structure of
the department.
This includes the possibility of
democracy with the department
(among both faculty and
students) and the contradiction
between teaching ability and
publication as a basis for
promotion and the granting of
tenure.
Jordan's address made it clear
that he favors publication and the
PhD degree as the sole criteria for
promotion in the department.
He considers publishing to be
the most important single
indicator of scholarship.
of good teaching, not scholarship
in the sense that the guidelines
describe it."
The guidelines referred to were
passed last fall and serve as a
handbook for English department
faculty.
"Guidelines accomplish a
legitimate and commendable
function in making clear that
scholarship and teaching are both
central to the work of the
department," Jordan said.
But the guidelines state very
clearly that publication and the
PhD are the dominant
considerations when
recommending for promotion and
tenure.
"The PhD degree or
'acceptable   equivalent'   will   be
required for appointment as
assistant professor... acceptable
equivalent means a significant
published book or series of
articles..." they state.
(Powell has a PhD and several
publications including an edition
accepted for publication. Mayne
has a British MA which he claims
is equivalent to a North American
PhD. Both consider teaching and
lecture preparation as the
dominant consideration in their
work at this time).
Jordan added that he thinks
too much consideration has been
placed on democracy in the
department, and the promotions
committee — made up of full
professors and one or two other
senior faculty members — should
have most influence in this area.
"I am talking about... a
careful process of assessment in
which votes are meaningless unless
the person meets the
qualifications ... too much
emphasis has been placed on the
significance of votes and
majorities in determining
promotion and tenure," he said.
He also said he doesn't think
there should be a need to appeal
the decisions made by the
department.
"I can affirm that the faculty
of arts promotion committee and
president's committee are
becoming increasingly demanding
that the recommendations from
departments should not require
special pleading or special
justification," he told the
department.
We're stu/tified'-women
By BERNARD B1SCHOFF
Liberation from what?
According k> Simon Fiaser University
student Marcy Cohen, liberation from the
rote western society ptescribes for all
women.
Speaking at a panel discussion on
women's liberation in the SUB club's
lounge Thursday, Cohen said: "We want
'to be liberated from the nartow,
stultifying wife-mother existence which is
the only one possible for a large number
of women today.
"Whereas the male lias a thousand
different ways of tultiilmg himself and
being creative, the woman is tuuglil fioin
chillMod   thai   sin-   i\m  <■"!>■ K- a  full
human being if she ha« a child."
She said Christianity, Freudian
psychology and social science are all used
as tools in this brainwashing process.
"And in a society where status is
measured by money we want to stop
being exploited economically, being
discriminated against in matters such as
wages, and consequently having to he
second-class people," Cohen said.
She also pointed out that there is overt
discrimination in the university and gave
examples of courses that women are not
allowed to take, .tnd departments tliat
will only accept a certain quota of
women.
"Oui basic premise." i.iid une woman,
"is llul men and wurncii ,nu .ill human
beings and then- is no intellectual,
emotional or psychological diffciencc
between them."
Margaret Mitchell of the Unemployed
Citizens Welfare Improvement Council,
said the conditions of women with
children on welfare is shocking.
She said the small welfare cheques do
not even adequately covet basic
necessities such as food, and called social
workers "sadistic hooligans" who do
nothing for welfare people.
She said children of parents on welfare
are emotionally disturbed fot the wry
simple reason thai they dun "I have
enough to cat.
She adek-d the majority of pom people
do not benefit tit.nn chanties. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1970
SUB CRAFTS SHOP is alive and burgeoning in room 247. Ubyssey photographer
Maureen Gans caught Linda Ellstrom, left, and Dirk Heiss, centre and right, getting
their hands dirty with clay. Other activities include weaving, batiking, leatherwork,
candle-making. Students instruct every Monday and Thursday, but SUB cultural
supervisor Fred Flores hopes the centre will open every night in future. If you're
interested,   drop in or go up and talk to Fred about it.
Admin proposes
Loyola merger
MONTREAL (CUP) - In a surprise move January 22, the
administration at Loyola College suggested that members of the
campus community begin thinking about a year-old proposal that
the Roman Catholic institution merge with Montreal's Sir George
Williams University.
The suggestion, by administration president Patrick Malone,
ended a period of more than five months during which the college's
administration resisted any serious discussions on the questions.
Negotiations between the two institutions over possible
federation began formally last year on all possible forms of
cooperation, but came to a gradual halt last summer when Loyola's
interest waned.
One of the key incidents behind re-opening the question is
viewed to be the recently-defused conflict between the Loyola
faculty and administration which exploded December 15 when the
administration attempted to fire 27 professors.
In Thursday's statement, Malone urged deans, department
chairmen and students to study a proposal made last year by Loyola
history professor Donald Savage and SGWU assistant dean of arts
Michel Despland.
Their scheme called for a new "federal university" with two
constituent colleges — designed to better exploit human and physical
resources of both campuses, without'threatening the identity of
either.
Malone asked the Loyola community to present their views on
the proposal to the administration, based "on its practical
implications not only for your own department, but also for the
students and for the Loyola community as a whole."
The Loyola administration is under considerable pressure from
the Quebec department of education to link with Sir George, with a
view of reducing budget expenditures and duplication of facilities.
The Despland-Savage proposal has already been approved by
SGWUTs university council and board of governors as the basis for
future negotiations with Loyola.
If the report is eventually accepted, the new university would
include two colleges of arts — on both existing campuses - with the
facilities of science, engineering and commerce from Loyola
merging physically with those at Sir George.
The "federal university" - bearing a new name - would be
headed by a board of governors consisting of representatives from
the constituent colleges, the three university departments and the
"general public."
A joint senate would oversee operations of the college councils
at each campus; each college would be headed by a principal who
would be subordinated to an administration president elected by the
Senate and board of governors.
Non-support kills union
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP)-The third attempt
at a regional student union among maritime
universities—the Federation of Atlantic Student
Councils—ended here Sunday (January 25).
The executive of the FASC decided to disband
the organization in a weekend meeting after student
councils at four campuses turned down membership
in the regional federation.
The councils at Memorial University, Dalhousie
University, the University of New Brunswick and St.
Thomas University withdrew their support of the
federation following a week-long directional
conference in Fredericton over the Christmas
holidays.
They cited dissatisfaction at the priorities
system for fieldwork established at the
conference—in which campuses would receive help
based on their student population and the degree of
organizational development already in existance.
MacKay said it was personally disappointing
that the federation didn't get a chance to implement
its programs.
"I think we had a program and a method of
implementation that could have worked," he said.
Other executive members felt the same, and
spent most of the weekend trying to work out ways
to keep the organization going. In the end, they
decided to keep FASC field workers employed until
the end of January, working at the Nova Scotia
Agricultural College and St. Anne's College.
Money remaining in FASC accounts at the
beginning of February will be returned to fee-paying
member campuses.
Speak Easy-no files, no desks, no
lectures—just answers.
Birth control pills are readily available. But
where can you get them?
A student has run out of cash and is being
evicted. Can he get money?
A girl is pregnant. What are her alternatives?
Everyday students are stopped by cops for
identification. Do we have rights?
Several university students committed suicide
in the past year. Was there no one to listen?
For many, the university means alienation.
How can contracts be made?
We are not just another service on campus. We
bear no resemblance to any other. Speak Easy is a
place where students can relate to you as fellow
students, and you can feel free to discuss any
problem you have.
Speak Easy is in the process of assembling
information relevant to your needs and concerns
like compiling a pamphlet with alternatives and
help for the woman who is pregnant.
We will also be posting students' rights when
confronted by the police.
Our next column will be devoted to a
discussion of birth control information and where
it is available.
Speak Easy is soliciting your ideas and
suggestions, your questions and concerns, for
student response is the only yardstick we deem
valuable for evaluating our own attempts to meet
those needs.
This column is one way of receiving feedback,
of answering questions of personal and general
interest, and of tuning in more effectively for
student ideas. Every letter will be responded to
either in print, or confidentially; every idea will be
welcomed and incorporated if possible.
Address your inquiries or comments to this
column, c/o Speak-Easy, room 218, SUB, box
115, and drop them in campus mail—no 'ostage
necessary. **
P.S. Feel free as well to drop into SUB 218,
Mon.-Fri.. 12-9, with personal problems-or phone
us at 228-3706. , Friday, January 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Referendum group asks equal advertising funds
An open meeting will be held
Monday at noon in the SUB
ballroom to discuss Wednesday's
referendum, which asks: "Are you
in favor of the membership in and
the paying of fees to the Alma
Mater Society being made
voluntary?"
The Alma Mater Society
executive has refused equal
advertising funds to society
members on the side of voluntary
AMS membership in Wednesday's
referendum.
AMS president Fraser Hodge
said Thursday night the executive
has granted a full-page Ubyssey
advertisement - worth $143 to
AMS organizations - to students
in favor of voluntary membership
but has refused them an amount
equivalent to the $200 the AMS is
spending in posters.
Hodge said the executive
would not agree with law student
president Carey Linde, a
proponent of voluntary
membership, that refusal to grant
Linde and his group the same
amount the executive was
spending to oppose the
referendum would "deny students
access to their own monies."
(The yes-no referendum will
ask students whether they are in
favor of making membership in
and fee-paying to the AMS
voluntary. At present all students
must pay a $24 membership fee,
although they are not forced to
belong to the society.
(The AMS council and
executive are in favor of retaining
the present involuntary structure.
Linde, debating society president
John Cherrington, student
senators Peter Ladner and D. J.
O'Donnell and others are
opposed..
(Both sides have full-page ads
in today's Ubyssey — both paid
for out of AMS funds.)
Linde approached Hodge
Wednesday with a written request
for equal funds, pointing out that
the AMS in its stand on the
academic activities committee had
said:
"Any committee which sets
out to promote any single point
of view, no matter what that view
might be, is not acting in the
interests of the majority of the
students, and should therefore not
have the exclusive access to
student funds."
Linde charged the council is in
fact promoting only one point of
view — that the AMS be
compulsory.
"To deny students access to
their own monies on an issue of
this import is to exhibit precisely
those qualities that many find
repulsive in the concept of a
society that offers no freedom of
choice as to membership," Linde
said in his request.
He said the AMS executive
decided not to hear any requests
for funds from those who favor a
voluntary AMS until Monday's
council meeting, and called this
"blatantly unfair" as the meeting
is only 36 hours before the voting.
(Hodge denied Thursday that the
executive made such a decision,
and said he informed Linde of this
on Wednesday.)
(Ubyssey reporter Jim Davies,
who accompanied Linde both
times to Hodge's office, says
Linde was told he "could apply
for money at the next council
meeting.")
Hodge said he told Linde to
come back in two hours for his
decision. He still hadn't made up
his mind when Linde returned, he
said.
He said he told Linde the AMS
was   considering   trying   to  get
private donations to pay for the
pro-involuntary membership
publicity, but that this was not a
definite decision.
(Linde claims Hodge said this
decision was in fact definite. He
says he asked the president where
the AMS would get the $350 for
the advertising it had ordered, and
was told it would come from
"friends of the AMS" whose
names Hodge refused to divulge.
(Davies concurs with Linde's
account of the discussion.)
At any rate, Hodge phoned
Linde on Wednesday night and
told him the executive's final
decision was that the AMS would
pay for equal advertising in
today's Ubyssey but Linde would
have  to pay for his own posters.
Linde, who is using his own
funds for posters, claims this is a
reversal of Hodge's earlier
position. "It is clear from all the
unadultered garbage they are
saying about the consequences of
passing this referendum that they
are really running scared, which is
difficult' to do for a bunch of
people who have never even
crawled before," he said.
Hodge said he considered the
idea of collecting private
donations for publicity but
decided students would not react
very kindly to his solicitations
because they are already paying
$24 per year to the AMS.
"Anyway, I don't see anything
immoral or dishonest about an
organization spending money to
promote itself," he said.
GALLIMAUFRY'S WAYNE ROBSON hit the audience hard in SUB
Gallimaufry will be back Friday.
—dirk visser photo
ballroom Wednesday with "Krap's Last Tape" by Samuel Beckett.
Loyola admin, takes fired prof's case to court
MONTREAL (CUP)-In a
surprise announcement Thursday
the administration of Loyola
college here declared it would
take the case of dismissed
physicist S. A. Santhanam to
court, to obtain legal justification
for firing him last year.
The move came as the
administration's response to a
report issued by the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers investigation team into
_ the Santhanam affair, and is seen
by observers at Loyola as an
attempt to foil CAUT attempts to
act as binding arbiter in
Santhanam's case.
Observors also felt the
administration would win the
case, which will go to court
February 16.
Santhanam signed a statement
in December, 1967, stating his
intention to resign from the
Loyola faculty in 1969, but was
later given a contract for the
M 969-70 year which stated it
"superceded all other verbal
agreements."
But the Loyola board of
trustees  fired him anyway, and
has refused to pay his salary for
this year.
The CAUT report, product of
an investigation which began
December 6 without the
cooperation of the Loyola
administration, was delivered
secretly to both Santhanam and
the adminstration Jan. 16, for
comments by both parties.
In a 60-page rebuttal, the
administration reportedly rejected
the recommendations of the
report, which called for binding
arbitration in the case.
In a meeting Jan. 24, the
CAUT academic freedom and
tenure committee accepted the
investigation    report    and
authorized the CAUT executive to
find out if the Loyola
administration would accept
binding arbitration.
They had until today to
reply.
Presumably, failure to respond
would have brought a blacklisting
of Loyola by the CAUT, a
procedure in which members of
the faculty pressure group—which
includes most Canadian
academics—would be warned
away from seeking employment at
Loyola.
The administration action in
seeking a court opinion on the
Santhanam firing is identical to
tactics    employed    by     the
University of New Brunswick last
year to justify the firing of
professor Norman Strax, a
physicist deeply involved in
radical activities on the UNB
campus.
New Brunswick courts upheld
the UNB administration's right to
fire Strax over the protests of the
CAUT. A retaliatory CAUT
blacklist of the campus was lifted
this summer when it became
obvious the pressure group could
not aid Strax in any way.
The Loyola action further
undercuts the credibility of the
CAUT, which claims it acts to
preserve the interests of Canadian
UBC security tightens
Stronger security precautions have been taken at UBC since
the recent bombings, security head D. H. Hannah said Thursday.
The campus patrol is working closely with the RCMP in
providing security, Hannah said.
"I don't want to state what we are doing at the moment," he
said.
"We are not free to divulge the RCMP plans," he said.
faculty in disputes with university
administrations.
CAUT officials were
unavailable for comment over the
action.
The case of Santhanam, united
faculty and students in a series of
protests.
A number of sit-ins outside
administration president Patrick
Mai one's office brought the
investigation by the CAUT and
incurred retribution in the form
of dismissals for 27 professors,
most of them supporters of the
student protests.
The firings touched off a new
series of protests in which the
administration threatened court
injunctions against protesters and
used Montreal riot police to clear
one sit-in from the administration
building.
The provincial government set
up a one-man inquiry into the
crisis and the administration
finally defused tensions by
announcing suspension of the
firings until appeals were heard by
a revamped committee on
appointments. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1970
Denial
THS UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
JANUARY 30,  1970
UBC and Athletics
Why is UBC supporting athletics? What good are
athletics to the general university populace, or more
important, what part do they play in the community?
That starts with recreation. Some students in
UBC's School of Physical Education and Recreation feel
that there is no real need for PE. Recreation is what
should be taught in schools.
Many people spend their recreation hours chasing
all number of little round balls, or flat round pucks, or
rocks, but there are also some who couldn't give a damn
about those things. For most people that is healthy, for
some—distasteful.
Some people would much rather do than watch,
others find enjoyment in watching. Recreation takes all
of these people into consideration and supplies their
needs. Physical education only teaches those who want
to be taught the physical skills involved in athletics,
according to the recreation boosters.
In that case, here at UBC and out in the big bad
world we should be attempting to supply the public, or
the student body with facilities to suit their own needs.
Athletic teams are less important than the public, but
not as much as the non-athletes would like to believe.
To make sports more enjoyable to the watchers on
campus, we should develop winning teams. That is
possible as part of the facilities thing. If you can't offer
a young athlete money to bride him to attend, you can
offer good coaching, good facilities and good
competition, and have a reasonable chance of
convincing him of the merits of the institution.
All of these ideas were brought forward to the
Men's Athletic Committee by the Alumni report on the
athletic situation here. For some reason that report
hasn't been noticed by anybody on campus.
It also suggested the divorce of the athletic
department from the school of PE. That way team
coaches could spend a reasonable amount of time
preparing their teams for competition, the department
could become self-supporting, or work with grants from
the university and the school could hire educators, not
coaches.
On one hand the school of PE doesn't know what
it is doing or where it is going. That school also runs the
athletic program which has the same problems.
According to common sense, the professors in the
school of PE should be teaching their students how to
teach the physical skills, not just showing them how to
do the little tricks.
Coaches of the various teams, on the other hand,
should be showing their team members the little tricks
which make winners out of people who can do the
normal things that everyone else can do.
No blame should be laid on any one person unless
he is blocking attempts to change the system.
Athletics are a good recreational pursuit for those
who like exercise and those who just like watching. If
ideas such as those presented in the Alumni report were
to be accepted by the various bodies concerned, then
there would be a good reason for UBC to support
athletics. __j. m.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I wish to disclaim the title of
"spokesman of Mayne and
Powell" ascribed to me in your
recent article "English tenure
conflict escalates". At no time
was I requested by Professor
Mayne or Professor Powell to
express their point of view in this
matter. In answering your
reporter's questions I spoke
merely as a concerned member of
this department.
Keith Alldritt
assoc prof
English
Names
Editor:  Michael  Finlay
News         Paul   Knox
City       Nate Smith
Managing         Bruce   Curtis
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire        Irene   Wasilewski
Sports      Jim  Maddin
Senior            John  Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City           John  Andersen
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Temporary acting deputy assistant city
editor was Brian McWatters. With him
were Ginny Gait, Sandy Kass, Jennifer
Jordan and Bev Gelfond. Treated to
her first Jim Davies animal show was
Linda Hossie who was astounded by it
all. Other sampling life's tangerine
nectars were photogs David Bowerman,
Dirk Visser, Dave Enns, Maureen Gans
and Newbody Marc Kenton.
