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The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1970

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Array HOSTEL UP TO STUDENTS
Z_~0^ fy GINNY GALT AMS Activities Co-Oidinatoi Hanson Lau stressed the     100 would be set. The list of 100 would be
By GINNY GALT
Students will decide the fate of Jericho Hostel
residents at a special meeting Tuesday noon at SUB plaza.
The decision to take the issue to the students was
made at an emergency Alma Mater Society council
meeting Thursday night after a groundswell of opposition
forced the council executive to re-assess the stand taken
Wednesday night.
AMS Activities Co-Ordinator Hanson Lau stressed the
need for the general meeting.
"A motion was passed at council Wednesday night.
There was a big fiasco with a lot of wrong publicity in the
media," said Lau.
"A lot of students are under delusions about what we
are going to do. The meeting is to inform them exactly
what we're going to do."
JERICHO HOSTEL STAFFER Lyn Atkins asked council Wednesday night to help house young people who will be
displaced when the army camp hostel closes in two weeks. Council agreed to try it for a week. But Thursday they
changed their minds and Jericho students will now have to carry their appeal to a general meeting Tuesday.
Council had decided to open SUB to Jericho residents
for a one week trial period when the residents are forced
out of the army camp hostel - expected to close in two
weeks time. (See story page 3.)
It took council about one-half hour Thursday night
to vote 13 to three in favor of holding the general
meeting.
Lau — who had been assigned Wednesday the
responsibility for working out the details of the
accommodation in SUB - has formulated a list of
regulations.
The stipulations, which are being distributed around
campus on a leaflet, include:
•      Due to a lack of facilities, an arbitrary limit of
100 would be set. The list of 100 would be drawn up by
the Jericho Hostel staff according to their priorities.
• The building would be run as usual during the
day. At midnight, anyone wishing to stay in the building
overnight must report to Lau. (This includes students and
non-students - but non-residents must be on the list.)
• No liquor or drugs will be allowed, and there
will be no cooking in the building.
• SUB will be locked at 1 a.m. as usual. At 7 a.m.
all people are to clean up their belongings and leave.
• Anyone refusing to comply with the rules, or
causing a disturbance will be removed.
• Hostel staff will be responsible for organizing
hostel members into clean-up crews.
• Speak Easy will help with clean-up, security,
and counselling. Two chaplains have agreed to sleep in and
help.
• There will be extra security guards working
with Lau.
• The transients will sleep in sleeping bags on the
main floor of SUB.
• The Inner City Service Project will continue to
provide twice-a-day meal service to the transients, but
they'll have to go off campus.
AMS president Tony Hodge told The Ubyssey at the
Thursday meeting that a vote will be called on the council
motion at the general meeting.
As a special general meeting, a two-thirds vote of a
quorum of at least 2,000 students will be necessary to
make a decision on the hostel proposal binding. Voting
will be by a show of hands.
Other items on the agenda of Tuesday's general
meeting will include a statement of AMS proposals
regarding action over the provincial government's refusal
to grant a draft beer licence for SUB, and an
announcement by Hodge about the Amchitka protest
benefit concert planned for Oct. 16.
(In an effort to raise money to finance the purchase
of a ship to sail to Amchitka, off the Alaska coast -
where anothe nuclear blast is scheduled for September,
1971 - the AMS is supporting a concert in the Pacific
Coliseum, Hodge said.
The concert will feature Joni Mitchell, Phil Ochs,
and Chilliwack. Tickets will be $3 each, Hodge said.)
Opposition to the hostel proposal was swift
Thursday.
By mid-morning several student groups has visited the
AMS executive office with mentions of petitions against
the council action.
And several undergrad societies voiced official
opposition - including the agriculture and home-ec, who
held general meetings in their faculties Thursday noon and
voted heavily against the plan.
A random survey by The Ubyssey also confirmed
generally negative student reaction to the proposal to
house the Jericho residents in SUB.
If implemented, will the plan cost UBC students
anything?
Lau says not.
"We are going to demonstrate that the people who
come in will cause no extra work to the night janitorial
staff. They'll clean up their own mess.
"And I'm thinking of taking our liability insurance
for that week in case of danger," Lau said.
Continued on Page 2: see HOSTEL
iS.-!
Peterson rules against campus beer licence
By ROBIN BURGESS
Ai far as "attorney-general Leslie Peterson, js
concerned, UBC' students won't be get ling a draft
beer pub on campus    and that's final.
In a two-paragraph letter to Alma Mater Society
president Tony Hodge. Thursday, Peterson said flatly
that "the Cabinet is not prepared to alter the
Order-in-Council at this time."
The oider-fh-council m question prohibits the
granting of a draft beer licence in the Point Grey area.
On Aug. 6 Hodge wrote Peterson tequcsting the
matter be put before the Cabinet.
The AMS has been negotiating with the liquor
control board for a draft beer licence for SUB since
July of 1969.
"I think this is an incredible reply from Peterson,"
said Hodge.
'*Over 17.000 students on campus are over the
legal drinking age and Peterson is telling them in
effect to 'go lu hell' ".
Hodge said the AMS is "definitely" planning
further action-.
"There've been brick walls before this one."
He said council will have some kind of a proposal
to bring before the students in connection with this
issue at Tuesday's general meeting.
The AMS has been seeking a licence to help
finance the outfitting of a permanent pub, the Pit. in
the basement of SUB.
The order-in-cowieil filled a loop-hole in the
Liquor Act which allowed a draft beer licence for
buildings other than hotels, when there is no hotel in
the area.
There is no hotel on Point Grey but the special
order prohibits the licence, which only the provincial %
cabinet can reverse. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970
Separatists clash over blueprints for independence
CLAUDE CHAR RON, CHARLES GAGNON (below)
.. parliamentarian, revolutionary
By JOHN ANDERSEN
and PAUL KNOX
The differences between
revolutionary Quebec socialism
and the Parti Quebecois came into
sharp focus for 500 UBC students
Tuesday.
Charles Gagnon of the Quebec
Liberation Front (FLQ) told the
students in SUB ballroom that
theere can be no true political
independence for Quebec until it
is freed from the shackles of
monopoly capitalism.
Gagonon was debating Claude
Charron, 23-year-old Parti
Quebecois member of the Quebec
legislature.
Charron maintained that the
social revolution in Quebec can
come only after the province's
electoral majority has voted for
separatism.
But Gagnon said the electoral
system in Quebec is merely an
instrument for placing power in
the hands of a small elite at the
expense of the people.
"The electoral system is a
fraud," he said. "The first task of
the Quebec people is to destroy
Hostel
from page 1
But AMS treasurer Stuart
Bruce said this project would
probably result in over-time work
by the janitorial staff "which I'm
sure the administration will bill
the students for."
Bruce said SUB is technically
owned by thee administration,
but the students have a 45-year
lease for $1 a year, in an
agreement which makes physical
plant (administration) responsible
for the maintenance of the
building.
"The building will end with
people in for 24 hours a day, and
human bodies leave dirt, whether
they're hippies or what," said
Bruce.
He couldn't say what the extra
expenses could actually amount
to.
The motion passed Wednesday
night by council was in response
to a plea that Jericho residents
would have nowhere else to go
when the hostel closed.
Lynn Atkins, a hostel staff
member, said Thursday that there
are other proposals for transient
accommodation in the works —
but nothing is definite, and
nothing will be ready for the next
two-week deadline imposed by
the hostel's expected closing date.
Atkins noted that city council
has passed a motion authorizing
any agency to set up a hostel,
providing the operations "meet all
the department regulations and
by-laws - which is really
difficult."
Hodge, who did not support
council's hostel decision, said the
AMS has taken Mayor Campbell
off the hook.
"So they'll come out here for a
week, but what's going to happen
to them after that week when
they get tossed out?
"We're only prolonging a crisis
by a week. And when they get
locked out this time, they won't
blame the federal, provincial or
municipal governments — they'll
blame the AMS."
the present system."
He attacked the PQ for its
sympathy toward American
capitalists, which the PQ believes
would help Quebec attain
ecomomic independence from
Canada.
"If you people agree with
David Rockefeller," he told
Charron, "your independence will
be paper independence.
"You either choose to work
with the bourgeoisie or you
choose to work with the working
class.
"You can't negotiate with
American corporations. They go
where they want, when they want
to do what they want."
Charron accused Gagnon of
attempting to make a revolution
without having any idea of what
would come afterwards.
He said the Quebec liberation
movement had passed the point
of no return with the April 29
provincial election, in which 30
per cent of the French speaking
population of Quebec voted for
the PQ.
Quebec people have been
discovering the French language
and culture, he said.
"The last ten years have been a
long discovery of ourselves. When
a people begin to discover and
believe in themselves, nothing can
stop them," he said.
However, he added, Quebec
independence could only be
achieved by a hard struggle.
Gagnon agreed.
Quebec society is like any
other colonized society, he said.
He attacked statements the PQ
leader Rene  Levesque  made to
1,500 students Monday. Levesque
said the next provincial election
will be the "last chance for a
freely elected separatist
government."
Said Gagnon: "There is no last
chance  for  a  people engaged in
struggle. They go on fighting.
"We know very well there is
going to be trouble in Quebec. No
colonized people ever free
themselves without a struggle.
"We know we are going to be
engaged in a long struggle."
It's time to get out and do something.
If you don't know where to start, start with Speakeasy.
We can find you a club for just about any interest you can think
of. If we can't find your kind of club we'll help you through
the political hassle of getting one started.
Hopefully a few of you have found places to eat, buy
food and obtain other necessities at a reasonable price. Don't be
selfish, share it.
Speakeasy is working on a list of places to save money
which we'll get printed as soon as we have enough to make it
worthwhile. We'd also appreciate any money-saving hints and
You might be wondering what your prof meant when he
announced his office hours. Don't think this is the only time he
works.
Office hours are the times that profs and instructors set
aside for their students. If there's anything bothering you about
the course, the university or anything else drop by and see him
during office hours. He'll, or she'll, be willing to talk about it.,
Speakeasy would like to print letters from readers on
anything of interest, common problems or personal opinion.
The only problem is that we haven't had any letters yet this
year.
If you ever do write to us, just be sure to mail it (or drop
it off yourself). Our mailing address is Speakeasy, Box 115,
SUB, Campus.
Speakeasy — open every weekday 11:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
in SUB 234, phone 228-3700.
THE ORIGINAL
MANDRAKE
THE MAGICIAN
And His Nightclub Show
#* Friday, September 25, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Split council approves hostel in Wednesday vote.
By GINNY GALT
Student council's decision to open SUB as an
emergency shelter for transients when Jericho Hostel
closes was not an easy one.
The motion and two amendments — which may yet
be rejected by the students at a general meeting Tuesday
— were finally passed after nearly an hour of heated
debate at Wednesday's council meeting.
The motion, which was not officially on the agenda,
was proposed by Evert Hoogers, grad students' association
representative.
"Should adequate facilities not be made to house
these people, council is prepared to provide space and
facilities in SUB in response to this emergency situation,"
Hoogers' motion said in part.
During the course of the meeting, two amendments
were added.
Engineering undergraduate society representative
Chris Green moved that the provision of these facilities be
initially restricted for a period of one week following the
closing of Jericho Hostel (which will be in about two
weeks).
After the one week trial period, the project could be
evaluated, student reaction assessed, and a decision on the
continuation of the project made.
The second amendment, also moved by Green, was
that AMS activities co-ordinator Hanson Lau be
responsible for the organization and operation of the
project.
And it stipulated that there would be no cooking in
the building in connection with the project.
Council voted nine to seven in favor of the motion
and amendments.
After the initial proposal, Jericho staff member Lyn
Atkins said the hostel situation in Vancouver was serious.
