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The Ubyssey Feb 27, 1970

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Array PAGE 3: WHAT MAKES A SEPARATIST TICK
Page 6: The Americanization debacle:
straight from the horses' mouths.
Robin Mathews and James Steele
talk with senator Peter Ladner.
Page 24: Whither the UBC Endowment
Lands? They just might become
part ot Vancouver.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 36
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1970
"       228-2305
Western civilization just wouldn't be the same without the human hand, photographed on a UBC lawn.
—dave enns photo
Bank burned in riot-torn Santa Barbara
SANTA BARBARA (CUP) - More than 1,000
persons — protesting both the Vietnam war and what one
student called, "increasing police repression aimed at
stifling political dissent — controlled streets here
Wednesday for the second consecutive night.
Street battles broke out Wednesday after a phalanx of
riot-equipped police charged a large demonstration at
downtown Perfect Park.
Retreating demonstrators pelted the officers with
rocks and bottles as they took to the streets, smashing
windows in commercial buildings and setting numerous
bonfires.
Fire gutted a bank building and a police car was
fire-bombed before the California highway patrol declared
a state of emergency and sealed off the Isla Vista district
near the University of California campus here.
Demonstrations began here Tuesday night after
sheriffs deputies on patrol stopped and questioned a
black former student, recently expelled from the Santa
Barbara campus.
One policeman was. injured and at least six persons
were arrested Tuesday, during a 10-hour outbreak which
saw demonstrators erect street barricades, smash bank
windows and firebomb a patrol car.
AAAS  plans  general  anticalendar
For the first time in UBC history, a general
anticalendar is going to be published for the 1970-71
academic year.
The proposal for the massive campus wide course
evaluation pamphlet was initiated by Alma Mater Society
internal affairs officer-elect Sue Kennedy.
Plans for the anticalendar will be made during the
next three weeks, after which a definite planning
committee and program will be set up.
"An anticalendar is something this campus has
needed for years," said AMS president-elect Tony Hodge.
"I'm glad we're finally going to see it."
No injuries or arrests were reported out of
Wednesday's demonstration. Firemen were ordered away
from the Bank of America blaze, while sheriff James
Webster described the situation as "'completely out of
hand," and asked Governor Ronald Reagan for 500
National Guardsmen.
Students told reporters the branch of the largest U.S.
commercial bank was fired because "it holds money for
the war in Vietnam."
Police    officials    have    attempted to    link    the
demonstration to a speech on campus Wednesday by
William   Kunstler,   a   defence   attorney in  the   recent
"Conspiracy 8" trial at Chicago.
Kunstler told 5,000 persons Wednesday that the real
violence in Santa Barbara is not in street demonstrations.
"The real violence," he said, "occurs in the
backrooms of police stations."
"I think the shadow of the swastika is on every
courthouse, on universities, on government buildings,
maybe even on the apartment building door next to you."
Mass media matchmaking may have saved Mike
By JIM DAVIES
Ubyssey Matchmaker
What has happened to Mike the deserter? Has he
found a wife? Has he been deported to the United
States? Is he in prison? Have any courageous girls
offered themselves as marital prospects to save him from
a life behind bars?
Read on as the saga of Mike versus the American
army continues.
Since the article about Mrke's requiring a wife to
escape 40 odd years in U.S. Army prisons first appeared
in The Ubyssey, there has been considerable reaction.
CBC television has done a feature on Mike, the
Express, the temporary city newspaper, has covered the
story, and the Georgia Straight has reprinted the original
story.
What all this coverage has boiled down to is simply
this-a prospective wife for Mike. During the first two
days after the initial story appeared, 14 girls contacted
The Ubyssey office to say they had an interest in helping
Mike.
The principle disadvantage was that if the girl is
under 21 years of age, as were most of the applicants,
she has to obtain parental consent.
In a situation such as this, parental consent is almost
impossible to obtain.
However, Mike has received offers of help from
several girls over 21. Mike, 20, is presently involved in
obtaining consent from his mother (his father is dead)
before he* can proceed with his plans for a "token
marriage" with one of the girls.
At present, the girl wishes to remain anonymous for
obvious reasons, however, it can be stated that she is
over 21, and is not a student at UBC.
Applications for helping Mike have been filtering in
steadily from as far away as Mission City.
The Ubyssey wishes to thank all those girls who
have expressed an unselfish desire to help Mike stay in
Canada and out of prison. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
Pacific Press management
resumes talks with unions
High level talks between representatives of
Pacific Press and the unions involved in the current
contract dispute will resume today in Victoria.
The management team will be led by Pacific
Press general-manager Ed Benson but will include FP
Publications chairman Brig. R. S. Malone who
recently flew into Vancouver "for the regular board
meeting."
Representing the unions at the meeting will be
American Newspaper Guild international president
Charles A. Perlik Jr., International Typographical
Union president John J. Pilch, of the International
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union
vice-president Robert Brown, and a representative
of the International Stereotypers and Electrotypers
Union still to be designated.
The meeting will be the first confrontation
since the ccmpany refused to bargain Dec. 1 and
termed the unions "irresponsible."
Sources close to the top have indicated that
talks were cancelled by the company because of a
personality conflict between Benson and ITU local
president Len Guy.
According to these sources, Benson has denied
this and said that Len is a very nice Guy.
The company finally shut the plant down on
Feb. 15 due to "increased loss of revenue because of
production difficulties."
When informed of a newspaper to be run by the
newly unemployed Pacific Press employees, the
company informed the Joint Council of Newspaper
Unions "they would soon learn just what was
necessary to publish a newspaper."
But the Vancouver Express was created
anyway.
The first issue came out Feb. 21 and sold over
100,000 copies. The second issue Feb. 24 did just as
well.
In fact it seems more than coincidental that
FP Publications' brass are in town the same week
and a meeting quickly set up.
It appears the higher echelon has been called in
to save face for the local wheels.
Dear Speak Easy,
I'm writing you to describe a situation which
myself and probably many others are finding
themselves in. I have graduated from UBC and I
had been led to believe that my degree would
result in a job that would be interesting as well as
financially equal to the investments one puts into
getting an education.
Instead, I've discovered that fe*w such jobs
exist. Somehow, someone has miscalculated the
economic conditions pertaining to the university
educated individual. There are, however, some
very pertinent factors. For one, government
anti-inflationary measures hit directly at
government services which usually employ
degreed people.
Having spent several months looking for a
job I'm beginning to feel my degree is worthless
— a white elephant.
Well that's pretty well my situation and I
only want to add that I still owe money for my
student loan and recently got a letter from the
Sherriff s office of Vancouver City pertaining to
my loan. So: five years getting my diploma -
money, time, effort, emotional investment. Hah!
What can I do? Have a diploma burning.
DISAPPOINTED
Dear Disappointed,
The plight of the "educated unemployed"
has been pretty much ignored by governments
and everyone else. What makes the situation
particularly frustrating is the gaggle of H.P.D.
teachers, parents and friends who told us "to get
our education" and we would be set. Somebody
miscalculated indeed.
The job situation does seem grim without
much prospect of improvement. If you have the
strength to keep looking, you might try the
student placement centre on campus. They
informed us that last June they actually had jobs
available that went unfilled. They also would
have the most up to date information about
where "university type" jobs might be available.
If you are broke, you could apply for
welfare. It might also be worthwhile to contact
the Unemployed Citizens' Welfare Improvement
Council (1726 W. 7th, Vancouver, Phone
731-0131). This is a somewhat radical group of
people, I believe, on welfare. Perhaps if enough
people became aware of how bad the situation is
for the unemployed, and got behind the groups
like the above it might be possible to demand
that the government provide, if not jobs, at least
a decent welfare system.
Speak Easy is open Monday to Friday 12
p.m. to 9 pjn. Phone 228-3706, Room 218,
SUB.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
For Take-Out Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry Brownlee, Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
WOW!
Have We
Got It For
THn*
K
NATE SMITH
new editor displays team spirit
UNIVERSITY SQUARE - Behind the Pharmacy - 224-0915
Aroma of lox and bagels
to invade Ubyssey office
By NATE SMITH
Ubyssey Appointments Editor
Nathan H. Smith, The Ubyssey's resident "super-jew", has
been named editor-in-chief for the 1970-71 academic year.
Smith was The Ubyssey's city editor this year and is co-author
of the forthcoming best-selling jokebook "All-Time Weakies for City
Desk."
When asked about Smith's appointment, his literary
collaborator Brian McWatters said: "That's great, now we can keep
Smith in the editor's office and out of the newsroom where he only
gets in everyone's way."
Smith, who was available for comment, told reporters he
would run the paper with an iron hand.
"I will run the paper with an iron hand," he said.
"Everyone around here will have to understand that I'm the
boss," he said. "What I say goes and anyone who doesn't like it can
leave and, and what do I say now Paul?"
Smith's appointment will be formally ratified when the new
Alma Mater Society council takes office at the end of March.
H»      fESy     DAY ATMR«
DAY IS      H WW MIKE'S
CHARBROILED STEAKS
4489 W. 10th at Sasamat
Open to 12:30 week nights
8:00 on Sundays
. AUDREY
JOHANNESEN
TODAY - 12.30
SUB AUDITORIUM 50c
Playing BACH — BUSONI
CHOPIN
BARTOK
MOUSSORGSKY
Presented by
SPECIAL   EVENTS Friday, February 27, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Quebec's young people
are not
afraid'
Why a historian
and a labor leader
think separatism
is inevitable.
By Christine Krawczyk
"I came here to speak to my friends the students and
tell the truth about what is happening in Quebec today,"
Quebec labor leader and separatist Michel Chartrand said
Thursday.
The arts faculty sponsored historian Stanley Ryerson
and Michel Chartrand, who spoke on the history of the
separatist movement and its long range objectives.
Ryerson spoke on Wednesday. His talk was meant to
serve as an introduction to Chartrand.
Ryerson outlined the history of separatism, and
showed how the problem had been aggravated in recent
times because of American domination of our economy.
History is  the  cause of the problem according to
Ryerson.   "The   cases   of   both   English   and   French
Canadians are the .product of a historical phenomenon,"
he said.
"English-Canadians were the first to establish
separatism when they set up Upper and Lower Canada as
two separate provinces," said Ryerson.
He went on to say that was just a historic scare crow
used by the English.
Ryerson then showed how the state structure as we
know it today is a product of imperialism of one kind or
another.
"Old state structures were a product of merchant
capitalism and feudalism. An example of this is the
Quebec Act," he said.
"Then came the industrial capitalist and feudalist
state which was perpetuated by the British through the
Act of Union," said Ryerson.
Ryerson showed how the entire state structure of
Quebec was established by an alien colonial power.
"What we have today is a corporate capitalist
society," said Ryerson, "and the people must be made
aware of the nature of their society and the direction in
which it is heading."
The fact that there is a French-Canadian nation in
Quebec is obvious. French-Canadians have all the
essentials of a nation.
They speak a different language, most of them are of
a different religion and their cultural background is
different from that of the rest of English-Canadians. But
perhaps what is most important is that the French
Canadians feel they are a nation.
"instead of looking into the very basic
socio-economic problems of Quebec, historians are still
arguing whether or not there was a bourgeoisie class in
Quebec before the conquest," said Ryerson.
There still are today certain historians who refuse to
see a French nation in Quebec. Donald Creighton nas
called biculturalism "a product of politicians".
"Such an attitude is extremely naive to say the least
since even the Bicultural and Bilingualism Commission has
admitted there are two nations living in Canada," said
Ryerson.
It is commonly assumed that separatism is a recent
phenomena. Ryerson pointed out this was false.
"Separatists existed as far back as 1806 at which time
they were putting out a newspaper called "Le Canadien".
Not only are there two nations living in Canada but
the two do not enjoy the same status. The B&B
Commission in this investigation found that there were
political and economic inequalities between the English
and the French.
The B&B Commission however can not touch that
problem, since that is not the purpose of their inquiry.
"Today Trudeau tells us there will be a commission
to look into the constitutional question," said Ryerson.
"It is already too late. All that can be done now for the
constitution is to abolish it".
"The longer English-Canadians insist on ignoring the
fact that there are two nations the harder it will be to
grapple with the problem," said Ryerson.
Today Quebec separatists are fairly united. They are
aiming for "Solidarite ouvriers et etudiantes" said
Ryerson.
When asked to predict the outcome of the next
provincial elections in Quebec to be held in October,
Ryerson said he thought the separatists would make some
considerable gains.
CHARTRAND: American domination
On Thursday Michel Chartrand spoke about what is
happening in Quebec today, relating it to the rest of
Canada.
"The economic structure of our society is like a
pyramid. At the bottom are the working people; then
come the farmers and the professionals. Further up the
pyramid is the lumber industry. Next come the insurance
companies, the banks and at the very top is the
government dominated by Americans," said Chartrand.
Chartrand then explained that it is the Americans
who decide where funds will be allocated, since they
RYERSON: history of separatism
control most of the funds.
"Although our economy is dominated by the U.S. we
still have some bargaining power if we want to make use
of it," said Chartrand.
"We can withhold the goods they want from us. We
can sell the produce we sell to the U.S. to China or Cuba.
It would probably do a lot more good there," he said.
Chartrand then went on to denounce capitalism as
amoral, antisocial, and anti-nationalist. He said once the
people saw that, they would denounce capitalism.
"The young in Quebec are no longer hypnotised by
Americans. They have no inferiority complex, they are
more educated than ever before and they are not afraid,"
said Chartrand.
He said that Quebec youth is being radicalized. There
are more radicals in the junior colleges than in the
universities.
"The new generation of Quebecois is not going to be
as patient as my generation was. That is how separatism
will be accomplished."
Much has been said about the political orientation of
those leading the Parti Quebecois. They have been
accused of being opportunists, pro-American or bourgeois
by some radical groups.
Commenting on these accusations Chartrand said
"Our problem right now is not a welfare state. Our
problem is to have our- own government to run our own
affairs."
"The P.Q. couldn't be bourgeois since the Quebec
bourgeois is already involved with the established political
parties. Sure there are many educated members in the
P.Q. but that is because there are rnore educated people in
Quebec than ever before," he said.
"In any case they will have to go to socialism to solve
the problems of our province. An increasing number of
labor people are joining P.Q." said Chartrand.
Chartrand explained why the French Candians feel
they can't work with the English.
"We may have the same or similar problems but our
attitudes toward them differs," he said.
That does not mean there is nothing that students in
Vancouver can do to help the Quebecois. They can
convince people that the cause of the French-Canadians is
a just one.
"The English-Canadians who sympathise with our
-cause can help prepare the rest of Canada to accept an
independent Quebec and thus help us. There is nothing
they can do for us inside Quebec," said Chartrand.
Senate waffles on Belshaw recommendations
The UBC senate didn't really do anything
Wednesday night, it just kicked a few things around in
hopes they would get lost.
Senate tabled three recommendations of the
Belshaw report on long range objectives.
Recommendation two of the report calls for the
raising of the entrance requirement for all first year B.C.
students to 65 per cent.
Senators felt that raising admission standards was
not essential at this time as the present enrolment quota
of 3,400 new students next September would probably
exclude most students with marks below 65 per cent.
Recommendation three calls for the setting up of a
quota system whereby enrolment to the first two years
of agriculture, education, physical education and
recreation, and science as well as the first year of
commerce would be restricted.
Senate tabled this recommendation until more work
has been done in finding the best way to apportion
students between the various faculties.
Recommendation four calls for the implementing of
the quota system by limiting enrolment on the basis of
academic ability.
Since a quota system as recommended in
recommendation three had already been tabled by
senate, the senate was also forced to table
recommendation four.
Said student senator Peter Brock after the meeting:
"I was pissed off at senate."
Student senator Jim Davies said: "I next expect
senate to table a motion on whether or not they are
against apathy."
The tabling of the motion will, at any rate, give
opponents of a quota system based on academic
qualifications time to marshal their forces.
A motion by economics prof 'Gideon Rosenbluth
mat with more success.
He suggested a committee be set up to investigate
the physical, financial and academic resources available
for each student and the maximum size of classes
required to maintain the quality of education in each
faculty.
Standards should be set up on information regarding
the standards prevailing at "good universities". These
standards would deal with matters such as student-staff
ratio, library space per student, books per student, size
of classes, laboratory space and equipment per student,
etc.
The formation of this committee was approved by
senate by a large majority. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango^The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 27,1970
Changes?
We're, a little disappointed in the Vancouver
Express.
There has been a lot of talk in the past about the
monopoly that Pacific Press has on the newspapers in
this city and about how things would be different if the
monopoly could be broken.
Now we realize the Express doesn't have the
money, manpower or facilities to put out a top notch
paper, but it surely could be better than it is now.
We think there are more important things to write
about than T.V., women's news and sports. A ridiculous
amount of space is given to these subjects.