Leading the no-shows was Robin
Burgess. Maddin listed John Kula
under sports for some reason along
with Scott McCloy, Dick Button and
Tony Gallagher. Christine said to say
something about poli sci profs while
back at cityside, Phil Barkworth, Jan
O'Brien and Daves Keillor and Schmidt
writ.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Because I have no wish to take
what I regard as an administrative
matter into the public forum, I
will make no comment on the
views expressed by Dean Kenny,
Mr. Myers, and Professor Aldritt
on the "English Tenure Conflict"
(Ubyssey, Jan. 27). I do deny the
allegation that the four professors
directly involved other than
Mayne and Powell (Actually two
of the principals are instructors)
"did not want their names
released because it could
jeopardize their bargaining
position with other universities
should they not be granted tenure
at UBC." There may or may not
be people associated with the
controversy who have reason .to
feel embarrassed or afraid, but as
one of the six parties alluded to in
the article, I assure you that I
have not —nor, as far as I am
aware, has any of the other five.
Alan R. Shueard
AMS relevant
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: The relevance of the AMS.
Your recent articles have
perhaps caused some
consternation among some
students because of your inability
to print all the facts, which of
course no newspaper could
possibly do. A referendum of this
kind is similar to one which would
ask citizens of a country whether
they are in favour of being a
citizen or not, and whether they
should be exempt from taxes
because they do not participate in
some activity. This is absurd. The
AMS is still very relevant however
it is failing in its duties because
the members of the AMS have
failed to fulfil their respective
duties. It is difficult for many
students to know what is going on
on campus because they have to
search diligently through The
Ubyssey for the activities they are
interested in. An important duty
of the AMS is to coordinate
activities and to inform the
students of all of what is going on
including both when and where.
Perhaps a one page bulletin would
be more pertinent than adds
spread through The Ubyssey.
Another job is to coordinate
student demands with the other
universities as a unified pressure
group on the government and
business for more money in grants
and scholarships and for the
creation of more student
employment. The AMS is also
responsible for cultural activities
and exchanges. It has managed to
hold its own in this area, however
it has failed to keep the students
posted about what it is doing in
the previous area. In conclusion,
the AMS is relevant today,
perhaps more so than before,
however the students should
know what it is doing and where
its money really goes. A fairly
detailed and regular financial
statement (monthly or quarterly)
posted in various buildings on
campus and an information sheet
informing students of what is
going on in an organized fashion
would be appreciated by myself
and probably many others. In
other words-What are you doing
AMS? How are you spending our
money AMS? What activities and
entertainments are available for us
AMS? How can we appreciate
what you are doing for us AMS if
we don't know what you are
doing? Therefore INFORM US!!
K. Burgar
arts 3
Explanation
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A number of students have
expressed to me some
bewilderment as to my stand and
that of student council on the
Feb. 4 referendum due to the last
paragraph of Jim Davie's article
about the Jan. 26 Council
meeting.
To set the record straight:
Valair moved, I seconded that a
referendum be put to the students
with the wording as reported in
the Ubyssey. I also asked the chair
to record the vote as unanimous
to put forth the referendum. I
then moved that the council go on
record as opposed to the notion
of a voluntary union, not as
"opposing the referendum" as was
reported. The vote on this motion
was 15 to 1.
Art Smolensky
president
grad student association
Q.C. again
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I refer to your edition of Jan.
23rd I have no desire to prolong
our correspondence but I thnk
you will wish to correct your
statement at Page 5:
"It is our understanding that
McK. Brown acted as counsel for
the e Bureau during the
commission on auto insurance,
which was the crucial period".
I enclose herewith a photostat
of Volume 2, Page 748, which is
Appendix D to the Report of the
Commissioners, wherein you will
see that Mr. R. F. Wilson, Q.C,
was counsel for the Insurance
Bureau of Canada and called a
number of witnesses. I also
enclose a photostat of Page 746
wherein you will see I was counsel
for All Canada Insurance
Federation and called a number of
witnesses. The All Canada
Insurance Federation does not
have any actuarial staff and is not
concerned in the rate making
process, and I have received no
communications from them with
respect to the recent amendments
to the Insurance Act.
There are a number of copies
of the Report of the
Commissioners at UBC and a
telephone call to Dr. Lusztig, one
of the Commissioners, would have
put the matter straight.
DOUGLAS McK. BROWN
Our information was obtained
through a phone call to the
Insurance Bureau of Canada office
in Vancouver. We regret any
innaccuracy, though we fail to
understand why they would give
us incorrect information.-Ed.
The Ubyssey wants
photographers! If you
can take pictures, and
want a life of cheap
thrills, sex and other
assorted goodies, not to||
mention a darkroom toy
muck around in, drop in
at The Ubyssey office,
2nd floor, SUB. Friday, January 30,  1970
Residence
THE      UBYSSE
inhabitants
y
reply
to
Page 5
Davies
Fingered
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Will the real Jim Davies please
stand up? Yeah, that one over
there with both feet in his mouth.
I would like to award him the
"Flying Fickle Finger" for the
year, in recognition of his latest
piece of one-sided reporting,
namely the article on Life in
Residences (Jan. 27).
I suggest, Mr. Davies, that you
travel a little farther afield in
collecting the opinions (other
than those of the eight students
you were able to quote by name)
„ of people living in the three
residences. (Yes, three, if you
count we 700 Great Unwashed at
Fort Camp.) You might also have
polled some of the former Acadia
Camp residents up at the Barn on
Saturday night, all in the throes of
a nostalgic reunion. Yes, Virginia,
most of the females (virginal or
not) were stoned.
Apart from those
overwhelming inconveniences,
such as only 13A hours to eat
supper, having to pay (my God)
$1.59 per day for three meals and
having the visiting (in rooms)
hours of only 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.,
there is something going on down
here in residence that is ultimately
more valuable to a student's
university education than all the
credit courses on campus.
It has something to do with
"meaningful inter-human
relationships" (you have a truly
bitter laugh, Mr. Davies) and it's
" what makes Fort Camp residence,
at any rate, far more than merely
a collectivity of "people with no
place else to go."
Granted, students at UBC have
other doors open to them that
would provide more privacy at
less cost, with a menu suited to
their individual tastes, but in
having to contend with the varied
interests and preferences of
several thousand students
presently living in residence, the
housing administration has, I feel,
done a far better job than that
with which you accredited it (may
I be patted on the head until it's
worn flat).
Take   a   little   wander   down
'here, Mr. Reporter, and bring
your unhappy friends with you.
There are plenty of people who
would be happy to show you
what the other side of "the dullest
form of life on campus" is like.
EJ BAILEY
recreation 4
Girls gripe
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We, certain of the female
residents of Place Vanier, feel that
the article created gross
misconceptions of residence life
and specifically of the women
residents. Since "one student in
every eight lives in an on-campus
residence" how is it possible for
the writer to insinuate such broad
generalizations from the opinions
,of so few quoted individuals?
Although some of the complaints
are valid, such as the expense and
lack of privacy, residence life
must be reasonably enjoyable to
the majority or else the thousands
involved would move out.
Nobody is forced to live there.
Regarding in particular the
following quotation: "Girls that
live in residence are the ones that
brag if they get a kiss on the first
date. They are all virgins in the
Ann Landers tradition. They
don't drink, don't smoke pot and
are usually homely," all we can
say is this girl is understandably
justified in not wishing to be
identified as she must be an
extremely frustrated female
misfit. As to the good night kiss
on the first date, our
conversations usually don't dwell
on such trivial thrills. By the way,
we have a vague notion what a
virgin is but what in hell is the
Ann Landers tradition? And
although we are not confirmed
alcoholics we are sure we can keep
up with the best of the
off-campus crowd. Regarding pot,
this is purely an individual thing;
residence, just as anywhere else,
has people who smoke it, and
people who don't. In reference to
our apparent homeliness, there are
very few people who are homely,
anywhere, and those that are have
certainly not congregated in UBC
residences.
The article concludes by saying
"residence is just a place to live,
you can't expect pleasant
company and a nice
atmosphere."Pleasant company
abounds, in fact often to the
point where studies may lack, and
the atmosphere in only what you
make it.
JOANNE
PAT
LINDY
SUSAN
INA
DOT
ROSITA
VICKI
Place Vanier
Bias buries
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to the article of
Jan. 27, 1970, "Gripes: food,
noise, money privacy", we would
like to point out that a few
pertinent facts concerning the
reality of residence life have been
buried beneath the author's
obviously biased presentation.
Firstly, Food Services are
allotted 81c per person per day
for actual food costs. From this
we get three hot meals a day.
Living on your own, could you do
this? In addition, the food is
varied and there are always at
least two choices at each meal.
Bag lunches, dinners, late dinners,
weekend packs, and sick trays are
easy to get if the simple effort of
ordering is made.
Councils are elected by the
students, representation is, ample
and constant connections are
maintained by councils with
Housing Services. Both facilites
are open to and welcome
suggestion and have in the last few
years removed many of the very
chaste restrictions such as no
visitation hours and limited late
leaves.
Please note that above all,
Housing Services must contend
with a body of close to 3,000
students, a situation which
understandably requires
regulation. Rules are held to a
minimum and students are in
charge of all discipline. Housing
Services have adopted the attitude
that residences are for the
students and have made all efforts
to promote this feeling.
Finally, we would like to point
out that 120 of a total of 3,000
students is certainly a meagre
portion   of students leaving the
UBC residences - 96 per cent still.
prefer to stay.
WENDY NICHOLSON
vice-president,
Fort Camp Women's Council
P.S.
Why was Fort Camp omitted
from the survey — afraid of a
Residence that should gripe that
won't?
Cheap food
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In reference to the article in
the Jan. 27 Ubyssey in which
Ruth Blair was quoted as saying,
"Do you know that grilled cheese
sandwiches are the most popular
thing on the residence menu?"
She seems overjoyed that the
residents have such humble
backgrounds that they prefer
simple sustenance to the more
expensive gourmet delights served
in residence.
It seems that the lass has a
rather inadequate background in
economics. Perhaps if she were
given the choice between a 20
cent cheese sandwich and a 20
cent steak dinner, she would see
without study why we prefer her
cheese sandwiches. The fact that
cheese sandwiches are a favorite is
more indicative of poor quality
food than cheap taste on the part
of the students.
But we are certainly not in
despair. We share Miss Blair's
pride in having the chapest food
in Canada. It is great sport to
poke holes in the "Chicken
Tahitian" and watch the water
spurt out. We also take pride in
the fact that our salmon patties
are made from whole ground
salmon. Above all it is
strengthening to know that Ruth
Blair understands the feelings of
the residents in this matter.
Yours with a belch,
D. LITTLEJOHN
Equal returns
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We non-drinking,
non-pot-smoking, homely
virgins-in-the-Ann
Landers-tradition almost dropped
our cotton-knit bloomers when
we read Jim Davies' article on
residence life. Things just aren't
what they used to be — a few of
us old-timers still remember such
atrocities as limited late-leaves for
first-and-second-year girls (two
four-o'clocks per year, for
instance), and open house from 1
to 5 every second Sunday,
provided you were lucky and
Housing approved your request
for this privilege.
As we snaggle-toothed
harridans realize, the residence
situation is not ideal, but not all
of the faults can be imputed to
Housing Administration. Is noise,
for example, a necessary evil of
the residence system, or does it
stem from certain individuals,
totally devoid of self-disciplirie,
who keep the whole building
awake all night in the name of
Personal Freedom and
Self-Expression? And why is it
that the noisiest people often
make the most complaints about
restrictions? ("I paid my $850
and I'll make all the noice I
want.. .") Your council wastes
its time planning irrelevant
entertainment to vary the
academic routine, instead of
stimulating Meaningful Thought?
. How dare they! You want to rock
the council boat, but none of the
other kids want to play?—gee,
that's too bad, little fella. Of
course, you can't turn around and
play their way; that would be
compromise, and compromise is a
Dirty Word.
Utopia it ain't. Even ugly
virgins are frustrated by rising
costs, lack of privacy, particularly
in double rooms, and food that is
hardly ambrosial (it ranges from
good to godawful, Miss Blair, but
it's not exactly excellent.) But,
believe it if you will, there are a
few strange characters like us who
actually enjoy residence. You've
seen the type: the walking cliche
who believes that you only get as
much out of residence life as
you're willing to put into it. Did
you talk to any of these people,
Jim?
Yours with humble respect and
homely purity.
PAT BIGELOW
DIANNE BARNES
Mary Bollert Hall
Poor show
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
First, in response to the quotes
that appeared in the article it
seems that some people have
forgotten that you only get as
much out of something as you put
in. Waterman was right when he
said that you can't expect
pleasant company and a nice
atmosphere. If you approach a
situation with preconceived ideas
of what it should give you, you're
taking a lot for granted. Without
making allowances for the human
factor in residence, and expecting
the "groovy" "cool" or "with-it"
group to be there for you 24
hours a day, the dumb frosh and
the dumb whoever-else-thinks-the-
at-way) are in for a rude shock.
Residence is a background
against which the individual may
do what he can with his own
potential and abilities. And if he's
enjoying it, so much the better!
Secondly, I think that if this
article was supposed to be a
cross-section of residents'
opinions it was a pretty poor
show.
CAROL FIELDHOUSE
science 1
Davies   reply
I stand accused of writing a
one-sided, biased article
concerning residence in the last
issue of The Ubyssey. I plead "not
guilty".
First, I did not merely speak to
those eight or so students quoted
in the article. I spoke to between
fifty and a hundred resident
students (closer to the latter) and
I presented a representative
picture of the replies. I did not
speak to the students in a
structured interview style, but
rather, I engaged them in
conversations which generally
concerned their likes and dislikes
of residence life.
I spoke to housing head Les
Rohringer, food services head
Ruth Blair, and residence advisor
Ken Hutton. I presented these
persons' positions on the
criticisms given by students of
residence life.
Granted I did not name all of
the single residences together with
their exact population figures,
although these facts are
doubtlessly interesting. However,
the article was not concerned with
building names and statistics, but
rather with the "quality" of life in
residence.
I guess it is a fact of life that
nobody says anything nice about
residence life when asked and
does nothing to improve its
quality unless goaded. It seems-
that this article has acted as a
catalyst for, at least, a
conciousness that maybe all in
residence is not "peaches and
cream".
I am pleased that people have
written The Ubyssey and have
approached me saying residence
does have its good points. I agree.
But for God's sake do not ignore
all those people that have
legitimate gripes, passing them off
as "shit disturbers". Do something
about their complaints. Speak to
one another, discussing what is
wrong, suggesting ways of
improving the situation.
I do not regret writing the
article. It has gotten some people
off their asses.
-JIM DAVIES
ARE YOU . . .
RADICAL
REACTIONARY
A WORKER OF THE WORLD
A WASP
P.O.'d
SLATE II. ELECTIONS ARE HERE!
Nominations open  Feb. 4
Nominations close  noon  Feb.   12
ELECTION   FEB.    18
1. Vice-President
2. Treasurer
3. External Affairs
4. Internal Affairs Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1970
MORE LETTERS
Sandboxes
"Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am amazed that The Ubyssey. should be
content with so superficial an appraisal of the
Vancouver left as was offered in Mr. Andersen's
article. What is presented as analysis is in fact
nothing more than a shopping list, with no attempt
being made to evaluate the goals and tactics of the
groups he identified. As a result he has compounded
the confusion he set out to unravel, and in the
process arrived at an overall conclusion I am certain
is too optimistic.
For one thing, Mr. Andersen assumes that the
proliferation of ideologically-oriented groupescules-
somehow indicates that the Left is "building
strength". On the contrary, the Left has never been
successful except when it has been able to mobilize
a large coalition of social forces against the status
quo, and this it can only achieve by identifying
itself with vital and tangible human needs. Verbal
hairsplitting about the "correct line" leads precisely
nowhere. It is perhaps germane to point out that the
rise of the SDS to a dominant position in the
Movement was due in no small part to its pragmatic
flexibility, and its virtual demise seems assured now
that it has reverted to the game of ideological
factionalism. Chairman Mao said it better than I
can: "Your dogmas are less useful than shit. Shit at
least can fertilize a field. But dogmas?"
Moreover, I think it is about time we stopped
labelling as "revolutionary" and "progressive"
Orwellian microsects like the VSM. While it is
useless to speculate whether such groups are in fact
agents provocateurs, I could think of few easier
ways to destroy the Movement than by financing
these left-wing Jehovah's Witnesses. I cannot count
the number of progressive students alienated by
their pseudoleft rosaries, to say nothing of their
Hell's Angels parody of revolutionary tactics. Worse,
their caricature of radical belief and action is a
heaven-sent gift to those who seek to tighten the
noose around movements advocating meaningful
social change.
To put it bluntly, unless we can return to the
libertarian,  open-minded  modes   of thought and
Davies
action that originally inspired the New Left, the
Amchitka demonstration will set the pattern for
future events. That is, real pressure for radical
change will bypass organized leftwing groups and
will as a consequence lack the leadership and
continuity to achieve anything important. As long
as groups on the left are more concerned with
excluding than including, with purity rather than
creative thought about how best to achieve their
goals, they cannot possibly provide this leadership,
let alone constitute a "vanguard". No one has ever
created any sort of revolution playing a rhetorical
sandbox.
MICHAEL D. WALLACE
asst. prof
political science
First, the article was intended to be a general
survey of the Vancouver left, not a PhD thesis.
Secondly, from nothing I wrote in the article
could you draw the conclusion that most of these
groups are dogmatic. Simply because they have
great differences in political theories does not mean
they are dogmatic. On the contrary, many groups
are continually expanding their political
consciousness through combined actions with
others.
If you would read the article more carefully,
you would note that at least two of the groups
mentioned are attempting to "mobilize a large
coalition of social forces against the status quo".
Also, you surely don't think all these groups
will be on the scene in a few years' time. That seems
to me to be the strength of the left. Those groups
that most accurately reflect what people want will
continue to grow. Others will simply stagnate in
their own sectarianism.
Thirdly, I don't know who the "we" is that
labels the Vancouver Student Movement
"revolutionary" and "progressive". I personally
think they're the biggest collection of assholes this
side of Mark Rudd's Weathermen.
The reason they were included in the article is
that a great many people think they are
representative of what the left is really like. I hoped
instead to show they were a perversion of the left,
not the general rule.—J. A.
Ravies
Mardi Gras brings frat frolics
DAVIES RAVIES
The scene: one of the
sprawling ranch-style houses on
frat row.
The time: Mardi Gras week.
The characters: Lance Sterling,
fraternity president, all-around
great guy, and Leroy Hockey,
squeaky-clean frat pledge.
Leroy: Geez Lance, when ami
going to find out about all them
neat initiation rites?
Lance: I presume that you are
referring to the sacred and
traditional entry into our fraternal
organization.