"It's an urgent situation. These people have no other
place to go," Atkins said.
Lau and external affairs officer John Zaozirny asked
how long these people would be housed in SUB.
"Are we in for a hostel for eight months?" Zaozirny
demanded.
Grad students' association president Dave Mole, who
had seconded Hoogers' motion, said that was "quite
possible" unless federal, provincial or municipal
governments acted.
Treasurer Stuart Bruce pointed out that members of
the Alma Mater Society are not allowed to stay in the
building overnight.
"If non-members are allowed to stay overnight,
should we let members stay overnight?"
Lau suggested that UBC cope with this situation for
one week, and that the people who come would clean up
the building.
But Hoogers said this is an emergency situation and
this facility should remain open until the emergency
situation is over.
Arts undergrad representative Don Palmer said he
would support the motion in full only if it would involve
looking after these people one or two weeks at the most.
Hostel staffer Valerie Angell said the transients
needed AMS support to put pressure on the municipal
government to take some action.
"The university has so much influence in the
community," Angell said.
AMS president Tony Hodge said if the motion went
through, the AMS would be taking every level of
government off the hook.
Zaozirny said he would like to help but, on the basis
of his discussions with federal government representatives,
it wasn't his impression that they were not about to act.
"And the municipal government will definitely not
act."
"So when it comes right down to it, you're not about
to help other people less fortunate than yourselves," Mole
charged.
Two observers shouted:
"These people are cold, for fuck sake."
"We just want you people to get up off your
lily-white asses and help these people!"
Bruce moved that the whole motion and amendments
be tabled a week.
"I sense a real split. I suggest that if the Jericho
people have not found another place in one week, they
should come back," Bruce said.
The motion was defeated.
Bruce said after the meeting he didn't know the issue
would be presented to council until he read it in
Wednesday morning's Province.
Before the final vote was taken, Hodge said the issue
involved more than just opening the doors and spreading
mattresses on the floor.
"I don't know if anyone has considered who will pay
if any damage or theft occurs in the building."
"Last year we were involved in quite a deep fight over
the maintenance of the building, which came to $20,000
with repair and replacement of furniture."
Lau said he was prepared to take full responsibility of
the program — where people would sleep, security
precautions, number limitations and other technical
problems.
"If it works out, we'll extend it. If it doesn't work
out, well.. . I'm prepared to make it work out," Lau said.
Hostel staff, youth divided
ADDRESSING COUNCIL Wednesday night is Ron Moorhouse,
spokesman for the public relations committee at Jericho Hostel.
"Look, we're not lazy. We're prepared to clean up after
ourselves," Moorhouse said.
Attacks continue
After a two-month lay-off, University Boulevard is once
again the scene of a rape.
A 21-year-old co-ed was grabbed from behind while walking
east on the dimly-lit street last Friday about 8 p.m., and carried
into the woods where she was bound, gagged, blindfolded and
then raped, RCMP said.
The rapist then released her, telling her to count to 50
before getting up.
RCMP say the method is the same used on three other girls
earlier this year in the same area. A spokesman Thursday said
they are investigating several angles, but have no clear lead.
"All we can do is issue a warning to single girls not to
hitch-hike or walk alone in this area," he said.
By ROBIN BURGESS
Finding out what Jericho
residents think of the Alma Mater
Society's decision to provide
temporary housing in SUB
depends on who you talk to.
A Ubyssey survey Thursday at
the hostel revealed that many
Jericho residents were doubtful
the Alma Mater Society scheme
would work.
They said the plan — devised to
given a place to stay — would be a
"fuck-up" that would "ruin
SUB".
Of the several people randomly
picked by The Ubyssey, most felt
the plan would not provide a
workable solution to the closing
of Jericho.
But another staff worker at
Jericho, Valerie Angell — who was
among those appearing before
council Wednesday night - said
student support for the proposed
scheme is essential.
"These are kids striving to
make something of themselves
and they're not getting any help."
She referred to the fears voiced
by some students that the Jericho
residents will cause property
damage in SUB if allowed to stay.
"The Jericho hostel is
dirty and many of the kids don't
even seem to be able to pick up
after themselves," she said. "But
you have to understand that the
total dehumanizing way they've
been forced to live has put many
in a despondent, hopeless state of
mind."
"They've got to have a place to
put down roots. They're not
transients. They're kids struggling
for survival."
Housing the Jericho residents
in SUB will not be a, permanent
solution, she said, but mainly a
way of bringing home their
situation to the student body, and
therefore the community.
Other residents interviewed
didn't agree.
"Frigging around moving
people here and there is not going
to solve anything," said a man
from Sudbury Ont., who arrived
at Jericho Wednesday night.
He suggested that instead of
moving to SUB the Jericho
residents should "dig in" where
they are and refuse to leave.
Ann, a youth worker,
cautioned that unless students are
willing to hire professional staff to
look after the youths' needs, the
scheme will be a "big fuck-up."
"What about band-aids, toilet
paper, paper, pens? Who's going
to provide the kids with those
things —. because they'll be asking
for them."
If the students want to help
they would do better by raising
money, she suggested.
Moving the Jericho residents to
SUB will actually be "playing into
Campbell's hands," she said. Once
the students take over the
responsibility Campbell can wash
his hands of the whole affair.
A lot of well-meaning students
are going to get their eyes opened,
said Ann.
"There's going to be junkies in
the SUB washroom shooting up
.. . that sort of thing."
Hazel, a volunteer worker from
Nova Scotia was more vehement.
"I feel sorry for the students.
You're going to have a ruined
SUB."
"The kids here are typical of
society in general. Ninety-five per
cent don't give a goddamn."
One hostel veteran from the
Beatty St. Armoury said if the
Jericho residents are moved to
SUB he'll go along.
"As long as they keep having
stop-gap solutions all winter, I'll
be alright."
A transient from Stratford was
enthusiastic about the scheme.
"I think it's a great idea. I
walked up to SUB the other day.
It's nice up there on the hill."
Gage opposed
By JAN O'BRIEN
Walter Gage, administration president, doesn't think the
Alma Mater Society council should have done it.
"It's an all-Canadian problem," he said of the need for
accommodation for the Jericho residents, "and if facilities are
needed, the federal government should maintain them or provide
other alternatives.
"The student council should have urged the federal
government to keep the hostel open if there is really a need for
it."
Gage made the comments Thursday morning as he entered
the first year math class he teaches.
Shortly after the encounter with a Ubyssey reporter,
information director Arnie Myers contacted The Ubyssey to
clarify Gage's comments.
Gage told The Ubyssey that in an overcrowded university
like UBC, all available space should be reserved for the students
"who pay for it".
Meyers pointed out that Gage had meant to say also that
students are hardly justified in complaining about over-crowding
if they allow the Jericho residents into SUB.
Asked about what the administration policy towards the
residents will be if and when they actually reach the endowment
lands, Gage entered the math class:
 "This is all I have to say." ^^ Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
.228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 25,1970
To the rear, march
We should have known it was too good to be true.
When the AMS council finally took a stand on a
crucial issue and announced its intention to back that
stand with action, we should have known that the
gutless wonders who pass themselves off as our student
government would reverse field in record time.
Wednesday night, council firmly committed itself
to making SUB available to the transient youth being
evicted from the Jericho hostel. The federal, provincial
and municipal governments were trying to wash their
hands of their responsibilty, but the valiant AMS was
going to step into the breach.
Less than 24 hours later, the AMS had waffled its
way back to the beginning.
The rhetoric that flew around the council
chamber Thursday night was an experience in itself.
"Let's call a general meeting and see what the students
think of our action," they said. "We're only the
students' representatives."
That fine sounding statement from the same
people who, week after week, make decisions without
the slightest effort to determine the mass opinion.
But this time, with student councillors challenged
to show some courage and stand by their decision, the
tune changed. Suddenly, the AMS no longer saw itself as
a government elected to make decisions, but only as a
kind of standing public opinion poll.
The council's first decision would have meant
slapping the faces of the federal government, which
thinks social problems can vanish with the closing of a
hostel, and mayor Tom Campbell, whose redneck
mentality converts human misery into an election
scapegoat.
The decision would have meant allowing people to
actually sleep in the AMS's sterile edifice. It may even
have meant incurring the wrath of the university
administration.
Quite simply, council was scared.
Allowing transients to spend the night in SUB is
not going to solve the basic problems.
It will not change an economy that does not
provide enough meaningful jobs. It will not alleviate the
social conditions that force increasing numbers of youth
onto the road.
What it will do is put a roof over the heads of
people who desperately need it..
In a small way, it will mean the university
stepping down from its middle-class pedestal and doing
something to help people.
This time, the AMS didn't have the guts to do it.
Our only hope is that those council members who
supported the original motion will stand up for their
convictions at Tuesday's general meeting.
LETTERS
Editor: Nate Smith
News     Maurice Bridge
City     John Gibbs
Wire        John Andersen
Photo    Alan Katowitz
Sports    Scott McCioy
Associate     John Twigg
Ass't City    Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Managing        Bruce Curtis
Page Friday    Tim Wilson
Art Smolensky showed up with two
cases of stolen beer and the party
began.
Sharon Boylen was so mad at the
proceedings she mumbled something
about castration. Caroline Woodward,
who insisted her name be spelled
correctly this time, agreed. So Michelle
Gelfand's opus was cut. It bled out of
control.
Sandy Kass went into labor. Peter
Woodward raped an RCMP officer, but
they haven't caught him yet. Josephine
Margolis spent a long time trying to get
something good for Shane McCune —
he deserved it everybody agreed. Shane
agreed and put it in his pipe and began
to smoke when the RCMP officer came
in looking for Peter.
Amarjeet Rattan was the first to
realize what was happening so while
Leslie Plommer occupied the cop in
the darkroom, Dave Schmidt and
Kelvin Beckett slipped out the back
way. Just on principle they said.
Ken Lassesenand Dave Klassen went
to help in the darkroom. But Shane
was still smoking so Ginny Gait took
the matter in hand. And the solution?
Nobody would say but Jan O'Brien
had a solution. And John Twigg came
up with something. Paul Knox did
things he hasn't done in a long time.
Tony Gallagher, Keith Dunbar and
Peter had meanwhile gone in search of
Maureen Gans. The cop was still there.
Peter was hiding. Dave Enns, Bill
Loiselle, and Kevan Perrins were really
worried. But when the cop saw David
Bowerman, he left.
But Robin Burgess was still working.
So everything was happy in the end
and the big staff meeting — for all
staff, especially new blorgs — is on
again for noon today in the office.
Nate said I could congratulate the
council for trying at least. He wanted a
biting editorial so he refused to.
'Chauvinism
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am part of the problem of
Americanization in Canadian
universities, the subject of recent
editorial comment. I worked with
a Canadian advisor in California
and in Edmonton, but I am
American and the mathematics
and medicine which I now teach
are, therefore bad stuff.
You suggest that UBC
promulgate two new regulations,
one making it difficult to hire
non-Canadian teachers and
another making it impossible to
grant non-Canadians tenure or
positions of educational policy or
responsibility. Any new
bureaucratic rigidity is likely to
make UBC more Canadian, if not
more warm friendly or scholarly,
but I especially like your
bureaucratic proposals. What
could make an American feel at
home more quickly than
chauvinism?
You are properly outraged that
"studies at a number of
universities have revealed students
who write about American issues
using phrases like 'our problem'."
I,     too,     am     dismayed     by
Davies Ravies
By JIM DAVIES
Looking through the big
statements made so far this year
at UBC, the term "credibility
gap" becomes rather
understandable.
• Housing czar Les
Rohringer on male and female
students who will soon be living in
co-op residences:
What he says: "We can't let
those students have all the fun."