The editorials read like the same old stuff we've
been seeing for years. Has no one got any new ideas or
points of view?
The philosophy behind the news coverage is no
different—witness the sensationalistic story in
Thursday's paper about a murder being linked to
"orgies" and the murder house being a "den of
prostitution." Such cliches, such inconsequential news.
And on top of all this, the paper looks like shit. It
looks like a a poor imitation of the Sun or the Province,
standard broadsheet layout done poorly.
We understand that the Express "newsroom" and
print shop have the air of a light social gathering when
the paper is being produced. We admire the spirit of the
people working under such hardship.
But putting out a paper in this city is a serious
business, especially now. This is a big chance for the
newspaper guild to show what its members can do and
what sort of different paper can be produced.
It's not being done.
Now, with the latest issue heavy with advertising,
we fear the Express may lose sight of its initial objective
to put our a paper as a public service—unlike Pacific
Press—and now join Pacific Press in aiming primarily for
■ profit.
We hope this is not the case. But it would not
surprise us if it were.
Cards
Passing through the SUB cafeteria Monday, we
saw no less than eight tables occupied by people playing
cards.
At the same time, people were wandering through
the tables and chairs, looking for some place to sit.
At one time there was a rule against card-playing
in the cafeteria. Now, it appears, this rule is not being,
obeyed and is not being enforced.
So, it remains for the individual student to
enforce the rule.
Our own battle plan involves a 10 cent glass of
that sugary lemonade—or maybe coke would do.
We walk along with our lemonade and there's this
briefcase jutting out into the aisle and, oops, sorry, we
seem to have dumped our lemonade on your deck of
cards. Accept our apologies. It was an accident, of
course.
Editor: Michael Finlay
Newi      Paul  Knox
City      Nate Smith
Managing      Bruce  Curtis
Wire      Irene  Wasilewski
Sports     Jim Maddin
Senior   John Twigg
Photo     Dave Enns
Ass't News  Maurice Bridge
Ass't City   John Andersen
Page Friday   Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
David Bowerman and Phil
Barkworth put on the animal act of the
century. Even Smith was shocked. Jan
O'Brien and Ginny Gait teamed up
while Bob Bennett and Christine
Krawczyk, came back. "Who the hell
does J. Broadway think he is?"
chorused Bev Gelfond, John Butler,
David Schmidt, Dave Keillor, Jennifer
Jordan, Sandy Kass and Linda Hossie
in four part arpeggio. Elaine Tarzwell
got her feature held by a dirty old man
named Brian McWatters.
"Silly, it's nylon, not silk!" said
Robin Burgess. Sports people were
Dick Button, Scott McCloy and Tony
Gallagher. Thanx for turning in a list.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Absentees
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On Tuesday last Robin
Mathews and James Steele spoke
on the Americanization of the
Canadian university. Throughout
this past year we have heard many
complaints regarding these two
gentlemen from various faculty
members. Yet when Mathews and
Steele come to speak on campus
we find that most of their critics
do not attend the meeting. Worse
yet, those who do come are
unable to offer a single word of
criticism or argument. We wonder
if our "critics" are now won over
to the Mathews/Steele position or
if this is just another example of
the truth that Jerry Farber taught
us "most professors don't have
very much in the way of balls".
RALPH STANTON
arts 4
Racism
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your paper has in two issues
(Feb. 6 and Feb. 24) accused
AIESEC of promoting racism.
As an international association
of students in economics and
commerce operating in 49
countries, AIESEC's goal is to
promote understanding among
nations and help educate the
manager of the future. Since
1948, AIESEC has exchanged
over 40,000 students around the
world. We have special
consultative status with UNESCO,
ECOSOC (United Nations
Economic and Social Council),
and are on the special list of the
International Labor Organization.
Clearly, in view of our
objectives and activities we are
against racism. However, the issue
that your paper has brought up is
this: by sending trainees to South
Africa on an exchange program,
does AIESEC implicitly support
that country's government? Put
another way, is the sending of a
student on an educational visit to
an illegitimate government a
political act—that of public
support and recognition?
After heated debates and long
deliberation, I have decided that it
does. It is irrelevant whether or
not AIESEC is non-political and
non-racist in intent, if in the eyes
of the majority it is viewed as
supporting apartheid.
On the other hand, the positive
effects    of    the    reciprocal
exchange—in which a South
African student has the
opportunity to see the fallacies of
apartheid by comparison with
Canada's less racist society—have
also to be weighed. But this factor
does not compensate for the
negative effect of indirectly
supporting racism.
Therefore, following a vote by
the UBC local committee
members, I shall write to
AIESEC-Canada's national
committee in Montreal, our
International Secretariat in
Rotterdam, and the South African
national committee, informing
them of our wish to formally
cease exchange activities with
South Africa.
JACQUES A. KHOURI
AIESEC-UBC
local committee president
Expression
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A letter credited to me
appeared in the Feb. 24 edition of
the Vancouver Express in a
version so mangled as to be
scarcely recognizable. The editors
of that paper completely altered
the structure of the original letter,
changed one adjective and one
(correct) spelling, and several
punctuation marks'. Far more
serious, they misprinted a figure
of crucial importance, which
should have read $9,811,200
instead of $9,200. The result
made me look like a fool, which I
like to think I am not.
Since I think the original letter
had an important point to make,
and still does, I would appreciate
it if you could print it as a letter
to The Ubyssey, along with this
(or an edited version) disclaimer
of responsibility for the letter
which appeared in the Express,
This will not only help to get the
point across, but save me the
embarrassment of some funny
looks I am getting from friends.
THOMAS L. PERRY JR.
Perry's letter to the Express
appears below as he wrote it—Ed.
The Editor,
The Vancouver Express,
1655 W.Broadway,
Vancouver,
British Columbia
Dear Sir:
I read in the Vancouver Sun of
February 9, 1970 that the British
Columbia Government has sold
the Seattle Light Company the
rights to raise the level of Ross
Lake by 125 feet in order to
generate electric power to meet
Seattle's needs. The resultant
flooding will apparently destroy a
wilderness area of considerable
recreational value to the people of
British Columbia.
The Sun's article states that the
current retail cost of power in
Seattle is 8 mills ($0,008) per
kilowatt hour. The Rose Lake
project will generate
approximately 140,000 kilowatts
of power.
Computation of the value of
this power at Seattle retail prices
is simple:
8 mills
kilowatt hour
x
140,000 kilowatts
x
24 hours
day
$26,880,000
day
The province of British
Columbia will receive $35,000 per
year in compensation for the
flooding of 6,300 acres (about
10 square miles) of the Skagit
River Valley. At the Seattle rates,
this is about 31 hours worth of
power.
Put another way, in one year
we will receive $35,000 for power
whose worth is $9,811,200.
Such calculations do not take
into account the aesthetic,
recreational, and tourist dollar
value of the Skagit Valley, which
is reportedly unusually well suited
to development as a recreational
asset for the rapidly expanding
population of the Lower
Mainland.
Let us hope that someone in
Victoria has only made a stupid,
but pardonable and
REVERSIBLE arithmetical error.
Mr. David Brousson, M LA /has
assured us that it is not too late to
cancel the agreement with Seattle.
It would be a frightening prospect
indeed were this deal to represent
an official government policy of
selling away our future at bargain
basement prices.
Thomas L. Perry Jr. Friday, February 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Berkeley: The defection of the clerks
By CHARLES CURMI
In the wake of large public
outbursts such as last year's
Moratorium Day demonstrations,
there usually follows a rash of
introspective essays, articles
columns, and so-called
"definitive" droppings from the
academic tables of North
American Universities. The
October "cri de coeur" of a
nation desperately trying to
disentangle itself from a social
disaster of its own making was no
exception. And though one is
tempted to question the
humanistic content of a mass of
conspicuous consumers suddenly
faced with the economic realities
of a prolonged war, some
noteworthy soul-searching has
nevertheless begun.
That onetime Canadian, John
Kenneth Galbraith, speaking of
the October 15 marches, stated
that Richard M. Nixon might very
well have been affected by the
size of the crowds in New York,
Washington and Boston. Though
his assumption hardly applied to
his callous disregard of the orderly
masses that flooded the Capitol
one month later, he could hardly
have failed to notice its
middle-class content - he, the
self-styled voice of the neat and
the clean, of that so-called "silent
majority."
As a fulltime Canadian,
enjoying a certain degree of
geographic remoteness (if nothing
else) from the American scene.
Moratorium Days and their
attendant diagnoses, brings to
mind the lack of a comparable
examiniation of conscience after
an occurrence whose impact on
America might in time surpass
that of    Vietnam.     I     refer
specifically to the defection from
Berkeley of that nucleus of brains
whose quality for a time, gave
credence to that institutions's
claim of parity with Thoreau's
alma mater. Of this nucleus, the
most prominent defectors are
Henry Rosovsky, Japanese
Economic History, the economist
Harvey Leibenstein and the
eminent sociologist Seymour
Martin Lipset, all presently at
Harvard. Canada's University of
Toronto gained the sociologist
Lewis Feuer, and in the same
discipline, Pennsylvania acquired
Erving Goffman and Ohio State,
William Peterson.
A Berkeley source commenting
on these losses was quoted as
stating that "the numbers are not
great... but when we begin to
lose these types we get worried,"
to this he added that since 1964
Berkeley has lost an average of 24
senior professors a year. From a
campus of some 28,000 students
this figure might not seem too
alarming, yet in contrast to the
American ethic of success, volume
is not at stake here. What is at
stake is quality — that rare form
of intellectual excellence which in
disciplines such as history,
sociology and economics (to
name but a few), demands of
those who "have it," a double
dedication: First, an academic
dedication to their specific
discipline, then, and most crucial
to their status of excellence, a
"spiritual dedication" to the
society they are analysing and its
varied individuals.
In the age of multiuniversity,
when so much appalling,
mediocrity is being forced onto
the students of even the better
universities   of Canada and   the
U.S., the losses of Berkeley seem
to herald a new emigration, this
time from West to East. An
emigration so similar to an earlier
one, that from the Weimar
Republic which so crucially
depleted the German will to resist
the savagery of National
Socialism, with consequences all
too often forgotten today.
Whether professors Rosovsky
and Lipset left Berkeley for
motives other than the prevailing
political and social climate, the
fact remains that this very climate
with its blatant curtailment of
academic freedom, demanded that
they and their colleagues remain
at Berkeley. Granted that research
and reflection are difficult in- the
midst of aerial gassings and
shotgun law, but it is precisely in
the midst of such a social cirisis
that excellence is needed. In such
circumstances the mediocre, the
wishy-washy hewers to policy and
the departmental toadies, as in
war, soon disappear, and all that
remains are the courageous. But
courage is not enough, it must be
wedded to the cool analysis of
quality, to that intellectual
excellence which demands from
the few a personal commitment to
the many, a commitment to the
convictions they have up to now
only been preaching.
If these few refuse to lead, to
even if need be go down into the
streets when the cause demands it,
then no amount of hair splitting
analogies or academic fog will
obscure the solid fact that they do
not have the courage of the own
convictions. When this happens,
then all the humanism and logic
with which they've surrounded
themselves will stand naked,
revealed for once for what it
really is: mere academic cant.
These are lean years for the
intellectual, for who will risk the
loss of tenure, a chair, majority
prestige or even arrest and
physical violence for the dubious
honour of being taken seriously
by one's students — of finally
gaining their respect? Yet, is not
this very loss of respect one of the
fundamental reasons for the revolt
of the universities? Are not
Canadian and American university
students fed up with the lore of
commitment from post-Sartian
apologists whom they know will
never act? Has not the time come
(to use the haggard cliche) for
those who preach to "stand up
and be counted"?
One who has stood up,
recently summarized America's
present tragedy by stating that for
the first time in his life he found
himself wondering "whether this
MORE LETTERS
Oh, no
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am delighted to read that you
do love me. At least I do hope
that your editorial is correct as
far. Otherwise it is a bit
misleading. But I most willingly
forgive this if only it is true that I
have always been wrong in my
impression that your constant
failure to mention Experimental
College was due to your dislike of
me as a person as well as of my
goals. I also much enjoyed the
signs of sympathy shown to me
by many students having read that
I am living. Though I am not a
saint like Saint Joan, in a way I
fear that correcting your story
may bring about the same effect
as it has in Shaw's play when Joan
suggests that since now everybody
seems to love her she might return
to earth. Nevertheless I must
correct it.
To the best of my knowledge I
never said that I am definitely
leaving, nor have I made up my
mind to do that. What I did say at
student council and other places is
that after fifteen years in Canada
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for brevity,
grammar, legality and taste.
Letters should be typed, if
possible, and triple spaced.
Letters to the editor can be
sent to The Ubyssey office in SUB
by Campus mail or can be
delivered personally.
miOALS
GUARANTEED
MUFFLERS
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country might not, after all,
succumb as Germany did, to a
diabolism, Ku Klux Klanism,
armed vigilanteism, and
irresponsible militarism. I am sure
[he continues] that there will
always be a nucleus who will
never surrender to the
obscurantists. What I am not sure
of — and this for the first time —
is whether this nucleus can still
lead a majority in defence of
American ideals and of the Bill of
Rights. I hope so."
One can only join Professor
Arthur Bestor in hoping that this
defence can still be effected yet.,
With Berkeley as an example one
cannot but wonder whether the
nucleus of which he speaks has
not already been depleted to the
point of near extinction — for
America and for Canada, I hope
not.
without achieving anything I may
in the end leave. I pointed out to
council etc. that since I did fail to
get any real number of students
involved e.g. in the idea of
suggesting a meaningful Bill of
Rights to the political parties
formulated as so called natural
law (in essence not to be taken
away again but amendable in form
by qualified majorites) and
including the right to work and
the right to a guaranteed annual
income etc. I now wish to get
some money to get few thousand
booklets on this subject printed.
This at least could still become a
real service to this country - and
that perhaps after this work I may
leave if again I cannot find any
meaningful work.
KARLBURAU
1970 Graduates
B.Sc. (with interest- in Data Processing)
B.A. (Economics Major)
B.C. TELEPHONE CO.
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March 5 and 6
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SUNDAY 2:40, 4:50, 7:00, 9:10 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
THE COMMUNITY
HAS A RIGHT TO KNOW
The Canadianization campaign of Carleton
University professors Robin Mathews and James
Steele hit UBC this January when student senator
Peter Ladner simply asked the senate to authorize
a study of the overall citizenship makeup of
professors here.
Here he talks with the two professors about
the reaction to their campaign at UBC and across
Canada.
Ladner: First of all, what has been the
reaction to your statements across Canada?
Mathews: On May 17 at Sir George Williams
University, students and faculty of ten universities
met for an emergency symposium on
de-Canadianization. They set up a steering
committee to look at special Canadian problems,
and they've since published a number of reports.
There are also individual universities doing
studies.
Some Windsor undergraduate students have
done a study and presented it to the Ontario
government; the Canadian Liberation Movement
has started in Toronto and the University of
Toronto graduate students' association has
presented a brief to the university authorities
pressing for advertising of all jobs in Canada.
(Art Smolensky, UBC GSA president, has
presented a similar request to the UBC senate, but
it has not come up for discussion yet).
York University has had a lot of writing about
this in their newspaper, and some students there
have been pushing for a two-file system.
(This means the file on potential Canadian
applicants for any university position would be
considered ahead of a second file, which would
include all non-Canadians.)
Some members from the executive of the
Canadian student Liberal association have phoned
me asking for advice on studies they would like to
do.
The Conservatives have brought this up in the
federal parliament, and our studies were
mentioned in the Watkins manifesto to the New*
Democratic Party convention.
In general I would say Canadian people are
much more aware of the situation now. We have
also constantly related the problem to the whole
problem of American imperialism in Canada and
sensitized people to that issue.
Ladner: You wrote a book called "The
Struggle for Canadian Universities." How well has
it been selling?
Steele: The 3,000 copies of the first printing
sold out in a month and a half. The book has now
gone into second printing but I haven't heard
anything more since then.
Ladner: At UBC, several faculty members said
this whole issue was a creation of the press; that
the press out here imported the whole argument
from the east, where it was nothing but a flash in
the journalistic pen.
Mathews: Those people clearly don't
understand the Canadian community. They live in
a little ivory tower which they consider an
international outpost.
Canadians right across the country are very
concerned and are growing more concerned. We've
had as many letters from B.C. as from any other
province in Canada.
Ladner: Another objection raised here is that
the total number of Americans in Canadian
universities doesn't exced 20 per cent at the most,
and at UBC, the overall percentage simply isn't
high enough to worry about.
Mathews: But look at the hiring figures for
1968-69: 1,013 new professors came from the
U.S., 545 from the U.K., 722 from other foreign
countries, and only 362 from Canada.
The greatest influx of new teachers is from
the U.S. and their numbers are increasing, so the
Americans are primarily the problem.