Greek Chorus:
The traditional rites are
performed on the grass,
Each of the pledges gets
a boot in the ass,
And later that night when
they are in bed,
We ship them out naked
candy apple red.
Leroy: Wow, that's heavy.
After that do I pay my
membership fees?
Lance; Yes, shortly afterward,
you may pay your initiation dues.
Greek Chorus:
Please don't give us any jive
Just kick out with the one
twenty-five.
Leroy: Gosh, what then,
Lance?
Lance: Man, then you'll have a
barrel of laughs.
Greek Chorus:
Yes, my son you will
have a grand larf
If a good time is
watching clowns barf.
Davies (left) getting his jollies.
Leroy: What about the
fraternity stunts I have heard so
much about?
Lance: These things of which
you speak are perhaps the most
sophisticated games ever
performed.
Greek Chorus:
It is neat and discreet
To bare your seat in the
street
But when cold it is no
treat
For without the heat it
resembles a beet.
Leroy: Wow, neato, neato! Tell
me about Mardi Gras.
Lance: It is a time at which we
sacrifice ourselves to do good.
Greek Chorus:
6nns photo
Grab a girl and call
her Mabel
Take her down to the
pingpong table
Grab your mallet, she'll
grab a ball
Then together you'll
climb the wall.
Leeroy: Gee Lance, you really
know where it's at.
Lance: That's what frats are all
about, Leroy.
Greek Chorus:
Good and Great is a
fraternity
Like maple syrup and
maternity
Get your folks some
money to lend
So you too, Leroy,
may buy a friend.
koH-l'Noon
RESTAURANT
SUPERB
INDIAN
CURRIES
& CUISINE
TUES - SAT FROM 6:00 P.M.
aXju&A
%
• EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway     736-778S
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
796 MAIN STREET
688-5236
LISA'S FLORIST
6570 VICTORIA DRIVE
Flowers For
All Occasions
Student Discounts 15%
FREE DELIVERY
Bus. 321-1411
Res. 434-1423
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry  Brown lee,  Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
San Francisco
Weekend for
YOU& A FRIEND
FREE!
For Details — See Page 10
WE LOVE LONG HAIR
Upper Tenth Barber
HAIRSTYLING FOR MEN
FOR APPOINTMENT TELEPHONE 224-6622
4574 W. 10th AVE.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS-
THE
POPPY
FAMILY
IN CONCERT !
SUB BALLROOM
THURSDAY.. FEB. 5
- 8 P.M. -
Advance Tickets Now On Sale
at AMS Business Office
Students $1.7S — Non-Students $3.00
Get Yours Early to Avoid Disappointment Friday, January 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
How the money goes
The Ubyssey prints this diagram as an aid to students voting in Wednesday's
referendum on the question of a voluntary AMS and in response to letters
from readers.
SCHEDULE 1
Non-Discretionary allocations % total budget
Student Union Buildings  58.6
Accident Benefit Fund  .3
SUB Art Fund   .3
SUB Management Fund  2.0
Undergrad Fees Levies   2.0
B.C. Union of Students   1.7
All monies in this category are allocated according to the constitution
and as a result cannot be changed or altered.
SCHEDULE 2
Discretionary allocations % total budget
Students' Associations and Undergrad Societies   27.0
Radio Society  .2
World University Service Committee   .4
Intramural Fund  2.0
Open House  .5
SCHEDULE 3
Service Functions % total budget
Campus activities and events
—AAC, External affairs, CUSO, Conferences, Debating
union, Frosh orientation and retreat, Higher Education
promotion, high school visitations, Homecoming, Trek
Week, Performing Arts, Speakers, Special Events and
Housing Action   6.0
Publications
—Bird Calls, Tuum est, Ubyssey   4.0
Registration Photographs  1.0
University Clubs Committee  1.0
Administration and General Expense          13.0
SCHEDULE 4
% total budget
Margin
—covers  all  subsidiary grants  to  undergrad, societies,
clubs, committees, publications and special projects  5.0
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY- 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
10042  King George  Hwy. — 588-2727
2052  Kingsway — 874-3622
CLARKE
SIMPKINS
USED
CARS
■67  TRIUMPH $1AQC
SPITFIRE,   convertible     *I47J
'67   TOYOTA $1405
CORONA,   automatic KI47J
'67   AUSTIN   A-60 $19QC
Sedan,   A   speed f*/3
'67    DATSUN    PICK-UP   tlOQC
w/camper   type   box   ....     *lv/J
'65   MGB   Convertible $1401
Good   condition   ....  .... I 4 / J
'64   AUSTIN   A-60 $AOC
Sedan,  A   speed     "^073
'64    VAUXHALL   VIVA $AQC
Sedan,   good   runner  —       "^iTJ
'61   VOLKSWAGEN $OnE
Sedan      *3y3
CLARKE
SIMPKINS
736-4282
BURRARD at 7th AVE.
A THINKING
MAN'S MESSAGE
about Diamonds
Puzzled by the wide variety
in diamond pricing? Confused by "discount" promises
in mail-order ads and catalogs? Then you need someone you can trust to give you
factual information about
what to look for in a diamond. As a member firm of
the American Gem Society,
we have such a diamond specialist on our staff. He will be
happy to properly and ethically advise you on the subtle
differences in diamond quality that affect the price you
pay. Come in and see us.
Registered Jeweller
North American
Gem Society
&.&aefaH
Granville at Pender
Since 1904 Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Fee
increase
at UPEI
•   • ■•
initiates
• ■   •
sit-in
'Serve
the
community'
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP) Prince Edward Island education
minister Gordon Bennett brandished the threat of police action over
the heads of 300 university students Tuesday, forcing them to
discontinue a sit-in provoked by fee increases and substandard
education at the University of Prince Edward Island.
After a march through downtown Charlottetown, the students
filled the corridors of two floors of the provincial government's
administration building for two hours, also occupying Bennett's
office and the outer chambers of PEI premier Alex Campbell.
The students were demanding higher operating grants for
UPEI, guarantees that students would not be forced to pay for
further increases in university expenses through tuition fee raises,
and the institution of a grant scheme for student aid in the province.
The students also asked that premier Campbell live up to
promises made in a government white paper issued April, 1968, in
which Campbell said the province "would have a university
comparable to national standards."
An advance group which occupied education minister
Bennett's office were given no responses to their demands for
government action.
After two hours of discussion, Bennett called in eight members
of the RCMP and local police force, and told students they would be
liable to charges of obstructing a police officer, obstructing private
property and obstruction of justice if they did not leave.
Eventually the students filed out of the building, after
convincing a small number not to face arrest by staying.
Tuesday's protest climaxed two weeks of unrest at the
one-year-old UPEI campus, which began Jan. 15 when students
discovered via a local television program that their board of
governors had secretly approved a $100 residence increase for next
year.
The board decision was made October 27, 1969: both
administration president R. J. Baker and a single union
representative on the board justified their silence by saying "the
students would find out about it anyway."
The increase would raise tuition to $550 per student; and
residence fees to $775 per student. A poll conducted by the UPEI
student council revealed that 68 per cent of those interviewed would
find it "very difficult" to return to university if the increases were
implemented. One-quarter of the campus was sampled in the poll.
The average summer earnings of students polled by the council
was $718.
Currently, students at UPEQ are eligible for up to $1000 in
loan-only financial assistance from the provincial government.
Students had originally proposed that the system should be
supplemented by the institution of a $200 grant after the first $200
in loans.
A government counter-proposal would "match" student loans
over a minimum of $600 with equivalent grants: the scheme would
allow students a maximum grant of $400 on financial assistance
totalling $1,400. Students oppose the scheme as they would have to
go $ 1000 into debt to get a $400 grant.
Monday, 250 students watched as the UPEI board refused to
rescind the fee increases . According to administration president
Baker, the board could not go directly to the provincial government
without "usurping the authority" of the PEI government's
post-secondary education commission.
At a meeting January 19 between Bennett, Campbell and 400
university students, the provincial premier said the government was
not "in a financial position or a bureaucratic position" to guarantee
the implementation of a grant system for students in the province.
But, Campbell added, he was "optimistic" that the system
might be in effect for the 1970-71 academic year.
The University of Prince Edward Island, less than a year old, is
an amalgamation of St. Dunstan's University and Prince of Wales
College, which the government implemented to raise educational
standards in the province.
In the government white paper which announced the creation
of the new university, Campbell promised the institution 18 million
dollars in student aid and 69 million dollars for operating costs
during a ten-year period ending in 1978.
So far, neither program has been implemented.
WATERLOO (CUP) - After a two-day student occupation,
faculty at the University of Waterloo appear to have successfully
defended their administration-financed club against an attempt to
turn it into a community centre.
Approximately 40 students took over the just-opened building
Jan. 23-24 to demand it be turned over to the community which
paid for it.
The building was constructed on land donated by the
university and financed with a $100,000 administration grant and
additional grants for operating costs.
Faculty club members plan to pay off the building's mortgage
from club dues.
The student action followed publication of a special
community edition of the Chevron, Waterloo's student newspaper,
which invited the public to the opening of a "community centre."
The issue gave no indication of the Waterloo administration's plans
for the building.
Campus police turned away residents of the Kitchener and
Waterloo communities who came to view the building, but allowed
occupying students to set up a temporary day care centre, show
films, and serve refreshments.
The students finally left the building to the faculty Saturday
evening, but announced plans for creation of another campus day
centre, and the beginning of a program to focus campus attention on
community needs.
Friday, January 30,  197C
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive   Prices
Genuine Volkswagen   Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body  Repairs and  Painting
225 E. 2nd Are.
879-0491
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
For Details - See Page 10
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
■:   ^E1   *''"^'w*'rf!%tf^_.
... For Glasses
,    for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlesciibtioH. Optical
€70
j                        ([dispensing ]1
~                                       OPTICIANS
%5x
|             Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
4000
Bleeding Hearts
Needed
The Red Cross Needs Your Blood
UBC CLINIC — Room 111, SUB
JAN. 26 - FEB. 6 — 9:30 - 4:30
Do Your Part — Make a Date Today
milks
JANUARY CLEARANCE
LAST    FEW    DAYS
20% to 50% off
• DIAMONDS
• WATCHES
• FASHION JEWELRY
• CHARMS
• PEARLS
• CHINA and GIFTWARES
Downtown Vancouver
• 655 GRANVILLE ST.
• 47 W. HASTINGS ST. 682-3801
Downtown New Westminster
• 622 COLUMBIA  ST. 526-3771
Hlillcrs
Vancouver Stores open Fridays until nine, New Westminster Store open
Thurs. & Fridays until nine. Friday, January 30, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
PERFECT
Ready-
made
and
made-to-
measure
* Slacks
OF ALL KINDS
• SKI &
CURLING
PANTS
• PANT
SUITS
* SKI OUTFITS
SKIRTS   MADE  TO  MEASURE
Pantalones
654 Seymour Tel. 681-8621
Opposite 'The Bay'
Mon. to Sot.
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Russ Thornberry, formerly of the New Christy
Minstrels and Pozo Seco
Singers, entertains fans
in SUB ballroom Thursday noon.
—dave enns photo
Safeway officials
wont communicate
By GINNY GALT
Grape boycott organizers and a delegation of consumers and
public figures were disappointed Wednesday in their attempt to
speak with Safeway regional director W. J. Kraft.
The delegation, which included British Columbia United Farm
Workers' representative Pamela Smith, Vancouver alderman Harry
Rankin, Canadian Labor Congress rep. Gordon Wilkinson and B.C.
Federation of Labor rep. Collin Gableman was told at Safeway
headquarters at 840 Cambie that Kraft will be away indefinitely
because of illness in the family.
Kraft was originally told in a telegram from Smith that she and
a delegation of public figures were requesting a meeting with him
any time between January 26 and 30.
"Our plan was to try to speak to Safeway and to tell them that
we are circulating petitions. We're trying to tell them why, but they
just won't communicate," said Smith.
She believes if Safeway and its subsidiaries would stop selling
grapes, California grape growers would be forced to negotiate with
the farm workers and the strike would end.
"Safeway and its subsidiaries are the last major supermarket
chain providing a market for grapes. The boycott now depends on
whether or not Safeway will stop selling them. If they stop, it will
' mean victory for us," said Smith.
She said Kraft left no one in charge who would talk to the
boycott organizers, but she left a message stating that they will be at
his office next week at the same time.
Social  action
The cluttered field of social action has another participant.
SOS is the name of a four year old volunteer action group
dedicated to social change.
"SOS doesn't initiate any action but is invited to
participate by organizations already involved in a social problem,"
said staff member Harvey Stevens.
In 1967 SOS was called upon by a group of West
Vancouver citizens to do research into the teenage riot that
caused considerable damage to a Park Royal shopping center on
Halloween.
"Our researchers recommended a youth center and a
permanent position for a person to work with teenagers," said
Stevens.
Both were implemented.
"This summer we will be working with the Active
Committee for Unemployed Students and the Unemployed
Citizens Welfare Council," said Stevens.
"SOS volunteers would do any task for these organizations
from research work to active participation in public
demonstrations," he said.
SOS volunteers are mainly university and high school
students who are expected to link up with social action groups in
their communities after completing their summer projects.
Anyone wishing information can contact Sue Creelman at
521-8021.
CO     CD
-a
c
L.
NP
C/5
■  ■
CO
ro
z
o
t
\
Worry Beads:
\
HOME CALLS THEM
Anti-Up-Tight Baubles!
For Details - See Page 10
ANGLICAN ■ UNITED CHURCH
CHAPLAINCY MEETING
Discussion of New Joint Chaplaincy
All  Interested Students  and  Faculty
Fri., Jan. 30 — 12:30 - 1:30 - SUB 215
Sat., Jan. 31 — 1:30 - 5:00
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTRE Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30,   1970
'Voluntary union would be disadvantage1
The fallowing is a statement of
opinion. It does not represent the
position of The Ubyssey.
By DELL VALAIR
Students on this campus will be faced
on Wednesday with what is probably the
most crucial referendum ever held here.
The future of student government at
UBC will rest on the outcome.
The referendum asks whether you are
in favor of a voluntary membership in the
Alma Mater Society.
The idea of a voluntary union has been
seriously tossed around for about a year
now. I was one who was originally
attracted by the idea.
But I believe now that if the voluntary
union comes in, it will work to the
disadvantage of all students.
This referendum must be defeated.
It is quite clear that if fees become
voluntary, only a relatively small number
of students will join. Not only would the
finances of such a union be very limited,
but it could not effectively bargain with
the administration or represent itself to
the outside as the voice of the students.
Everyone would know damn well it
claimed only a fraction of the campus as
its membership.
Such a small union will be prone to
take-over by any group welded by a
common philosophy and with enough
single-minded purposeness to take it over.
We have seen recently how easy it was
for one dogmatic political sect to capture
an AMS committee and use it as a
platform for propaganda.
It doesn't take much imagination to
see how easy it would be to gain control
of a small voluntary union, squeeze out
the opposition, and then use the union to
promote one political line, in the name of
the whole student body.
Students on this campus would have
no means ot removing executive members
of a voluntary union, yet this executive
would be claiming to speak for the
students of UBC.
You can't recall officers of a voluntary
union if the bulk of the campus doesn't
belong to it.
And what is going to prevent rival
voluntary unions from setting themselves
up, competing for membership and fees,
each claiming to be the legitimate voice
of UBC students?
The result will be total confusion. No
students will benefit and no one in the
community will listen to any of the
groups.
Where is the money going to come
from to run student services, and who is
going to do the work? The answer is
simple. There won't be enough money
and the services will go down the drain.
If there isn't a student government to
perform the services that students want,
this campus is going to become the most
insufferable hell-hole  in North America.
No clubs, no dances, no special events.
no entertainment, no political action, no
power in numbers as a student interest
group of thousands.
What may happen is that the
administration will try to take over some
of the things that we now do for
ourselves.
Back to the good old days of
university paternalism. Take it or leave it
kid.
The choice is between a responsible
student government with a membership
of the entire student body, and a
voluntary union, small in size, claiming to
represent everyone and responsible to
only a fraction.
If this referendum is passed, it will be
a Great Leap Backward on this campus.
Vote NO.
Rights  commission  slow to  investigate  discrimination
HAMILTON (CUP)-The student council at McMaster
University Jan. 21 agreed to prod the Ontario Human
Rights Commission into issuing a three-month-overdue
report into the case of political scientist George Haggar.
Haggar laid charges with the commission last
September against five Ontario universities, charging that
they refused to hire him because of his pro-Arab,
pro-socialist beliefs.
The commission promised to issue a report of
Haggar's charges by October 1969; so far, no report has
been released.
"It is important that the commission make known its
findings in this case," arts representative Jack Monteith
told the McMaster council. 'The McMaster students' union
should express its desire to see justice done."
The  council  will present a petition to the human
McMaster
fights
stalling
rights commission, asking the body if it has come to any
decision over Haggar's charges.
Haggar said Waterloo Lutheran University, Lakehead
University, York University, Seneca College of Applied
Arts and Technology, and King's College (an affiliate of
the   University   of  Western   Ontario)  all  refused  him
employment because of his political beliefs.
All the universities have denied the charges.
Haggar taught at Lutheran from 1965 to 1967, when
his contract was not renewed because, according to
then-acting administration president Henry Endress:
"Through numerous channels, you have made it very clear
that you are not happy with the philosophy, operation
and personnel (at Lutheran.)"
In January, 1968, the Canadian Association of
University Teachers investigated the case, and found that
Lutheran had acted legally in terminating Haggar's
contract because it contained a clause forbidding teachers
"to attack or in any way disparage the Christian religion."
Since his release from Lutheran, Haggar said he
applied to over 50 North American colleges and
universities, but has "not even been granted an interview."
Win a Week-End
for two in
San Francisco
6 trips for two will be won by UBC students
between January 30th and March 13th.
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for 2 days for winner
and friend.
PLUS EXCITING EXTRA PRIZES
EVERY WEEK: Dinner for two at
Hy's Steak House — Canucks Hockey tickets
for two — Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
Evening for two at the Daisy — Dinner for two
at the Grouse Nest.
Easy to enter! Fill in coupon and get your special Home    Credit Card
We'll mail your special Credit Card to you as soon
as we get the coupon. Every time you use your
Home Credit Card at any of the 298 Home Stations
you are automatically entered in the contest. The
more often you use it the more often you enter.