"What he really means:
"Screwing in the hallways will not
be permitted."
• Carleton Prof Robin!
Matthews on the influx of
American teachers to Canadian
universities:
What he says: "It's
neo-colonialism of the .worst
kind."
What he really means: "I'm a
Canadian."
• UBC medicine prof
William Webber on forgetting the
nationality of teachers and
concentrating only on academic
qualifications:
What he says: "Any other
criteria is extranious."
What he really means: "I'm an
American."
• UBC   Thunderbird   coach
Frank Gnup after his team's latest
loss to Calgary:
What he says: "Calgary came
to play."
What he really means: "We got
the pimping shit pounded right
out of us."
• UBC classics head Malcolm
MacGregor on students:
What he says: "Students are
here to study."
What he really means:"All of
those furshlugginer campus
radicals should be taken out
behind the barn and shot down
like dogs."
• UBC registrar Jack P?-"all
on classroom space:
What he says: "We're waiting
for new additions, but we don't
know when they'll be finished."
What he really means: "The
tarpaper shacks and army huts
will be here forever, baby.
• Ubyssey columnist Jim
Davies on this column:
What he says: "I'm not quite
satisfied with the finished
product."
What  he really  means:    i'm
pissed off that my porno column
got cut and I had to submit a
second effort."
suggestions that the Viet Nam
war, exploitation and abuse of
racial minorities or hippies, urban
low-cost housing and transit,
pollution and destruction of the
land and the role of the university
in society are not exclusively
American issues.
If American ideas continue to
infiltrate Canada, it is an alarming
possibility that Canadian students *
may increasingly ask not whether
Canadian citizenship should be
added to present requirements of
UBC professors, but whether the
Ph.D. and other documents now
used as the basis for hiring and
tenure have relevance to the
education of students.
Indeed, there are American
universities where basic concepts
of professorship, exams, tenure,
and finance, are already under
fire. Should such distress be
permitted to cross the border?
(Some Canadian immigration
officials have suggested that
Simon Fraser University could
have avoided its PSA mess by
adopting your policy.)
Does your anti-Americanism go
far enough?' Should not Canada
also ban American books, films,
rock music, artichokes, and
deodorants?
You know, of course, that
Americans do not smell the same
as Canadians. Being from a warm
climate, Americans are a happy
race, but naturally lazy and
simple-minded, not to mention
their primitive sexuality. <
NED GLICK
Mathematics department.
Silence
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
"Speech is silver, silence is
gold-
Considering the foolishness
which is so openly expressed in
your editorials, I would suggest
you follow the wise example of
president Gage.
W. ALDERLIESTEN
Arts 4
No Vote
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On Sept. 18, you printed an
article urging all those people over
19 who have lived in Vancouver
for a year to register as voters for
the civic elections.
I missed my lunch hour atwork
and hastened frantically through
traffic I would not normally
endure to go to the registration
office on Yukon Street. When I
arrived, I found I could not
register because I am not a
Canadian citizen or a British
subject.
The person who wrote the
article must have been aware of
that stipulation. If he wasn't he
should have been duty-bound to
spend the mite of energy required
to research the matter. I wonder
how many other landed
immigrants jwere led to waste
time, energy and money because
of such thoughtless and easily
correctible error.
JOHN M. LANKFORD
The citizenship requirement
was not mentioned because it was
assumed to be obvious.—Ed.
Letters to the editor must be
signed and, if possible, typed.
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for reasons of
brevity, legality, grammar or taste. Friday, September 25, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Government spending cutback
slices UBC budget increase
By JOHN TWIGG
Academic planning director Robert Clark says
UBC will in the coming fiscal year receive the
lowest percentage increase in its operating grants
since World War II.
"We're very badly prepared for this. We have to
realize there has been a turning against universities
by the public," Clark told the faculty association
meeting Thursday noon in Bu. 106.
He said both the federal and provincial
governments are very concerned that university
operating costs are rising faster than any other
government financed institutions.
"This is not just an increase in student
enrolment," said Clark, "it is a rapid increase in
costs per student."
University president Walter Gage also had
gloomy news about the financial future of UBC.
Appearing live and in color at the association's
fiftieth anniversary meeting, he said:
"Few of you may remember the strenuous days
of the '30s when the closure of the university by the
government was a distinct possibility.
"Unfortunately, it (the government) may feel
the same way now."
Gage prefaced his address by saying: "I'm only
here in spirit because according to The Ubyssey I
don't exist (laughter). So I'm not really giving an
official address."
Clark said the federal government wants to
curtail its financing of higher education because it is
committed to pay half of the total costs but has no
control over that amount.
He said the provincial government wants to
curtail its education spending because of general
financial difficulties.
"The times ahead are not going to be easy
financially,"said Gage.
"The premier can say at most times that the
province is flourishing, but he said only a few weeks
ago that things will not be so easy.
"This is bad news for UBC," says Gage.
Clark made two suggestions of ways to aid
university financing.
"It's going to be necessary to have some
increase in grad student fees," he said. "They pay
less than five per cent of the cost of putting
themselves through their courses."
And Clark moved that the faculty association
executive ask the board of governors and the Alma
Mater Society to cooperate with other B.C.
universities in a public education campaign.
His motion was tabled to the next meeting for
further discussion.
In other business, about 100 association
members heard law prof C. B. Bourne present a
report on the meeting last week the Canadian
Association of University Teachers executive, of
which he is a member.
The discussion concentrated on the Simon
Fraser University firings but no decision was
reached and the matter was tabled to the next
meeting for further debate.
There appeared to be an equal amount of
support for the fired profs as there was for the SFU
administration.
One prof, irate at hearing support for the fired
profs, asked association president Peter Pearse how
many members had withdrawn their membership in
the CAUT over the SFU issue.
He said he had heard many of his friends
complaining about the CAUT censure of SFU. When
told only two UBC profs had left the association,
the prof sat down to ridiculing laughter.
Earlier in the meeting, Pearse said he had
prepared an outline for the board of governors on
faculty wages so the board could make approximate
allowances in its next budget".
He told the association that the average profs
salary rose 11 per cent with continuing staff getting
a somewhat higher raise.
Pearse said the gap between UBC pay scales and
those at eastern universities was somewhat
narrowed, but only because of a breakdown of
negotiations at the University of Toronto.
"The salaries of grad students sure didn't go up
by that much," said former GSA president Art
Smolensky.
Meeting set to organize TA's
UBC teaching assistants have
decided that their lot needs
improving.
A leaflet calling on all TAs to
organize asks them to come to a
meeting at noon next Thursday in
Buchanan 202.
English TAs Evert Hoogers and
Peter Beyer say in the leaflet that
the major aim of an association
would be a clear-cut university
policy on hiring and firing,
grievance procedures, wages and
working conditions.
They add that "direct
bargaining . . . will permit them
(TAs) the just opportunity to
decide on the service they render
to the university."
Such a statement has been
sought from arts dean Doug
Kenny but he said the matter
didn't require urgent attention.
Said Hoogers in an interview:
"Simon Fraser University has a
TA association and most U.S.
colleges have one also.
"Many TAs rely on their salary
for their support. At $2,200 for a
first-year TA that means a low
standard of living."
His leaflet says non-faculty
teachers are "a bountiful source
of cheap labor."
Said Hoogers: "An association
will demand direct, speedy action
on grievances and will demand an
equal and just say in decisions on
them."
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PAYMENT OF FEES
Today - Friday,
September 25, 1970
is last date for payment of fees before
$25.00 late payment fee is assessed.
Friday, October 9, 1970
is date your registration will be cancelled
if the first installment of your fees is not
fully paid. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970
Ghosts — dead ideas, customs,
people — haunt our lives and
cripple our desires. Truth, "the
simple truth", struggles to make
itself known, with equally
devastating effects.
The Frederick Wood Theatre
production of Ibsen's Ghosts
reveals this awful message with
power and beauty.
Ghosts concerns facades,
accretions of traditional morality.
We watch as the cracks appear and
the yawning horrors beneath are
glimpsed by those afraid to look,
and unable to look away.
Reality, it tells us, is neither
stark nor simple. The sins of the
fathers are visited on the sons; so
are the dead and dying hopes,
fears, and dreams.
To live in that decayed reality,
as the priggish minister does — is
to be dead. To hope to leave them
behind for the new world as the
young artist tried, is eventually to
confront them in their enormity.
To live with, and to struggle with
the discrepancies, as the mother
does, is a dangerous, but
necessary, ongoing, confrontation.
There is no virgin world; the
excresences of the old lie within
you, and must be recognized and
understood.
Richard Hornby's direction of
this ever more relevant masterwork
is superb. The essence of
multi-dimensional reality is given
with the essence of artistry.
Doris Chilcott's portrayal of
Mrs. Alvingis rich and strong. Mrs.
Alving's paradoxes become real:
her ethical strength and weakness;
her engaging charm and stately
dignity; her self-denial of
mother-love and her refusal to see
where it is helpless when given.
The nobility of her struggle has
not mitigated her human qualities.
Her son Osvald (Joe Clarke)
distils the youthful, eternal joy of
existence.   And   his   agony,   on
facing its death, is all the more
rending for that.
Wes Taylor as the wily,
ingratiating Engstrand deserves
every ovation he gets. As the only
character in the play who has no
struggle with morality or truth, he
is free to indulge his petty goals
without remorse. Taylor takes full
advantage, and creates an
unforgettable and engaging, if
totally disreputable   character.
Pastor Manders is a rigid if
sincere bigot. Lee Taylor plays
Manders faultlessly, as far as that
narrow a personality allows.
However, is there not some
opening in the admittedly
restrictive role for a moment of
bewilderment, of a greater glimpse
into the abyss? Manders is more
one-dimensional than others in
Ghosts; Taylor illustrates that
well. Perhaps, though there is
room for more range of reaction,
even with such a durable facade.
Regina (Leueen Willoughby) is
a self-seeking slut with
pretensions. Here too is a
one-dimensional character.
Certainly Miss Willoughby vividly
illustrates Regina's physical
attractions and amorality. But, as
with Manders, perhaps there is a
possibility for increased subtlety.
Enhancing this excellent
control are the set and costumery.
The set (by Richard Kent Wilcox)
is palpable and luxurious. The
oriental rugs, chandelier, the array
of plants, and heavy, comfortable
surroundings lend an additional
dimension to the unfolding battle
with realities. The costumes (to
the credit of Kurt Wilhelm) are
rich and appropriate to the
characters. In fact, attention to
the smallest details of motion,
dress, and scene is evident in
contributing to the overwhelming
totality.
Ghosts is fearful and exciting.
Its questions are vital, especially
in a polarized society, where some
increasingly cling to their ghosts,
and others try to run away from
them. Certainly, this production is
worthy of the power of Ibsen,
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAM
FALL, 1970
Reading Improvement Course for
Students and Adults
The U.B.G. Reading Improvement Course offers individualized
programs for adults, university and college students, senior high
school students and others who wish to improve their reading and
study skills for educational, business, professional and personal
reasons.
Coursework emphasizes: increase in reading speed and
comprehension-previewing, skimming and scanning-study habits
and skills - critical reading skills - flexibility of reading rate -
reading skills in subject matter, professional, academic and special
interest areas.
Classes begin the week of October 5 and meet for two hours, twice
weekly for five weeks in East Mall Annex (Rooms 118 and 119)
U.B.C.
Fees:
Students   $30.00   (Senior   high   school   students,   college   and
university students)
Adults $60.00 (part-time adult students and non-student adults)
• Fee   includes   testing,   materials,   counselling,   use   of   reading
laboratory during current and future sessions.
Class Schedule: Early registration is recommended:
Section
Room
Begins
1
Mon.-Thurs.