They're especially concentrated in sensitive
areas like social sciences and humanities.
You also have to talk about American
expansion in all other areas of Canadian life.
Ladner: My motion in the senate was opposed
by one Canadian faculty member who probably
considers himself anti-imperialist, but who was
thrown out of the U.S. during the McCarthy era
and is afraid that any stronger links between the
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60215—Mozart Sonatas—Artur  Schnabel
60112—Songs of  Carl   Nielsen—Aksel   Schiotx
S 60107—Liszt;   Concerto   No   1    &   No   2   —   S.
Francois   piano,   Phil.   Orch.
S 60103—Franck;   Prelude  Chorale   &   Fugue,   Debussy,   6   preludes,   Malcuzynski
S 60098—Smetana;   The   Bartered   Bride,   Dvorak;
Scherzo Capriccioso
S 60096—Faure;   Requiem  Op 48—Choir of  Kings
College
S 60095—The  Horn Club  of Los Angeles
S 60093—Chopin;   Prelude   Op   28   Rafael   Orozco,
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60086—Richard Tauber—Opera  Arias
60077—Debussy;  La  Mer—Nocturnes,  Phil  Orchestra
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S 60072—-Mozart  Piano  Concerto,   Hephzlbah,  Yalta h & Jeremy Menuhln
S 6006*—Beethoven  Concerto  No  5  W.  Oleseking
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S 60058— Rossini   Overtures—C.   M.    Sivlini—Phil.
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assisting   artists)
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Colin  Davis cond.
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S 60048—Brahms;   Double   Cone.   Beethoven   Son.
No 1,  C.  Ferras,  P.  Tortelier,   P.   Barbi-
zet,   pianos.
S 60045—Dvorak;   Symph.   No   »  —   C.   M.   Givlin
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IB    6008—Mascagni;    Cavallera     Rusticana,    Italian
Songs,   Gigll   Bechi,  others  (2  LPs)
SIC    6005—Beethoven   Compl.   String   Quartet   Vol.
1   Early Quartets (3  LPs)
SIC    6006—Beethoven   Compl.   String   Quartet   Vol.
2 Middle   Quartets   (3   LPs)
S 60031—Tchaikovsky;   Symph.   No   6   (Pathetique)
C.   M.   Clulinl   Phil   Orch.
S 60028—Handal — Arias — Richard Lewis
S 60023—Tchaikovsky   —   1812   Overture   —   Sir
Malcolm   Sargent
S 60021—Falls;   Three    Cornered    Hat   —   Royal
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60017—The   Unashamed  Accompanist — Gerald
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IC    6037—Bellini;   Norma;   Orch   &   Chorus   of   La
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IB    6027—Puccini;  Tosca  —  E.   Dominlci,  B.  Cigli
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IB    6019—Giordano;   Andrea   Chenier  —  G.  Conti,
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IB    6014—S.    O'Casey;   Juno   &   the    Paycock   —
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IB    6009—Leoncavallo;   I.   Pagliacci,   Italian   Songs,
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
university and the outside community could lead
to government interference and the end of the
university as an effective critic of society. You're
asking for legislation to implement some of your
recommendations. How would you answer him?
Mathews: Every community has the right to
know the personnel patterns in its intellectual
centres. That must be public knowledge, period.
The Canadian people have not been
McCarthyite people. They have a right to address
the problems in their own country, and while in
the U.S. it might lead to forms of McCarthyism,
there's no reason to believe in this in Canada.
Ladner: Have any studies been done that have
found a correlation between a scientists citizenship
and his research interests? I had a lot of trouble
defending the need for Canadian citizens in the
sciences.
Steele: No studies have been done but every
scientist must select a particular problem on which
he works; he must have a sense of priorities. One
of his criteria is practical application to which his
scientific research must be put. His results will be
utilized by one community or another.
For example, a biologist might have to decide
whether he does research on the black fly or the
tse-tse  fly.  If he   were   a  Canadian  he   would
probably choose the black fly, not the tse-tse fly.
We want to make sure the peculiarities of the
local situation are respected.
Ladner: You've been attacked in the east and
your ideas have been attacked here by those who
fear a concern with the number of Canadian
citizens in a faculty could lead to discrimination
against non-Canadians.
Steele: Failure to examine in a scholarly way
the social and scientific problems at hand is
anti-academic and anti-scientific.
What we're proposing — an eventual
two-thirds majority of Canadian citizens — would
mean that Canadian universities would have the
largest percentage of foreign scholars of any
university system in the world.
Ladner: But in some of the European
countries where citizenship is compulsory for any
full-time posts, apparently they've been raising a
lot of fuss to change that regulation.
Steele: I too am fundamentally opposed to
the American or European solution to our
problem. They have a chauvinistic premise which I
find most unattractive and limited.
They want to keep out all foreigners. It's all a
matter of striking a balance.
. . . who our profs are,
say Mathews and Steele
Parks board scraps beach road
The Vancouver parks board has dropped its
consideration of a beach road and marine
development project on Point Grey beach.
Park board chairman Andy Livingstone
indicated recently that the board is considering the
development of a seawall, "like the one in Stanley
Park," he said.
The plan also calls for offshore sand dredging to
provide fill for the new beach development.
"We hope that by raising the level of the beach
against the cliffs, we can stop a greater part of the
erosion currently going on at the cliffs," he said.
Erosion causes the cliff face to recede an
estimated three inches per year.
The parks board is attempting to arrange a
meeting with provincial government officials to
discuss a possible $400,000 grant for erosion
control.
Vancouver Point Grey Social Credit MLA
Garde Gardom said if the seawall followed the
natural contours of the cliffs, it would be a
tremendous asset in erosion control and
accessibility.
"The seawall would be for strollers and
cylists-not cars. This would be a tremendous
recreational credit," he said.
A counter proposal, against the seawall, has
been mentioned, but no details have been released.
Bach to the good old music.
Audrey Johannesen plays Johann
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S.U.B. Aud. Noon Friday. Admission 50c.
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THE PRE - MEDICAL SOCIETY
presents
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WILL   YOUR   PHYSICIAN  OF   THE   FUTURE   BE  A  COMPUTER?
Dr. Pierce of the  UBC Pathology Department Discusses
The Future Course of Computerized Medicine
TUESDAY, MARCH 3   -   12:30   -  WESBROOK 201
CHINESE OVERSEAS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
presents
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164 W. Hastings / 760 Columbia, N.W. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
TACUY to clean lake and send bill to Bennett
By LINDA HOSSIE
Premier W.A.C. Bennett may be presented with a bill
for the cleaning up of Burnaby Lake this spring.
This is one of the strategies The Action Committee
for Unemployed Youth planned at a meeting Thursday.
The committee says it "exists not to add to the
existing facilities for recruiting summer jobs, but to
expose the limitations of these facilities and present a
more accurate picture of the state of employment among
young people in the context of prevailing economic
trends."
It has two basic plans of action for this summer.
The project to clean up one of B.C.'s polluted lakes
and present the bill to Premier Bennett is one of these
plans.
"This is what students can be doing and if Bennett
doesn't give us jobs, this is what we're going to do—and
demand payment," said Stuart Rush, law 3.
The project is a voluntary one that will take place
immediately after exams.
Members of TACUY are meeting with the Society for
Pollution and Environmental Control this weekend to
finalize the location of the project.
The important thing is to get students involved, Rush
said.
"The more students we can get involved in the
project, the greater the potential will be for the
government to realize this is what students should be
doing," he said.
"The issue is not just pollution, but conservation and
community action such as establishing drop-in centres for
transient youths," Rush said.
He said the committee plans to demand union rates
of pay.
The second project planned by TACUY involves
leafletting the Manpower office.
Rush said that TACUY plans an "information picket"
to "draw attention to the fact that Manpower can't
provide the jobs they say they can."
"Transient youths may have to resort to petty
thievery in downtown stores to stay alive, unless jobs can
be found," Rush said.
He said student involvement will accomplish the goal
of making more jobs.
"We see success in terms of the number of people
involved, not necessarily in the number of jobs. Jobs are
just one aspect of the demonstration," he said.
Well-known author, Harold Cardinal
featured speaker during Indian week
By ROBIN BURGESS
Indian spokesman, Harold Cardinal, author of "The
Unjust Society" will be the featured speaker of a
week-long program on Indians beginning Monday.
Only 24 years old, Cardinal is president of the
Alberta Indian Association and a nationally known critic
of the government's policy towards his people.
He is scheduled to speak Thursday at noon in SUB
mall.
Sponsored by Indian students on campus Indian
Week gets underway Monday at 10:30 a.m. in SUB
auditorium with six short films including "Encounter with
Saul Alinsky in Roma Reserve".
The films will be re-run at 10:30 Tuesday.
In panel discussions throughout the week Indian
leaders, students and professionals will deal with different
aspects of the Indian situation.
Monday at 12:30 in SUB auditorium Jean Albin, a
teacher, Ron Hamilton, an anthropology teaching
assistant at University of Victoria, Ben Paul, a councillor
for Indian Affairs, and Ray Bobb from the Native Alliance
for Red Power will discuss topics ranging from the
anthropology of Indians to colonialism.
Tuesday, same time, in SUB ballroom, members of
B.C. Chiefs and North American Brotherhood, Joe
Mathias, Bernard Charles, Philip Paul, Wilbur Campbell,
and Don Moses, will describe the effects of economic and
political legislations on the lives of the Indian people.
Noon Wednesday, in Angus 110, a panel on Indian
education is planned, featuring Jocelyn Wilson from
"Think Indian", Evelyn Paul, Gerry Larkin from NARP,
and Angie Todd, a teacher.
Indian young people Bob Hall, Larry Seymour, Ken
Basil, Bill Wilson, Henry Jack, and Ron Hamilton
(members of the Native Youth Association) will make up
the final panel Friday at noon in Angus 110.
Indian Week comes to a grand close Friday night at 8
p.m. with a Benefit Dance at the New Indian Centre on
the corner of Third and Vine. The dance is from 8 pm to
midnight and admission is $1.
THERES
WinaWeek-End
for two in
San Francisco
6 trips for two will be won by UBC students
between January 30th and March 13th.
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for 2 days for winner
and friend.
Easy to enter! Fill in coupon and get your s
We'll mail your special Credit Card to you as soon
as we get the coupon. Every time you use your
Home Credit Card at any of the 298 Home Stations
you are automatically entered in the contest. The
more often you use it the more often you enter.
And the better your chances to win.
We'll mail you your   Worry Beads as soon as we
get your coupon, along   with iull contest details,
your special Home Credit Card  and  fascinating
Worry  Bead  story.
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arrangements to make it eligible.
TO: Home Oil Distributors Ltd., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Complete this application form (please print) and mail  it to Home Oil. We'll  rush your special
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for two— Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
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GET YOUR  FREE WORRY BEADS TOO
Faculty Year THE HEROIN ACCOUNT
THE AGENCY
The Agency had no definite beginning. It
occurred, reoccurred and is still occurring. Long
before it came to be known as The Agency, it was
growing out of chance meetings, casual introductions
and brief conversations. Coffee was ordered,
cigarettes offered, taxis taken, plane tickets
purchased, names forgotten and faces remembered.
Gradually, in different places at different times, it
acquired the name of The Agency with fluctuating
degrees of irony. The Agency is as difficult to fix in
space as it is in time. It is composed of men and
women who, insofar as they are associated, are for all
practical purposes faceless and anonymous. In their
function as associates, they permeate the blank grey
landscape of our lives: offices, suburban homes,
telephone directories, highways, newspapers, the
airwaves. The Agency has no charters, no contracts,
no shareholders, no board meetings, no hierarchy of
command. It is not connected with any business or
political interests and has no ambitions in those
fields. It makes no profits and pays no salaries. It
considers itself independent and neutral. Having no
ulterior motives, it can accept no credit for the results
of its work: the work itself is both means and end, its
own reason for being what it is. It is the work itself
which best defines The Agency.
THE HEROIN ACCOUNT
Recently, The Agency took upon itself a difficult
assignment: what has jokingly been referred to as
"The Heroin Account." The problem, stated in its
bare essentials, is to involve a significantly large
number of the populace in the use of the drug heroin.
The Agency  fully  realized  the difficulties of this
assignment: the use of heroin is widely frowned
upon, even by many of those employing it. It was
decided that the first step would be to arrest,
minimize and eventually nullify the initial automatic
negative reaction to the mere mention of the drug. To
do this, it would be imperative to take into full
account the major and most resistent component of
that negative reaction: the fact that heroin is
definitely addicting. It is not enough to make the
immediate effects of the drug attractive:
instantaneously and almost unconsciously the
long-term effects would be invoked and the entire
subject rejected. An approach that describes heroin as
a pleasant and desirable experience and implies that
minimal use will preclude addiction was considered to
be not only clumsy and insulting to the intelligence
but in fact harmful, resulting only in the doubling of
the negative reaction. It was therefore decided to
treat addiction as an integral part of heroin use and it
was further decided that it would be naive to make
heroin use and accompanying addiction merely
attractive. To make something appear attractive
implies an appeal, to some degree, to the element of
choice. Such an appeal could only weaken the
position of The Agency. Thus it was determined to
remove heroin use from the realm of choice and place
it squarely in the realm of inevitability. What we now
have is not an appeal but a challenge: a direct
confrontation with the fact of the drug and the
gradual accustoming of the public to the inevitability
of their addiction. It will become apparent that the
only thing separating the public from heroin
addiction is the actual use of the drug and that use
will not be far behind.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
SAMPLE APPROACHES
1.     I'm a heroin addict. That's right.
You know of
anything better to do? (And don't fool yourself.)
I'm a heroin addict. The only difference between
you and me is that you're not. Yet.
The only good thing about heroin is that you
know it's the only good thing.
Heroin means business. How about you?
Heroin  is definitely an addicting drug. So you
know exactly  what  you're  getting  into.   How
many other things can you say that about?
You can say all the bad things you want about
heroin. You can say them over and over again.
And   when  you're finished  it'll still  be there
waiting for you. It can wait a long, long time.
Heroin doesn't give you freedom. It doesn't give
you truth or beauty or anything like that. It just
gives you  itself-heroin-and you  know that's
what you've really wanted all along.
The thing about heroin is that you get exactly
what you ask for. All you have to do is ask.
Heroin. Go ahead. Say it. Think it. Heroin. It's
that simple.
PRESSRELEASE
In presenting the sample approaches above. The
Agency wishes to stress that it is in no way connected
with organizations or individuals currently or
potentially engaged in the production, distribution or
sale of heroin. Its purpose in this press release is
simply to acquaint the public with the existence of
The Agency and its relationship with The Heroin
Account. As we have stated, the work itself is the
best definition of The Agency and the work is
sufficient to itself. In keeping with this, it will be
obvious that the press release you are now reading is
another aspect of our work on The Heroin
Account. The inevitability of the fact that someone,
somewhere, should finally take up this Account is
quite clear.
8
9.
page friday
"Can he really playt" a girl whispered.   "Heavens, nor* f^
Arthur exclaimed. "He never played a note in his life."
They Laughed When I Sat Down
At the Piano
But When I Started to Play!
Buncha fuckballs anyway this weeks
masthead is brought to you my the great
infamous egregious michael guiggles
thoroughly inebriated as he is and also with
the occasionally hip of a(why the hell doesnt
this damn typewriter work)orbert rubesaat*
and timothy (artist) wilson.
OK. First of all we'll telUll you what's in
this issue just in case you8ve read this far.
(Look out Wilson, I'm doing my masterpiece
of a masterhead) on Page oNe we have the
great work of art above and the great work of
art below (this). One page Two three (two
that is) we present the sinclair-DICKin report
with none other than one of those dirty
cotton-pickin flax-eating mothahumpahs
commie ratfinks sonfoabichth (etc.) who
inflict our daily campus existence in in
conversation with our notorious duo. On page
three Musical Grum Lbings by meself and also
tougas who poops on a,film of somewhat
repute (it even got a hype in playboy
magaizeine which as we all know is cool since
it shows tits and ass and also) On pabe (that's
page for those who you npt accusto ed to
following typgoraphical erreurs) il ya (page
four) il ya sur la quatrieme page et aussi sur la
page cinquieme quelque chose par M. Norbert
Rubetoob quleque chose sur le phenomenon
de M. John Julianai, un tres grosses
Theatrefreaken-glogekengl-
uggenheimerschlatz. Read it anyway just in
case youve misunderstuud what weve writtne
so fjr: more mystery or page five in the name
of mystery which norbie that rubetobe has
forbidden me of which to speke. On the
sixienje page frederico cawsey hed wop and
greaseball for this here organization you dirty
rat has his say about a film which has caught
his frivelous fancy. Page seven finds what is it
neswswsws of the contemporary arts without
a capital f festival because of which something
youall (Y'all) should be very aware so REDE
REDE REDE READ YES////////////!!!!!!!!!!! !