And the better your chances to win
GET YOUR   FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
We'll mail you your Worry Beads as soon as we
get your coupon, along with full contest details,
your special Home Credit Card and fascinating
Worry   Bead   story.
ft If you now hove a  regular Home Credit  Card  phone our  Credit  Dept., 685-9131   — we will  make
arrangements to make it eligible.
TO: Home Oil Distributors Ltd., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Complete this application form (please print) and  mail  it to Home Oil. We'I
Credit Card to you, plus your FREE Worry Beads!
rush your special
SURNAME
Christian Names
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
WORRY BEADS ARE BIG ON CAMPUS.
Fourteen wooden  beads on  a
leather thong  .  .   .  anti-uptight
baubles  to  get you  through daily
disasters. And they're yours free
when you apply for
UBC Home Credit Card.
HOME
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS, if different from above. (Street No., Town, etc.]
REGISTRATION No.
Faculty Year
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400   ONE   BENTALL CENTRE,   505   BURRARD   STREET,   VANCOUVER   1.   B.C.
©  Jxi&jt (Day!
GALLIMAUFRY
THEATRE
BALLROOM 12:30
Admission 50c
SPECIAL EVENTS
CONTEMPORARY ARTS
VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
@>
A Complete Automotive Service
Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANCA - 224-7424
U.B.C GATE BARBERS
if INTERNATIONALLY TRAINED HAIRSTYLISTS
if UP-TO-DATE TECHNIQUES WITH CRAFTSMANSHIP
if ARNOLD  EPP-CORRECTIONAL  HAIR  CUTTING
if ZAIDA MERIO-LADY BARBER AND STYLISTS
Special Prices for Students and Faculty
4605 West 10th Avenue 228-9354
Bagdad - by - the Bay
San Francisco
home Could send you there
■"■■ For a FREE Weekend!
(There are Six)
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS — SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For Full Information & Dates. Etc., Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162
when dada was
By EF. TEE. AR. KOZZY
Confusion dominated the activities of
dadaism from the time it was founded in the
spring of 1916 in Zurich until its decay about
1922. Dada was founded by Hugo Ball, Tristan
Tzara, Hans Arp, Marcel Janco and Richard
Huelsenbeck at the Cabaret Voltaire, a little
bar where Hugo Bali and his tnend bmmy
Hennings had set up a miniature variety show.
Even today, however, a peculiarly dadaist
uncertainty has persisted regarding the origin of
the word "dada" which is termed an "infantile
sound" by the concise Oxford Dictionary. Was
it Tristan Tzara all by himself, or he together
with Huelsenbeck, who "discovered" the word
in a French-German dictionary and made it
serve as a name for the new movement — or was
it Ball, Arp, Huelsenbeck, Janco and Tzara all
together? What ever the answer, important or
not, it is symptomatic of the almost consistent
unreliability of all that Dadaists have said about
their movement.
The instantaneous success of the name
Dada reflected the fact that the attitudes and
activities it identified had been in the air for
some years. It arose in a number of cities in
Europe, and in New York, in part
spontaneously and in part through the
interchange of ideas.
The spread of Dada was inseparable trom
the first World War, which seemed to confirm
the bankruptcy of nineteenth-century
bourgeois rationalism, which could be and was
used to justify the killings and mutilation of
millions. "The beginnings of Dada were not the
beginnings of art, but of disgust," recalled
Tzara. Bourgeois society might, of course,
simply destroy itself in carnage, but its end
could be hastened, the Dadaist felt, subverting
what remained of its premises.
Huelsenbeck wrote: "The energies and
ambitions of those who participated in the
Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich were from the start
purely artistic. We wanted to make the Cabaret
Voltaire a focal point of the 'newest art'
although we did not neglect from time to time
to tell the fat and utterly uncomprehending
Zurich philistines that we regarded them as pigs
and the German Kaiser as the initiator of the
war."
Although there were central cores to Dada,
the phenomenon never actually existed as a
movement, neither as an organization nor as a
tendency in art. Nor did it have any clearly
circumscribed principles. Dada groups existed,
at various times, in Zurich, Berlin, Cologne,
Hanover, Paris, New York, in Italy and in the
Netherlands between 1916 and 1923 and the
only thing they realy had in common was their
battle-cry "dada" challenging the times in
which they were living. To ask what "Dada" is
was usually stigmatized by Dadaists as
"un-Dadaistic". In a lecture on Dada in 1922,
Tristan Tzara said: I don't have to tell you that
for the general public and for you, the refined
public, a Dadaist is the equivalent of a leper. If
you ask me why I won't be able to tell you.
. . . Everybody knows that Dada is nothing. I
broke away from Dada and from myself as soon
as I understood the implications of nothing."
"A person is dada, provided he lives", or
"dada is a state of mind" were definitions often
given by Dadaists. These are better than some
others which seemed entirely nonsensical and
merely designed to shock.
However the Dadaists may have differed in
their visions of the futre, all agreed that it
would have to be built around a life that better
comprehended and accommodated the
irrational in human behahaviour. Jean Arp
wrote: "Dada wished to destroy the hoaxes of
reason and to discover an unreasoned order."
At the heart of Dada lay the "gratuitous act,"
the paradoxical, spontaneous gesture aimed at
revealing the inconsistency and inanity of
conventional beliefs. Two exemplary Dada
gestures  were   performed by Arthur Cravan,
a. UiilsL Pd&iMsi,
who punctuated a lecture at the Sail des
Societies Savantes with random pistol shots,
and Jacques Vache who attended the premiere
of Apollinaire's Mamelles de Tiresias dressed as
an English officer and disrupted the
intermission by threatening to "shoot up" the
audience. Vache's was a provocation par
excellence, as it implicitly criticized the central
advanture in which the world was then engaged.
While Dada's positive contribution varied
from centre to centre, its nihilism was held in
common. Life in the years 1915-16 had become
nearly intolerable for young artists. Reason
appeared to them to have been abandoned by
humanity and they thought that anyone who
took life seriously must perish, so they
concentrated on subverting middle-class
culture.
The detented followed the end off World
War I created a less fertile environment for
Dada and by the early twenties the movement
had dissolved. By 1924 much of what remained
viable in it had been assimilated into the more
programmatic Surrealist movement, whose
formal beginnings were marked by the
publication of its manifestro in Paris that year.
The Surrealist accepted the end of the
bourgeois world as given and were more
concerned with what would come afterward.
They would replace anarchic gestes by
constructive, collective action.
Dada had to act as a shock treatment for
crazed humanity and its mission was to have
repercussions in the arts and literature for a
long time afterwards. One of the most
celebrated results of Dadaism is pop-art. Andy
Warhol's brillo boxes and soup cans, Roy
Lichtenstein's comic-book prints and even the
antics of one Yoko Ono have their basis in
Dadaism.
Dada in the plastic arts
-DUCHAMP - started on his Dada
experiments — he called them fantasies — with
machinizing humans (Nude Descending a
Staircase) in which he tried to capture
movement in a static frame and progressed to
actual machines which were above all, useless
(Bicycle Wheel) and to Readymades which he
elevated to art by signing them, (In Advance of
a Broken Arm and Fountain).
-FRANCIS PICABIA was a friend of Duchamp
and brought a dandyish flair to Dada. Picabia
was also working out of the cubist context but
in a less sophisticated manner than Duchamp,
and his switch to a fantasist came in 1913 after
a visit to New York, where the radical Armory
show was on display. One of Picabia's most
famous Dada works is his Portrait of Cezanne.
— MAN RAY, an American painter, also
underwent the transition from formalist to
fantasist as a result of his friendship with
Duchamp. He experimented with oils and
eventually with assisted Readymades (The
Rope Dancer Accompanies Herself with Her
Shadows and Gift) - One of the favorite Dada
pastimes was packaging objects or covering
them and tying them with rope. A more recent
artist, Christo, a very enthusiastic packager,
after doing the more mundane (Package on
Wheelbarrow) also had plans for packaging
certain skyscrapers in Lower Manhattan (Lower
Manhattan Packaged Buildings (1964). - More
specifically anti-bourgeois anti-art was seen in
the collages of the Dadaists. Examples are Cut
with the Kitchen Knife (1919) by Hannah
Hoch, and Metropolis (1923) by Paul Citroen.
-MAX ERNST was to Dada and Surrealism
what Picasso was to this century's art as a
whole. No artist more completely personified
the interwar avant-garde. As well as reliefs
(Fruit of a Long Experience (1919), Ernst
made collages in which he found himself as an
artist. Collages, he said, enabled him to bring
together diverse elements of his hallucinations
(Demonstration Hydrometique a Tuer par La
Temperature (1920).
pi 2WO
The Ruebyssey
Friday, January 30, 1970 Pretentions '70
An entirely unoriginal musicollage by Michael Quigley which he
claims as his own
(Dedicated  wilh love to  his heroes,  Bobby
Goldsboro  and  Karlheinz  Siockhausen)
-it
■mm
10'
5- w tt' 20' 25" 30" 35" *0" *$' 5.0' K'
4 ;
-4
t
r
GM«>s>»l  'Lt
^1 >>
'"     V      ;. r    " 1%  ' L   •    '
\*-ifft :*C"':  I
1   S5' *5"
30" ?0' JO" ' 5"    7'     55°
INSTRUCTIONS:
Selections for the ultimate material are made from this construction. In many cases the results are
again transposed higher or lower. Here, the tone 306 Hz at 19 cm/sec tape speed was proceeded
from. All transpositions are based on the frequency numbers 16 per octave (see frequency table).
.7.7. OOO, OOO, OOO, OOO, OOO, OOO, O
IN, OUTSIDE, AND AWAY FROM THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY, THAT'S WHERE THE
PROJECTS OF 995,000, THE CURRENT VANCOUVER
ART HAPPENING, CAN BE FOUND. THAT'S DJ YOU
CAN FIND THEM.
ART GALLERY OFFICIALS AREN'T TOO SURE
themselves as yet just where Lucy Lippard,
organizer of 955,000 and the artists involved
have executed some of the pieces submitted for
this show.
For example, one of Robert Smithson's Vancouver projects was to take either fifty truck loads
of mud, or ten trucks of cement or asphalt and
dump them somewhere. This has been done but
as yet the art gallery doesn't know where, and Miss
Lippard has left town.
Similarly the exten of Daniel Buren's project
os not known. A group of seven volunteers were to
go around "sticking sheets of paper with white and
coloured vertical stripes on walls, palisades, shop-
windows, etc." This has been done on the art
gallery and the Macmillan Bloedel building, and
? Marguerit Pinney, Information Officer at the
gallery explained she's trying to track down the
other locations, and also to find out if Randolph
Sims' "Vancover Landscaping" project has taken
place. Trees are to be sprayed with a ribbon of
paint from ground level to approximately a
height of fifty feet.
However, the whereabouts of some of the other
outdoor projects are known. William Bollinger of
New York has a larg log floating in the water at the
foot of Yew Street. Ralph Ferrer of Philadelphia,
PUERTO RICO AND NEW YORK HAS HAD HIS THING DONE
AT K1TSILANO. HERE'S A PARTIAL DESCRIPTION OP HIS
PROJECT.
"AN ADEQUATE NUMBER OF LOGS SHOULD BE PROCURED . . . AND SHOULD BE PILED, STACKED, ARRANGED,
LEANED, DROPPED, PUSHED, PROPPED, ROLLED, ORDERED
OR DISORDERED. THE LOGS CAN THEN BE CUT, SIEVED,
SPLIT, SHAVED,  NAILED,  BURNED, CHARRED, SCORCHED,
pissed, watered, painted, greased sind then floated or
sunk, burned or vou may start again . . . SEEN OR
NOT SEEN." (They were'nt seen this last Sunday
anyways.)
IF YOU'RE ENTERPRISING ENOUGH, YOU CAN EARN
$1,100 AS A RESULT OF 995,000 BUT, HURRY, BECAUSE BY
FEBRUARY THE REWARD MONEY WILL BE REDUCED TO
$1,000.
DOUGLAS HUEBLER'S DURATION PIECE No. 15 CONSISTS O FOFFERING A REWARD OF $1,100 BY HUEBLER
TO THE PERSON PROVIDING THE INFORMATION LEADING
TO THE ARREST AND CONVICTION OF EDMUND KITE
McINTYRE   WANTED   BY   THE   FBI   FOR   BANK   ROBBERY.
FOR EACH MONTH THAT PASSES, THE REWARD
MONEY WILL BE REDUCED BY $100 TDLL NO
REWARD MONEY WILL EXIST AT ALL BY JANUARY I,  1971.
There's doings and happenings as well
brewing in and outside of the Ace (formerly
Douglas) Gallery. Owner Doug Christmas has
just acquired the Andy Warhohl prints of the
Kennedy assassination. However, no date as yet
has been mentioned by Ace for releasing them
for public viewing, nor the price. Wasserman
said in his coluimn last week that already the
cost of ONE print has risen to three thousand.
GLEN LEWIS' OSAKA MURAL IS BEING
SHIPPED BY ACE TO JAPAN AND CAN BE
SEE TEMPORARILY IN THE GALLERY. IT'S
A LARGE PIECE MADE OF WHITE TILES,
ONTO WHICH WHITE SALT AND PEPPER
SHAKERS HAVE BEEN ATTACHED. THE
WHILE THING IS SORT OF A DIARY OF
LEWIS' ACTIVITIES FOR THE MONTH. FOR
EACH TILE IS A DAY OF THE MONTH, AND
SOME RECORD WHAT HE DID ON THAT
CERTAIN  DAY.
Friday, Jpnaury 30,  197
970
The Quigleyssey
.,,.. .,».J >ii   ,-i 1
1
i
I
i
i
i
i
I
i
i
i
|
§
§
I
I
I
i
I
i:
I
I
8
i
i
i
dAdA poem
vuJAjUcJio/iS
To make a dadaist poem
Take a newspaper
Take a pair of scissors.
Choose an article as long as you are planning to
make your poem.
Cut out the article.
Then cut out each of the words that make up this
article and put them in a bag.
Shake it gently.
Then take out the scraps one after the other in the
order in which they left the bag.
Copy conscientiously.
The poem will be like you.
And here you are a writer, infinitely original and
endowed with a sensibility that is charming though
beyond the understanding of the vulgar.
Tristan Tzara
(This is a newspaper article: if you wish to make a Dadaist
poem, follow Tzara's advice with his very exposition
including this instruction and you will undoubtedly have a
very intrinsically valuable Dada poem as you will be using
the words of a true Dadaist.)
Ed.
I       ILLusTratED    dADa    meMG*
San Gabriel—Valley gal 29 would like
to hear from other gals and couples
interested in photo exchange. No single  men  please. 3047
City of Industry, Calif., poor married
gal 28, would like to find a sweet old
generous sugar daddy. All sincere notes
will get my attention. Calif—5059
mAniFesTi
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar, roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar, roar, roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar, roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar,roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar, roar, roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar,roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
roar roar roar roar roar roar roar
Who still considers himself very charming.
TRISTAN TZARA
our very own   pOntE
love nefarious
stop
Black lead stripper small town
Yellow an; gin and stop and woman with her face
Jank smils and smiles
THE RUNNing FIGuring wheels
braoden and intensify hole in your pubstwar
dah dah dah dah musder of the Haitian people
A Goal (ball receptable) lying downward staring
makes the world alright let me hear ya
Bearded light shines windowing lightly
which cries mountain tree
ball music sitting
i know he's planning to
insence and insect and insensitive and incest
on the phone fingure ejaculates
sneer but shaped thighs and swell breasts
oh today at noon I'm going to if he doesn't
drying cabinet and foot boot on the desk
as treeing structure wathcers.
and i think i'm going otu of my head
The tower looms onto my shoulder
toB.B.
for the love of a preacher
smoke exhaling up his nostril
i know we missed them on Sunday
Jesus Christ talks honey
and she's fantastic look let's have a little conference
this is a good begginning for a solo
He roomed into spacing colding
a little bit of tenderness
Period of changes coming hardly
down to nothing how long he said
Keep talking Jack . . .
We play jammed up
upward as the sky
OwwwwW
actually you're playing
boxroxsox knox
signs on the wall
four lines quike
expurgation is a killer
No.
AUTOMOBILING RADIDIOUSLY;
yeah i keep forgetting
Hey Cawsey
When writing
ly running worward
snow on rises.
nice body against arrogance
around.
1 feel delicious
visions of the ring.
—Created by resident geniuses, Messieurs Cawsey,
Quigley and Ruebsaat. Under the direction of M.
Cawsey and under the ordained auspices of M. Tzara
each wrote 17 lines automatically and without revision.
Each line was cut up separately and put into a bag
(spread envelope) as instructed by the omniscient Tzara
in his method of writing a Dada pome. The title was
created in the same fashion. The pieces were shaken out
and compiled in the order they appeared by Messiers
Cawsey and Ruebsaat.
DADA
Dada is a virgin microbe
Dada is against the high cost of living
Dada
a joint stock company for the exploitation of ideas
Dada has 391  different attitudes and colors depending on
the sex of the chairman
It   transforms   itself-affirms- simultaneously    says   the
opposite—it doesn't matter—screams—goes fishing
Dada is the chameleon of rapid, interested change
Dada is against the future. Dada is dead.
Dada is idoitic. Hurrah for Dada. Dada is not a literary school roar
TRISTAN TZARA
•pfi4pur-
The Wilsyssey
Friday, January 30,  1970 News pHoToS  dS AnTi-drf
PAroxYsms oF lOve
—montage by cawsey-ruebsaat
—photo by dirk visser
XeRoX   reAlitY
\*#<fflgqim»   <
<T; * V'   . / •>/«JJ?|j .*f, ^     - /WteS«%#v#'
Being a made sort of
Readymade. Elevated to no
particular status by the
signatures of Cawsey, Quigley
and Ruebsaat. Method: Find
Xerox machine; put objects
from pockets on glass; pay.
One girl offered her belly
button and stripped to lie on
the machine. It was too
orgiastic to reveal. We knew
you wouldn 't understand.
,*%
If this issue of PF disgusts
you then you are idiots. Once
Again our civilization is going
through a period of decadence
where the killing and burning
and starving of people can be
rationalized by fat,
self-seeking asses. That is what
Dada originally came out
against. Warhol,
Rauschenberg, Lichstenstein,
Tinguey are a few modern
pop-artists who are doing
much the same thing the
Dadaists did. Ralph Ortiz gets
paid to destroy pianos with
axes. Yoko Ono sleeps in a
laundry bag on stage. You
don't like it. You are all fat,
stultified pigs going to hell
with your middle class
rationale stuck up your asses.
Gift by Man  Ray (1921)  Flatiron with tacks.