9:30-11:30
119
October 5 student
2
Mon.-Wed.
1:30- 3:30
119
October 5 student
3
Tues.-Thurs.
1:30- 3:30
119
October 6 student
4
Mon.-Wed.
3:30- 5:30
119
October 5 student
5
Tues.-Thurs.
3:30- 5:30
119
October 6 student
6
Tues.-Thurs.
7:00- 9:00
119
October 6 adult
7
Mon.-Wed.
7:00- 9:00
118
October 5 adult
8
Tues-Thurs.
7:00- 9:00
118
October 6 student
9*
Saturday
9:00-12:00
118
October 10 student
*(Section 9 —Saturday morning —will meet for six weeks).
Writing Improvement Program - Fall 1970
Improve your essay writing . .. This course is designed for those
who wish to improve the quality of their essay writing. The
common core of content for all sections includes the principles of
composition and the study of essay organization and structure. The
instructor helps identify and deal with individual student needs and
also focuses on problems common to all students in the class.
Meetings consist of brief lectures, writing practice and seminars.
Classes begin the week of October 5 and meet for 3 hours once a
week for 7 weeks in Rooms 224and 232, Buchanan Building, U.B.C
Campus.
Fees:
Students   $30.00   (senior   high   school,   college  and   university
students taking 9 units or more)
Adults: $60.00 (part-time adult students, non-student adults).
Class Schedule:
Section 1 Mondays 7:00-10:00 Room 232—for university students
taking English 100 or 200 and senior high school students)
Section   2 Wednesdays  7:00-10:00 Room 224-(for university
students)
Section 3 Wednesdays 7:00-10:00 R oom 232-(for adu Its)
Section 4 Mondays 7:00-10:00 Room 224-(for university and
senior high school students with special problems)
REGISTRATION FORM
Name of Course Fee enclosed
Section	
Name (Mr., Mrs., Miss)	
Address    Phone
Occupation    Employer Phone
Student    Institution    Year ....
Please make cheques payable to the University of B.C. and forward with
this form to Education-Extension, Center for Continuing Education,
University of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C. (228-2181).
Abstract
Synch
Synch, or, as the man once said: "Synchronicity spoken
here." We hope. The coming together of separate energies in
something more than coincidence, perhaps as in deja-vu. Like the
guy at a dance, totally zonked, flying, who orchestrates the
gyrations of the multitudes around him by simply waving his
hands in a certain direction, this way, that. And the movements
set up ripples, waves through the crowd as if they are . . .synched
to his thoughts. Chance, but more than that. Some sort of
directing energies in play. It's the same in any art, a chance image
sets up a complete metaphor for a poem or piece of fiction, and
all the other forces at work in the artist's mind - his
much-contemplated philosophy - all come together, blam, as if
synched into each other and the act of creation is performed.
Synch. This is the name we have chosen for this
publication, which will appear, almost magically, once a month in
place of Page Friday. We are approachable, open to all forces. We
want to get synched with other styles, other forms. Much the
same way a poem is formed so can a magazine take shape. We are
above all interested in good literature, from any force, faction or
individual capable of producing it.
So there it is. Poets, fiction writers, critics, photographers
and sketch artists, all invited to submit manuscripts or portfolios
to Synch. Send them to The Ubyssey office, room 241-k, SUB, or
bring them in yourself.
We may not be on the right side but we're going to win.
—Fred Cawsey
Editor.
Foundations of Contempory Poetry
It has come to our attention that Basil
Bunting, poet extraordinaire and well-known
man of letters, is teaching here until
December in the English department.
Author of seven volumes of poetry, Mr.
Bunting will give a reading of his work at the
end of October which will be publicized at a
later date.
Hugh MacDiarmid has said of Bunting's
poems: "his poems are the most important
which have appeared in any form of the
English language since T. S. Eliot's The Waste
Land and such poems of W. B. Yeats as Sailing
to Byzantium and The Second Coming."
Bunting has been and still is a close friend
of   Ezra   Pound.   T.   S.   Eliot   and   Louis
"Poetry, like music, is to be heard. It
deals in sound - long sounds and short
sounds, heavy beats and light beats, the tone
relations of vowels, the relation of consonants
to one another which are like instrumental
colour in music. Poety lies dead on the page,
until some voice brings it to life, just as music,
on the stave, is no more than instruction to
the player.. . Poetry must be read aloud.
Reading in silence is the source off half
the misconceptions that have caused the
public to distrust poetry. Without the sound,
the reader looks at the lines as he looks at
prose,  seeking a meaning.  Prose exists to
Sukofsky, James Joyce and Ford Maddox
Ford were also friends of his.
All this is to say that here we have a
genuine literary phenom on our hands, and it
would be a shame if students interested in
poetry didn't take advantage of the
opportunity to go and talk with the man.
English department people say he is a hell of a
good guy and very approachable.
This brings us to what we hope will be a
continuing series of pronouncements by
writers and scholars alike. We call it
Foundations of Contemporary Literature and
what it consists of is quotes and comment
about the present status of literature and how
it get that way.
What follows is Basil Bunting's view of
poetry as it appeared in a journal:
convey a meaning, and no meaning such as
prose conveys can be expressed as well in
poetry. That is not poetry's business. Poetry is
seeking to make not meaning, but beauty; or
if you insist on misusing words, its 'meaning'
is of another kind, and lies in the relation to
one another of lines and patterns of sound,
perhaps harmonious, perhaps contrasting and
clashing which the hearer feels rather than
understands; line of sound drawn in the air
which stir deep emotions which have not
even a name in prose. This needs no explaining
to an audience which gets its poetry by ear."
—Basil Bunting.
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, September 25, 1970 Poetry
The Party
In the flak of glances
I flash a professional smile sweeping an arc
and dive for camouflage..
The diver
remembers
nothing
of surfaces
feeds
on his own
raw adrenalin,
the idea
of fish
spawns
I mouth water
rythmatically
and drift with the undercurrent of music in the aquarium
above the lighted runways of an airport,
another channel in this potential night.
The tips of my arms tremble,
without instruments, like an animal, I glide
in the current of the hostess,
bank violently amid andean window ledges
and in a sudden downdraught crash
into her belly.
An altar floating on talk,
seconds later she dissolves in my mouth like a word.
Among scattered beacons
her believers in confessional twilight gnaw the carcass
and wait.
The range is three meters.
I calculate approaching her
at the ambassadorial, consular or representative level
or not approaching at all.
Alternatively, a policy statement.
"I am not about to die
and I do not apologize for the inconvenience."
She evaluates, ovulates.
With a mona lisa smile as a passport
my eyes slide down her neck
her breasts shift weight
a bra strap stays slack
rodin hips
the hemline hushed
like a theatre curtain
and my host ambushes me
protocols all over me.
I simulate myself
in a pre-recorded ritual.
A faded "what do you do?"
"I am abroad.
I have been abroad so long
that I have forgotten my mission
and I would still be abroad if I returned home.
Meanwhile I gather intelligence."
The men's eyes scream for territorial recognition.
I am not a party to any treaties.
A scratched "where are you from?"
"The border.
A land of complete freedom hunted by all.
I'm a hybrid with extinct and untracable ancestors.
You must come and visit sometime."
Inexplicable guilt seeps into their masks,
rumors are forming in their bowels.
The men itch in mistrust of themselves,
the women's limbs tremble.
Innuendos code their faces like cancer.
Everyone hates specifically.
I don't discriminate.
With feigned rapt distraction I slip into the warm pacific rug
and rig for silent running.
The women's fluorescent lips and tropical bodies
ease from cove to cove,
my words creep under the curtain.
In the mauve dusk
we act out priestly lies,
a shaft of sunlight projects from her sex,
fog balloons in from the mirror,
the room snows,
on the perimeter the scavengers,
we lie in the super-sonic silence of winter
with no desire for anything,
her body where it touches mine we are numb,
our genitals wet
we fall an eternity
remembering how we breathed in but not out,
the air is green
I stroll -
my nerves flow
along wet pavements
and in a sundial land
I become my shadow.
"We don't want you, but we need you."
The messenger burps and farts his way into oblivion
under the bed
forgetting to give me the map.
The cave instinct keeps us together,
will our bones be decipherable.
I prowl through the derelict sleepers,
rusted landmines of a war described in time capsules,
forgotten by their own selves.
At this moment everything is legal for me,
amid the clandestine decay of flesh and things
impotently legal.
My face naked I cross the neutral threshold of the door
and walk shivering into dawn
a million years too late in the wake of the glacier,
a million years to early for the sun's super nova.
I need some chlorophyll to recharge my blood,
I need some water to dilute myself,
I need a rock to pound my head against to reach
its unconsciousness,
again I approach the ocean with a speech,
the flesh crawls about my skull,
a word scrapes along my teeth
its yoke rips
slithers lungwards,
dribbles from my lips,
I mutter politely
and dive.
—Gyorgy Porkolab
Friday, September 25, 1970
THE       U BYSSEY
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Poetry
Telegram To The President
Stop
-Avron Hoffman
Untitled
& great pleasure
was in the park & upon the beach
for the little dog was there
& he brought much weight
The statues moved
& the clouds moved
& the tide moved &
a general atmosphere of youth prevailed
An old man ate like
his stomach was a drum
The wind which up until now was
still
moved & swept everyone's clothes away
& the pleasure increased
endured into joy
The ground shook & the walls of the city shook
everyone must have though
there was an incredible string band
in each tree
every tree needs
an incredible string band
-Avron Hoffman
The Unknown Poet
There's a forty 8 state alarm
out for me
& rewards posted
at every lumber Co. in the country
There are thirtytwo
descriptions of my face
& every cop has written instructions
on how to deal
with our imminent encounter
Monuments & wreaths
lay at the P.O. unclaimed
like letters to Santa
The people love me
know me & don't bother the Consulate
for my location
or identity
At every county poetry fair
i am a legend &
a bounty & famous beyond my value
When i eat sandalwood
the planet smells like things are changing
& when i make a mistake
the entire business world swears
Little does anyone know
that my tomb is filled with staples
for another busy century
—Avron Hoffman
synch 4
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, September 25, 1970 Poetry and Fiction
if
I wrote because I had hands.
Then my pencils
nailed them to the table.
Now I write the way I think.
And you say
the muse is a lobotomist.
If my hands were free,
you'd have to take that back.
-D. E. Thompson
One of Those Days
The first girl
wore shoes with chrome heels:
she was an aspen walking
off through the fallen sun.
The second girl this morning,
the one in blue,
wanted me to guess where her body
hid the sky.
The oriental ignored my opium come-on.
The hippie sold me a Georgia Straight
while I strangled
in the spider web doily between her tits.
I can tell you right now —
it's going to be one of those days.
—D. E. Thompson
New
We unzipped our nakedness
and under it found old coats:
mine was wet, mildewed wool
with chips of coal for buttons;
she wore satin, buffed slick by use,
and a tin daisy brooch.
We sneered at ourselves
and lived that way for years.
Worshipping secondhand sanctity,
honoring our restraint.
Was it a touch skin sparkling
through holes in torn mittens ?
Her daisy wilted in the heat
of my glowing buttons —
and we laughed, seeing
our coats melt off like paint,,
ourselves naked and seamless
in flesh without zippers.
-D. E. Thompson
Night and Day
When Coyote woke up, his eyes were everywhere.
The pockets in his tongue were full of them, all staring out at each
other like a myriad cyclopian baby kangaroos. They left an unpleasant
taste in his mouth.
It was the morning of the eighth day.
Eyes were drying on tangled coat-hangers rattling from his elbows
and knees. He stumbled all over himself trying to walk. Then he slipped on
eyes that were scattered about like marbles - as though a boy had
stomped off in disgust in the middle of a championship match.