And to grand organsmic climax this weaks
issue for yall on page eight are two record
reviews by maurice lions gate bridge and jim
raving fiend davies accomapnied by art by
timothy (artist)wilson which causy calls also
And((parkagraph) for the general layabout
and lays Id like to lay and stuff heres some
quotable quotes (only twenty inches or is it
five left) for all you masthead freeks/
/!!!!!!!!!!'7 wuit; avjfk w9ti u Vz
: "Ask Roger the Roach to Instal Clean
Towel" : "You don't have any feeling for
older people." : "What's worthwhile besides
money?" : "Crispy critter" : "I think I'll go
sodomize one of the linotype machines." :
"Do whatever you want I don't give a shit!" :
"He's just an editor, not god" : "He was the
asshole of the earth." : "You can't fire me
Finlay, I quit!" : "(Nober yoger yodels in
imitation of Swiss goathedrd)"
gosh only^ one ich left well goodbye to
brunirTiildegarde the mountain girl, jan,
meatball val, good firl susie and all the rest
(who else remains?) a host of consecrated
others... mjg feb 25 1970 11:25,25" PM. VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
©>
A Complete Automotive Service
Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANC A - 224-7424
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
PlescUbtion Optical
Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
TAPES    RECORDS   ^
i Open Nights 'til 10 |
INCLUDING SUNDAYS '
y ON GRANVILLE $
^    T      ORFHEUM THEATRE      003-114113   J   J^
PLAYHOUSE   THEATRE   CO.
An Evening with Bernard Shaw and The Ladies
A DOUBLE BILL INCLUDING
VILLAGE WOOING and DEAR LIAR
8:30  Nightly  to  March  6 — Sat.  Mat.  2:30
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
PLAYHOUSE 2 - THE CRIMINALS
Directed by John Juliani
THE ARTS CLUB THEATRE - 1181  SEYMOUR
THE CRIME — Mar.  2, 4, 5,  9,  10,  13,  14,   18,   19
THE PUNISHMENT — Mar. 3, 6, 7, 11, 12, 1*, 17, 20, 21
STUDENTS  HALF   PRICE —  Monday  to Thursday
VANCOUVER  TICKET CENTRE — 683-31255
RUSSIAN BALALAIKA
OrckeAtra & Concert
SATURDAY, FEB. 28, 9 P.M.
SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 2 P.M.
EXCITING
ENTERTAINMENT
Concert selections
from works of
Classical and Russian
Composers
Serge Lusgins, Director
RUSSIAN COMMUNITY CENTRE
2114 West 4th Avenue
General  Admission   $2.00
Student? & Members $1.50
Interview with
W. jB. Sinclair
(Reprinted from issue 2 of
THE STUDENT-PROLETARIA T SENTINEL.)
NOTE: G. Dickin, who conducted the
interview, is editor ot The Student-Proletariat
Sentinel, otficial organ ot the Maoist Student
Movement. W. B. Sinclair is Chairman of the
Maoist Student Movement, a new campus
socialist organization.
Dickin: How will you go about smashing the
capitalist-imperialist pigs?
Sinclair: They must be eradicated. We will line
them up against a wall and riddle their bodies
with socialist bullets. That is participatory
democracy at its best.
Dickin: Does that include the sympathizers, that
is, the lackeys of the imperialists, or will you give
these people who are, for the most part,
misguided and brainwashed, a chance to redeem
themselves through indoctrination and
assimilation into the student-proletariat society
with open arms and brotherly love.
Sinclair: No, we'll slaughter them all. They had
their chance before the revolution. We're being
fairly reasonable now with them, but if they
don't reform before the bomb of socialism
scatters the rotten meat of the
capitalist-bourgeois society from the bones of
civilization, then that's their tough luck.
Dickin: That sounds fair.
Sinclair: Damn right.
Dickin: How do you see the students' role in
the revolution?
Sinclair: The proletariat, when Marx was writing,
was the hope of society, but in North America
they have abused their opportunity to create a
brave new world, and have instead joined the
bourgeoisie and capitalists in the greedy pursuit
of luxury. The students, as Mao has
demonstrated, in his Great Leap Forward, are
now the hope of socialism. The students are the
only ones left to grab the axe and bury it in the
monstrous head of the capitalist society.
Dickin: Then the proletariat has copped out and
become lackeys of the imperialists?
Sinclair: There are a few who remember the
difference between right and wrong, but many
have fallen down before the altar of the
Almighty Dollar. You must see that a class
society is the Opiate of the People.
Dickin: What do you believe to be the greatest
difficulty in bringing about the revolution?
Sinclair: We've got the bombs, and we've got the
guns and ammunition, but what we really need is
people to throw the bombs and people to shoot
the guns. We also need to have connections in
high places.
Dickin: How many students do you believe really
support the struggle,-and how many hide behind
the skirts of the lackeys?
Sinclair: Last month we handed out
questionnaires to the students reading: "Do you
really support the struggle?" The results were
fifty-fifty. One proposed reason for the results
being so high is that we distributed
questionnaires only to members of the MAOIST
STUDENT MOVEMENT. The reason the results
were so low is because many of them thought it
was an exam, and guessed at the answer.
Dickin: I see. Will this have any effect on your
planning?
Sinclair: The revolution is next month.
Dickin: There are certain factions which suggest
that you have been moving too quickly.
Sinclair:    They    will    eliminated    after    the
revolution.
Dickin: Your group has been criticized by certain
revisionist lackeys as being too extreme. Do you
think these pigs have a point?
Sinclair:  They're entitled to their opinions, I
suppose.    We'll    eliminate    them    after    the
revolution, too.
Dickin: You earlier mentioned contacts in high
places. Do you feel you have any influence at
this point over any levels of government? That is,
do  you  have  anyone  planted  in  the rotting
structure of capitalist bureaucracy?
Sinclair: Well, we planted a bomb in the Post
Office last week, but it didn't go off. We suspect
that the Post Office probably  damaged it in
handling.
Dickin:    You   can't   trust   crummy   capitalist
materials, anyway.
Sinclair: True. Very, very, true. They're a bunch
of cheap shoddy materials made by exploited
workers . . .
Dickin:    Who    are    being    exploited    by
blood-sucking bosses, lackeys of the imperialists,
stooges of the capitalists . . .
Sinclair: They're nothing but a bunch of AMS
hacks —
Dickin: They don't represent the people!
Sinclair: Nor the students!
Dickin:   Puppets!   Puppets!   Lackeys!   Running
dogs    of   the    imperialists!    Servants   of   the
corporate structure!
Sinclair:    It's   a   Military-Industrial   Complex
sucking the marrow from our bones, it's a CIA
conspiracy. They're barnyard pigs, oinking at the
Almighty Dollar, their sun and moon!
Dickin:  They're puppets! Puppets! I tell you,
Puppets!
Sinclair: Worms!  Snakes in the grass! Howling
hypocrites!    Hyenas!    Hunchbacked    Camels!
Lunatics petrified by the moon of capitalism!
Dickin: Lackeys of the imperialists!
Sinclair:     Maggots!    Grub-worms!    Lackeys!
Puppets!   Running   dogs   of   the   imperialists!
Caterpillars with no chance for butterflyhood!
Dickin: Gutter-Press! Gutter-Press!
Sinclair: Irrational m—
Dickin:    When   the    red,   red   sun   of   Mao
Tse-Tungs's revolution rises in the east over the
blackened earth of the capitalist Babylon, the
lackey   pigs   and   their  running  dogs  will  be
desiccated!
Sinclair: Students of the world, unite! You have
nothing to lose but your AMS cards! Long live
the revolution!
Dickin: Argghgghgaspargh!
' 'A c c ret ion
Piece ' '- a
celebration of
the opening of
the Fine Arts
Gallery Sound
Show by Gathie
Falk. (Tape
Piece)
THE      U BYSSEY
■ pf 2WO
Friday, February 27, 1970 filmic mediocrity
Z is a nice, simple, spelled-out commercial film without any
political relevant significance (or if any, it is ultimately
reactionary in its form; high-gloss American Bpicture evasion).
Equivalent to the innumerable books resulting from the John
Kennedy assassination, this film describes very little and teaches
nothing. Such is sensationalism ... Z is dishonest.
Firstly it builds heroes.
Gregoria Lambrakis, deputy of the Left Democratic Union,
then the Opposition party in Greece, met his death at a rally in
1963. Resting on the laurels of his role in Resnais' La guerre est
finie, Yves Montand-as this deputy—strengthens a nice-guy r
image. Mild-mannered revolutionary, impeccably dressed, he
speaks calmly about peace, lack of hosiptals/doctors, absurd
military budgets, lack of universitites/professors... Hence in a
film intended for the market of "democratic" countries, Montand
proposes an iconic image everyone can identify with.
So this man, in no way extravagant or radical, in no way
different from quiet, acceptable liberal views, bravely ventures
into the seething crowd, and is mortally struck—Sympathy ...
The major hero appears, Jean-Louis Trintignant, the
equivalent of an investigating attourney. He is the clean-cut,
silent, incorruptable, dedicated detective on his journey into the
labyrinth of dirt. He is a formalist hero in the Western tradition,
being yet another casual, (ho hum)
put-down of a glossy film by pf s
quick K. Tougas.
Gary Cooper style in High Noon. You are invited by the director
to fervently, reverently and silently cheer him on—for he
represents that everpresent search for justice, truth, fairness and
moral honesty (exploited from Perry Mason onwards)—as he
unravels the mechanics of the assassination.
Next comes a civilian witness who dares come forward to
speak the truth, gets hit over the head, and ends up in a hospital
ward by himself. Otherwise he has a workshop where he varnishes
coffins, and is such a nice guy you're supposed to sympathize
with him and his icepack. That's not enough . .. well how about
we laugh with him? ... So the corrupt cops appear and tell him
he's imagining things. Then mamma appears and wails, followed
by sister who theatrically emotes for five minutes. Our hero,
buoyant Mediterranean, is amusingly baffled. Journalist appears
with camera, so he excitedly hams it up ... a front-page picture,
why, he's going to be famous ... Laughter ad nauseum.
Irene Papas portrays the wife of the murdered deputy. She
turns up, overhears the doctors relating the harsh medical facts,
and heroically holds back her tears. Later she returns to her
husband's hotel room and emotes longly. Thus having been
sympathized with, she leaves the film.
Secondly there are the bad guys.
These, instead of black hats, mostly wear medals. The
opening scene reveals them in a clumsy dialogue comparing the
control of mildew and ideological control. Nasty . .. particularly
that comparision of people and grapevines.
After a hackneyed line reminiscent of Guess Who's Coming
to Dinner in which Montreal is generously spelled-out as an
Olympic champion, doctor, and university professor, a faction of
the yelling demonstrators call him a fairy. So it's really morally
OK, you see, for the film director to continue to use the same
whipping boy when he comes to describe the killer. Like, he's a
killer—not nice; also a homosexual... well everybody knows
how nasty that is... And after an explicit scene, if you still
didn't get the point, the killer visits a male journalist-friend who
bashfully insists "No, I can't... No,I'm busy ..." Still don't get
it? Next the film follows him to a bar where this young man is
working a pinball machine. Our killer slips his hand over the
guy's, and helps him push buttons ... Very, very nasty.
Then, as if previous caricaturization of the bad-guy military
wasn't enough, their indictment is represented as a waltzy
burlesque:  going in  one  door, being accused (hick raising of
con't on pf5
-see INSIGNIFICANCE
Musical Diarrhea
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
The following is a carefully contrived
hype to get you to attend some
contemporary musical events occurring
on campus within the next two weeks.
First of all, the events in the Music
Building itself. As of today, you've
missed two of these: a piano recital by
Montrealers Bruce Mather and Pierrette
LePage which was fairly uncontemporary
except for William Bolcom's boring Night
Music and Henri Pousseur's Mobile pour 2
pianos. The latter piece was interesting in
overall structure, apparently a kind of
improvisation between the two players.
And on Wednesday last was a recital by
student composers Anita Sleeman,
Gordon Lucas, Steven Gidora, and
Michael Trew.
Coming events, all of which are free,
include SFU composer Murray Schafer
talking on Soundscapes, which will
presumably be a tape piece performed
before his rappings. That takes place next
Monday at 12:30.
On Tuesday at 4:30 is contemporary
percussion music by Colgrass, Shoaff,
Sleeman, Heney, and Sieve, and on
Wednesday at the same time chamber
pieces by Ibert, Rochberg, Fortner,
Wilson, and also including Rounds (for
two harpsichords) by Luciano Berio and
Henri Pousseur's Madrigal Two for four
ancient instruments.
On Thursday at 4:30 music to be
heard includes piano music by
twelve-tone fiend Arnold Schoenberg,
UBC hexachord advocate Barry Truax
and Gordon Lucas, another UBC student.
Also included is an improvisatory vocal
piece by Brian Hoover.
Climaxing the musical week will be a
recital on Friday at noon which includes
both taped and live performances. Taped
pieces include Barry Truax' Children,
Terrestrial Fire By Ross Barrett, and Icon
for Organ and Tapes, a new four-track
tape-with-organ piece by Lloyd Burritt,
former UBC Composition Major who has
had several of his pieces performed by the
Vancouver Symphony. Soloist for the
UBC premiere will be Hugh McLean.
Other works on the Friday recital will
include ^Games for Three Players by
Michael Longton and A Light Blue Myth
by Karl Kobylansky. The latter piece will
be probably written "the night before"
according to its composer.
So GO!!!! All the above take place in
the Music Building Recital Hall.
Also associated with the
Contemporary Arts Festival and music is
the sound display-exhibition currently in
the Fine Arts Gallery which runs till
March 14.
Unfortunately, some awkward
circumstances are putting a damper on
the exhibit. The people studying nearby
in the stacks as well as the Anthropology
Museum people next door have been
complaining about the noise, so the
volume levels of the cassettes and tape
machines in use have been considerably
reduced, which seems ridiculous in view
that this is a sound show.
Go down and browse nevertheless.
Most of the tape recorder displays come
equipped with earphones which helps
compensate for the lack of overall
volume, even though it would be nice to
have a new soundproofed art gallery more
adequate than the present
inconvenience-oriented space that Gallery
Curator Alvin Balkind and his crew have
to contend with.
* * *
When I first saw the sixteen-year old
jazz pianist Craig Hundley on TV, I was
faintly impressed by his abilities - even a
bit jealous. However, after listening to his
recent and third record album -
Rhapsody in Blue (World Pacific) - it's
somewhat apparent that Hundley's
"talents" (if one could call them that )
are being diverted in strange ways.
Take a look at the cover, for example,
where Hundley is being pushed as a
clean-cut junior Glen Campbell of the
piano. See him with his Pepsodent smile
and his brand new George Gershwin
sweatshirt.
Musically speaking, the would-be
wunderkind emerges like Peter Nero,
rattling off cocktail-muzak tunes with a
sledgehammer touch. Adding to the
effect are some incredibly thin
arrangements obviously inspired by the
worst back-ups of artists like Nero, Roger
Williams, and Ferrante and Teicher. Hear
the insipid guitar dribblings, the swooping
violins (there must be at least six of
them), the gimmickly drumming, and the
static brass outbursts.
Hundley's solo work is swamped as a
result. He also seems incapable of playing
a slow tune (there are about five minutes
of un-up tempo music on the album).
Poor Craig Hundley. It would be nice
to see him grow up to have even a bit of
Bill Evans' jazz piano talents instead of
becoming a momma's boy Liberace.
#       *       ♦
GENERAL RAVINGS: Murray
Schafer's new electronic-with-orchestra
piece The Divan of Shams i Tabritz, will
be world premiered by the Vancouver
Symphony on March 8 and 9. According
to one advance rumour, the orchestra on
this occasion will be divided up into
thirteen sections which are scattered
around the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, one
of which is reportedly in the middle of
the lower orchestra seats. More about this
new work in next week's Page
Tuesday... the Georgia Straight will
possibly include its second pop
supplement next week... the Beach
Boys and Paul Revere tonight at the
QueeniE — don't forget, nostalgia freaks!
pf shvee>
Friday, February 27, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY She lust site there on stane *nd
plays by herself. Ill SHOCK
INC??? No, piano. Audrey Jo
hannesen. SUB Aud. noon today,
Admission 50c
Busonl. No, Ifs not food; Ifs
food for thought. Pianist Audrey
Johannesen plays Busonl, Bach,
Bartok, Chopin and others; noon
today* SUB Aud. Admission 50c.
The
pROfESSiONAl
jeweIer
WEARS
severaI
Ihats...
First,
he's a gemologist,
trained in the evaluation
of fine diamonds
and other gems.
A consultant,
skilled in advising
customers on the
quality and value
of jewelry.
And then he's a
merchant,
offering the best
in good taste
and good value.