5i Ve IQflOgQQOQOQQOOOOOOOQQCQQOOeOOOOOaQe
J
Friday, Janaury 30,  1970
THE       U BYSSEY PART
The ACADl
end of Nov.   I
its  Seventh A
student hacks
went into acti
ers  bein<;  inv
ent's funds  c.i|
around compl
posium was th
The politics
1.  Do propag
harass  stude
society ■ a"1'
the bro.. ir m-
workert- tuder
thorities1 for
Scientific
The progso
run for makig]
people.     In 11
order to ma:
perialist firi
so that theyj
of tirugs' aris
rising.    Si'l a
hoax is ere a
when in farte
The pro;S a
what is boium
study of cite of
tions.    Itr up the lines
he sylnp
a crack or other in thtcists,
this pheme reactionary forc;s against scientific invee fun-
find their ion to the prograunesessive line gave many.
Fascist   Method vs  Bourgeois    Theories
Apart from the ab   from?    Do they drop orth the paper
tention of ideas becrom social practice,   aKnd not him-
Canadian supporterrUggle for productic   ,   i1 tudents.    Such
questions.    They ar hat determines Ins thin'.ourgeoisie
a concrete problem ;.    For example,   at the present time
the root cause of all is U.S.   imperialism and its accomplices.    For a scienfact and build appropriate guidelines
to defeat this evil isie enemy and support the evil de-'_
signs of the imperiae studied in isolation from the soci-
economic system hemic system which dictates what kind
of scientific researcle who suggest that "there is nothing wrong with scii it is put are the determining factor"
are deluding t.hems e ialists will allow them to da research
onmings which are n<s.    Those scientific experiments
,,#diich are anU-peoplperjaiiajUl and it is the imperialists
th^re is no develop-
people because there the
kind of scien-
ial and
to con-
the de-
u have
ntal
ve; i.e.
i gation but
ve as well
stand up
ly and are
on the
ressive
are well-
-      vv»»r» eB as valuable,
Pll9 reactionsi-uss usually are wary of discus»
:hfem«i»tly &|fcjK»e them.   During
grfj| and the two lines was
  iia* tJ«8p0,t*-Ci>;rofe«-80*#) to confuse
T hti£. jpiifclr * iii^*'iflf tor*" "Ajcffffi.*SflfiL tto* they could
it ML IWp^^i^»fHia^tndrtl jfc W'^Tpi'.ffiy1 attackin6
^on'mCtSXa or paste?ro <tti^"?|?Piffl*l^Bal^^iil: the same
*"*>3fdn- the theme of ORCrfr dUv^ltJ|fllfll'WF and hus-
hour or weekly evenin elopment of science and technology.
of reaction and their c man's know-how is usee, against him to
tempts of the progrescic class which arose with the rise of
student hacks claim to innovate further methods of repression
inals of the feudal-ar cientist who refrains from seeing this
final and complete ov-ction—in the air —is a scientist who is a
■ pg 6ix.
Centennial Museum
1970 Lecture-Demonstrations
THE COAST SALISH INDIANS - PAST AND PRESENT
Ethnology and Your Community Feb.  12
Dr. Pierre Maranda
The Story of Archaeology in B.C. Feb.  19
Dr. Charles Borden
Making a Living March 5
Dr. Roy Carlson
The Society and World View of
Vancouver's First Citizens March  12
Professor Michael Kew
A Handicraft Revival March  19
Discussion: Miss Madeline Bronsdon;
Mr.  Oliver Wells
Demonstration: Mrs. Martha James
Cowichan Knitting & Salish Basketry March 26
Demonstration and Discussion by:
Museum staff and guests from
the Stalo, Musqueam and
Thompson tribes
The Indian Scene Today April 2
Mrs. Jean Galligos Albin
Chief Joseph Matthias
Centennial Museum Auditorium, Thursday, 8 p.m.
Admission:  Seven   Sessions   $5   ($3   for   VMA   members)
Individual   Lecture   $1
.Advance Registration:   Centennial Museum
(by cheque) Education   Department
1100   Chestnut   Street
Vancouver 9, B.C.
Madam I'd like to give you your money
but the Campusbank architect made a
slight error in wicket design.
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
Visit your Campusbank
Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Student Union Building Branch - T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch — G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr.
The ,£a\yseysse.y,
Friday, January 30, 1970 n
EL
•V)
c
>
so
^ Dramatic Fragment
a Sir.
b.   Yes?
a   You are under arrest, Sir.
b. No.
a. I shall shoot, Sir.
b. No.
a. I shall shoot. Sir.
b. No.
a. I shall shoot, Sir.
b. No.
a. I hate you.
b. No.
a. I shall crucify you.
b. Not so.
a. I shall poison you.
b. Not so.
a, I shall murder you.
b. Not so.
a. Think of the winter.
b. Never.
a. I am going to kill you.
b. As I said, never.
a. I shall shoot.
b. You have already said that once.
a. Now come along.
b. You can't arrest me.
a. Why not?
b. You can take me into custody, but no more.
a. Then I shall take you into custody.
b. By all means.
b.    allows himself to be taken into custody and led away.
The stage grows dark. The audience feels duped and there
are catcalls and whistles. The chorus cries:
"Where's the author? Throw him out! Rubbish!" ^
-KURT SCHWITTERS     ^3
H3A3N H3A3HOJ SAVM1V   A/qipOJMI   ■§
ZOOLOGICAL LOVERS:
FEEDING HOURS AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO
(Sloat Blvd. & Ocean Beach):
Lions  2  p.m.   except Mondays
Leopards & Small Cats 2:35 p.m.
Elephants 3:30 p.m. daily
home Could send you there FREE!
jj.uuiuuiijjUAi.wi *$■§& MfflWTfMifffflri
/AeteJ &/feu? im/MI
to today's bridal ensembles - and one that's young in
heart. In keeping with the simplicity of the original
prong-set solitaire, these, however, have a definitely
modern verve with their graceful, sweeping curves.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
Special Discounts to Students and Faculty
i&6<LC£,i
566 Seymour 685-2271
Victoria Store, 1209 Douglas - Tel. 385-4431
I'M i.i.i1; n-m-m i igM-rfi'hiiini'i'Ba
l^'o.M
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full   Dress  (Tails)
• Morning  Coats
• Directors'  Coats
• White  &  Coloured Coats
• Shirts   and   Accessories
• 10';    U.B.C   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal   Wear   Rentals
531   Howe 688-2481
BBEsasBsspf 7e veil EH
PIZZA
EAT IN ♦ TAKE OUT. DELIVERY-
3261 W:Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
\    TAPES   RECORDS   <£
\ Open Nights 'til 10 %
INCLUDING SUNDAYS '
y ON GRANVILLE %
^   ^     ORPHEUM THEATRE      685-0405  J  J^
QUESTION?
HfiNG-UP?
STUDENT-RUN - STUDENT-ORGAN I ZED.'
SUB 218     /Aon.-Fri. 12 to 9        PH. 228-3706
HELD OVER
FOR THIS
WEEKEND ONLY
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
MO ADMITTANCE TO MftSONS UNDM II
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT   OF   SEX
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
SUB AUDITORIUM
Friday, Jan. 30, Saturday, Jan. 31
7:00 & 9:00 P.M.
Sunday, Feb. 1 - 7:00 p.m.
Special admission price for this presentation only
n
I
I*.
LEXANDER&
XELSON APPLIANCES
LTD.
FINAL  DAY OF OUR ANNUAL
CLEARANCE SALE ON  SATURDAY
THOUSANDS OF LONG PLAY RECORDS
CLASSICAL - POPULAR - FOLK - JAZZ
Reg. values 1.98 to 6.98 per Disc
SPECIAL CLEARANCE PRICES from 79c to 4.90 per Disc
EXTRA LARGE DISCOUNTS in ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS on
TV   -   RADIOS   -   TAPE RECORDERS   -   TAPES,   Etc.
4512 West 10th Ave.
228-9088
Friday, Janaury 30, 1970
The Dolsyssey absurd ridiculous
A newspaper (ait) is process, is, (energy
transferred) moving. Information (objects in
interaction) received and sythesized (correlated) and thus created.
The process is arbitrary—totally—governed by CHANCE, to which our editing minds
are usually unhappy, but here glad and accepting.
Events (Facts) - - - typewriter process. Edit
marks — visually arranged on unreal dummies
which exist. Offset printing, proofread (usually)
arrange on actual page. In your hand you
have the new thing NEW THING.
,p£ Sight,
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W.  10th Ave. 224-4144
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
,^\CATI0NS
• Oft/I N |V« *-
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
685-7929
(FOR FREE INFORMATION)
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held as
follows:
SECOND  SLATE:
Vice-President
Treasurer
Internal Affairs Officer
External Affairs Officer
Nominations open — Feb. 4
Nominations close — 12:00 noon, Feb. 12
Election — Feb. 18
Contact   $AQ.50
Lenses       ^ ^
Any Color - ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us .. . -AND REALLY SAVE!
LONDON Ed DRUGS
X OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES—
Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS & FACULTY ON GLASSES
NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
Downtown
677  GRANVILLE          Opp.  the   Bay
681-6174
South   Granville
2987  GRANVILLE     At  14th
736-7347
Oakridge
5618  CAMBIE            at  41st
327-9451
North   Van.
1825   LONSDALE
987-42264
675 COLUMBIA ST.
Opp.  Army  &  Navy,   New  West.
521-0751
763  FORT  ST.
VICTORIA,    B.C.
286-7578
Strong and honourable traditions provide the
foundation of firm training in leadership
expressed today in the motto of the three
Canadian Services Colleges:  Truth-Duty-Valoui
Allied to the prestige of the past is
advanced education   at university leve
given by these colleges to the officer-
cadets of Canada's armed forces. Carefulh
selected high school graduates are trained
for challenging professional careers  as
officers in the Navy, Army or Air force,
for  the  responsibility  of  holding
the Queen's Commission.
fixmveZfo
Tutu-re-
COLLEGE MIllTAIRB ROYAL
DE SAINT-JEAN
"fSAINT-JEAN, f.Q
Through the Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP) the Department of National Defence will sponsor a limited
number of qualified High School graduates to obtain a university education,
either at the Canadian Services Colleges or at designated Canadian universities. Full details of this financial
assistance can be obtained without
obligation from your nearest Armed
Forces Recruiting Centre, or by mailing this coupon now.
Sjfl
• •»»   |<tt;IIUI |
royal. jyutlfAWiamm
- KHKWfbtli; QWTAMO
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
Please send to me full information on the Regular Officer Training Plan
Name	
Address	
City/Town Prov
Age Education	
Service Choice Navy □ Army □
Air Force Q
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30,  1970 Friday, January 30,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
McMorran
in talk to
It's not the job of the
prosecutor or the defence counsel
to judge the accused. He just
defends or opposes him as best he
can, Vancouver city prosecutor
Stewart McMorran told a meeting
of the pre-law society Thursday.
"My feeling is that our job is to
make it as easy as possible to get
down to the issues. You let the
accused know what he has to
face."
"I'm sorry to say this is not
always the case in other parts of
the cabinet. But B.C. has a high
standard," he said,
The United States started out
with a law system the same as in
England at the time, but they
have not made changes like
England and Canada, McMorran
said.
"The U.S. has a problem of
state   rights  opposed to  federal
faces law systems
pre-law society
McMorran .  .  .  'people
alienated from government'
rights," he said. "One of these
rights is to a trial by jury."
"There is some real value is this
system because people can say
they don't like a law and don't
want it enforced."
"In Canada the government
never gets close to the public," he
said.
"The jury is the judge of the
facts and the judge is the judge of
the law. The judge must not
interfere in any way in the
function of the jury."
"If the Liberals are in power,
then most of the judges chosen
have some Liberal connections.
The same with the Conservatives,"
he said.
"However, there is more
tendency now to try to get the
best man regardless of his party
affiliations."
Unofficial voting at U of O
indicates French preferred
OTTAWA (CUP) - Social
science students at the University
of Ottawa turned thumbs down
on bilingualism January 22, and
gave moral support to a student
council bid for priority
French-language instruction in
their faculty.
Only 13 per cent of the U of O
students favored the retention of
current bilingual instruction in an
unofficial referendum called by
the social sciences student council
after U of O administrators
rejected demands for more French
and less English-language
instruction.
The unofficial referendum
asked students to choose between
bilingualism, French-only
instruction, and two other
systems which would give the
French language priority in the
department.
Although none of the options
received a clear majority, 34 per
cent of the 350 social science
students voted for French
unilingualism, while 51 per cent
favored either of the two systems
for priority French.
French-speaking students said
after the vote that the results are
not anti-English, but an attempt
to correct abnormal situations
where English courses are out of
all proportion to the number of
anglophones in the faculty.
Many anglophone students in
the faculty, however, said they
would leave the faculty if a
unilingual policy is accepted by
the U of 0 administration.
"They're only cutting their
own throats," said one student.
"Where will they go after
graduation with nothing but
French in their education?"
Others were confident the
studend council demands would
not be accepted by the U of O
senate.
The University of Ottawa's
purported bilingualism has come
under attack from other sources:
December 8, 1969, U of 0
student council president Allan
Rock said the two-languages
policy at the 4,500 student
campus was a "failure", and
agreed with charges in a Quebec
newspaper that the policy is a
"disguised road to assimilation".
The article in the
province- wide weekly,
Quebec-Presse , said the
university's two-language policy
hides the process of assimilation
of French-speaking students, and
called on the education
department to establish a Hull
branch of the Universite de
Quebec to serve French people in
western Quebec.
The U of O administration has
made no response to any of the
accusations.
Laymen admitted to Loyola BoG
MONTREAL (CUP) - Loyola
college will open its currently
all-Jesuit board of trustees to
laymen, including at least one
woman, administration president
Patrick Malone announced here
Tuesday.
The change will also involve
dissolution 'of the board of
governors, currently a mostly-lay
advisory group, Malone said. A
number of the present governors
will be named trustees.
Under attack by faculty and
students since June, the trustees
revamped their internal structures
in September, replacing Malone as
board chairman, and adding eight
more Jesuits to bring their
number to 15.
Observers at Loyola see the
move Tuesday as an attempt to
counter criticisms that the Jesuit
board is operating repressive
programs without recall by any
lay group or persons.
Although an adminstration
press release said the board's
"membership will be increased
substantially," it is expected the
Jesuits will retain a majority.
It is not known how the move
will affect a recent proposal that
Loyola be united with Sir George
Williams University in a common
"federal" university.
Hot Poop
PAGE FRIDAY annexes extra territory this week to bring you
this special edition of
HOT POOP
and again it happens for this week at the
ARTS
J ARTS
for
CONTEMPORARY
1970
Mon. Feb. 2, 12:30-"CRACK A STICK-THE SOUND OF
INTERMEDIA" Music Recital Hall-"COLLAGE EXPERIMENTS"
by Fine Arts students. Lassare lobby. To Friday the 6th.
Tues. Feb. 3-"FOUR ARTISTS" is the second festival event
at the Fine Arts Gallery. Featuring Tom Burrows-recent things,
hard, soft and liquid—Duane Lunden — drawings — Jeff Wall — two
books-and Ian Wallace-works of art. The show will run to Feb.
18th.
Fri. Feb. 6th-"AL NEIL TRIO"-freak music-Free Concert
at 12:30 in the Music Recital Hall.
* * *
FURTHERMORE ... "Spaced Age", an evening of three
experimental one-act plays continues at the Arts Club Theater.
Make US
withdraw'
A world-wide petition
demanding American
withdrawal from Vietnam
will be circulated among
students this week.
The petition is being
distributed by peace groups,
church organizations and
professional men and women
throughout the world.
If enough signatures are
obtained, an international
mission will be elected to go
to Washington and present
them to President Nixon.
Part of the petition reads:
"We demand the total,
immediate, unconditional
withdrawal of United States
and allied troops from South
Vietnam."
Copies are available from
the Vancouver Peace Action
League, 1768 West 11th Ave.,
or phone 733-9018 for
further information.
SWING IN
PSYCHEDELIC
SOPHISTICATION
Back   By   Popular   Demand
The Fabulous
Good Fortune
Wed. to Fri.
8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Sat. - 8 p.m. to 1 am.
5th Ave. at Fir - 736-4304
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
$1.00
OFF  REGULAR  ADMISSION
WITH  STUDENT  CARD
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Announcement of Elections
Elections for G.S.A. Executive will be held on
Thursday, Feb. 26, and Friday, Feb. 27
Nominations Open Monday Feb. 2
Nominations Close 4:00 p.m., Friday, Feb. 13
The   following   positions   on   the   Executive   are   open   for
Nomination:
PRESIDENT
ASSEMBLY  COORDINATOR
SECRETARY
Nominations   should   be   in   writing   and   should   bear   the   signature   of   the
nominee   and   of  four   (4)  active   members   of  the   G.S.A.  They  should   be
addressed  to the Secretary, c/o  Graduate  Student  Centra.
CMkoI ODEOIM Heahi P
INTERNAL  AFFAIRS  COMMISSIONER
EXTERNAL   AFFAIRS   COMMISSIONER
t fe James Bond 0gy is back!
M:-fH;ltt#.'i:H;vj(HH
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
West van
ODEON
TECHNICOLOR
VOGUE SHOWTIMES:  1:00,
3:50, 6:30, 9:10
SAT. WEST VAN. 2 P.M., 7:00
& 9:30
922-6343  SUNDAY:  VOGUE:  1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30
WEST VAN.: 2:00, 4:30. 7:00. 9:30
"THE YEAR'S BEST COMEDY!"
-SATUROAr REVIEW
"A MARVELOUS MOVIE!"
-wees RADIO
SHOW TIMES:
12:30, 2:40,
4:50, 7:00,
9:10
ITH
WEEK
BobQCarol
Ted^Alice
TECHNICOLOR
SUNDAY 1:40, 3:30,
5:30, 7:30, 9:30
:   ELVl'S PRESLEY
Sings'Rubberneckin'
CHANGE OF HABIT
Coronet
(51   GRANVILLE
685-6828
DAILY AT 12:25, 2:15, 4:00
5:50, 7:40, 9:25
SUNDAY AT 2:15, 4:00 5:00
7:40, 9:25
DUSTIN HOFFMAN * MIA FARROW
Park
"JOHN and MARY
COLOR
LAMIIt  4 I
176-2747
«'h     ADULT ENTERTAINMENT    SUNDAY: 3:00, 5:00
SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30
7:00, 9:00
Vifsijg "PUTNEY _SWOPE"
224-3730
4375 W. 10lh     SHOWTIMES
7:30, 9:30
Warning: The very
coarse language could
offend you.  B.C. Censor
SUNDAY 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 Page  20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30,  1970
SFU grad studies dept.
adopting screening process
Changes are in the works for the Simon Fraser
University grad studies department.