The wax in his ears was thick with the eyes of lizards and the smaller
creatures. There were still more to be plucked out off his fur like lice.
—The eyes of the lice were hopelessly lost.
—Nor was there any hope for the unicellular beasts.
—Coyote felt worst about this, for he had genuine affection for
amoebas.
He   must have  begun howling  then.  I  heard (an  odd event  to
assimilate into one's breakfast routine) and, leaving Ev e at home, ran over
the investigate. Coyote had never howled before.
"What's the trouble?" I asked. "The eyes," he wailed, "it's the
damned eyes! I forgot to put in the eyes!" It wasn't until that moment
that I discovered my blindness, realized that darkness had prevailed since
the beginning.
Of course, I panicked.
Scrambling all over the earth on my hands and knees, I grabbed for
the slippery things that always seemed to squirt out of my fingers before I
could jam them into my empty sockets. I finally got one in, but had to
pull it back out because the air had instantly become a terrifying absence
of water in which I choked for breath.
"Sit still, you idiot!" It was Coyote, trying to catch me. "Look
who's talking!" I screamed back at him, "You're the one who left me
blink! What am I going to do?"
At that moment, Coyote must have opened his tail, for I felt a huge,
furry sleeve squirming down over my head to pin my arms to my sides and
hold me immobile, roaring curses into its muff. "I'll take care of this,"
Coyote's voice waggled through to me.
For hours he ran about gathering eyes and inserting them into the
proper animals. As soon as one received his vision, he was able to help with
the others.
When the eighth day had ended, all the eyes in the world had settled
into their sockets. Only then did Coyote remove me from his tail, stick his
tongue deeply into the vacant holes in my skull and deposit an eye in each.
Oh, the world is so beautiful to see . . .
But one gets used to things the way they have always been. I had
lived so long in darkness that I now yearned desperately for it:
—the way sounds are a dance when you can't see their source;
—the feel of land, dragging your fingers through waist high grass; and
guessing the slope of hills;
—wet stone, the jags of stones;
—Eve in the dark!
When I told Coyote of my unhappiness, he was furious. "I've just
finished thy eighth day of a seven day contract!" Nevertheless, realizing
that he was to blame in the first place, he recovered his essential
good-nature and, with a shrug, set to work on the moon.
An odd beginning for a true labor of love.
D. E. Thompson.
Friday, September 25, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
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MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER
Poetry
Directions
Only the landscape crawls out
from beneath the latitudes of her smile,
like an empty highway.
In the morning
her eyes are clear, my exploring hand
loses itself in her distance:
no roadsigns indicate her body's curve.
Entering the last tunnel
she paints lines on my body with her tongue,
but her eyes are red,
and the bed
where she parks her cold machine
is paved in asphalt.
—Gerry Porter
Fools
What a pack of fools they were
to dig up your grave
and fight over your bones.
Don't they know it was I
who found you,
I alone?
-Gerry Porter
Between Trains
Between trains
I stretched my love out
in a cold room
in a prairie town,
and we ate sweat and honey
poured from each other.
Between trains
I collected psalms in taverns,
read the Saskatoon paper
waiting
for my love to punch-out,
and returning,
light the torches
of the mindless prairie.
—Gerry Porter
synch 6
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970 Boohs
NEO POEMS by John Robert Colombo. The
Sono Nis Press. $5.95.
Raymond Souster calls John Robert
Colombo "a non-poet who also writes
non-poems," a description that applies
particularly to Colombo's latest book - (Neo
Poems).
Maybe Colombo is right. Maybe what he
writes are neopoems, not nonpoems. In any
case, with this volume, the poet, editor and
man of letters continues to innovate, to use
poetry as a jumping off point from which he
can move on to page-performances of an
entirely different sort.
It would be unfair to quote lines from Neo
Poems. The book is a veritable almanac of
writings, a series of thoughts, notes, emotions
and ideas that has to be seen as a whole to be
fully appreciated. But maybe one of
Colombo's own lines puts it best:
"I want to scribble passionate marginalia
all through the Book of Like," he writes, and
this is basically what he does.
Between the covers of Neo Poems, you can
find lists, remembrances, obscure quotes,
witty reflections, aphorisms and bits of
philosophy. You can find evidence that
Colombo is a fine scholar, a litterateur and an
incorrigible collector of trivia.
You can also find evidence that Colombo is
a Canadian, a Super-Canadian, the kind that
has the benign wit to put his own country
down so devastatingly and with so much
pride.
Neo Poems is without a doubt an
interesting book. Not all the time, mind you.
It has much fine material. But some bad
material too. It is definitely amusing. Also
boring.
But this is the kind of mixture you have to
expect when a writer decides to leave the
beaten paths and try something new.
The prime practitioner of "found poetry"
in Canada, Colombo refuses to be held to the
established notions of what poetry is. He
prefers to deal in terms of what it might
become.
This, certainly, is the way that all great
changes in art have come about, with someone
heading off in a different direction. Dadaism,
Surrealism,    Cubism,    all   movements   and
schools have begun with a change.
Whether or not what Colombo is doing will
remain significant years from now cannot be
known. But there is the chance that in Neo
Poems, a reader is going to be able to take a
look into the future and see the beginnings of
a new branch of literature.
• • •
Several books have come out recently that
bear mentioning. Canada's literary potential
and accomplishment continues to grow and
the publishing industry here is finally making
it possible for a lot of writers to hit the
printed page. Most of the time it's good news,
sometimes not. A few recent releases, some of
which will be reviewed individually in later
issues:
THE HAPPY HUNGRY MAN by George
Jonas. House of Anansi. A super-book by the
author of The Absolute Smile. A top-notch
work combining the blackest nihilism with
devastating wit. Well produced, excellent
photographs, inexpensive. Poems.
IT WAS WARM AND SUNNY WHEN WE
SET OUT by Joan Finnigan. Ryerson Press. A
very strong book by the award-winning author
of three previous volumes. Lyrical but
powerful. Poems.
THE CAVE by John Newlove. McLelland
and Stewart. A good, almost folksy,
sometimes funny, very enjoyable work by one
of B.C.'s own. Poetry for people who think
they don't like poetry.
AN EVENING OF CONCRETE ed. by b. p.
nichol. Oberon. A book for concrete poetry
freaks only. Not poetry, not art, a boring
series of rarely amusing drawings and
consistently uninspired typing collages.
Yin-Yang.
CAPPLEBAUM'S DANCE by Stanley
Cooperman. University of Nebraska Press. The
best yet by the SFU prof from New York.
Funny, amazing, intriguing. Travels from one
end of the emotional spectrum to the other.
Poems.
THE POETRY OF FRENCH CANADA IN
TRANSLATION ed. by John Glassco. Oxford
University Press. A long needed book giving a
broad selection of French Canadian poetry
from New France days to the present.
Generally well translated.
-Michael Finlay
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Priday, September 25, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
synch 7 Boohs
SIXTEEN STORIES AS THEY HAPPENED
by Michael Bullock. The Sono Nis Press.
$5.95.	
To say that life is something more than just what happens,
something more than just what you can see, touch, hear, smell or say, is
not saying anything terribly profound.
Any child knows that life is also everything a person can think,
dream or imagine. And while literature is not supposed to be life, it is
supposed to be about life. It's a little surprising, then, that so few
writers have recognized this other dimension of living.
Michael Bullock is one that has. A professor at UBC and one of
the world's foremost translators, Bullock is also one of the most prolific
and certainly the most consistent surrealist writers in English.
That other dimension - that's what surrealism is about. And
that's where Bullock's books live: in that strange, elusive realm where
fact and fiction, reality and fantasy, merge into a whole new plane.
It's a kind of writing that takes its name from the movement of
Andre Breton and his companions back in the 1920s but which has its
roots in centuries of earlier literature.
The world of surrealism is an extraordinarily rich, contemporary
world, one in which every possibility can become a probability or a
totally new reality.
SIXTEEN STORIES AS THEY HAPPENED is a book about that
world. Consider a passage from Two Girls and a Man Coming and
Going, the first story in the volume:
"When we wake in the morning and the sun is streaming in
through the window and we lie in bed drinking coffee, we talk
geography and voyages. Greece, India, China, Japan - we are going to
all of them. I wonder if the girls notice that I am so longer lying in the
bed, but floating in the air close to the ceiling. I decide to come down
again and back between the sheets (I'm afraid of spilling my coffee
while I'm flying, and although the girls are not very tidy they might
object to me spilling coffee from the ceiling)."
And so it goes. With Sixteen Stories, Bullock - author of five
books of poetry, translator of more than 100 books, critic, playwright
offers the reader a peek into a delightful, amusing, provocative and
intriguing region of the mind.
It's a place where we have been, where we have all lived for a
little while, but one which is easily lost in the fog of dreams and
fantasies. Our thanks to Bullock for bringing to back to us.
—Michael Finlay
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synch 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25, 1970 Friday, September 25, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
—maureen gans photo
CHIN ON HANDS, bored student listens to Abdullah, folksinger who described himself as a "god"
during impromptu performance outside library Wednesday. Female companion collected coins from
audience.
Gordon hits lock of protest
By SHANE McCUNE
Walter Gordon said Thursday
he is concerned about the lack of
protest over American control of
Canadian secondary industry.
And Gordon — former finance
minister and president of the
Privy council in the Pearson
Liberal government — said New
Democratic Party politicians are
at least partially to blame.
He was debating in the SUB
ballroom with former NDP
candidate and SFU teaching
assistant Jim Harding before
about 200 people.
Gordon said the lack of protest
on the part of students is due to
ignorance of the situation and a
'feeling of powerlessness to stop it.
The    debates    between    Mel
Watkins of the NDP waffle group
and    NDP   house   leader   David
-Lewis  only  serve   to  cloud the
issue, Gordon said.
''Watkins advocates
nationalization of existing
American-owned industry while
the      older,      cautious,
Gordon ... NDP partly to blame
over-conservative Lewis insists on
more public ownership of
Canadian industry, and neither of
them has explained the
difference," Gordon said.
"At the Liberal policy
convention at Harrison Hot
Springs, the subject of economic
independence wasn't even on the
agenda," he added.
Gordon maintained that "the
whole social structure" of the
country must be changed to effect
economic autonomy. But he did
not elaborate.
He told students that "your
generation can overcome the
timidity of my generation."
"I feel more optimisitic about
the assimilation (by the U.S.)
problem and the separatism
problem than I have for a long
time," he concluded.
Harding also expressed
optimism in his opening remarks,
but he viewed the question of
Canadian independence in a
different light.
"I'm very down on
nationalism," he said.
He said he preferred to view
the matter in "human terms."
Harding described Canadian
history as a conversion from
British colonialism to American
neo-colonialism.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Striking B.C. trade unionists
just want that oT good life
Friday, September 25,  1970
By SANDY KASS
Politicians like to promote the "good life" but
condemn unions for striking to get their share of it.
Ray Haynes, secretary of the B.C. Federation
of Labor, identified this as a main reason for the
past "summer of discontent" in an address
Wednesday to about 100 people in the SUB
ballroom.
"We are in an age of communications," Haynes
said. "The worker sees what the 'good life' should
be and becomes frustrated that his financial
depression cannot allow him to share it."
Both local and provincial politicians, he said,
promote the "good life" to enhance their public
image, but condemn the unions for striking in an
attempt to get their share.
"Workers become frustrated with boring,
unimaginative   jobs.
"People for the most part think garbage
collectors, for example, make too much money. I
often wonder how many of them would do this
kind of work for even twice the pay," he said.
Haynes indicated that as long as the U.S.
dominates Canadian industry, and therefore the
labor force, the trade unions can do little to enforce
controls over rising inflation in Canada.