The professional
jeweler's a good man
to know when you're
looking for
a diamond.
LIMITED
Gran villa at Pender Sine* 1904
j.Mji.iiui.i.ii.i.ii.i..i.i.i.ia;^Ar.i
Walchw & Fine lewtlry
dainty, dazzling and decidedly feminine. Gently
curved, the ring tapers gracefully into an updo
setting to raise the diamond and emphasize it.
Adding to its brilliance are five small diamonds
in the wedding ring - contoured to the solitaire.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
Special Discounts to Students and Faculty
566 Seymour 685-2271
Victoria Store, 1209 Douglas - Tel. 385-4431
-John Juliani
/ -M-   consider my self "radical" in a theatrical, not a political
I    sense. Political theatre is limited because it is invariably
-"-   somehow propagandists, and often only topically relevant.
The 'Revolution' — if we want to call it that — that I am working
for,  is  an  emotional, a visceral one, seen in terms of new
awareness and enlightenment; not a political takeover."
With these works, Vancouver's "young", "radical" stage
director John Juliani began telling me about his fairly personal
brand of theatre: the kind of thing he is trying to project in his
SAVAGE GOD productions, in his production of Jose Triana's
The Criminals as guest director for the Playhouse 2, and finally,
actually, in his everyday life.
The man obviously — as I felt from the beginning of our
discussion   —  has  a kind  of "all-inclusive" vision  which  one
JULIA.
the regular proponents of stre
because his kind of revolutionai
whole human being, and not jui
statement.
"And furthermore," he a
be able to dismiss me on the b<
own standards, they will have
"good" — and that will make i
what I am saying."
RELIGIOU
Continually, throughout
Juliani's artistic vision, and his o
on me. We talked about the acl
ritual; about his vision of a theal
event "just grabs you and pull
biological-emotional revolution
intense awareness; about the ac
"enlightenment" of being truly
self, goes forth and "annoint
experience; about the theatre re
not just for an evening, but thi
things.
Since coming down froi
Juliani has been trying diligent
alive, and working in this w:
theatre at the Art Gallery thr
must be free because it is a fe
consumer product" — and receh
for his efforts.. And consisten
fanatical dedication from his act
"Only through this kind
will the actors truly master trr
... be sure to see Juliani's presentation oi Cuban Jose Triana's "th
Arts Club on Seymour — choose "maximum   vulnerability" to tense
opening Monday the 2nd to March 21. "You must involve yourself on
the whole play!"
todays  so-called
director holding
unfortunately does not often find among
professional" artists. He is no "established"
down a job (like everyone else) but rather ...
"... the actor should be, I think, always a kind of priest.
He takes upon himself the collective inabilities — freely given —
of the audience, and acts them out to completion. In this sense
the theatrical experience becomes a kind of therapy for the whole
human being."
"I want the audience to be totally, biologically involved in
what's happening on stage."
The stage transcends pure politics.
COMMANDO THEATRE
Juliani came here from the National Theatre School to get
involved in the "exciting" artistic/educational experiment in the
Communications Center at SFU. (when that institution was still
fresh). His actual reputation as a "radical" stems from his time
there ... until he was silently shoved off the mountain by the
uptight administration. His main attacks then — and now — were
directed against, as he put it "mediocrity of any kind". He
consistently refused to compromise himself in his idea of this
engaging, religious theatre, and thus ran inevitably into
opposition from, the academic establishment at SFU, and the
downtown theatre establishment now.
"Most established theatre today is not emotionally relevant.
Contempory theatre must deal with things, forces, happening
now - regardless of when the play was written. It must be
topical."
What Juliani envisions - and is trying to achieve with his
Savage God group - is a kind of "commando-street theatre"
which goes around and zaps minds. Again in more a religious than
purely political sense. And in this process, there is an educational
thing happening on all sides:
"The actor must develop his 'craft' to perfection, he must
become extremely self-aware before presuming to step out onto
the stage in front of an audience. He communicates this
self-awareness - through the medium of his entire self - to the
audience in his role."
In his idea of "craft" Juliani thus departs somewhat from
On this intense religiou!
being merely an intensificat
married   Donna   Wong.   Th
"performed" in the Vancou
Savage God production. An au
"You see John has thi;
commented to me.
THEC
"I don't think either, tt
by working for the Playhous
about his production of The
will not be free — this is com
"prove" yourself to a payi
Furthermore, The Criminals
thing ... "although I will d<
Juliani sees this production, v
of a test case, a challenge to j
theatre can work.
The play is admirably t
contemporary Cuban playwri
in itself) and the play itsel
ensconced in an attic, «
frustrations against various au
obviously at work here too
vengeance upon parents, teai
point of view already a staj
whether they have "actually d
especially when, in the seconc
for their alleged actions.
The play thus a{
"contemporary issues" as -
"contemporary catch-phrase
"Revolution", "The Need for '
'VULN1
Juliani has already begot
production. For "proper trans
into two parts playing on diff
■p£ 4our,
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970 f/
CRIMINAL
eatre, guerrilla theatre, etc.,
satre is directed towards the
demonstration of a political
ues, "I don't want people to
f lack of craft. Even on their
cept my kind of theatre as
n harder for them to accept
EATRE
talk, the religious basis of
it of theatre, impressed itself
rigins of theatre in religious
tival, in which the theatrical
"away with it" — again the
process to a new land of
iest who, having gained the
to communicate his entire
ople during the theatrical
ualizing, demythologizing us,
Dut our days... Beautiful
rnaby Mountain last May,
Keep his Savage God group
rhas been presenting free
>ut this winter — "Theatre
a public celebration, not a
financial return whatsoever
e demands a total, almost
what they are doing.
fanatical committment
ft."
iminals" at the
ncrfic action —
evenings to see
life and art seem to fuse; one
" the other. Juliani recently
tual"   marriage   ritual   was
rt Gallery as a "theatrical"
was in attendance,
about life and art," Donna
"ALS
>ve compromised myself now
/s John as we begin talking
wis. Unfortunately, the play
1 theatre, where you have to
dience and are vulnerable,
"officially" a Savage God
ame things I normally do."
e was asked to direct, as sort
hat his kind of experimental
Jose Triana, the author is a
hich is, I suppose, 'nuff said
i with three young people,
J about and act out their
figures. The life-art thing is
is the kids "act out" their
tc. — on what is, from our
'e are are never quite sure
le represented things or not:
they put themselves on trial
'   articulates   such   stock
.thered   under   such   stock
"The   Generation   Gap!"
" etc.
JTY'
iry his own methods to this
i", the play has been divided
venings. Part I will be "The
Crime" and Part II "The Punishment". People will therefore have
to come on two evenings to see the whole play. This was, Juliani
indicated, to extend the theatrical action beyond a typical
one-evening- entertainment-package kind of thing and more into
the festive — longer time and wider space — event we were talking
about previously.
Furthermore, tickets will be sold on the basis of minimum,
medium, and maximum vulnerability, defined by the degree of
exposure to the play, in terms of the physical outlay of the Arts
Club.
"The idea is," Juliani outlined, "To give people the
opportunity to make a decision about how much they want to
get involved. For instance, minimum vulnerability could mean the
particular specatator will watch the whole thing through a
keyhole, or from behind some pipes; whereas maximum
involvement position could put him right in the middle of what's
happening."
It is an effort to break down the whole idea of an audience,
watching something else. The entire Arts Club will be the "attic"
(a kind of "private retreat" which John refers to as a
"macrocosmic brain" — i.e. constantly rearranging itself) and
everyone will be a participant in what's going on.
"Originally I wanted to fracture the audience, fracture
perception, to the point of having no one viewer seeing any other
onlooker... but this turned out to be only partly possible as a
result of space limitations."
In order to extend his play beyond a purely "theatrical"
mileau and- again into a more total, all-inclusive life
thing, Juliani has invited various "outside" people from different
fields — social workers, psychiatrists, teachers, writers, etc. — to
participate in rehearsals and, through communication with the
actors, become instrumental in the final productiion.
The Criminals is of course also not restricted in range
■Pf
merely to the Arts Club. A recently received press release informs
me that... "a commando raid was made on David Thompson
School on the 19th of February. A spokesman from 1181
Seymour Street stated that all members (of the cast) and Director
returned safely to base."
(Members of the Criminals were also seen by this reporter
demonstrating and making "a scene" outside the reverred
Playhouse Theatre on opening night of the Shaw play two weeks
ago.)
And who knows, they may be loose anywhere; appear at
any time. Watch for them!
After talking with Juliani, seeing the kind of urgency and
commitment he is putting into this - an "ostensibly officially
normal Playhouse 2 production" -- I would definitely suggest
that, if everything pans out even half successfully, this could be
one of the finest farthest out theatre events to happen this year.
(In contrast to loud rumours heard throughout especially
younger circles these days, theatre is, as John Juliani put it,
"Alive.")
£acrtmentat   J'm
Cttfihe
Supine on rhc thick belt. She cairies a whip wjii.-ai the
cornei open window gre> shawl candy Auss cloiuN oi'/inc :i
while plate the two women set the cnv loud Jiui Midile;'
oveiluie rearing viscous mass over leather |ock. \ phallus ot [Ik-
same the ioof lcnch the stillness helore a handful open a
wound skeleton dances, moving hoi bones. gallons of
opalescent appe.ir, dressed in shiny black plastic ucon pours in
slow bairagc of electric guitars coloicd orange grey trance
mist floats away on blood old dieam leaving end of the music
floats away on engines, die fish continue to twist the drummei
for Mexico the fiiu cut the spinal cord - put his old dream
until they explode - nothing was burning - like a mechanism, a
lobut. The car slops screeching seeing the foam cover everyone
the Pope of iubber the iuteiscnion is now evervonc exists
but me empty you can't tly alwavs get exempting hymn.
Slowness wont cleat yout force I rip out a pigs foot
intersection points please - immense white hands throw ml- you
get back to mc shabby man become the the head
approaching (he wet conciete where I tell mv body. a coipse m
the shape ot blank faces lift shovels. His overcoat like circling
around a dead planet -1 feel likefliekennglayers of yellow film
overexposed desire to sec lor thousands of years. Black police
car - in Spite of the violence, the man w.nts at the corner both
al once. We can control au old man with white, black, pink and
silver women a cane seems intent mixed with dust n forms.
She was piaclised in - 1 begin to be horn. Cries of a woman
giving birth - (he art of* deception, l-ady with two Catherine
Hailey models, stiangers to everything child tampers with the
cross. The crucified fire alarm box lettei in decRvmu hands
clams. I type them on my chest like rwo living ciosses on stonv
oce.m floor yellow sun she dances uiMde over dissolving
chinch images on glass he aels lice from lhe plaMic >tnp. He
exits.
layers of icllcction these woids ihoe sound like those
ot a baby oi old m.m woid.s are noi nie eye shattered in
giving me  lile.  the woman had thrown death to uretiiev.ihle
pieces    coinei 7lh and Hunaid    din\ huskv dog    pavement
black   liieiature   oo/mg  cob.ilf        the  hlack   paint   sut;gcsK  a
cremation; my own death hale and blindness.
Insignificance     cont
eyebrows, phony expressions all designed for laughter) and
leaving by another door to a loose musical tune. Still don't get
the point? Well, an indicated general is questioned by
newspaperman "Do "you believe yourself to be a victim of judicial
error, like Dreyfus?" Close-up of amusingly furious face of
general: "Dreyfus was guilty". Knowledgeable guffaws from the
audience. Long shot of general wiping his brow.
Thirdly there is dishonest omission.
Where are the people? Where is the massive vigilant power
of populist support which made possible any enquiry by an
investigating attorney—the people who ultimately ousted the
Caramanlis government? Where are the thousands of individuals
who inscribed the thousands of letters "Z" (the first letter of a
Greek word signifying "he lives") inscribed across the countryside
which ultimately made this film, possible?
I recall an incident where a small group paints the mark on
a roadway. After that, they are forgotten and the film continues
its sentimental duel between heroes and villiains.
Fourthly, as I have pointed out previously, Z is dishonest
stylistically. It is a game where the spectator is invited to applaud
himself as the victories of Montand and Trintignant fill the
screen. When the final few minutes appear describing the deaths
and disappearances of all the main witnesses in the case, and the
relatively light sentences received by the killer, its form develops
as a fleeting charade as though in jest.
And then comes a remarkable opportunity for the audience
to pat itself on the back as it leaves the theatre. A list of things
banned by the military junta rolls across the screen (including
long hair, mini skirts, Albee, Pinter, Sociology, Beckett, New
Math, Tolstoy, Trotsky, etc., etc.) and the spectator proudly
realizes that his "democratic" country permits all these things.. .
A final point: At the San Francisco Film Festival a local
anti-government Greek distributed handbills calling his "Fellow
free men" (those who had just given the film a standing ovation)
to join him in a demonstration outside the Greek Consulate.
Armed with hundreds of placards for the expected supporters, he
appeared at the appropriate time and place. Not one person
showed up. Commitment out the  window. (Significantly the
Academy Awards are receiving the film under their auspices.)
Thus Z is a film painstakingly constructed to manipulate
identification and to eke out fake sympathetic emotion—a lousy
political film and a passable American thriller complete with ga-ga
Friday, February 27, 1970
THE      U BYSSEY ANTI-UPTIGHT BAUBLES
To Get You Through Daily Disasters
Application Page 8
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& SPAGHETTI
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FREE DELI VERY - 224-1720
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2052   Kingsway  —  874-3622
film soc presents
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AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY 27, SATURDAY 28
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SUNDAY, MARCH 1 - 7:00
BRAIN
—with Michael Caine
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NlCATIONS
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
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A NEW APPROACH TO AN OLD PROBLEM
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One Showing Only —
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SUB AUDITORIUM
FREE!
MARCH 3rd
7:00 p.m.
film
Crash
Christian
(and his merry gang)
By F. T. R. CAWSEY
As almost everyone knows, there are people who will
literally swim in manure for enough money. That is to say,
everyone has their price. Also common knowledge is that fact
that the rich are decadent slobs and that money is useless
except to spend. Both these gems are well-worn and
time-honored cliches and hardly, one would think, the basis
for a bright, funny movie.
The Magic Christian, now playing at the Downtown
Theatre, exploits these cliches so audaciously, however, that
the result is surprisingly entertaining. Not a film to be taken
seriously, The Magic Christian is a product, shall we say, of the
fertile imagination of Terry (Candy)Southern. Possibly the
only real objection that could be made to the film -
considering its authorship — is that the script requires stars
Starr Ringo and Sellers Peter to run amok through too much
metaphorical muck, so that all the hijinks become finally a
little tedious.
The story concerns fabulously wealthy Sir Guy Grand (a
grand guy) who adopts a young man to be his son Youngman
Grand (a jolly grand guy) because he has been unable to sire a
son of his own. Grand (Sellers) then leads Grand (Starr) by his
prominent proboscis through his wealthy new paces. This
includes a duck hunt in which Grand Senior hires an artillery
unit to blast a lone duck out of the sky.
The big social event of the season is the sailing of a new
super-luxury boat, The Magic Christian, and only the
top-drawer members of the upper crust are allowed passage on
the maiden voyage. All hell breaks loose once underway, and
the vessel appears to be powered by 80 topless female galley
slaves.
As it turns out, the cruise is all a sham, and the unwary
suckers have parted with a lot of money without ever
departing from a dockside warehouse converted to look like
the inside of a ship.
The film itself is a sham as it only vaguely pretends to be
making some sort of comment, where it is really just exploring
some funny possibilities at the expense of none but those who
can afford it.
The Magic Christian is not more profound than a
satisfying fart, but, to continue the metaphor, it does clear the
air.
And in the end, there is manure, as most of us know,
and The Magic Christian is no exception. Sir Guy, who has
been increasingly obvious in his attempts to show that
everyone has his price, fills a vat with tons of manure, urine
and blood and then throws in pounds of folding money. The
result is predictable, but amusing nonetheless.
.pf 6ix.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970 iW CONTEMPORARY
CONTEMPORARY
1970
NOW IT IS MARCH, spring
is here, the sun ... and the
Contemporary Arts Festival
enters its final, most intense
month of "eventing" on and
around this beautiful campus.
Throughout this month
there will be things happening
almost every day, climaxing
periodically in various high
points. Each week's events will
be gathered under a sort of title
— ie. next week is called
SOUND WEEK, then follows
Poetry Week, Film Week.
Theatre Week etc.
Scattered around this page
randomly, are announcements
of some of the events — to give
you an idea of approximately
what to look and hope for.
Details (times, places, people
etc.) will then be announced
weekly, just before they
happen, in this very Page
Friday.
So we will be celebrating all
this month ...
SOUND WEEK - MARCH 2 - 6
Monday, March 2, 12:30 —
"IN THE FOREST": Ecstasy
of Trees, food, singing,
dancing, Totem Residence
Beach Access.