The SFU senate grad studies committee has
devised a procedure for evaluating new grad
programs and re-evaluating old ones.
"A mechanism for screening new programs
similar to the one being used at the University of
Western Ontario will be instituted," said committee
head Lionel Funt.
All programs will be examined on a rotating
five year basis. At the end of the five years, it will
be decided whether or not the program will be kept.
Any changes needed will also be discussed.
In an  article published in the Sun Tuesday,
education reporter Mike Graham implied that the
committee was being set up to investigate grad
studies. This was denied by both the SFU
administration and the people in charge of the
committee.
"The Sun story was incorrect, all the senate
committee for grad studies does is prepare the
senate's policy on grad studies," said acting
vice-president Lalit Srivastava.
Arts dean Dale Sullivan said the committee
would also set up a system whereby grad students
would be told their degree requirements and have a
faculty adviser appointed within eight months of
registration.
Guelph students prepared to fight
~   decision  on  firing  of  professor
GUELPH (CUP)-Students at the University of
Guelph began mobilizing Monday to fight an
administration decision not to renew the contract of
sociology professor Don Grady, and to open the
general issue of political repression within the
department.
Discussion of Grady's firing and of other
newly-created vacancies in the Guelph sociology
department was scheduled to take place at a
meeting Tuesday.
The sociology department's tenure and
reclassification' committee had recommended tenure
for Grady, but their recommendation was
overturned by the administration, which then
refused to offer him a new contract. Administrators
gave no reasons for their decision.
Grady was a leader in a fight for student
participation in the sociology department on a
one-man, one-vote basis.
Senior faculty crushed the move last November,
after the department voted to support an October
strike of campus workers.
Currently, the Guelph sociology department is
short nine faculty, and three more are expected to
leave after this semester; conflicts with
administration are believed to lie behind most of the
vacancies.
"I think we probably have more vacancies than
any other sociology department in Canada," said J.
E. W. Jackson, chairman of the department's
recruiting committee.
Administration officials declined comment.
Berkeley to hire black activist
LOS ANGELES (CUP-CPS) -
Harry Edwards, the black activist
who attempted to organize a
boycott of the 1968 Olympic
Games, is about to be hired as an
assistant professor of sociology at
Berkeley, according to a story
leaked at a regents meeting here.
According to the report, the
appointment has received
approval at all levels and is now
on chancellor Roger Heyns' desk
awaiting approval. Such approval
is normally routine. Heyns refused
comment on the matter.
The University of California
regents spent over an hour in
executive session, and it was
rumored that the Edwards case
was heatedly discussed.
Edwards is now completing his
PhD at Cornell. It was while
teaching at San Jose State College
that   he   became   an   adviser   to
many black athletes at the school,
including Tommy Smith and John
Carlos.
The Edwards appointment will
probably become a campaign issue
among    some    conservative
legislators this year. The
appointment may lend push to a
drive in the legislature to remove
the constitutional status of the
university, putting the regents
under the state legislature.
Foreigners pay more
MONTREAL (CUP) - Foreign students attending McGill and
other Quebec universities will have to pay higher fees than
Canadians, if administrators accept a suggestion proposed by
McGilFs faculty of medicine.
The proposal, passed Jan. 24 at a faculty meeting, suggests
that McGill contact other Quebec universities to raise fees for
non-Canadians. The move will need approval from the McGill senate
and board of governors.
Students from "a rich neighboring country", are encouraged
to apply to Quebec universities due to comparatively lower fees, he
said.
The universities could increase bursaries to students from
Third World countries, McGregor said, so they would not be affected
by the move.
The proposal is "a completely unacceptable display of petty
nationalism," according to McGill student society president Julius
Grey, who added the plan, if accepted, "could destroy the
university."
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
TEBWEWCBIR
L{&> sir, i" tiiis
pRftPu.CE &r
ptJUSH.."   _.-    .
&r\ali"sK   chVcfe.
t-Ke i d<so B«.t- she.  lays
Unscrambled Life at:
The Lutheran Campus Centre
Daily & Sunday 9:30 a.m.
College Worship 10:30
tSHELM
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
0 Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W  10th Ave.
224-0828
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma   Mater  Society
Chairman Required for AAC
The Academic Activities Committee is without a
Chairman. Anyone who is interested in this position
please apply in writing to the Secretary of the Alma
Mater Society second floor S.U.B., before Friday,
February 6.
CUSO Recruitment
Information Session   -   International House
Thursday, Feb. 5 - 8 p.m.
General and medical recruitment staff from Ottawa
will be present.
IF YOU ARE THINKING OF APPLYING,
COME TO THIS MEETING
Personal   discussions   with   Ottawa   recruitment   staff,
Sat., Feb. 7, 9 a.m. - 12 noon, CUSO office.
International House.
NOW... SUNDAY MOVIES
at all the theatres. . .
0
Z
6
10
From the
country that gave you
"l,AWOMAN,""INGA"
and "I AM CURIOUS (yellow)
2
o
10
new...and from
Sweden    I
Feature 12:05, 2:05,
4:05, 6:05, 8:05, 10:05
Sunday from 2:05
> NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER 18
CAPITOL
Are You?
RADICAL
REACTIONARY
A WORKER OF THE WORLD
A WASP
P.O/d
#tyt£ ejection* an here!
SLATE  I — Nominations Open Jan. 28
Nominations Close   Noon, Feb. 5
ELECTION - FEB. 11
1. PRESIDENT
2. OMBUDSMAN
3. SECRETARY
4. COORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES Friday, January 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page
* T„
"davs wins photo
HIGH-FLYING BIRD'S Rick McPhee bends his harp in SUB ballroom Wednesday in part of Mardi
Gras celebrations.
Selection  committee
looking for good profs
We have at least 29 good professors on
campus, but we don't know who they are.
Dr. Robert Clark, secretary of the UBC
Selection Committee, received 29 nominations for
the second annual Master Teacher Award.
However, he would not disclose the names of the
nominees.
The Master Teacher Award is donated by Dr.
Walter   C.   Koerner,  chairman   of the  Board of
Governors, and his wife "to give recognition to
two of the outstanding teachers of undergraduates
at the University of British Columbia."
Each award is accompanied by a cash prize of
$2,500.
Last year's winner, President Gage, said, "I
felt honored to be chosen."
The two winners, chosen from the 29
nominees, will be announced in March.
Proposed IH change
International House is in the
process of change.
IH was originally designed to
be an orientation center where
foreign students could accustom
themselves to life in a Canadian
university.
But now IH wants to do more.
"We want to break down this
paternal influence we have over
foreign students," said IH director
Dave Roxburgh.
"We feel the students of this
university have reached a calibre
of understanding where a paternal
influence is no longer needed," he
said.
"We want to reach not only
foreign students, but Canadian
students who are interested in
foreign affairs," he said.
A proposal to make IH a center
of international information will
be considered at an upcoming
board of directors meeting. At
present, IH provides students with
cultural and social activities only.
However, these activities will be
maintained regardless of the
board's decision.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY- 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
10062  King George  Hwy.  — 588-2727
2052  Kingsway — 874-3622
E&B
'
RESTAURANT
DELUXE WESTERN  CUISINE
7 a.m. . liOO a.m.
4423 W.  10th 224-6322
abc tm$<M itiMte Society presents
rleUo.
Public Pfrformances"
Feb 6,7,12.13,14 8:3„ pM
UBC AUDITORIUM
TICKETS
Sua.   -      VancouverTicketCentre-683J2ss
Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10% UBC Discount
JIM   ABERNETHY,   MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
FOR ALL YOUR
TRAVEL
REQUIREMENTS
USE THE
PROFESSIONAL ADVICE
OF OUR TRAVEL AGENTS
UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON WHERE TO TRAVEL.
IN MANY CASES YOUR AGENT HAS BEEN THERE.
HIS  PERSONAL  EXPERIENCE  COSTS  YOU   NOTHING.
TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF IT.
ITINERARIES   PLANNED   USING   THE   BEST  MEANS
OF TRANSPORTATION, WHETHER IT BE BY AIR,
LAND  OR  SEA,   DESIGNED  TO  SUIT  YOUR  BUDGET.
WE   WILL  MAKE  ALL  YOUR   RESERVATIONS,
ISSUE ALL NECESSARY TICKETS  AT TARIFF  PRICES
AND  SUPPLY  YOU   WITH  A   DETAILED   ITINERARY
Call for a chat with
MRS. LINA ROGERS - 224-4391
on UBC Campus  - 5700 University Blvd.
ERD    ^1^
or call MRS. VERENE SHEPHERD
Room 237 B - Student Union Bldg. - 228-2980
THIS WOULD  GUARANTEE YOU  A  BETTER   HOLIDAY
AND A CARE-FREE TRIP
WANTED
A Tuum Est Editor
THE JOB: To work with various groups; to plan, control and co-ordinate
the  copy  and  lay-out  of  Tuum   Est  (student  handbook).
TO APPIY: Send a written application to Tony Hodge, AMS vice-president. He's found in the AMS executive offices. This application
should contain:
(1) name of applicant;
(2) applicant's university experience;
(3) applicant's view on the general outline  that Tuum Est should
take;
(4) View on what the specific purpose of Tuum Est should be.
WHY: A payment of honoraria upon completion of a satisfactory issue
of Tuum Est. This is an important position so please submit all
applications to Tony Hodge, SUB 258 by 5:00 p.m., Feb. 3rd.
FREE PASS
to ENGINEERS' display of models next week in SUB:
— IS Roberts Bank Superport really a hoax?
— WHO stuck the Voo-doo pins in Bennett Dam?
— Atomic MEDICINE ?
SUB BALLROOM - Tues. & Wed., ALL DAY
SUB PARTY ROOM - Mon., Tues., Wed., ALL DAY
SUB AUDITORIUM - Mon., Tues., Wed., 12:30 - 2:30
(If you forget to bring this Pass, just show your face to get in free.)
, CLIP    AND    DESTROY Page 22 AdVCrfiSeitieilt THE      UBYSSEY Advertisement Friday, January 30,  1970
Let's not kid ourselves!
A Voluntary Student Union
will not function
for the GOOD
of 21,000 Students
So there you are, chequebook in hand, and it's registration day and
time to shell out.    On top of tuition fees, you find yourself paying $29.
$5 goes to Athletics.    The AMS never sees this money.
$15 goes to pay for SUB.
$9 remains to support all other AMS activities and projects.
You are being asked to vote on whether AMS fees should become non-compulsory.
If you support the idea, you are supporting the concept of a voluntary student union on this campus.    That's what it boils down to.
LOOK AT SUB.     If the AMS can't come up with $15 per student to pay
for SUB, the administration will take over control of the building.    The
administration doesn't have $275,000 to put into SUB each year, so this is
what will happen:    the Board of Governors will raise tuition fees by $15
per student.    If you don't pay it one way, you'll pay it another.
LOOK AT A FEW OTHER THINGS.    Over 75 clubs and activities.    The
Ubyssey.    4,000 students involved in intramural sports.    Birth control booklets.    Winter Sports Centre, Amchitka.    The housing service.    Support for
co-op housing,  day care, Cool Aid, and other projects.    Grants to undergrad
societies.
LOOK AT CURRENT WORK on summer unemployment, charter flights, the
Spanish Banks Beach project, promotion of higher education,  a pub on campus,
highschool visitation, BCUS and a western universities union.
Compulsory fees permit the AMS to finance and support all these
things.    Could a voluntary union do the same?    Doubtful.
LOOK AT ONE OTHER SMALL ITEM.    We're the 3rd largest university in
Canada.    Right now, the students on this campus can speak through the AMS
as one large interest group.    How many students would a voluntary union
speak for?
IF YOU VOTE FOR N0N-C0MFULS0RY FEES, YOU GAIN $9.
HOW MUCH DO YOU LOSE?
HEAR THE DEBATE MONDAY 12:30, BALLROOM.
VOTE     NO       Next Wednesday Friday, January 30, 1970 AdvertlSeitietlt THE      UBYSSEY
Advertisement
Page 23
IF YOU REMOVE THE COMPULSORY NATURE OF THE AMS
THE UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION WILL RULE OUR LIVESI
SUB WILL GO TO HELL
OUR LIVES WILL BE MISERABLE
Such is the nature of the scare tactics being endulged in by members of the Student Council as they
attempt to defeat Wed's referendum, and thus preserve the compulsory nature of your membership
in and payment of fees to the Alma Mater Society. We feel that not only are such accusations completely off topic, but even if they weren't, they would be fallacious and misleading.
SOME OF THE REASONS WHY WE FEEL THE NEED
FOR A VOLUNTARY SOCIETY
Dorothy O'Donnell, Student Senator
John Cherrington, President, Debating Society
W. Carey Linde, past AMS Vice-
Student Council is asking the students what they think about
being forced to be members of the Alma Mater Society. They have
consented to holding the referendum Wednesday because, as they say,
the self-reflection and questioning will cause the councillors and
students to re-examine the function of their AMS. But they urge the
certain defeat of the referendum.
Susan Taylor, Education 4
Peter Ladner, Student Senator
President and Law President
Their reasoning is not the best. If the referendum is defeated as
they urge, they will be forced to do NOTHING, and everything will
stay as it is. Only if the referendum passes will anybody be forced to
do some serious thinking. Right now students councillors aren't giving
examination to the purposes of the AMS. They are too busy trying to
find their ways out of their offices and down to the students to urge
the defeat of the referendum.
AND WHAT WILL HAPPEN
Passage of this referendum cannot alter the existing compulsory
nature of the AMS. Only a legally worded motion at a general meeting
specifically urging the winding up of the society can do away with the
present AMS. Passage of Wednesday's motion will bring very strong
moral force to exert itself upon the student councillors and AMS
executive. Only then will they commence that re-evaluation and
restructuring that they presently pay lip service to while they run
around urging defeat of the referendum.
IF THE REFERENDUM PASSES
The Student Council would then have two months before the
spring general meeting to design a purely administrative scheme for
the management of SUB by students. Such a scheme would be offered
for acceptance at the general meeting. SUB at no time need go into
the vicious and evil hands of the administration, as apologists for
compulsory membership claim will automatically happen if you vote
in favor of this referendum.
WHAT HAPPENS TO SUB AND EVERYTHING IN  IT
Nothing will be altered by passage of the referendum. What The   voluntary   or  non-voluntary  nature  of  the   AMS  in  no  way
happens to SUB depends on the Student Council's proposals that materially affects what happens in SUB. The $15 per student per year,
should come subsequent to a successfully passed referendum. The plus generated revenues within the building, will keep it all going,
clubs, social societies, cultural functions, etc., need not be effected.
WHAT, THEN, WILL CHANGE
Not much. The Ubyssey will no longer receive financial support
from every student automatically. But that doesn't mean the campus
need be without a paper, a paper that all students are not forced to
finance.
The present AMS role in attacking such campus wide problems
as parking fees, book prices, food services, over crowding, the library,
and academic reform can not possibly be made any the less, as there
presently IS NO ROLE in these areas. It is the student members on
the senate who are actually engaged in indicating proposals in these
areas.
IS THE PRESIDENT OF THE AMS EQUIVALENT TO A MAYOR OF A CITY
OR THE PREMIER OF A PROVINCE
The Alma Mater Society is just that, a society. It is not a union.
The President of that Society is merely the chief executive officer, the
chairman of the council meetings. He is in no way different from the
President of the Vancouver Symphony Society. The AMS does not
"tax" us to benefit the "citizens". Just as no one in their right mind
COULD THE STUDENTS ORGANIZE IN A
Had there been no compulsory AMS this year, the
demonstration against the Amchitka bomb test would have still taken
place down at the border if the students had wished it. The idea for it
came from the University of Victoria. The manpower for the
promotion came from students who dug the idea. Half the students
drove down in their own cars. The busses could have been hired by
the undergraduate societies, or the other students could have arranged
would argue that people who live in Vancouver should be compelled
to belong to the Vancouver Symphony Society and pay fees, neither
is it rational to say that students who happen to be going to this
University must be forced to join any society out here. And we still
have a good symphony in Vancouver.
MASS WAY AROUND CRUCIAL ISSUES?
to go down in cars as well.
The Save the Beach Campaign of last Spring was well underway
and already had off campus support long before the AMS was asked
to lend its nominal support.
The open senate campaign of two years ago only got the
reluctant support for AMS after it was obvious that many students
considered it a real need and were acting on that need.
THE POLITICAL NATURE OF THE AMS
Is it right for twenty five individuals to decide to commit your own  council  members, against the Liberal, New Democratic, and
funds, money that you had no choice in giving to the AMS, to finance Social Credit candidates in the Trail riding in the last election?
the campaign of a student in a provincial election? What right did the Clearly, students who do not wish to contribute to such a stunt
AMS have to spend $6,000 on the campaign of Dell Valair, one of its do not have to pay their money toward the funding of that stunt.
THE PRINCIPLE ISSUE OF THIS REFERENDUM
Whether or not the present AMS serves any purpose other than
its own self perpetuation, or misappropriating funds, is not the issue of
this referendum. The issue is: if it is true that the university is not the
same as a city or municipality, that the university is rather at law a
corporation with a board of governors, does it offend the basic
democratic right of free association to compel students to pay fees to
and be members of a non-voluntary organization within that
university?
If you think that membership in a society like the AMS should
be voluntary, and if you want your student council to come up with a
scheme for the administration of SUB suitable to the likes of students
(as opposed to the likes of the Board of Governors,) on Wednesday
VOTE YES.
(Do yourself a favor) Page  24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1970
FRIDAY
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC
"The   instinctual   compulsion",   noon,
Bu. 234.
ALLIANQE   FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, l.H.
DEBATING  SOCIETY
Tournament,    3:30   p.m.,    SUB   Audi
torium.
FILM SOCIETY
Facade,  Fri.,  and Sat., 7 and 9 p.m.^
Sun.,  7 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
HAMSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
NDP  CLUB
Executive meting, noon, SUB 216A.
CUSO
Panel,  noon,  Bu. 202.
AFRO-ASIAN   MOVEMENT
Lecture,  noon,  Bu.  203.
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
Forum    on    Women's    Liberation,    8
P.m.,  1208 Granville St.