"While the U.S. continues to fight her war on
poverty and engage in open warfare such as in
Vietnam, the situation in Canada cannot change too
much for the better," he said.
He added that there is little relation between
the raising of wages and the rising cost of consumer
goods.
"It is a question of productivity," he said.
"Employers say profits have dropped. But in
reality they have only dropped slightly in 1970
from a fantastically high level in 1969."
Said Haynes: "Profit is a bit like sex. When it's
good, it's very good. And even when it's bad, it's
still pretty good."
Fibrosis test not a shoe-in
Only 150 UBC students
turned out to shine shoes for the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation last
Friday.
Shinerama participants set up
their shoe-shine stands throughout
Vancouver and the North Shore,
collecting more than $3,400 for
the cystic fibrosis fund by the end
of the day.
Another $12,500 was
collected by 900 students from
the B.C. Institute of Technology,
Trinity College, Vancouver
General Hospital, and St. Paul's
Hospital.
UBC Shinerama chairman,
Chris Ryan, blamed the
disappointing turnout on rain, and
the    fact    that    a   letter    from
administration president Walter
Gage, asking that classes be
cancelled for the day, "was largely
ignored by profs."
He said the fact that The
Ubyssey printed "only about 10
lines" of advance publicity last
week also contributed to the poor
turnout.
WELCOME STUDENTS
AND FAMILIES TO UNITED-ANGLICAN CHURCHES
Combined Services This Sunday at 11:00 a.m.
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED CHURCH
University Blvd. at Toronto Road
Sunday Breakfast Club at 9:30 a.m.
Church School through to Grade 8 at 11:00 a.m.
tNe (most ENqAqiNq u/Ay
to caII Her
sweetNeart
You'll find a complete array
of engagement rings in
our collection. Each one
suerbly styled in the
glowing O. B. Allan tradition
SOLITAIRES
PRICED FROM
150.00
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
\
MEET ME AT
THE HOTEL GEORGIA
October 19th
 Fo re s try	
Undergraduate   Society
 PRESENTS	
UNDERCUT 70
Friday
October 2
SUB CAFETERIA
TICKETS   AVAILABLE FROM AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
ANY FORESTER, AND F.U.S. OFFICE IN MacMILLAN BLDG.
REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE COUPLE $3.50 REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE
The Key Note Is Relevance
Evening Courses being offered by the UBC Centre for Continuing Education
Register Now For
ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF
HUMAN       CULTURE    AND
SOCIETY
Dr.    Harold    Hickerson,   P.S.A.
Dept., S.F.U.
10 Tuesdays, beginning Oct. 6,
8 p.m.
(sessions every second week)
Maritime Museum Auditorium
POWER POLITICS AND
PEOPLE: SOCIOLOGY OF C.
WRIGHT MILLS
Richard    Salter,    Graduate    Studies,
McMaster University
8 Tuesdays, beginning Oct. 6, 8 p.m.
Room     114,     East    Mall    Annex,
U.B.C.
WOMEN    IN   A   CHANGING
WORLD
Mrs.     Renee     Kasinsky,    Graduate
Studies, University of California
8 Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 30, 8
p.m.
Room  221, Old Auditorium  Annex,
U.B.C.
THE    YOUTH    CULTURE   IN
ANGLO-AMERICA
Mr.     James    L.    Heap,    Dept.    of
Anthropology & Sociology, U.B.C.
8 Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 30,
8 p.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre, U.B.C.
AN   OVERVIEW   OF   SOCIAL
CHANGE
Mr.  D.T.  Driscoll, Graduate Studies,
S.F.U.
9 Thursdays, beginning Oct. 8, 8 p.m.
Room  222,  Old Auditorium Annex,
U.B.C.
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
ANTHROPOLOGY:
VOYEURISTIC, VANDAL-
ISTIC, VALID?
Mrs. E. Wendy Eliot Hurst, Graduate
Studies S.F.U.
10  Wednesdays,  beginning Oct.  7,
8 p.m.
Room  222,  Old Auditorium Annex,
U.B.C.
THE     WORLD
ADOLESCENTS
O F
Dr. John Friesen, Faculty of
Education, U.B.C.
7 Thursdays, beginning Oct. 8, 8 P.M.
Centre for Continuing Education
Lounge, U.B.C.
For information and to register call the Centre for Continuing Education, 288-2181, local 252. Friday, September 25,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
OPEN SEASON on campus roads was declared Thursday by engineers who took law into their own
hands and removed nasty inconvenient Road-Closed signs to library pool, where they stacked them
neatly and disappeared.
Greek exile says countrymen
must resist V.S. occupation
TORONTO (CUP) - The U.S. decision to
resume sending aid to the Greek fascist regime
"terminates all illusions concerning the role and
intentions of the U.S. in Greece," Andreas
Papandreou said Wednesday in Toronto.
Papandreou, a professor at York University and
a Greek exile, made the statement on behalf of the
National Council of the Pan-Hellenic Liberation
Movement (PAK).
"For every Greek it is plain now that the
occupation in Greece is American and that the only
Blood  for  Coke
Students will be asked to bleed next week.
The annual blood drive for the Red Cross -
sponsored by the Civil Engineers Undergraduate
Society - will be held all next week in SUB 111
(behind the cafeteria) from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Nurses will be on hand to give students
refreshments in exchange for their blood.
way to deal with it is resistance to the end,"
Papandreou said.
Washington cut off grants of military items to
Greece after the military coup in April, 1967, but
soon afterward resumed sending ammunitions and
light equipment. These shipments have been
sizeable, the U.S. state department disclosed at the
time it made its statement.
Papandreou said the resumption of American
military aid to Greece came as no surprise to PAK.
"It has always been our position that the
Pentagon and the CIA engineered the coup and are
maintaining the vile gang of Greek officers in power.
The Nixon government said: "The decision to
resume the shipment of suspended items rests
entirely" on the strategic advantages to NATO that
Greece offers.
At present the American government is
supporting the fascist government in Greece which
admits to holding over 600 political prisoners and
restricts the freedom of the press and the freedom
of travel of its people.
Judge heaves
3 riot charges
REGINA (CUP) — A Regina court has dismissed charges laid
against three of 12 anti-war demonstrators, who were accused of
"participating in a riot" after clashing with people attending a concert
by the U.S. field band and soldiers' chorus.
Three others have not yet been served their summonses for the
May 14 demonstrations, and charges against five others were dropped
last week.
Charges were dismissed for lack of evidence, but the 12 who are
engaged in left-wing political opposition, community newspaper and
organizing work, were forced to spend considerable time and money
this summer in preparing a defense.
Supported by notables Robert Fulford, Rabbi Abraham
Feinberg, Melville Watkins, Dalton Camp, and Pierre Burton, among
others, the 12 had charged that the trials were "political trials" based
on their known left-wing sympathies, and had little to do with the
actual events at the Kinsmen organized concert.
In a telegram to the Regina mayor, Fulford, Feinberg, and
ten others explained their objections.
They pointed out that the demonstration was not declared a
riot nor charges laid until June 8, almost four weeks after the
demonstration.
Michael O'Sullivan, who was charged with participating in the
riot, had been in Mexico at the time, but this did not prevent police
from releasing his name to newsmen as one of the demonstrators.
Police refused to serve him his summons, however, when he returned
to Regina in September.
Further, the telegram states, although the 12 were charged with
"participating in a riot," no person who supported the U.S. army
band's visit has been charged.
"It is imperative," the telegram sums up, "that the use of the
Canadian courts for the suppression of legitimate political opposition
be guarded against by all possible means."
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD:
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HQURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
No student role in Western hiring
LONDON (CUP) - Once again in the
continuing saga of anti-democratic university
bureaucracies, students have been refused a role in
deciding who will teach them.
Regulations governing the Wring and firing of
faculty at the University of Western Ontario, have
been approved after two years of discussion by the
university senate and board of governors.
Though pressured by student representatives,
the faculty unanimously supported the regulations
which allow no student participation.
Western students' council president Larry
Steinman said the regulations are also supported to
determine a professor's status based on his research
and his "value to the university community".
"But there is no provision for feedback from
the students in the regulations," he said.
ROARING 20's DANCE
FRI. SEPT. 25th
featuring
TOMORROW'S
ryrQ  + CHARLIE
£ I tw      CHAPLIN FILMS
9:00 -1:00
REFRESHMENTS
ANVIL K0RUS
(who's JASON .UQ8YER7)
IF YOU'RE
NOT BUYING
YOUR RECORDS,
8 TRACK TAPES,
& CASSETTES
■FROM-
MILLER
SOUND CENTRES
YOU'RE PAYING
TOO MUCH!
3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
655 Granville St., Vancouver 683-6651
1820 Burrard St., Vancouver 758-5818
622 Columbia St., New Westminster        526-3771
ALL MILLER SOUND CENTRES ARE AUTHORIZED
"SONY" SERVICE DEPOTS Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970
FRIDAY
MUSSOC
Wide Side Story: auditions now in
SUB 210. See time schedule and sign
up before Clubs Day.
FILM SOC
Ingmar  Bergman's  "Shame"; in  SUB
theatre Fri.   and  Sat.   at 7 and  9:30;
and Sun. at 7.
L'ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting in upper lounge of International House at noon. Free coffee.
VARSITY DeMOLAY
Organizational meeting at noon in
SUB 105A.
UBC TEAM CLUB
Electors Action Movement. First general meeting. New members are welcome to hear guest speaker Alderman
Brian Calder.
CLASSICS CLUB
Speaker   R.   Nemsee.   8   p.m.   at  4495
West 7th.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Clubs   Day   organizing   meeting.   12:30
in Angus 24.
ROWING CREW
Films on Canadian National Trials and
the   Third   World   Rowing  Championships. SUB 205 at noon on Fri.. Mon.,
Tues., and Wed.
COMPUTER SOCIETY
Films on Man-Machine  interaction in
Chem. 250 at noon.
(^^ODEON
Vogue
Tit MANVILLC
699-5434
New West
the 'CARRY ON GANG' CARfltfON
 (Soto**
VOGUE Showtimes 12:15,
2:35,4:45,6:55,9:00
New West: 7:30, 9:30
Coronet
(SI   GRANVILLE
6«5-6S2S CORONET
They're the'Dirty Bunch'on wheels!
Surrey
12:10,2:05,3:55
5:50.7:45,9:40
«io7 Kiur rtn DRIVE-IN at sundown __,
5 94%ai3 2nd feature: "Kill them and come back alone
Odeon
III   GRANVILLE
4I2-744S
VGPlece§
SHOWTIMES: 12:10, 1:50, 3:40,
5:35, 7:25, 9:20
MO HMItlMI 10 WMH MWM I|
»       WARNING:
Catholics
may be
insulted.
B.C. Director
DONALD SUTHERLAND   ELLIOTT GOULD
7:30,9:30 -B.C. Censor       *Y»*^»*^ —
Dunbar
^""^Hffiffl^"*
224-7252        ONE COMPLETE
DUNIAR »t 30th    SHOW at 7:30
MAE WEST in
"MY LITTLE       .     "SHE DONE
kingsY..KN.GHT CHICKADEE" HIM WRONG"
I76-304S One Complete Show at 8 p.m.
Hyland
MAX OPHUL'S AWARD 1969
Varsitll "my night at maud's"
224-3730«»           starring JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT from "Z"
4375 w. 10th        SHOWTIMES 7:30, 9:30 English Subtitles
Warning:  nullity. »ex anil
futility.     —B.C. Directori
West Van
922-4343
SHOWTIMES
7:30,9:30
fillVERREED ALAN BATES
D.H.LAWRENCE'S
WOMEN IN LOVE'
FALL
CAMPUS WEAR
In Beautiful Stretchy Boots
* BLACK KRINKLE
* WHITE KRINKLE
* RED KRINKLE
$18 00. i2l
It's the year of the boot - for every look - the midi - the maxi
- the pants tucked inside - the boot's the thing.