Tuesday, Match 3, 12:30 —
"IN THE FOREST":
Drumming and Chanting,
Totem Residence Beach
Access.
Thursday, March 5 —
SOUND AND PEOPLE
SPACE: Music Building Lobby,
continues to March 20.
Monday, March 2, 12:30 —
"Soundscapes" by Murray
Schafer, Music Recital Hall.
Tuesday, March 3, 3:30 —
"A Receiver... Frequency"
continues at Fine Arts Gallery
to March 14.
Tuesday, March 3, 3:30 —
"Contemporary Percussion",
Music Recital Hall.
Wednesday, March 4, 12:30
- "Race Track Gallery Staff
Band", Fine Arts Gallery.
Wednesday, March 4, 3-:30
— ''Contemporary
Harpsichord", Music Recital
Hall.
Thursday, March 5, 12:30 -
"Gateway to Olympus":
Tableau Theatre with tapes,
SUB auditorium.
Thursday, March 5, 4:30 -
"Contemporary Sounds",
Music Recital Hall.
Friday, March 6, 1:30 -
"Contemporary Sounds",
Music Recital Hall.
"IN  THE FOREST":     Last  Supper  and  Mantra   %      ^ ^
Chanting  for  the Organism  in the      ^ ^    > 12
Environment.   Totem Residence  Beach   ^       &    | js
**!»>*  KACCeSS all  day      30 G,     „       £   g '
ffp;iyc, SI«V AHTOCWW3INOD ^     <i^ Asrf •   1       £$
fr   **ta       "*     ° °o/„._.■**»-jfat      *c e^ *c to
%
^\°<a.4Q%       ^>**v0**e6 a and  postures e>
V^® oV%      C*XXv**\o^    GaiiS-    SPRONG MK  IV/
V<>  • \fV^   V->C "IN  *HE  FOREST":
0>A S> **». <?   <S>   "a Totem   R0c^»-..
M
M
h3
M
►3
M
to
W   W j# "™  TOE FOREST":      ErStiS   Poetr/^
°0.
V. V ^    •     ojl r .     <y^.       —"murium!
V2 <x#
o>.
-'c3»  Ar*V
&
o
3
5!
3
0)
rl
O
CT>
o
FILM  FREE-FOR-ALL,     Lasserre   204     ^5//> '°c©^ e ^ **$"
'Appsanj;
■pf 7even>
San^^00   ^
What price culture? Would you
believe 50c. Audrey Johannesen,
Canada's leading female pianist
plays Friday noon. S.U.B. Aud.
Admission 50c.
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used University Texts
Bought and  Sold
146 W.   HASTINGS
Opposite  Woodwards
681-4931
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews for teaching positions in
the School District No. 36 (Surrey)
may be arranged for March 9th to
11th, inclusive, at the Student Placement Office. Please enter name on
Interview Forms.
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GRADUATE STUDENT
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POLLING STATIONS OPEN:
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(BARN 4:00 P.M.)
VOTE - LAST DAY - VOTE
Friday, February 27, 1970
THE      U BYSSEY An interesting, poorly-recorded effort, John Mayall's Diary
of a Band (London PS570) is a new approach to the concept of a
"live" album.
According to the liner notes, it is the result of some 60
hours of tapes made by Mayall of his Bluesbreakers band,
recorded at various clubs and shows. Consequently, the stigma of
recording is removed and the band gets into its material well, and
without pressure.
There is a constant hiss from the tape throughout the
album, along with occasional dimmings in sound level and
quality. But the value of the work is similar to that of the new
presses of old records now being released in that they give a bit of
the feeling of the band as it was on its regular gigs.
There are several short rap sessions that add little, but can
be blocked out pretty easily. One of the main points of interest is
the guitar work of Mick Taylor, currently with the Stones.
His timing is good, underscoring Mayall's vocals, and he gets
into some good stuff in lead tracks on a couple of the longer cuts.
Less appealing is the reed work by Mayall's two sax men,
who have a very rough edge to their sound, and do little but
explore scales and octave jumps, which soon get boring.
Basically, the album is not a musical showpiece for the
Bluebreakers, but, as it says, a diary for one of the better blues
groups England has produced recently.        -MAURICE BRIDGE
Every once in a long while a record of truly great stature
comes along. I'm On The Right Road Now (Liberty LST-7633)
By Gary Lewis is one of those records.
Gary is at his musical best in this offering. The selections on
the L.P. are quite as brilliant as his previous heavies such as "This
Diamond Ring", "Green Grass", and "Just My Style".
The first cut on the delicious disc, "Something is Wrong",
sets the pace for the rest of the record.
Other precious pieces of musical magnificence on this
raunchy recording include the tender "I'm Gonna Shoot The
Moon", the memorable "I Saw Elvis Presley Last Night", and the
meaningful "Roll Over Rover".
However, the grooviest groove on the record has to be
"Great Balls Of Fire" with a superb style somewhat reminiscent
of the 1910 Fruitgum Company, a really boss band.
A sleeper in the set might be "Co-op Farm".
This record is without a doubt another musical giant. Boss!
Tough! Heavy! Mint! Gear! —JIM DAVIES
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
- Theatre  Excitement -
AS YOU   LIKE  IT
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V
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STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00
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THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970 Friday, February 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
'Man who holds purse strings
wears the crown'—Mathews
JAMES STEELE
Canadian students minority'
By JOHN BUTLER
"Canadians must be masters
in their own house."
That was the message
Canadian authors Robin
Mathews and James Steele of
Carleton University laid on
Tuesday in the SUB ballroom.
Speaking on Issues Facing
the Canadian University, Steele
pointed out that Canadian
students make up a rapidly
'.iminishing (49 per cent)
minority in arts faculties in
Canada.
"If this trend continues
there will be less work done on
Canadian problems," he said.
"Canada is practically the
only country in the world that
allows non-Canadians to teach
in universities without taking
out Canadian citizenship," he
said.
ROBIN MATHEWS
'Canada gives ... U.S. takes'
"Only in Canada do foreign
scholars compete with
Canadian scholars on an equal
and impartial basis."
The U.S. is the largest
foreign operation in Canada
and it controls 60-80 per cent
of the economy.
"The man who holds the
purse strings wears the crown."
said Mathews.
"A recent study of 257
books in 17 courses at Carleton
U., showed that only five were
written by Canadian authors
and four of these had nothing
to do with Canada," said
Mathews.
He spoke of a Canadian
representative for a U.S.
publishing company who at a
meeting in New York asked:
"Why don't we publish more
books by Canadian authors?"
He was told: "Because they
don't sell in the U.S."
"We are in a sad state in
Canada when most of our
university administrators are
non-Canadians," Mathews
explained. "Many professors in
our universities know little
about Canada."
Two American PhD
graduates wrote to Carleton
University requesting
employment. The letter was
addressed to Carleton
University, Ottawa, England,
he said.
Commenting on the rape of
our natural resources, he said,
"Canadian-U.S. relations work
on the principle of give and
take. Canada gives - the U.S.
takes."
HUNGARIAN     BORN    POET
George Jonas will read at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday in Bu. 106.
Jonas, who now works as a radio
producer in Toronto, has
published poems in many leading
North American journals.
Faculties
pass
new fees
Three undergraduate societies
passed fee referendums Tuesday.
Pharmacy students voted 90 to
22 in favor of a professional fee.
At the same time they rejected a
$3 levy for the Canadian
Association of Pharmacy Students
and Interns.
The medical undergrad society
fee referendum was passed by a
vote of 57 to 7. It calls for a $17
fee from third and fourth year
students and a $2 fee fiom first
and second year students.
Forestry students voted 98 to
16 in favor of a new $4 fee.
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Angus 104—Today —12:30
ALSO . . . HAVE COFFEE WITH RON - YOUR CHANCE TO
MEET  WITH   THE   MINISTER - SUB 212 - 11:30-12:30
SPONSORED BY THE LIBERAL CLUB Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
Token student
reps recalled
EDMONTON (CUP) - Student councillors at the University of
Alberta adopted the position of "parity or nothing" Monday
concerning student representation on the university's general faculty
council (academic senate).
By a 20-10 margin, the council agreed to recall its two
representatives on the GFC and all other representatives on
administrative bodies until students received parity on the
university-wide body.   .
According to student council vice-president Liz Law, the
student decision would affect 39 students now sitting on a variety of
administrative committees.
Acceptance of student parity would require the seating of 10
graduate and 38 undergraduate students on the general faculty
council.
The student move came in the wake of a GFC refusal Monday
to discuss the case of philosophy professor Ted Kemp, refused
tenure at the U of A despite widespread student acclaim for his
teaching ability.
Philosophy department officials say Kemp has not fulfilled his
PhD requirements, and that Kemp is not a good "professional"
philosopher.
Monday, the GFC refused to put the Kemp case on the agenda
despite strong urging from student GFC representatives.
Student council president David Leadbeater said the GFC
decision showed "the uselessness of token representation" on
administrative bodies at the university.
The student council also decided to continue agitating for
discussion of Kemp's case, mandating Leadbeater to petition the
GFC executive to call an emergency meeting within one week to
discuss Kemp's tenure appeal and come to a final conclusion
regarding the professor's future.
The council also agreed to sponsor a mass meeting — billed as
the first "student-faculty assembly" — in order to discuss the issue
with students.
AMS gets into
mental health
Mental illness is a very real
problem today, but it remains one
of the least understood forms of
illness by a large portion of the
society.
In order to further
understanding of UBC students
about the problems faced by the
mentally ill, and the avenues of
rehabilitation open to them, the
AMS is starting a new mental
health program this year.
Over the next few years, panel
discussions, films, and lectures
will reach the students to help
them understand and deal with
problems of mental health.
This program is one of the
items under the Services
Commission in the proposed
constitution and is currently being
run from the AMS secretary's
office.
The first item on the program's
calendar is the film Warrendale, to
be shown at 7:00 p.m. this
Tuesday. The film deals with an
experimental home set up in
Ontario for disturbed youth. It is
a close look at the life they lead.
After    the    film,    Ena
Brocklehurst from Brown Camps
in Vancouver will lead a
discussion on how the film affects
its viewers.
Admission to the film
Warrendale is free.
Pompidou
welcomed
MONTREAL (CUP) -
Montreal students Wednesday
celebrated the first official visit to
North America by French
president Georges Pompidou, by
presenting a 1,500-name protest
petition to French consulate
officials here.
The petition, presented by a
group entitled the committee for
social justice, criticized a selective
French arms embargo against
Israel, the sale of French jets to
Libya, and attacked French
complicity in jeopardizing peace
in the Middle East.
The petition was signed by
Montreal students and university
faculty members, primarily from
Anglophone McGill and Sir
George Williams Universities.
Medieval scholar talks
Eugene Vinaver, a distinguished scholar and teacher of
medieval French and English literature and an expert on
Camelot and the legends of King Arthur and his knights will
deliver three lectures and a series of graduate seminars from
March 1-20.
The first lecture, will be in Lassiere 104 Monday at 8 pm
on "Meaning and Form in the Novel". It will be open to the
public.
On Wednesday Vinaver will speak to literature students
and faculty on "The Rediscovery of Malory" at 4:30 pm in the
Buchanan penthouse.
The last lecture, Monday, March 12, will be an illustrated
talk on "Medieval Interlace", tracing aesthetic patterns held
common by literary and graphic arts of the Middle Ages.
The lecture will be held in Lasserre 104 at 12:30 pm.
FOR RECORDED THEATRE INFORMATION
(24 HOUR SERVICE)
681-4255
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FEATURE
"GALIA'
BOTH
FEATURES Friday, February 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
'Student evaluation of profs' teaching helpful
Students' evaluation of
teachers should be among the
factors for promotion and grading
of a teacher said English prof Ian
Ross at a teaching evaluation
seminar Thursday.
Economics prof, Michael Kelly,
announced the results of a
questionnaire he gave to his
Economics 200 class asking the
students to grade his teaching
ability, knowledge of subject,
handling of questions, value of
text, and his overall performance.
Kelly said the students replied
honestly and he learned several
things from the results. "A
significant minority thought I
talked too fast," he said.
MICHAEL KELLY
'Students say I talk too fast'
A spokesman for the German
department said that students
were extremely generous in
evaluating teachers and didn't
want to knock a person especially
if he was a teaching assistant.
Most of the faculty present
agreed that students can get
carried away with a teacher's
"dynamic enthusiasm" even if the
teacher really doesn't know what
he's talking about. Numerous
people including Ross suggested
that a neutral professional body
should also evaluate a teacher.
Physics prof Walter Westphal
questioned the usefulness of the
LSA picks manager
for new bookstore
The law students association has appointed a manager for its
proposed student bookstore.
Don Sorochan, law 1, was given the position at the LSA
general meeting Thursday.
He was appointed after a motion to turn the bookstore over to
a private group was defeated.
The private group, led by Larry Kahn, law 2, said they would
sell new books at cost and sell used books at a profit.
The students also passed a motion donating $250 to the grad
class for an after graduation party. $50 will be used to rent the Hotel
Vancouver executive suite and the remainder to buy gifts for certain
faculty members.
Former president Carey Linde introduced a motion to send
$500 to the Chicago Seven and their lawyers so they could launch an
appeal.
The students said they supported Linde's motion in principle
but that there were better places to spend the money.
Linde said after the meeting, "It shows the priorities of the
students around here. They spend $250 for a drunken party and
nothing for the protection of people's rights even though they agree
with it in principle."
The LSA members also voted to join the B.C. Environmental
Council, a group which is co-ordinating the efforts of all the
anti-pollution groups in the province. It will also serve as
communication between these various independent groups.
Pick up on ecology
Who's in SUB Aud. at neon
today? Bach? He's dead. Bartok? He's dead. Fred Chopin?
He's dead. Audrey Johannosen
brings them back to life. Is she
a medium? No, simply a great
pianist.  Admission  50c.
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During the week of March 2-5
workshops will be held in SUB
111 from 1 to 3 p.m. to find
viable solutions to the various
kinds of pollution threatening
mankind.
On Monday water pollution
will  be   discussed, Tuesday, air
pollution, Wednesday pesticides
and food, Thursday, the
transformation. The workshops
sponsored by Ecological Crisis
Operation are serious and only
people really concerned with
pollution are asked to attend.
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questionnaires. "Maybe a
professor's class thinks he's a bad
teacher but the questionnaire
doesn't tell the teacher why he is
bad," he said.
"At present," said Ross, "only
the commerce, economics,
psychology, classics, German and
Asian studies departments have
questionnaires. The science
faculty has the Black and Blue
Review (an anticalendar) but I
would like to see students in every
course having a say in the
evaluation of their teacher's
ability.
Registration for summer work
Students seeking summer employment should register at the
student services placement office (opposite the armory).
"Last year by the first week in July, there were more jobs
listed on the bulletin board than were students available to fill
them," said placement officer J. Cameron Craik.
The office is open every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 27, 1970
Intellectual treated as foe
of the cultural revolution
The intellectual was frequently treated as an
enemy in the Chinese Cultural revolution, professor
Paul Lin said Thursday.
Lin, a professor of Asian Studies at McGill
University, lived in China from 1949 to 1964.
"He (the intellectual) is a great deal more
conservative than the peasants," Lin said.
"They think they are the custodians of truth
and justice and take on the elitist attitude they were
supposed to have been fighting.
"If you really want to be a revoluntionary you
must learn from those you want to liberate, those
who are disposessed."
He said the Young Communist League was
attacked for the same kind of elitism.
"They come out of meetings looking wise and
secretive," he said. "They act as if they are thinking
'you are not going to know what I know'."
He said the Young Communists could easily
become young fascists unless they are under
constant education.
Lin said the most important but least
understood aspect of the cultural revolution was the
"reidentification of the individual."
"People think since society has been a certain
way for several thousand years it is human nature,"
he said.
On conformity of thought Lin said young
factory people in China are more sharply critical
politically than Canadian university students.
He said China was trying to ensure the
perpetuation of their changes after the death of Mao
by social dynamics.
As a final comment of what life would be like
in a society like China's Lin said, "If you cannot
adapt to a society which is overwhelmingly moving
in one direction and you are moving in another, you
run off to Hong Kong."
Lakehead pres backs down
THUNDER BAY (CUP) - The
administration at Lakehead
University has backed down in its
attempts to fire sociology
professor Victor Wightman.
In    a    letter    received    by
Wightman Monday,
administration president William
Tamblyn told the popular
professor that "It has been
decided not to insist upon the
termination    of   your   contract
Conflict in  American
preaching and practice
By GINNY GALT
"How does the rest of the
world see America?"
"I could cut this whole speech
short of saying 'It doesn't' which
is always a frightful thing to say
to Americans," said guest lecturer
Alistair Cooke at the Freddy
Wood Theatre Wednesday.