LEGAL   AID
Campus Legal Aid Panels, every Mon.,
Wed.   and   Fri.,   noon,   SUB   237   and
237A.
CHESS CLUB
Tournament,  noon,  SUB 216.
VCF
Meeting,  noon,   SUB 207-209.
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
CIASP
Meeting,  3 p.m.,  4630 W.  5th.
UBC   SAILING  CLUB
Party,  8:30 p.m., 5785 Agronomy Rd.
cuso
Caribbean Workshop,   11 a.m.-4 p.m.,
l.H.
MONDAY
AMS
Speaker,   7:30-9:30  p.m.,   SUB 213.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVE
Meeting, noon,  SUB 211.
TUESDAY
THUNDERBIRD  SKI   TEAM
Ski film, Tues. and Thurs., noon, Old
Auditorium.
DEPT.   OF   HISTORY
Discussion,   noon,   l.H.   404-402.
PHOTO   SOC.
Basic darkroom'classes, 8 p.m., Tues.
and Wed.  night,  SUB 241A.
GREEK CLUB
Greek   dancing,    7:30   p.m.,    Intema-
tional  House.	
pollution.--.
INDUSTRIAL WASTE
FEB. 5
THURSDAY NOON
...at   U).
NOW -ANEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie   St.
Vancouver   15,   B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
FIX IT NOW!
Most car illnesses don't
heal themselves . . . they
need professional help.
We're professionals and
are willing to serve you
now!
r!
(No   appointment   necessary)
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 Oak St.    263-8121
FULLY GUARANTEED
WEDNESDAY
SAILING   CLUB
Film   and   general   meeting,   Bu.   104,
noon.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Dr. Clarke speaks, noon, SUB 125, on
guaranteed   annual  income.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Wednesday's  4-Dance,  7:30 p.m.,  l.H.
EUS   ACADEMIC   SEMINARS   SERIES
Dr. Murray speaks, Civil Eng. 201.
UBC SAILING- CLUB
Film and general meeting, noon, Bu.
104.
THURSDAY
HISPANIC   AND   ITALIAN   STUDIES
Prof.    Joaquin   Calasduero,    lectures,
noon, Bu.  202.
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY
Argument from intimidation, SUB 113.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Poppy   Family   concert,   8  p.m.,   SUB
ballroom.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Panel   discussion,   noon,   IH
PRE-MEDICAL   SOCIETY
Seminar,   7-9  p.m.,   SUB 207.
jlSeRViCeSj
llllllllll ar U60 wiiiijIN
PATH*
■ EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. S< Sat. 3 a.rrt.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
MAUDI GRAS COSTUME HALL —
Jan. 30. Tickets AMS — SUB info
desk.	
HELD OVER: LARRY KENT'S
Facade. SUB Auditorium, Friday,
Jan. 30, and Saturday, Jan. 31, at
7:00 and 9:00; Sunday, Feb. 1, at
7:00. Warning: Very frank treatment of sex.—i!.C. Censor restrict-
ed.    $1.	
GIRLS . . . YOU'RE ALL INVITED
to another Engineers' Mixer tonight at Lions Gate Hall, 2611 W.
4th, from II p.m. til da\vn(?), only
25c.
Greetings
12
GOT   A   QUESTION?
GOT   A   HANG-UP?
SPEAK   EASY,   SUB   Rm.   218,   228-
12-11   p.m.
3706.   Mon. - Fri.
DO YOU WANT A BETTER PLACE
to lay your head? Observers welcome at general meeting ot
Acadia   Co-op  Housing  Assoc.
THE FOLKS AT THE YALE TJNI-
versity Film Festival said: "Wow!
This film wins first prize!" What
will you say when you see "The
Rose" on Feb. 25? Watch here for
more  details.
Wanted Information
13
SHOULD STUDENTS BUILD
their own housing? Observers
welcome, meeting of Acadia Coop Housing Assoc., Buch. 212, at
12:30,   Friday.   Jan.   30.	
RE: YELLOW VALIANT DOORS
creased Sunday, Empire Pool pay
lot. Information wanted. Please
phone   321-9919
Lost & Found
14
LOST BROWN WALLET IN SUB
cafe phone Duncan 277-6716 or
leave   at   SUH   info.	
LEFT TEXT INTRODUCTION TO
Eng. Statistics in car two weeks
ago, hitchhiking. Phone 873-1129
eves.
LOST: CAMEL COLOURED KASH-
mir scarf, Freddie Wood Th. Wed.
21.   Please   phone   922-8439.	
FACADE BY LARRY KENT. SUB
Auditorium, restricted. Friday,
January 30 and Saturday, January
31 at 7:00 and 9:00. Sunday, Feb-
ruary  1   at  7:00.   $1.	
LOST IN EAST MALL ANNEX,
large red folder with photograph
inside. Personal, sentimental
value. Reward offered. Phone AI-
len   733-7019.	
LOST BLACK PURSE MON. VIC
Chem or Wesbrook. 327-7720 after
6 p.m. Contents or Personal Importance.
LOST TWO RINGS, ONE SILVER,
one green and gold; in Brock
washroom, 27 Jan. Phone Heather
224-9881 or leave at SUB Info.
Reward.	
LOST DARK BLUE SQUARE RING
binder, Hennings 200, four courses
of notes. Return to Info or 266-
5680,   Ian.
Rides & Car Pools
15
WANTED: RIDE TO UBC FROM
central West Van. for next 3
weeks.   922-4406.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott.   299-9422.	
LORD TWEEDSMU1R HOMECOM-
ing, F-iday, Feb. 6, 7:30-???. All
ox-T\ve.die-ites welcome. Come
and iih et your old teachers,
friends, etc. Guided tour of the
new labs  and  facilities.
BEYOND -THE~~GRrcEN'    DOOIL
'THE SECRET RACE" IS ONE OF
Ihe only films that captures feelings of skiing. See all 55 minutes
Tues. and Thurs. next week at
noon in the Old Auditorium. Produced by Dick Barrvmoro in
Chile.  1966.  50c  (cheap!.
FREE GREY FEMALE CAT IS
months, produces beautiful kittens. Call 7.11-1997 or 732-6778.
Not   for   neuterers.
GOOD FOLK-LOCK STNGER
wants to .loin band. Has original
material.   Phone   253-1241
Special  Notices  (Cont.)
16
FLEA MARKET, SUN., 3 - 5 P.M.,
Feb. 1, 2054 Trafalgar Petite
Wearables by Evelyn Roth Antiques by   Ivan.
THE B. C. CENSOR SAYS '. '. '.
"Warning: Adult Documentary -
Graphic Scenes of Childbirth." An
astute observer claims he also
mumbled: " Great flick ! " One
showing only, Feb. 25. "The
Rose."   Watch   for   more   details.
Travel Opportunities
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobile For Sale
21
63 CORVAIR. DELUXE SEDAN,
automatic, radio. Body and motor
in A-l shap. Ph. 738-6577 eves.
65 MUSTANG CONVERT 289 4-
spd excellent condition. Best of-
fer.   684-4007.	
1961 ENVOY. GOOD TRANSPOR-
tation car. Only $250. City tested.
Call 224-5987, Peter. Leave num-
ber.	
I >ROP YOUR FACADE. SEE THIS
latest flick by Larry Kent. SUB
Auditorium, Friday, Jan. 30 and
Saturday, Jan. 31 at 7:00 and 9:00,
Sunday, Feb. 1 at 7:00. Restruct-
ed.   Special   admission j)rice   $1.
54 METEOR, GOOD FOR PARTS;
59 FORD, good running car. Bar-
rett,   224-1581.	
RETURN TO EUROPE, SELL 1969
VW-Bus, all glass, 13000m (long
distance), $2600 or best offer.
224-3082.	
1962 VOLVO GOOD CONDITION,
city   tested.   Phone   224-7443.	
1961 RENAULT. GOOD CONDI -
tion. $290. Very economical and
reliable. Phone 224-9720. Paul room
No.   428.
Motorcycles
25
66 ZUNDAP "SCRAMBLER" 100
cc, $250 or best offer, Barrett,
224-1581.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
FACADE — FACADE — FACADE
Held over! SUB Auditorium, Friday, Jan. 30 and Saturday, Jan.
31 at 7:00 and 9:00. Sunday, Feb.
1   at   7:00.    Restricted.    Admission
_$_L	
Duplicating  & Copying 32
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS. SPECIAL-
ists in graphs, maps, text-book
illustrations, complex formulae
scientific displays. Advertisements
phone   733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
ARTWORK PHOTOGRAPHY Posters call me and see if I can't do
it.   John   Kula   224-4146.	
GRAPHIQUES SCIENTIFIQUES.
Specialistes en graphiques, cartes,
illustrations pour livres, form-
ules complexes. Maquettes scien-
tifiques, advertisements. Tel. 733-
4506.
Photography
34
VERY FRANK TREATMENT OF
sex: Larry Ken't Facade, SUB
Auditorium, Friday, Jan. 30 and
Saturday, Jan. 31 at 7:00 and 9:00.
Sunday, Feb. 1 at 7:00. Restricted.   $1.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
WHAT'S BEYOND THE GREEN
door?       	
VOTE HTA R V E Y KIRK^ FOR-
estry's candidate for Mardi Gras
King.   I   Phelta   Thi   fraternity.
FACADE — HELD OVER! RE-
stricted. SUB Auditorium. Friday, Jan. 30 and Saturday, Jan.
31 at 7:00 and 9:00. Sunday, Feb.
1 at 7:00. Warning: very frank
treatment ot sex—li.C. Censor.
Admission   $1.
GIRLS. PLACE A LTGHT PINK
circle around Feb. 2:> on your
calendar. Guys, scribe a heavy
blue line around Feb. 25. Watch
here  for  more  details.
Sewing & Alterations
38
MARDI GRAS '70 COSTUME BALL
Floorshow "The Games People
Play". Tickets: AMS, SUB info
desk.
Typewriters 8c Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.	
UNIVERSITY GRAD. TYPING
service (w 25 cents per page.
681-0221 or 942-8144, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
10   years   experience.
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
page. Essays 30c/page —• 5c per
copy. Fast effiicent service. Ph.
325-0545.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, these, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.	
THESES TYPED. EXPERIENCED
typist. IBM-machine. Call Jenifer
Tomlin, days 688-8572, eves. 682-
5380.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy,   738-8794  —   35c  page,   5c
 copyj	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis
typist.   Reasonable  rates.   321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
 Please   call   224-6129	
"EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC
home typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work, reasonable
rates.   Phone   321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
FEMALE HELP WANTED SIX TO
eight hours week, $1.75 hr. Keep
house   clean.   266-1611.	
PART-TIME TELLERS WANTED
by Bank of Montreal, S.U.B. Mondays and Fridays. Prev. exp. is
required. Phone Mr. Fisher 228-
9021  or  call  at   the  office.	
COOK REQUIRED SATURDAYS,
10-7, 110 day. Call 224-9667 (Ernie
or   Dave}.
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
STANLEY PARK PAVILION —
Married medical or dental student
with at least three years of study
remaining will be considered for a
position which is part time in the
winter and full time during the
summer. Pay rate —• about $2!75
per hour. For an interview contact Mr. B. C. Smith, 681-1141,
local   34.
Male or Female
53
DO YOU HAVE A CAR? CAN YOU
use    an    extra    $100.00?    Can    you
spare    5    hours    a    week?    Phone
522-3011   betweeen   3   p.m.   and   5
p.m.   for   interview.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
Tutoring
64
TUTORING   IN   MATH   -   PHYS.   -
Stat   by   instructor   (Ph.D.}   $5   per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STILL  AVAILABLE — $1.00
al  the Bookstore,
AMS   Publication!   Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
LOVELY LAVENDAR GOWN —
full length formal with white bod-
Oice   and  delicate   trim.   437-1808.
PHILIPS FOUR TRACK TAPE RE-
eorder, excellent condition stereo
pre-amps, very reasonable. 733-
G410.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
KOFLACK LACE SKI BOOTS;
size 11M, $35.00—1 season. 738-
7793.	
KNEISSL DIPLOMAT W 190CM,
cable bindings. Like new % original   price.   224-3340.	
HEAD COMPETITION GS SKIS,
210cm, $75. Lange boots, size 10,
$65.   Phone   Ralph,   224-9016.	
PR. 27"' SPRINT WHEELS CLEM-
ents tubs, Fiammi rims, Campag.
Q-R   hubs,   $60.   Mark   266-7957.
RECORD YOUR OWN STEREO
cartridges on a 8 tr. deck. Speakers, tape recorder, 80 amp also.
224-5194.	
SKI BOOTS, LANGE PRO 8V2
worn twice. Save $25. Head and
Knessil skis y2 original price.
Phone   263-9188.	
8-TRACK CAR STEREO PLUS 4
tapes, 2 speakers, $95.00, or best
offer.   Rm.   328.    224-9755	
MUST SELL ! 1968 PROOF COIN
sets (lc - $1.00) from the Mint.
Call   263-5975   after  seven.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT ROOMS WITH REC.
room, T.V., record player, private
entrance, bathroom, near UBC.
263-9609.	
FURN. ROOM FOR RENT, 35TH
and Dunbar. Avail. Feb. 1st, $50.
Phone   732-7119   after   six.	
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS AVAIL-
able immediately, $34 a month,
share kitchen and T.V. 733-7358
evenings.	
SLEEPING ROOM—MALE ONLY.
Suitable Faculty, Staff, Senior
Student.   224-1754. 	
82
COMMUNAL HOUSE HAS ROOM
for male student, senior or grad-
uate,   261-3234.	
COMFORTABLE ROOM, ONE
male, LHK, private entrance, 200
ft. to Gates. Avail. Feb. 1. 4650
W.   11th,    228-8749.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY!
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5760 Toronto
Rd.	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy,   224-9620.	
LIBERAL-MINDED GIRL WISHES
to share 4-bedroom house with
rec. room, 7th & Dunbar. Furn-
ished.   732-7774	
Room & Board	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.	
FREE ROOM BOARD EXCHANGE
for sitting and light duties faculty home. Transport to UBC. Ph.
RE 8-8205	
Furn. Houses & Apis. 83
SHARE WITH GIRL. BASEMENT
suite, furnished, washer, dryer,
private entrance, bathroom, show-
er.   $55.   228-8238,   224-7338.	
SENIOR MALE R O O M M, ,AT IE
wanted for modern semi-furnished
Beach Ave. Apt. rent $75/mo. Call
Rod   688-9683.	
WANTED FOURTH FEMALE TO
share three bedroom apt. above
campus travel agency. 37.50/mo.
Ph.   224-9159.	
2 BEDROOM BASMT. SUITE,
furn., wash. Kitchen, sep. ent.
Call 228-9858 aft. 5:30 p.m. 3781
W.   20th  Ave.	
BASEMENT BED SITTING ROOM
fully furnished; fridge, hotplate,
private bath, entrance, $75 month.
Tel. 738-4090 or Math 209. Male
student   only.	
GIRL TO SHARE LGE FURNTSH-
ed apartment with same in Kit-
silano.    733-0519 _      	
UnJ. Houses  &  Apts. 84
WHAT SHOULD CO-Or'"~HOUSING
mean at UBC? Come and tell us
at'general meeting, Acadia Co-op
Housing Assoc, Buch. 212, 12:30,
Fri., Jan.  30.
FOR BEST RESULTS USE YOUR UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Friday, January 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 25
m
LeviV for Gals
S.U.B
&HQP Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30,  1970
—dick button photo
FRIDAY NIGHT SKATERS enjoy the newest, largest ice surface in North America at UBC's Winter
Sports Center. Besides the two full size hockey rinks shown in the picture, there is a hockey rink with
seating for 1200, a six sheet curling rink, handball and squash courts, and tennis courts next to the
building. The double rinks have removable boards between them to which gives the longest oval speed
skating rink in North America. This has given rise to a new varsity sport at UBC, and the formation of
the Haida speed skating club. The center is located on Wesbrook Crescent (where it becomes an
extension of 16th Avenue. The facilities are open for use by students most mornings without charge,
and skating goes every Friday and Saturday night. The center is also host for the Physical Education
voluntary hockey, skating and curling programmes.
^••■■yj^'r^-^L: . "^ '' >':^
hunderette basketballers
ooking to rigorous week
The UBC edition of the basketball
ThundiTcttes commence a rigorous week as they
meet the University of Regina twice on the
weekend. The University ot Saskatoon on Monday
mid Tuesday, and could conceivably start their
•knioi A league playoffs Wednesday night .
Wiiile you might think this is the schedule of an
NBA club it is in fact the upcoming agenda for a
croup of spirited athletes.
fho team presently has an overall record of 20
wins and five losses, and a respectable 9-1 record
in VvC 1AA competition. The conference should be
decided on Monday when the Thunderettcs take
on the only undefeated team in the personage
of Saskatoon.
The real action starts when the Senior A league
playoffs starts, as they meet Molsons in a two
game total point semi-finals series. This all leads to
the Canadian championships March 12 and 13th in
an undecided city in the Maritimes.
In terms of personnel the team is rather well
stocked in fine players. "There are some kids on
this team with tremendous ability and potential",
said co-coach Ken Shields, "They've really worked
hard and have performed very well".
Certainly two of the outstanding players on the
club are Betty Ross and Terri McGovern who have
consistently been top scorers as well as strong
defenders through the lengthy season. Ross and
McGovern also played for the Canadian National
team coached by Pat Jackson who happens to
direct the efforts of presently league leading
Saskatoon.
The club, as well as supplying members of the
Nationals also do extremely well on the local
"scene. The Thunderettes won the inter-city league
with an impressive 11 win 4 loss record, the first
time ever for a UBC club. If everything goes
according to Norm Vicker and Ken Shields' plans,
a Canadian title might not be entirely out of the
question.
The fan support to date has been non-existant
as the only people to watch are the coaches and
the occasional stray janitor. However that is not
indicative of the brand of ball in which these girls
indulge. They hustle, run, and gun in an authentic
fashion, work as a team and play defense which at
times has proven quite inpregnable.
If you feel motivated to come out and see for
yourself, game time on Friday and Saturday is 4
p.m.
Bob Molinski with an 18.3 point
average followed by guard Ron
Thorson at 18.2. Derek Sankey
remains the leading foul shooter
with his 81 percentage from the
line and rebounder in the
conference.
UBC travels to Victoria
Monday evening to meet the
Vikings, the only possible loss in
their remaining five conference
battles.
Tickets for the SFU game at
the Pacific Coliseum Feb. 14 are
now on sale at the Athletic
Department in War Memorial
Gym.