4516 W. 10th Ave.
228-8115
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
VIETNAM    ACTION    COMMITTEE
Help plan Vancouver participation in
Oct. 31 Day of Protest; includes workshops (one on Women's Lib). YMCA
audit., 955 Burrard St.  at 10 a.m.
SUNDAY
UBC ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
"Is Non-Violence No Violence?" Dr.
Allan Brick, F.O.R. In SUB Club
Lounge from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
MONDAY
UBC   WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   GROUP
All     women     invited     to    Buchanan
Lounge at 8 p.m.
SAILING TEAM
Interested racers meeting in SUB 224
at noon.
CAN. CROSSROADS
Meeting for students  interested in a
work-study project in Africa or India
for summer "71 meet in International
House  at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
SIMS
Room    for   Meditation.    International
House, room 406.  Mon.-Fri. 8-11 a.m.:
Tues.. Wed., Fri. 3-6 p.m.-; and Thurs.
4-6 p.m.
LEGAL AID
Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 12:30 in SUB
228   and 232.
EL CIRCULO
Orientation meeting. Film "Holiday in
Latin   America."   12:30   in   Km.    402
International House, Oct.  5.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 Lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial-3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.t Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY. DANCING AND
great refreshments, Friday from
9 p.m.-l a.m. at International
House.
TRIALS OF JASON HOOVER ARE
playing at Place Vanier tonight,
Sept. 25, 9:30-1:00. Residents,
$1.00; non-res.  $1.50.
THE UNDERCUT RETURNS TO
SUB on Friday, Oct. 2. Come and
have a hard time.
Greetings
12
Lost &> Found 13
LOST — CANVAS STAMPED
Wells Gray Park, on Chanc. Blvd.
Saturday, 19th. Phone 255-6874
after 6.
LOST — GREEN NYLON RAIN
jacket. Left in V.W. Bus in which
I caught a ride last week. Please
call Jim  at 732-7579.
LOST — UNIVERSITY OF b7c.
ring in Education Building. Blue
stone. Reward, 261-1230.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
U.B.C BARBER SHOP. WE ARE
open 6 days a week, located 2
blocks east of Memorial Gym.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS
B.C.'s largest selection from THE
GRIN BIN, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311. Personal Photo Blowups, Black
Lights, Gifts, Jokes, Post Office
(Opposite Liquor Store & Super
Valu). Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through  Friday,  Sat,   till   7  p.m.
UBC BOWLING CLUB DESPER-
ately needs about 35 more members
especially girls to bowl Monday
nights. New bowlers welcome. For
further information call Walter at
228-8225.
FLEA MARKET, 139 WATER ST.,
Sat. and Sun., Sept. 26 - 27, 11-4
p.m. Designed samples by Evelyn
Roth: furs, rugs, bean bags. Ph.
738-7809
SGT. GARCIA DEMONSTRATES
autocratic beerocracy at the Undercut, Friday,  Oct.  2,  in  SUB.
TRTALS OF JASON HOOVER ARE
playing at Place Vanier tonight,
Sept. 25, 9:30 - 1:00. Residents
$1.00,   non-res.   $1.50.
POTENTIAL SKI INSTRUCTORS!
Take pre-season instructor training starting Oct. 3rd, Saturday or
Sunday. Cost: twenty-five dollars
for five weeks of lessons. Phone
733-2613
JOIN A BAND!!! SENIOR BAND
has openings for interested players. Meets Sun. 1-3 p.m., Mar-
pole Centre. For more info., phone
Mary,   738-0063
SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS ING-
mar Bergman's "Shame". A film
about people trying to escape the
horrors of war. In SUB Theatre Friday, Saturday 7, 9:30; Sunday, 7:00.
Students 50c, Others 75c.
TRY PSI U
MANDRAKE
the Magician
Full Evening  Illusion   Show
Sept. 29
8 P.M.
Totem Park
Ballroom
ENGLISH- LANGUAGE IM-
perialism Exists! Consider Esperanto — a Just solution.
Travel Opportunities
16
LOCOST CHARTERS UK EUROPE
Mexico, Japan, Australia, African
Safaris. Call Mick 687-2855 or 687-
1244.   Evenings  224-0087.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
19 5 8     MERCEDES     BENZ     219.
Reliable city car in good  condition.
1962 VANGUARD STATION WAG1
on. Only 39,000 miles. Asking $295
—phone Larry 266-4854
'63 VW GOOD CONDITION, $575
or near offer. 876-8171 .after 12
noon.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
1965 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, 43,000
miles. Rblt. motor, clutch, suspension, front end. Very sharp. Ph.
738-6245	
MUST SELL 1957 CHEV., GOOD
condition, 6 cylinder automatic,
phone. 266-5652 evenings.
'63 CONSUL, 4-DOOR, 4-SPEED
standard. $250. 683-2086, Margaret.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
1967 YAMAHA 350 cc EXCELLENT
condition, very clean throughout,
has  tuneup,   224-9841
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
calibre graphs, maps, text-book
illustrations, formulations, adver-
tising. Phone 980-2928	
CREATIVE GRAPHICS SPECI-
alizes in posters, scientific artwork, photography.  John 224-4146.
Scandals
37
DOUGLAS FIR IS NEEDLIN' JACK
pine to get all spruced and come
to Undercut '70.
SURVIVAL IS ONLY A WORD
but Bergman weaves a film about
your survival of a cruel war. Don't
miss "Shame" this weekend, SUB
Theatre.	
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND
guys: free 9000 word essay on Vancouver gay life from graduate student 22, Box 8969, Station H, Vancouver 5. Phone 683-4864. Over 750
copies sent already.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter, my home.
325-2934.	
ON - CAMPUS    TYPING,    FAST,
Accurate, All types of theses, texts,
essaysy  IBM Electric,  224-9183.
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING
my home: essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
Phone 263-5317
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO, VANCOUVER'S
Largest Take-Out & Delivery Service wishes to maintain it's policy
of offering part-time employment
to male students during the coming school year. Applicants should
be over 21 with valid V.C. driver's
licence, transportation advisable
but not essential. For appointment
contact Personnel Manager, 688-
2381, No. 4, 1170 Bute St., Van.
PIZZA PATIO WISHES TO OFFER
part-time employment to female
students to work in the new
licensed Pizza Patio's locations at
Theatre Row, Denman & Nelson—
West Van. and North Van. during
the school year. For appointment
contact Personnel Manager, 688-
2381, No. 4, 1170 Bute, Vancouver.
SKI INSTRUCTORS. GROUSE
Mountain requires instructors.
Will train this fall. Good wages.
Phone 985-0478.	
GUITARIST WANTED: ELECTRIC",
own equipment and willing to
work at joining present group.
Lee or Al, 872-7301 .
FRIENDLY OUTGOING GIRLS TO
sell flowers evenings. Can choose
.hours. Commission. $10.00 to $20.00
for evening. Phone now, 684-2618.
Car is asset but not necessary.
STUDENTS FOR ORDER DESK IN
Mamooks. Apply 12:30 - 3:30 Monday through Fri. SUB   249.
INTERESTED IN SELLING?
Then why not be an ad sales rep.
for the Ubyssey. The AMS Publications office needs one or two second
or third year business minded students preferably Commerce who will
work hard about 8 hours a week.
Transportation is essential. This is
an excellent opportunity to gain
worthwhile sales experience and to
earn commissions for part - time
work. Apply Publications Office after 2:30  p.m.
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
CHINESE   MARTIAL   ARTS
(King Foo)  — Self-defence lessons.
Ancient  meditation  for  tension  relief.   Chinese   studies/languages.
For   inquiries   phone   872-1106
SPANISH AND LITERATURE
professor. Graduated in University
of La Plata, Argentina, after 5
p.m., 688-0568.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
PRE-SALE TICKETS - 75c
at the  Bookstore  and
AMS Publications Office
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON — WE
sell, style and color, Wigs & Hair
Pieces at reasonable rates. Tel.
228-8942,  5736  University  Blvd.
KODAK ENLARGER INCLUDING:
lens (50mm), extra filament and
three sizes of negative carriers,
$50 or best offer. Phone Dave at
224-7533	
APT. FURNITURE FOR SADE:
living room, bedroom. Call 683-2095
evenings. Address, 704—1110 Car-
dero  St.	
ONE YEAR OLD AM/FM STEREO
with speakers, $175 or nearest
offer, 736-7153. Excellent condition.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ALL STUDENT HOUSE GUY(S).
Heat, light, phone. All house
facilities. Kits. Double and s ingle.
Phone  738-0784	
GIRLS ! SPACIOUS ROOM WITH
all facilities in home. Ideal location. Only $ 100 mo. Available
now for two non-smoker or drinkers.  Call now, 732-8448.
LARGE, FURNISHED ROOM, KIT.
facilities. 15 min. bus UBC, $50.
266-9007 — 41st and  Dunbar.
BRIGHT GROUND LEVEL ROOM.
Private ent., bath, $55. Ph. 224-
0014. Male student, non-smoker.
TWO ROOMS, PRIVATE BATH
and entrance, $45, and $50 — 3945
Puget near 16th Ave.  Ph.  733-0462
ROOMS ON CAMPUS, $50. KIT-
chen privileges, large lounge and
TV room. Linen changed weekly.
Ample parking. Phone Bill . Dins-
more, 224-4530, or 224-9660, or
come  to  5760  Toronto Road.
Room & Board
82
BRIGHT ROOM & BOARD. 30 MIN.
on Deas Tunnel. $85.00 monthly.
Phone 531-4298.
ATTRACTIVE LIVING ROOM AND
bedroom. Share with female student. Full board. Near gates, 228-
9824.
FREE ROOM, BOARD TN EX-
change for help evenings with
children.    Near   Gates.   224-8192.
ROOM AND BOARD, $30 IN Exchange some evening supervision,
3 school-age children of working
mother. Private room and bath,
convenient UBC. Phone after 6
p.m.,   736-4773 	
Furnished Apis.
  83
FURN. SUITE, $95. PH. KATHY
732-8095. Quiet, clean. Call after
5 p.m. or Fri., Sat.,    Sun.	
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share furnished apartment. Call
after 5:00: 731-0205. Ask for
Stuart.	
LARGE FURN. HOUSEKEEPING
room, fridge, hot plate. Student or
working girl, $65. Ph. 738-5850	
84
Unfurnished Apts.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
TWO THIRD-YEAR GIRLS WANT
to rent or share a house or large
suite.   Phone  Katy,  224-0043.
BUY — SELL — INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Friday, September 25, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
\
TORIfl*   7©
)^l|lg[^,,
Pallacanestro!
By KEITH DUNBAR
Basketball Italian style - that's
"pallacanestro".
From Aug. 26 to Sept. 6,
1970, the UBC Thunderbirds
competed with 29 other teams for
the world championship of
student basketball.
The location was Torino
(Turin) a large industrial city in
northern Italy. They were the
hosts in 1970 for the World
Student Games, which were by no
means restricted to basketball.
In basketball, however, the
Birds competed against some very
stiff opposition. They finished the
series with four wins and four
losses, landing them in eleventh
place.
After beating Portugal 89-56,
they were pitted against a scrappy
'team from Korea and lost in the
last minute of the game by an
84-80 score. Had they won this
game, they were assured of a spot
- in the top eight.
Coach Peter Mullins felt the
Thunderbirds were equal . in
overall ability to the teams that
' finished in the seventh-twelfth
positions. The big guns, however,
deserved their places in the
standing.