Cooke, British broadcaster and
American correspondent for the
Manchester Guardian, said the
U.S. has a vast desire to make the
world over in its own image.
Americans have the illusion that
everyone wants to imitate them.
"One thing that Americans
discover with astonishment when
they go abroad is that the
Lebanese would like to remain
Lebanese," said Cooke.
He said the trouble with U.S.
foreign policy is that they
approach all countries on the basis
of "are you with us or against us".
"The intense chauvinism that
has taken over the world was
started by the 'reverent'
Woodrow Wilson when he arrived
in post-war Europe with his
idealistic 14 points and draft of
the League of Nations. No one
not even Arnold Palmer — has had
more reverence."
When the people saw Wilson
they thought they were seeing the
second coming — "unfortunately
Wilson thought so too," Cooke
said.
"What you notice in going
around the world is the conflict
oetween American preaching and
\merican practice."
They want democracy for
■veryone but will form immediate
Hiances with anyone who
pposes the Russians."
Cooke
intense chauvinism
The domestic situation of the
U.S. has also changed since the
war. In a press conference before
his speech, Cooke said the most
dangerous thing in the U.S. is the
rooted tendencies to fly to
extremes.
"There are repressive periods,
and then periods where people
are drunk on liberty, but no
middle periods."
under the terms of the notice
given by my letter of January 29,
1970".
At that time, Wightman was
told that "budgetary
considerations" had made his
dismissal from Lakehead
necessary. Wightman- was
reportedly fired on the
recommendation of department
head Cecil French, who declared
that his decision was backed by a
majority of faculty in the
department.
Subsequent investigation
indicated faculty had not been
consulted in the dismissal.
Wightman had supported a
counter-bookstore set up in
Thunder Bay to fight the high
prices in the administration's
bookstore—a move the Lakehead
administration regarded as an
affront.
In addition to a review of
Wightman's firing, the students
were demanding a total
res true ting of hiring, firing,
promotion and tenure procedures
at Lakehead, increased
representation of students on
hiring and firing committees, and
full access to "all relevant
information such as budgets,
graduate programs and other
administrative and academic
matters which affect decisions"
on hiring, firing and promotion.
The administration's decision
to forestall Wightman's firing may
effectively short-circuit the
demands, though students are still
requesting that a review board be
set up to investigate the events.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W.  10th Ave. 224-4144
EAT IN • TAKE OUT. DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
$1   BOOK SALE   $1
New Books - Large Selection
Any Book In Store-$1
BONAVENTURE BOOKS
2355 Burrard St.
EXPO 70
May 27 and June 12 tours leave with our own escorts
from Vancouver. Other countries in the Far East
included.
March 29, May 2t, Sept. 2 are dates our other tours
leave. Not escorted right from Vancouver, but our
people in Japan look after you and side trips to other
countries are  optional.   Free brochures  available.
Open 9-5 p.m.,  incl.  Saturday
HAGEN'S
736-5651
Hagen's   Travel   Service   Ltd. 2996  W.   Broadway
Takla Logging Company Limited
requires
ROAD CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
DUTIES: Supervision of construction assignments. Layout and design of
main roads, camps, rail sidings, bridges and other facilities. Preparation
of contracts and specifications for construction projects.
QUALIFICATIONS: Graduate Engineer (Civil or Forestry). At least 2 years
practical experience. Familiarization with government regulations.
LOGGING ENGINEER
DUTIES: Supervision of field engineering crews on layout work for roads.
landings and clear cuts. To conduct feasibility studies for future projects. Conduct cost and efficiency1 studies on elements of log production costs.
QUALIFICATIONS: Forestry Graduate. At least 2 years practical experience.
Both of these positions are for our operations in the North
Central Interior of B.C. The successful candidates will work
out of our Prince George head office. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Medical, Group Insurance and
Relocation Assistance are available to the successful candidates.   All replies will be held in confidence.
Reply to:    Industrial  Relations Department,
Takla Logging Company Limited,
Unit  No.  5,  1989—1st Avenue,
Prince George,  B.C.
You talk a lot
about the problems
of this world.
Do you really want
to help solve
some of them?
You're a high school student.
Sooner or later you're going to have to stop just talking about
the problems of the world and start doing something about them.
Are you ready to? Are you ready to accept a meaningful
position? Earn your own income? Be responsible for your own
future security?
If you are, you're ready to see us about our Regular Officer
Training Plan. It leads to an officer's commission and a degree in
Arts, Sciences or Engineering.
For more information contact your local military career
counsellor.
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST., VANOUVER Tuesday, February 24,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
NOW out to conquer loneliness by telephone
By SANDY KASS
People helping people is the idea behind
NOW.
Initiated by the Crisis Intervention and
Suicide Prevention Centre of Vancouver,
NOW (736-7376) was established to form a
communications link with the city's youth.
After   the   center's   seven  months  of
' operation, assistant director Norm Gibbons
felt there was a need to reach the young
people who had previously not approached
the centre with their problems.
"I think the connotations behind the
word 'crisis' scare a lot of kids," he said.
NOW is not yet a 24-hour service, and
even after its official opening March 1, it is
doubtful that it will be.
"Out of the 70 volunteers we have
training now, at least half of them will
NOW wants people who are
for people. If you are NOW
people, call Alex at 736-7376,
or Ann at 266-8621 after 5
p.m.
"drop out because of the pressures put upon
them," said Gibbons.
"It'll be hard to stay open 24 hours a
day, but we will try for at least 18
Several of the volunteers are from UBC.
The telephone service, which provides
young people with an immediate listening,
helping, and answering service, is run by a
.staff of volunteers.
The volunteers are not professionals,
but are individuals who are just interested
UBC Flying Club
SUB 216G
MARCH 3
228-4392
NOON SUB 105A CF - 104 LECTURE — 7:30 P.M. SUB 215
NAVIGATION COURSE
MARCH t, 7
CESSNA 150 OPEN HOUSE
DISPLAY
CLARKE
SIMPKINS
USED CARS
'69 VOLVO Station
Wagon. Radio —
Tape Deck, Auto. __   $3595
'69 CORONA-Auto.
Radio    $2245
'68 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE Convert. $179S
'68   ISUZU   BELLETT
Excel. Cond. Low
Mileage    $1295
'67 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE Convert.—Very
clean    $1495
'66 AUSTIN HEALEY
Sprite Convert. 12,-
000 miles. Mint
Cond.       $1395
'64 CORVAIR
MONZA       $695
'59 HILLMAN MINX
Sedan         $95
CLARKE
SIMPKINS
"HOME of FIAT"
7th and BURRARD
736-4282
in helping people.
"Especially for NOW, we're looking for
people who don't over-identify with things.
A volunteer has to think practically, not
theoretically, and has to know how to
handle immediate and short term
intervention in people's lives," he said.
While the service has not yet officially
opened, volunteers have already received
hundreds of calls from confused and
helpless teenagers, just looking for
someone to talk to.
"NOW means immediately, and that's
exactly what the service is trying to
provide," said Gibbons.
While problems range from drugs to
pregnancy, the most extensive is loneliness.
"There is an amazing number of lonely
kids out there," he said.
"They either don't know what to do
with themselves, or there's nowhere for
them to go—consequently, many of them
feel locked out of society."
"People like this only show up the gaps
in our community."
Besides the telephone service, NOW has
an emergency visiting committee of people
who go out and talk to the people that
phone the centre.
"This is only done when volunteers
cannot cope with the problems of the
individual over the phone," Gibbons said.
Gibbons also expressed a desire to set
up a drop-in centre as a place for young
people to go when they have nothing to
do, "something the local community
centres have yet to provide."
"We're working towards getting other
groups to take on this responsibility."
NOW is also planning to publish a
directory of information that young people
would be interested in knowing.
GIBBONS
. .. practically, not theoretically
The Free Vancouver, as it will be
called, will give newcomers to the city
immediate information that it normally
takes weeks to obtain.
"It's an idea centre," said volunteer
Alex Michaels.
"We welcome people to call us with
ideas on how to help," he said.
Besides solving other people's problems,
NOW has several of its own to solve.
Its cramped office quarters at 1735
West Braodway are becoming increasingly
inadequate in meeting the centre's growing
needs.
A search for a new location is
continuing, but as yet nothing has been
found.
The biggest problem, however, is
money.
There has been little response to NOWs
campaign for money on radio station
CKLG, and while grants are coming in "it
just isn't enough".
"It will cost $15,000 to operate NOW
for a year," said Gibbons.
"If people want this service, they are
just going to have to help us provide it," he
said.
The money is used to pay rent, phone
and other bills, and to pay the salary of a
director, assistant director, and secretary.
Appeals have been made to several large
companies, but the majority of funds has
come from individuals.
"NOW is a place for young people to
call for any reason whatsoever. We have
access to many resources in Vancouver that
most people don't even know about, and
we hope to provide any person that calls
us, with any resource that will help their
problems to be solved," he said.
"NOW should always be what's
needed."
'Group 80'. Air Canada's
$ 2 71 -way to Europe
and back
This amazingly low new group affinity return fare is yours when you
organize and fly with at least 79
other members of a bonafide association or organization, the main
aim of which is not travel, and of
which you have been a member
for at least six months.
You go and return as a group on
regularly scheduled flights. And
you can stay as long as a year.
Air Canada affinity 'Group 80'
Economy Class fares apply from
major cities in Canada to dozens
of exciting European cities. Start
your 1970 holiday planning now.
Air Canada can clear up any questions you may have about organizing your group. But do it now
and make your arrangements very
soon to get the benefit of the lowest affinity 'Group 80' fares of the
year.
^MK HL"
{i^TtP'afeLL
rmx
^/'y<A-
Vancouver
to
In effect from
Now to Mar. 31
Nov. 1 -Mar. 31/71
Apr. 1 — May 31
Aug. 10-Oct. 31
June 1 — Aug. 9
!N;^
3a
London
Paris
$271
$277
$294
$300
$342
$352
Ask about affinity 'Group 25' and 'Group 40' fares as
Fares subject to Government approval.
well. For all the details, call Air Canada.
Go Group 80'   AIR CANADA Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
CLASSIFIED
Rafesi Student., Faculty & Ctub-3 fines,  1  day 75#, 3 days $2.00.
Comroercial-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 15t; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads an? not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is lt;30 a.m. the day heicre publication.
Publications 0#*e*, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.Ci Vancouver 8r B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
STARTING MONDAY! SPEAK
Easy will be open 10 a.m.—9 p.m.
Drop by SUB 218 or phone 228-
3706.
Wanted Information
13
LOST: CLEAR PENCIL CASE AT
bookstore phono booth. Feb. 16th.
Pen and notebook wanted. Reward.   732-9820   or   SUB   info.
EVERYONE UNDER 75 ADMTT-
ted free—a doctor will be in attendance at all times—Warrendale. March 3, 7:00 p.m. SUB
Auditorium.
Lost & Found
14
LOST,   NEMO   STANDARD   CLarge)
black   podle.   Owner   desolate.   $50
reward.   Phone   731-3483.
FOUND.   A SET OF CI«5m7~NOTE-
cards.   Cliff,   261-4431.	
LOST.   ONE   GITANK   TEN-SPEED
racing   bike.   Phone   1122-671::   with
any   information.
LOST,  PAIR SANDALS IN BROWN
* bag.   Call  Ron,  731-0985
15
Rides & Car Pools
16
Special Notices
THIS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE
See Michael Caine, Francoise
Dorleac in "Billion Dollar Brain."
Fri, & Sat., 7:00, 9:30. Sun. 7:00.
Still the cheapest in town. Only
50c I	
U. OF T. STUDENT (FEMALE)
seeks apt. in Vancouver with
UUC students this summer. Write
Chris  PeCatanraro,   44  Devonshire
 Place,   Toronto   181,   Ont.
THE GORD OF HOSTS WAS 21
on Wednesday. Drop by and say
hello. Carrell 1071-1st level stacks.
BUSONI. NO IT'S NOT FOOD-
It's food for thought. Pianist
Audrey Johannesen plays Busoni,
Bach, Bartok, Chopin and others:
noon today, SUB Aud. Admission
50c.
I'LACE      VANIER      RESIDENCES
U.B.C.   Art   Show.   March   7   &   8,
1970    painting   student   art    work.
HAVE    YOU    HEARD    OF    BAHA
ULAH?      Come     and     find     out
about the Baha'i faith. Int. House
Room    402,    Mon.,    12:30.
CHINA   NIGHT:   CHINESE   CUL.T-
ural    display.    Evening   of   entertainment.   SUB   Ballroom,   8  p.m.,
Feb.   28.   Refreshment   served.
RUMMAGE   SALE!
Arcadian   Auditorium
2214   Main   St.
Sat.,   Feb.   28,   12:00 - 3:00
ITBC    FLYING    CLTTB.    MARCH    3,
noon.   SUB   105A.   CF-104   lecture.
Tactical  flying  7:30  p.m.   SUB  215
Navigation    Course.     Bring    your
computer.	
VOLUNTEERS! PLEASE HELP
interviewing visitors at the UBC
open house architectural evaluation project. Call X 2721 or meet
on main mall in front of president's office at 3 p.m. Monday,
March   2.	
SOFTBALL PITCHER NEEDED
for a Commercial C League team.
Phone Ken MacLachlan, 327-2737,
6-7  p.m.  any  evening.	
GOLDEN GT.OVES BOXING, MAR.
6 & 7. 8:00 p.m., $2 & $3, P.N.E.
Garden   Auditorium.	
TNVTTATTON, THE STUDENT
Discount Book, is now selling for
under half price in the Bookstore
and at SITB Information. Two for
the price of one at Odeon, Concerts. Plays, Nightclubs, Restaurants, etc. All this for onfy 75c.
Don't  Miss  Tt! 	
VICK'S   T.V.   &   RADIO   CO.
513 West Pender — 685-8622
Guaranteed   Repairs   TVs.   radios,
tape   recorders — 10%   discount   to
students.	
100% BIODEGRADABLE DETER-
gent does the best job for less
$$. See Richard Hollins, 351 Sal-
ish.   224-9755.
Travel Opportunities
17
FOR    SALE:    ONE-WAY    TICKET
N.Y. - Luxemburg.   Good   'til   May
15.   $98.00   Can.   Phone   874-6068.
EUROPE   FOR   SWINGING
SINGLES   AGE   17-30.
meals,    accommodation,    tours    &
transportation.
3   weeks   $225.00
6   weeks   $330.00
DINERS   FUGAZY   TRAVEL  —
688-2545.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED:     RACTNG/TOURING
bike.    Jill,    228-2134,    736-5397.
AUTOMOTIVE "~
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58   V.W.   GOOD   RUNNING   COND.
Radio.   Asking   $175.   Ph.   263-4118.
1965     SUZU     BELLETT     DELUXE
Excellent condition  $875.00.   Radio.
Call   Sasha,   266-8035   after   6.
'57   PLYMOUTH   2   DR.   H.T.   with
'62   Chry.   383,   3   spd.   auto.,   Dual
exh„   H.P.    Susp.   $350.   526-6073.
1958   CHEVY.   AUTOMATIC   WITH
radio,   heater.  Excellent condition.
Phone   224-3865.	
1954   CJJEV.   WELL  MAINTAINED.
Above     average     condition,     can
demonstrate.   929-4129   nites.	
1961    FORD    FAIRLANE.      AUTO.
4-dr.,    6-cyl.,    radio,   snow    tires.
228-8562.
Autos For Sale. (Cont.)
21
'59 CHEV. $50 OR BEST OFFER.
Phone   224-1769.	
FOR SALE. 1965 ECONOLINE
camping truck. $850. 224-4185
after   8   p.m.	
1961 SUNBEAM. ECONOMICAL
transportation for student. Asking $230.00. Jim, 228-3898 day, 228-
9609   eve.	
'67 TRIUMPH TR4A CONVERT.
Good condition, Michelin X radi-
als, br. green, $1400. Call Doug
at   224-3140   between   5:30   &   7:30.
1955 BUICK SEDAN, EXCEPTION-
al condition, 88,000 miles, one
owner, one driver. Power windows, power seat. Transmission
rebuilt 1969. $575. or best offer.
266-5695.	
'66 TRIUMPH TR4A—IRS. Excellent condition throughout. EX-
_tras    Asking $1700.   263-3915.   Rick.
1961 V'.W. IN PERFECT SHAPE.
Must sell. No reasonable offer
will   be   refused.   263-5720.	
1962 MINI WAGON: NEW TIRES
and brakes. Good condition. $400.
1'hone   224-7623.   Ask   for   Roger.
1954 CHEV. 2-DOOR HARDTOP
for   sale.   224-6350.	
'63 PONT. PARrslENNE CONVT.
U.S. auto. P.S., P.B., radio, tape
deck. Good condition. $950. 321-
8695.	
'64 BEAUMONT V-8 STD. RADTO
new paint. Good condition. Ph-
435-0732.	