Basketball men
face easy games
By TONY GALLAGHER
The University basketball fans will again witness two bombings
this weekend as the University of Regina and Saskatoon come to UBC
to take their lumps.
Baring a minor miracle the
Birds should advance their
WCIAA season record to 13-0 as
they take on two outmanned
clubs from Saskatoon.
The Birds earlier downed their
Friday night opponents 91-53 in
Regina and defeated Saskatoon
the next night 110-66.
The Birds are currently rated
No. 1 in Canada according to the
CIAU national ratings which
includes all the Canadian clubs
with the exception of such
independents as SFU.
The current leader in season
scoring for the Birds is forward
Soccer Birds finally win
as Noble posts a shutout
The long drought has finally ended for the Thunderbirds
soccer team who defeated Paul's Tailors in a shutout, 3-0.
The win is not just the first for the Birds but perhaps a
forecast for things to come.
Goalie Rob Noble is following in the footsteps of last year's
all-star goalie, Barry Sadler, who set a league record in shutouts,
keeping opponents scoreless in 13 games.
The goals themselves were well spread out with UBC
displaying a balanced attack for the first time this season. After
fifteen minutes forward Gary Thompson scored. Ten minutes later
Tony Mayor tallied for the second score. Scoring ended five minutes
later with Gary Thompson getting his second goal and the team's
third.
Half-time score: UBC 3, Pauls 0.
In the second half the complexion changed slightly with the
loss of Tony Mayor and fullback Jim Jardine. Mayor went out due
to the flu while Jardine retired to visit the hospital for some stitches.
In spite of this, UBC still had scoring chances and managed to
contain Pauls offense with relative ease.
So therefore the scene is set for next week's action.
Wednesday night the Birds take on sixth place Firefighters and
Saturday second-to-last place North Shore.
If the Birds can take both games it will elevate them to a tie
with North Shore.
Intramurals
SKIING—The Intramural ski meet Is
being held on Mt. Seymour on Feb. 1,
that's this Sunday, at 11:00 p.m. All
competitors must pick up their numbers at the bottom of the race course
(Unicorn Run) no later than 10:00 p.m.
Registration for RUGBY ends on Feb.
12. See your Unit manager or come to
the Intramural office for registering.
BOWLING—Schedule now posted outside   the  Intramural  office.
SCHEDULE
BASKETBALL—Playoffs start on Feb.
—Jan. 30, 12.-3&: Pharm II vs. Grad
St.; Eng II vs. For II; Eng VIII vs. Kappa Sigma.
—Feb. 2, 12:30: PV 0 vs. Phi Delt I;
Dent U vs. Eng V; Swim Team vs. Kappa Sigma. 7:00: Beta II vs. PE IV; Figi
II vs. AD; Beta I vs. Union I. 8:00: DU
vs. MBA; Comm I vs. Figi I; SAM 'C* vs.
Kappa Sigma. 9:00: Beta Pledge vs.
Union II; PE VI vs. AD; SAM 'D* vs.
Beta. 10:00: Sigma Chi vs. Dekes; Arts
English vs. Pharm II.
—Feb.   3,   12:30:   SAM *C*  vs.     Figi.
HOCKEY—Feb. 3, Rink 1, 6:20: Beta
vs. PE. 7:35: Dekes vs. Aggies. 8:50: St.
Marks vs.  Sigma  Chi.
DICK BARRYMORE'S
"THE SECRET RACE"
tells the unique story of the 1966 World Ski Championships
held in Portillo, Chile
TWO  SHOWS:
TUES, FEB. 3
AND
THURS., FEB. 5
at  12:30
(&*
LIFE mag. called it "one of the two films that captures
the true feeling of skiing."
55  MINUTES - COLOR - 50c
OLD AUDITORIUM (N. of Math Bldg.)
ENGINEERS and
CABLE CAR BUFFS
You   could tour  the  San   Francisco
Cable  Car  Power House
and Car Barn courtesy of
For Details - See Page 10
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just  One  Block from  Campus
In The Village
(Next to  U.B.C.  Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph.  224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
DEBATING TOURNAMENT
UBC vs U. VICTORIA
"Resolved Marijuana Should Be
Immediately Legalized  .  .  .  "
Today - SUB Auditorium
- 3:30 -
BUSY  "B"
BOOKS
Used   University  Texts
Bought and  Sold
146 W.   HASTINGS
Opposite  Woodwards
681-4931 Friday, January 30, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
Newly-installed lamps work
but rugger squad does not
By SCOTT McCLOY
Rugby went under the lights at
Wolfson Field Wednesday night
and the players and coach Donn
.Spence were full of superlatives,
when talking about it.
"We had no difficulties
whatsoever. The great advantage is
that they're much higher than the
old ones so the ball doesn't get
lost in the lights as it used to,"
said the coach.
According to athletic business
manager Buzz Moore the new
lights were installed as a result of
a robbery in which some of the
old ones were stolen
They are a wide arc, sealed
beam floodlight made by Sylvania
and    distributed    by    Northern
Electric. UBC's physical plant
installed the twelve lights which
will stand up to winds of 75 miles
per hour.
Moore considers them a
bargain at a cost of approximately
$6,000.
; If these are successful, and
I every indication is that they will
j be, Thunderbird Stadium will be
Jnext according to Moore. If the
lights went in the stadium it
'would mean Friday night games
and this, authorities hope, would
mean greater patronage of their
events.
There were minor problems
though.
In the scrums the ball was
often lost in the harsh shadows.
Hockey Thunderbirds
aim for stranglehold
By DICK BUTTON
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey team will try to strengthen their
hold on fourth place this weekend against Brandon University and the
University of Saskatchewan. Saskatoon campus.
It is quite probable that this
weekend's action could shake up
the standings considerably.
Manitoba, barely holding onto top
place in the league plays the next
two teams in line, Alberta and
Calgary. Both teams are playing
better hockey than Manitoba, and
odds are on two losses for the
Bisons.
Edmonton is also showing a
distinct tendency to fade in the
late season, while Calgary and the
Thunderbirds are coming on
strong.
If the Birds are hoping to go
anywhere in the western playoffs,
they will have to prove themselves
this weekend and next. They have
a lot of momentum going for
them after playing two really
good hockey games last weekend,
land they must keep this
. momentum going.
! The trip will be physically
tiring for the Birds, as Trans Air
airlines will not be running on the
weekend, so the Birds face a long
bus trip to get out of Brandon.
Since Brandon has been doing
extremely well at home this year,
the Birds also face a rough game
Friday night.
In Braves action, Friday night
at 8:00 at the Winter Sports
C£rrtre„ they will meet Simon
Fraser in Pacific Intercollegiate
League play. It will be the last
meeting between these two teams
this year. SFU has picked up some
new players this term, and UBC
has lost some of their best, so it
could be a close game.
Photographers will have to use
flashes in their cameras as well.
Unfortunately the Birds
themselves did not fare so well.
They face a tough Georgians
squad and came up on the losing
end 14-9.
Injuries, and that bane of
winning teams -- inexperience -
took their toll. A few former
football players and some
members of the Braves crew were
used to bring the squad up to
strength.
"We made two glaring errors
which cost us six points and the
game," said Spence.
On a more optimistic note the
Birds beat the Meralomas
Saturday 15-6. The team scored
three trys and two penalty kicks
while the 'Lomas managed but
two penalty kicks.
The Birds have only one more
exhibition match left before
entering the university schedule
next week.
A select team from UVic and
UBC will take on the tentative
B.C. Reps, the team that will
represent the province in Japan.
Playing for UBC will be forwards
Grimsdick, Maclntyre, Jackson,
Hillier, and McAvitie, while the
backs will consist of Macintosh,
Austin (who is trying out for the
Reps) and McTavish. Doug Shick
is on the Reps side.
Game time at Thunderbird
Stadium is 2:30 p.m.
,   Volleyball T'Birds  j
I prepping  for meet!
This Sunday afternoon at War Memorial Gym the Thunderbird
volleyball team will start into its final lap of preparation for the
WCIAA volleyball tourney that they will be hosting here at UBC
Feb. 13 and 14.
Vancouver Marc, made up of a number of ex-Bird players will
be here in a regularly scheduled league game.
The Birds have just returned from a tournament in Calgary,
where playing against the other WCIAA teams they finished second
behind the University of Manitoba 15-8, 15-2. They beat last year's
champions, the University of Winnipeg Wesmen.
WCIAA HOCKEY
STANDINGS
GP    W
L
P
Manitoba
10     8
2
16
Calgary
9      8
1
16
Alberta
9      7
2
14
UBC
9      5
4
10
Brandon
9      4
5
8
Saskatchewan
8      4
4
8
Winnipeg
9      2
7
4
Victoria
9     0
9
0
Skiers look good
The UBC men's ski team is taking on some tough
competition this weekend at Banff and Lake Louise in the 23rd
annual International Intecollegiate Ski Meet.
The Birds will be aiming for University of Denver
Pioneers, the strongest of the American contingent at the meet.
The Birds are recognized as the class ot the Canadian field
but coach Dave Turner has the team aimed at the Colorado
school.
In the first three events, the Slalom, Giant Slalom and
cross-country the Birds are exceptionally strong. They do lack a
jumper, so stand to lose heavily in that event.
VARSITY SPORTS CENTRE
"YOUR VARSITY SKI SHOP"
RED TAG DAY
3 DAYS ONLY-THURS.-FRI.-SAT.
JAN. 29-30-31
10% - 20% - 30% SAVINGS ON
SKIS - BOOTS - SKI WEAR, ETC.
SKIS - Rossignol - Dynastar - Gresvig
Holzener - E.C.L.
BOOTS - La Dolomite - Le Trappeur
Vol d'Or
SKI JACKETS — up to 1/3 off
SKI SWEATERS — up to 1/3 off
SKI PANTS— 1/3 off
LOOK FOR THE RED TAGS!
ALL SALES FINAL
Open till 9 p.m. - Thursday & Friday
4510 W. 10th Ave. (Just 2 blocks outside the   gates) 224-6414
Ware***.*.*"*-
7(/irtte* Sfront* (fatfae
HANDBALL - SQUASH
PHYSICAL EDUCATION TIME IS AVAILABLE
MON. TO FRIDAY INCLUSIVE — EXCEPT ON
UNIVERSITY HOLIDAYS
UBC Students may use these facilities FREE from
8:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. each morning.
Squash Racquets are available for rent — 25c
Hand Gloves — 15c
Hand and Squash Equipment may be purchased
from the Sports Shop
At other than Phys. Ed. times, UBC Students may
reserve courts at a Rental Rate of 50c per person
(casual rate).
$5.00 per month or $15.00 to Sept. 15th
or $30.00 annually.
Phone 228-9708 Page  28
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1970
Career Assessments:
what you tell them
could get into
the wrong hands
By D. B. Scott
The Gazette, Western Ontario/CUP
When it comes to looking for a job, especially
when faced with the grosser, cattle-auction aspects of
job interviews, most of the students who'll graduate
this spring, would welcome someone paving their way
to that "good job with more pay."
And it was inevitable that some entrepreneur
would see the commercial possibilities of taking the
worry out of being hired.
And the scheme to take advantage of those
commercial possibilities is Career Assessments Ltd., a
computerized job placement service with a difference.
The difference is the setup, of the company and of
the customer (read product).
$$$$$SS$$S$SSSS$$SS§S.$$$$$$
Computer matching
Quite simply, Career Assessment Ltd. combines
the collation abilities of computer technology with the
results of behavioural studies to come up with a new
way of matching job hunters with employers.
"It will compare," a press release from the
company says, "what the students have to offer with
the employee characteristics sought by various
companies in hiring staff."
For the student taking advantage of the company's
service all that's required is five dollars and an hour or
so of his time.
He picks up a Biographical Inventory Blank and
fills in the required information. The Blank and its
instructions, according to promotional literature, will
be available in most college bookstores, or by sending a
cheque or money order to the company's Toronto
headquarters.
The information provided on the BIB is stored and
sorted by computer facilities of the Multiple Access
General Computer Corporation, located in Don Mills,
Ontario.
The interpreted result of the questionnaire is sent
to students in the form of a "personal counselling
report." Career Assessment says this report should tell
the student which areas of work he is best suited for.
The principle behind the BIB works this way
according to a CA producer: "The reasonable and basic
assumption behind the work in the field of "biodata"
is that people will most often behave in the future as
they have behaved in the past. It treats the person as an
individual, based on his unique life history antecedents,
but is related to the social milieu in which he exists."
$$ S $$ $ S $$ S S 5 S S S 5$ $ S S S S S $$ $ $
Who pays  CA?
The fee paid by students goes, not to Career
Assessments Ltd. but to the Human Studies
Foundation, "a non-profit, Canadian institution being
set up to further research into human resources, their
allocation and use."
If all the money for the BIB's goes to the Human
Studies Foundation, where does the profit of Career
Assessment come in?
From the employers.
For getting a selection service performed by CA,
employers pay a minimum of $500 to get several
acceptable candidates to fill two job vacancies, plus
five per cent of the first year's salary of the persons
hired.
If an additional employee is needed he can be
provided for $300 plus five per cent.
By the end of the first year of operation, CA
expects to have data on about 5,000 students to fit the
requirements of companies during the first trial period.
The data is extensive, running to 550
multiple-choice items on the BIB relating to every
espect of an applicant's past life. That data, combined
with the "empirical keys" developed by the
Foundation, using past research results, forms the
backbone of Career Assessment's product.
Career Assessment's president, Matt Hudson, is a
long-time student of the art of student marketing,
although not a very successful one. He is a
wheeler-dealer lawyer not unfamiliar with making a
buck out of the student market.
While at Queen's University in law, he was
involved in an organization called Mr. Campus. It sold
national and local advertising for desk blotters to be
distributed on campus and for some time raised charter
overseas flights.
Contrary to quite a few federal laws, Mr. Campus
sold flights to Europe and Jamaica even though they
were declared uncharterworthy by the Canadian
government. To get around this, they continued to
solicit passengers, but routed them through other
charter groups, also an illegal arrangement.
He was also involved in an abortive attempt to set
up a national advertising scheme. According to
Hudson, he was approached by a number of university
newspapers to pilot the scheme, but pulled out when
he encountered stiff opposition, notably from
Canadian University Press and its president, Stewart
Saxe.
Saxe said Hudson had too little know-how, a poor
plan, and was starting too late for the scheme to be
viable. The set up and sales techniques in Career
Assessment and associated companies is far more
sophisticated, than in his previous ventures.
$$$$???$$$$$$<?$<?$$$$$$$$<?•{>•?
Interlocking directorships
Career Assessment has nine members on its board
of directors. Hudson is president, James Hinckling
(listed as "one of Canada's foremost industrial
psychologists") is vice-president and Mr. George Elliot
(a Toronto Lawyer) is secretary treasurer.
Multiple Access General Computer Corporation's
vice-presidents of finance and marketing respectively,
Harold Andrews and C. J. Kurtz, are directors as are
the two psychologists in charge of the Human Studies
Foundation, Dr. Edwin R. Henry and Dr. William
Owens.
The staff psychologists are both from the U.S. Dr.
Henry is described as semi-retired, formerly chairman
of the Department of psychology of New York
University, Director of Social Science Research for
Standard Oil of New Jersey and Director of Selection
of the Peace Corops.
Dr. Owens, presently at the university of Georgia,
a professor and Director of "Psychometric
Laboratory", is said in promotional literature, to be
President of the Division of Industrial Psychology of
the American Pschological Association.
None of the other "eminent psychologists"
described by Hudson as working under Messrs. Owens
and Henry are named.
Hudson said the other two directors haven't yet
been named, but said they would be representatives of
two groups of shareholders. When asked if there were
any large shareholders he refused to say but did say "I
can tell you this, the company is 98 per cent
Canadian-owned."
He said both the corporation (Career Assessment)
and the Human Studies Foundation started at the same
time (1969) but legally, the Corporation began first.
"In terms of concept, they came together," he
said.
"The concept is really one of research — there's
going to have to be an awful lot of research done if this
placement idea is to get better. But a research
foundation doesn't happen to pay its own way so we're
going to have to get donations from corporations and
the government."
Hudson refused to name any trustees of the
foundation, saying that they were just at the stage of
asking people if they would consider joining the
organization.
But in promotional literature sent to bookstores,
the sales pitch was made in the name of the
foundation.
From the letter: "The trustees of the Foundation
have decided to make use of on-campus bookstores as
distribution points for the Biographical Inventory
Blank."
$ % $|$ $$$ $ $ $£'i$.$ $t £$$$.$■$ $•$.$ $
Bookstore involved
But the University of Western Ontario bookstore
manager told the Foundation not to bother sending the
unwanted and unordered BIB's and denied use of the
bookstore name in any Career Assessment advertising.
The letter sent by the organization took cooperation by
bookstore authorities as a foregone conclusion, to the
point of giving instructions on how to remit money
when the BIB's arrived.
The technique used to get people to sign up for
the scheme and to handle the BIB's for sale is typically
high pressured. The student is told in an ad that he has
less than one week to purchase, complete and mail the
form if he or she doesn't want to miss out.
Similarly, the bookstore is told time is of the
essence for students to benefit.
Hudson said CA would be providing some funds
for the Foundation because the $5 BIB fee wouldn't
cover even the processing of the form. But initially, he
said, the Foundation hoped to get government grants
to support the research.
The question of storage of statistical minutiae and
the possible abuse that could be made of this
information was "a very important ethical question,"
according to Hudson.
The Foundation will only use the information for
research with permission, he said.
Permission, however, consists of signing a consent
form contained in the initial BIB. If the consent form
is signed, putting the data in a pool for channeling to
prospective employers under the screening process, it
also gives permission for use in the Foundation's
research. So far the areas of research have only been
defined as "human resources and their application."
■$$ $$$$$$$$ $$$ $ $ 1 $lf$ $;$ $ .$■$ $
It's all legal but. . .
An applicant can withdraw his data, according to
Hudson, at any time with a letter to the Foundation.
Career Assessment Limited and the Human Studies
Foundation leave a lot of questions unanswered.
Hudson and his form are financially stable and
Career Assessments is a registered corporation. The
method of collecting the data and the setting up of the
non-profit corporation is legal.
But no safeguards are made for the possible abuse
of privileged information. And Matthew Hudson is not
a man to instill a lot of confidence in the prospective
applicant. Caveat emptore still prevails.
One thing you have to say for Hudson though. For
a pyschologist, he's a good capitalist.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0304623/manifest

Comment

Related Items