The top spot  went to Russia
' by the virtue of a 78-71 win over
the U.S. This gave them an 8-0
won/lost   record   with  the  U.S.
getting second place and the silver
'medal with a 7-1 record.
Meanwhile, the Birds were
fighting it out in the consolation
rounds.
After losing 76-56 to Turkey,
they   came   back   to   upset  the
Czechoslovakians    76-72    and
Hungary 77-75. They lost later to
• the Czechs as well as to Poland.
A review of high scorers and
top rebounders reads much like
the games played last season. Ron
Thorsen, guard, led the Birds in
scoring averages as well as being
the top scorer in six of the eight
games played.
SKI INSTRUCTORS
Training & Employment
Phone GROUSE MTN.
985-0478
PIZZA
PATIO
•EAT IN 'TAKEOUT* DELIVERY'
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
FREE
ROWING FILMS
For those interested, the
U.B.C. crew will be showing
these films of their past season:
thev include:
1) Canadian Henley
2) Canadian National Trials
3) III World Championships
TODAY, MON., TUE., WED.,
S U  B 205 - 12:30
He finished the series with a
17.7 points per game average
followed by forward Bob
Molinski, with a 15.0 average.
Centre Terry McKay led Bird
rebounders with 116 for the series
and also added a scoring average
of 11.3 points per game. Derek
Sankey brought down 110
rebounds and his scoring average
was 10.2 points per game.
Why did Canada not place
higher? Mullins sums it up in one
word — "size".
He felt his team compared
favorably in all respects to the
other teams, especially in outside
shooting, but lacked the height
advantage enjoyed by the other
teams.   Ron   Thorsen  and  Alex
Brayden, starting guards for the
Birds, were on par with the best of
them, although Russia had two of
the best, said Mullins.
The crucial factor, he felt, was
the mobility and finesse displayed
by the tall men on the other
teams. Even with their size, the
tall men were not awkward and
displayed the coordination often
enjoyed by smaller men.
For those interested in seeing
how the Birds and other Canadian
teams played in Italy, CBC-TV
will be carrying the last half of the
game played against Korea.
It will be telecast this Saturday
at 2 p.m. on the sports show,
Kaleidoscope.
Arrive derci.
—phil swift photo
SEE THIS FELLOW with the sincere smile on his face? He is an
avid member of the UBC Skydiving club. Training classes for new
members have been arranged and these will be held through
October at Abbotsford Parachute Centre with transportation
provided. Interested parties can enquire at the clubs room, SUB.
Soon
THE LIFE AND TIMES
of
CHESTER-ANGUS RAMSGOOD
Oct. 5 -9
SKI
Instructors' Training Course
at
GARIBALDI'S WHISTLER MTN.
Sats. and/or Sundays   Oct. 10th — Nov. 15th
Any parallel skier can join - Instructors jobs available
for information phone:
JIM McCONKEY, General Del., Alta Lake B.C.
932-5422 or 926-1034
speaking
frankly
Tony   Gallagher
Regarding the block type that appeared in this space last
Tuesday, one quick word:
Yes, Scott, apathy is one of the greatest problems in the world
today, but then, who cares.
Frankly, who wants to see foolish people running around in
strange costumes trying to move a football from one end of a field
to another, using all manner of violence and foul play to achieve
their ends. I wonder if football fans or players ever stop to think
that if the two teams on the grass ever got together, players on both
squads could make all the great runs they wished to, at no hindrance
to their limbs.
Instead, they bump into each other with alarming regularity,
constantly frustrating each others' goals for purely selfish reasons. If
they would co-operate and not keep trying to maim the fellow in the
different colored costume, they could all obtain enormous quantities
of glory and fame by all running for touchdowns, kicking field goals
and conceding safeties. But no, they persist in giving what is referred
to as the opposition, numerous forearm shivers, clips, and other
assorted aggressive gestures.
Of course much of this strange behavior is fun. At least that is
what the combatants say. Such lines as "I just love to hit", and "I
gave him a good lick", are anything but uncommon among those
who interchange thrusts and blows on a pleasant Saturday
afternoon.
I suppose if they want to do this sort of thing we should give
our approval, but surely we don't have to watch it.
People must get over this hang-up that because the UBC
Thunderbirds happen to be called just that, it is the duty of people
who go to this place to support, watch, laugh at, pray for, or
otherwise concern themselves with the football team.
If people wish to see football, let them see it. If they would
rather see Frank Zappa on Saturday evening, stop trying to tell them
they are letting down their University and committing gross
sacrilege.
Yes, 1,700 people at last weekend's game was a small
crowd, but large enough to keep most of us happy.
FOOTNOTES - Rumor has it the UBC rowers are looking to
start a freshman crew to build up to world calibre in the next few
years. Sounds like a good idea judging from the success that the East
Germans had at the recent World Rowing Championships at St.
Catharines on a similar program that involves young people for years
before they come to row for the fatherland.
WATCH FOR TUESDAY'S ISSUE OF UBYSSEY
FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF
GRAND OPENING SKI SALE
AT
IVOR WILLIAMS SKI DEN
( Oct. 1-2-3-  )
2120 West 41st Avenue, Kerrisdale
£33« Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 25,  1970
Canadian   Independence
'It needs a national movement'
JAMES STEELE
. . support growing
Robin
Mathews
and
James
Steele
answer
the
question:
Where
do we go
from here?
Betts: The purpose of the interview is to relate
your experiences across Canada as the issues you are
involved in affect left wing politics in the student
movement.
My first question is: in your travels across
Canada what kind of effect do you think you have
had on the issue of de-Canadianization? Do you see
any qualitative change in people's attitudes from
when you first started?
Steele: Yes, definitely. There has been a
growing appreciation of the problem and of the
issues of de-Canadianization, particularly on the
part of undergraduate students who want more
Canadian material in their courses and cannot get it.
More urgently, the graduate students are
realizing that they have put in years of training and
can look forward to seeing themselves unemployed in
Canada because there are no jobs here for Canadian
grads.
Faculty are frustrated when they become aware
of outside influences which change curriculum and
they were previously unaware, or unconscious until
now, that this was happening.
Mathews: There is another level which expands
the effect. A lot of people in Canada, and I'm
talking of the Toronto Star and other news agencies,
said we could not treat imperialism as an issue. But
there has been a tremendous amount of analysis
given to an issue which is an aspect of imperialism,
the cultural take-over.
The concept of Canada being imperialized, and
the cultural takeover was the sign, began to make
itself known. They could no longer say that
imperialism did not exist.
ROBIN MATHEWS
national independence newsletter starting
Some  statistics  released
English situation still murky
Douglas Kenny, dean of arts, has
released the citizenship statistics on
the 1970 Wrings in the English
department.
But the number of foreign
"faculty" hired is not yet clear.
Kenny, in a letter Thursday to The
Ubyssey, said the English department
"appointed for 1970-71 one British,
one New Zealander, five Americans
and eight Canadians".
He was replying to the "alleged
hiring of eight American professors
and only two Canadians" in the
English department, as reported in an
Alma Mater Society citizenship survey
of UBC faculty.
The survey, released last week, was
compiled by Art Smolensky, former
president of the grad student
association, and AMS president Tony
Hodge.
Smolensky said Thursday he thinks
that six of the eight Canadians Kenny
referred  to,  are only instructors or
lecturers with one-year contracts "and
are not really considered faculty".
Kenny's letter said the people
appointed were "all appointed to
either one-year or two-year contracts".
Asked by The Ubyssey to clarify
the status of those hired, Kenny said
they were all appointed by the board
of governors and "vary from lecturer
and instructor up to full professors."
Are they all considered "faculty"
"Yes, I would say they are all
faculty," Kenny said. "But it (the
definition of teachers as faculty) varies
from faculty to faculty."
Kenny said he could not obtain the
breakdown of the status of those
Canadians hired for The Ubyssey
Thursday.
The AMS report, which
recommended tenure at UBC be
granted only to Canadian citizens,
was particularly critical of the English
department hiring practices.
Kenny's letter refuted some of the
criticism by noting that the English
department advertised only in British
and Canadian journals and gave special
consideration to Canadian applicants.
The letter said English department
head Robert Jordan travelled to
Eastern Canada to recruit but that
"during the course of the year's
recruitment activities, it became
apparent that many of the most highly
qualified persons from Eastern Canada
were not interested" in coming to
UBC.
Smolensky said it was very
encouraging that the English
department was giving special
consideration to Canadians.
"I only hope that every department
on the university would follow the
English department's new hiring
policy.
"Many departments on campus still
follow the old-boy network policy of
calling back to where they come from,
asking for some bright people."
So for people, and political parties, the colonial
and imperial  relationship  became an unavoidable '
reality.
Steele: Studies are being done by York
University, Windsor and UBC. The one at York,
which is a study of the problem, is working with a.
budget of $3,000 and incorporates an ideological
analysis of the problem of imperialism, how it
effects us as Canadians.   '
Betts: Some see the university as an isolated
entity in the society. Do you see in the near future a
link-up between workers struggling for Canadian
unions (as opposed to the internationals) and
students struggling for Canadian content in their
courses?
Steele: Yes, there has to be. The two are
absolutely related. There can be no meaningful
politics on the left in this country until there are
detailed analyses of Canadian problems.
There   has   been   very   little   work   done   in
Canadian   universities   on   the  class  question  and
conflict in Canada. In fact the major work that has
been done, by Stanley Ryerson, was done outside    -
the university context.
We  have  a  fragmentation between university
and social struggles which must be overcome by
unity  and  the  universities have remained on the ~
fringe  in  political  and  social  movements  in  this
country.
Mathews:   There   is  another  response  to  the
question and that is we are hoping to put out a "
newsletter on the university which we say is going
to be the first national publication for Canadian
independence in the university.
It will record the continuing de-Canadianization
of the university but will also broaden as much as
possible.
One of the things which will have to be talked
about right away is opposition to the CAUT
(Canadjan Association of University Teachers)
which some of us think is absolutely bankrupt and
the creation of faculty unions which will then
integrate with the Canadian Council of Unions, not
the internationals, and to be really syndicalist, to go
on to the convention floor as intellectual workers
and work with working people on the major
problems.
We could incorporate graduate students who
are not yet faculty and be on our way to something
really dynamic.
Knox: Have you had any discussion with
Canadian union leaders?
Mathews: My role has been to support the CCU
which has been in strident opposition to the
internationals. Our relations with them have been
very good. I talked to the secretary in Montreal of
the CCU and he was very excited about the *
university teachers' union.
The idea that intellectuals and workers cannot
communicate is nonsense. When we talked to those
men the rapport was tremendous.
Steele: There is a danger, though, in insisting on «
too much ideological tightness. If it is demanded
that those who teach in the universities come out in
favor   of Canadian  independence   then  those  in
charge of the' hiring will say we refuse to hire.
Mathews: However, if you do not challenge the
CAUT on matters which are essential to the country
and the people in it then there is no
action-education.
Betts:   Do  you  see  the  regional  praxis  for   .
Canadian   independence,   regional   education  and
agitation around de-Canadianization, or the openly
national movement as soon as possible as the best
means for independence struggles?
Steele: The issue is national and the movement   *
should surely be a national movement. The concept
of the united front, diverse classes in Canada uniting
for independence is important too.
Knox: Speaking of the united front, what is.
this new committee up to? How do Canadian
capitalists like Walter Gordon, Jack McClelland and
Claude Ryan fit into the Canadian struggle? (These
three recently formed the Toronto-based Committee
for Canadian Independence).
Mathews: I doubt if they would have us. I think
we are too radical for them. If I were asked to work
with them I would because I think in our fight you
have to see who is nominally with you and go with
them as far as you can.

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