68 DATSUN 2000—135 HP, 5 SPD.,
etc. with or without hardtop. Best
offer.   261-2439.	
FOR    SALE:    1968    TRIUMPH    250.
Best   offer   accepted.   Phone   Bob,
263-6484   after   6   p.m.	
1967 DODGE DART, 6 CYL. STAND-
ard,     excellent     condition,     $1295.
Offers?   263-8366	
'67 V.W. 1500 IN GOOD SHAPE. 4
eitr    weinstr       ,/OHWi   RGE        A
winter   tires,   radio.   $1250.   Phone
738-0104.   Must   sell.	
1962      CHEVY      II,      AUTOMATIC,
radio,  four new tires, good shape.
Best offer, Irene, 874-3814 eves.
'59 MATCHLESS 500 SINGLE,
i good condition,  $350.00;   '60 Falcon
2 dr. std., as is, $150.00. 263-4803
1966    ENVOY    EPIC    EXCELLENT
condition.   Two   new   tires.   Phone
224-3385  after  7 p.m.	
'54   METEOR,   $50;   '59   FORD,   $225.
Barrett,   224-1581	
'57    FORD,    GOOD    SHAPE,    2    DR.
hrd.   top.   Low   mileage.   "C"   Lot
permit;   radio,   $100.    224-9460
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
'«7 180 YAMAHA. 7,000 MILES
Electric start. $285. '70 plates
526-6073.	
FACTORY YAMAHA DIAL
gauge (for ign., timing) $25. 435-
2970.	
'66 DUCATI "STREET SCRAM"
bier" 6,500 miles, excellent Condi -
tion.  Call Tom at 224-9545.	
'67 250 HUSTLER, 7000 MILES,
new transmission, excellent condi-
tion.   Ph.   733-6203.	
650 CC B.S.A. CUSTOM (1967) . . .
must 'be seen. Ph. 224-9665, Gord,
Rm.  20	
DON'T LET THIS BEAUTIFUL
weather pass without having a
bike. Yamaha 80, as new, Paul
926-1069 •	
'66 ZUNDAPP " SCRAMBLER ",
excellent buy.  Barrett,  224-1581
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Art Services
31A
SCIETIFIC GRAPHICS—SFECIAL-
ists in graphs, maps, textbook
illustrations, complex formulae.
Scientific Displays Advertising.
Phone   733-4506.
Duplicating & Copying
32
WISSENSCHAFTLICHE GRAPHIK
—Experten in techn. Zeichnugen,
Landkarten, Buchillustrationen,
Complexen Entwuerfe, Wissen-
schaftl. Ausstellugen U. Werbung.
Tel.    733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
BACH      TO       THE      GOOD      OLD
music. Audrey Johannesen plays
Johann Sebastian Bach and
others. SUB Aud., noon Friday.
Admission   50c. 	
Photography
34
NO ONE WILL BE SEATED
after the first half hour. No one
will leave during the last half
hour—Warrendale. March 3, 7:00
p.m.   SUB   Auditorium.	
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
CAINE VS BRAIN, SUPER SPY
stuff and all that jazz! Sit in
comfort for only 50c. That's this
weekend   in   SUB   theatre   "Billion
Dollar   Brain".	
BUBBLES
 LOVES    PENELOPE	
HEAR BARTOK . . . WITHOUT
going into a bar! Audrey Johannesen plays Bartok, Bach,
Chopin, and others in SUB Aud.
Friday   noon.   Admission   50c.
WARNING — SOME OF THE
language may offend you—come
and see. Warrendale. March 3,
7:00   p.m.   SUB   Auditorium.
Scandals (Cont.)
37
BEDSIDE     MANOR     MEDICINE
can't be beat! Wine and cheese
party   for   friends.   Sat.,   Feb.   28.
EVER SEExM REAL LION DANCE?
This and other goodies in "China
Night", Sat., 8 p.m., SUB. Ball-
room.   Refreshmens.	
VOC BANQUET. MARCH 13.
Tickets available from executive.
Contact  Jim,   224-9055.	
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
per page — Essays 30c per page -
5c per copy. Fast efficient serv-
ice.   Ph.    325-0545.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.    Phone   263-5317.	
ON-CAMPUS ACCURATE EXP.
typing. 40c per page, IBM selec-
tric.   Phone   224-9183   after   5   p.m.
FAST, EXPERT TYPING DONE
at a reasonable price. Will pick
up   and   deliver.   Phone   988-9781.
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work. Reas. rates, 738-6829
9   a.m.   to   9   p.m.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.	
ACCURATE TYPING — GERMAN,
Dutch, French, English. At home.
Reasonable  rates.   Phone  261-3751.
"FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST —
will do typing in my home. Please
call   263-0196.	
ELECTRIC TYPING; UBC GRAD;
English major; 35c a page; 736-
9874.	
QUALITY        TYPING        SERVICE.
(Private).   681-1805  after 6:00 p.m.
ESSAY   TYPING.
3589 West 19th Ave.
733-5922
ESSAY TYPING FOR FACULTY
of Arts. Phone 732-6739 evenings.
IBM  Selective  typewriter.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
theses, essays, term papers, documents.   Reasonable   rates.   266-4264
"ACCURATE   ESSAY   TYPING"   —
Mrs.   Pasqualotto,   434-1402	
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST,   ES-
says.   theses,   etc.   50c   per   page.
Mrs.   Duncan   228-9597.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (DOCU-
ments, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver home.   988-7228.	
EXPERIENCED FRENCH — ENG-
lish typist. Thesis-Essays-Translations-Publications, any other
work. Contact: Miss Danielle Cou-
nord, office hours: 682-1878; even.
hours:   879-3568.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing — essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone   321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER  LIMITED
684-7177
ATTRACTIVE VERSATILE FE-
male vocalist for steady weekend
work.   Call   526-9356  or  987-7214
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work.
Help Wanted—Male
52
WE REQUIRE PART - TIME
salesmen to handle a fast moving product at top commission.
Phone 684-5010 for an appointment.
Male or Female
53
PART TIME NOW FULL TIME
summer.   Brian  684-0609.	
MARRIED COUPLE ATTENDANTS
for campsite on Hornby Island.
Graduate student preferred. Trailer provided; leisure time; available June 19 - September 8. Applicants phone Saunders, 224-7355
between 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   Wednesday,   Thursday.
Work Wanted 54
INSTRUCTION ~~
Instruction  Wanted
61
Music
62
PREMIER DRUMS. L U D W I G
Snare. Ziljian Cymbals. Hard shell
cases. Excellent condition. $350.00
Phone  266-5025  eves.	
PIANO VOICE THEORY COACH-
ing by qualified teacher. Colling-
wood  and   Fourth.   731-5459
Tutoring
64
Language Instruction
61A
FEMALE MATH TUTOR, THREE
mornings a week for grade ten
night school student living on
campus. Must be grad student
or have teaching certificate.
Reply Norm Brown, Childrens
Aid   Society,   879-8821.	
TUTORING IN MATH AND
Physics by graduate. Call Phil,
731-1930.	
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats, by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00 per hr. Phone 733-6037 evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FISCHER GLASS GT SKIS 210
cm. Marker Bindings. Used only
once. Best offer! Phone 688-9050
after   5   p.m.	
WHAT PRICE CULTURE?
Would you believe 50c? Audrey
Johannesen, Canada's leading female pianist plays Friday noon,
SUB   Aud.   Admission   50c.	
DOUBLE BED, BEST OFFER,
and white wedding gown, train,
veil,   $60.00.  731-4550  after 6:00  p.m.
WANTED — A GOOD QUALITY
portable stereo tape recorder. Cash.
733-4013.	
FENDER   AMP   —   (PRINCETON
model); electric guitar (Kent)
and carrying case. Excellent condition.   Call   Tom—224-9545.	
HELP! MY CAB, INSURANCE
is due so I must sell part or all of
my   stereo   system.   224-5194.	
FOLK BANJO FOR SALE, Excellent  condition,  $60.00.   Phone  732-
9820  after  6  weekdays.	
LISST     UPRIGHT    PIANO    WITH
bench,    one   year   old.   $500.00   or
near    offer.     Financing    possible.
26S-5975   after   seven.	
STEREO RECORD PLAYER, POR-
table, Electrohome, cost $160. Like
new,   $69.   Offers?   263-8366	
HEAD      STD'S      210's      STEP - INS,
one year old. Muntz four track
tape, deck 18 tapes, speakers, $70.
266-4656,  ask  for Terry.	
SANSUI 500
STEREO RECEIVER
180 watt, reg. $659.95, spec. $399.
Stereo amplifier, 65 watt, solid
state, reg. $139.95, spec. $95.00.
Sansui received, AM-FM S.W.,
$68.00. Fisher stereo ampl., 60w,
reg. $299.85, spec. $188.00. Scott
radio    tuner,    best    buy,    $138.00.
HOUSE OF STEIN
ELECTRONICS   LTD.
901   Granville 685-5611
SMITH & CORONA TYPEWRITER,
older model in excellent condi-
tion,   $50.    Phone  738-9108	
'69 HEAD SLALOM SKIES, 210
cms, Barker bindings. Demanding
and high-spirited' skis for the
competent  skier.  Mike,   224-0500
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
at the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MALE OR FEMALE UPSTAIRS
sleeping room, private bathroom.
224-7471.	
OWN BEDROOM WITH ALL
house facilities. All guys, good
studying atmosphere, not Co-op.
Ph.   738-0784.	
GRAD. STUDENT & WIFE NEED
room with kitchen facilities. Phone
224-9774 after 7 p.m. Ask for Chua,
room   316/leave   message.	
BASEMENT BED SITTING
room, fully furnished; fridge, hotplate, $70 mnth. 3035 Hemlock,
male student. Tel. 738-4090 after 6.
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY !
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5670 Toronto
Rd.	
FURNISHED LIGHT HOUSE-
keeping and sleeping rooms. Close
to UBC and trans. Students only.
Available immediately, $60 single,
$45 double. Lloyd or Tom,
738-1895	
ROOM FOR MALE, NEAR UBC
gates. Kitchen and laundry facilities,   $35.   Ph.   224-1678
MONDAY
LEGAL   AID
Campus legal aid panels, every Mon.^
Wed. and Fri., noon, SUB 237-237A.
FINE  ARTS  GALLERY
"Sound Scapes'", by Murray Schaffer,
noon, Music Building, Aud.
VARSITY   DEMOLAY
Meeting,  noon,  SUB 213.
MUSSOC
General meeting and election, noon,
Old Auditorium.
POLITICAL ECONOMY
Prof.   L.   M.   Goodrich   speaks    noon.
Bu. 104. \
UBC  YOUNC  SOCREOS
Cacus meeting,  noon, SUB 130.
AIESEC
Meeting, noon, SUB 100A.
CI ASP
Training meeting,  7:30 p.m., 3035 W
10th.
COMPUTER CLUB
Open house volunteers meeting, noon
Chem.   150.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Insurance   seminar,    7:30   p.m      SUB
215.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
CF-104  lecture—tactical  flight,   noon.
SUB 105.
'tween
classes
TUESDAY
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP   SOCIETY
Tour  of  microfilm   division,   meet   at
card catalogue, noon.
FILM SOCIETY
"The  Billion Dollar Brain",   Fri.  and
Sat.,   7   and   9:30   p.m.,   Sun.   7   p.m.,
SUB   Theatre.
MARKET CLUB
Hon. Ron Basford speaks, noon, Ang.
104.
JOURNALISTS
Dr.  Stefan Schnell speaks, noon, Bu
202.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Open house meeting, noon, Ang. 24.
NDP CLUB
Model    Parliament    caucus    meeting,
noon, SUB 113.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting,  noon,   l.H.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Audrey Johanneson plays,  noon, SUB
Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY  OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem. 250.
UBC  YOUNG  SOCREDS
Caucus meeting, noon, SUB 130.
UBC STUDENT WIVES ASSOCIATION
Monthly meeting, 8 p.m., Cecil Green
Park.
THURSDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Mountaineering  lecture,   noon,   Chem.
150.
•3S61 W. Broadway     736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Room & Board
82
ROOM TO RENT NEAR UBC
gates. Available March 1st. Phone
224-3152   after   5   p.m.   Prefer   male
graduate   students.	
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MARCH 1st 3 BEDROOM UPPER
duplex, furnished, 5th & McDonald.
874-8531.    Newly    remodelled.	
2 BEDROOM SELF CONTAINED
upstair suite, $120, couple only. 733-
3767.	
WANTED: THIRD PERSON ($60
p.m.) or couple ($90) to share quiet
roomy   house.   738-0808.	
BACHELOR SUITE FURN. $85.
All found, priv. ent. 3013 Heather
St.   Avail,   imm.	
KITSILANO — CLEAN 2 ROOM
furn. suite in quiet house, grad".
female student, 2525 W. 7th Ave.
731-9841 ■__
MATURE FEMALE STUDENT
wishes to locate another female
to share apartment. Phone 228-
8567  or  228-9849
Uni. Houses & Apts.
M
4 BEDROOM HOUSE WITH Excellent view, ideal for students.
Dishwasher.     Ph.    731-9580.     $330.00
per   mo.	
FIRST AND STEPHENS, THREE
bedrooms on main, two in basement, $170 includes everything. 228-
8759. Tuesday, February 24, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 23
Rugby team  returns
bruised and beaten
Little did unsuspecting coach Donn Spence or his Thunderbird
rugby team realize when they left for sunny California last
Wednesday that there was an extra passenger riding with them.
This gremlin, as he shall be called, caused enough foul-ups,
misunderstandings, injuries and the like to last coach Spence this
many years.
The little fellow struck early for the Birds, as they were led to
believe before they arrived at UCLA that they were to be supplied
with accommodations and food. When they got there the
accommodations were there but not the food. The team was
supposed to be given meals throughout their stay at UCLA but
somehow were not. Consequently, the team had to buy each of their
meals out of their own pockets.
With this first fiasco in their minds they proceeded to go out
and play the UCLA Bruins with a 45 mile an hour wind in their
faces.
The gremlin was there throughout the entire game as UBC just
did not get the breaks. This is not to take away anything from
UCLA but it is a fact that not one of the trys they scored were set
up by their offense. UBC's mistakes amounted to the entire Bruin
offense.
The field was not in it's best condition either. The grass was
sparse and the ground hard resulting in injuries to three first string
players, Hillier, McTavish and Austin.
The final score was somewhat academic, UCLA over UBC
29-0.
Between the two games the gremlin was extremely busy. By
prior arrangement the players strip was supposed to be cleaned for
the next match. The laundry was not picked up so they had to use
the facilities where they were staying. After it was washed they
found the drier did not work so the players were forced to play the
game in wet strip. But the gremlin's work was not finished. Not only
was the strip wet but the team was given no time to warm up when
they reached the field.
The team came up on the wrong end of the score losing 21-3,
but they kept hustling for the entire game. The services of Scott and
Jackson were lost this game.
So much for the World Cup series, but the Birds' troubles were
not over yet.
Monday the team travelled to the University of Stanford
and with regards to the score suffice it to say that they were buried
badly.
"They've got the finest college rugby team, talent-wise, I've
ever seen. Six of their seven backfielders can run the 100 in under 10
seconds as can two in the front line," said Spence.
Coach Spence is hoping that the little gremlin has forsaken his
team for some other unfortunate soul as they will tackle tough
Western Washington in another away game this Saturday.
Hoopsters look
for WCIAA crown
Commencing this weekend things get a lot tougher for the UBC
basketball Thunderbirds in their continuing quest for the CIAU
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Opp.  Army  &  Navy,   New West.
521-0751
763 FORT ST.
VICTORIA,   B.C.
286-7578
championship.
The WCIAA finals begin
tonight at War Memorial Gym and
the guests will be the revenge
seeking University of Manitoba
Bisons. The prairie club qualified
to meet the Birds by disposing of
the University of Alberta in
straight games last weekend in
their semi-final series.
The Bisons finished the regular
season in second palce with their
only two losses coming at the
hands of the Birds; 59-48 at UBC
and 72-65 at the Manitoba field
house. Hence one would expect
that they will be here seeking
not only revenge for their only
two conference losses but also a
trip to the Canadian finals in
Hamilton.
Bison coach Jack Lewis has a
large well balanced club led by the
league's second leading scorer
Cliff Cornelius. The 6'4" forward
played four years at Wartburg
College in the NAIA befdre going
to Manitoba and has helped the
Bisons both scoring wise and on
the boards. Another starter for
the Bisons will be the veteran
guard Terry Ball who this year
was nominated for Manitoba
athlete of the year and who, were
it not for Ron Thorsen and Barry
King of Winnipeg, would certainly
rate as an all-star.
The other starters will
probably be John Loewen and
Ross Wedlake up front with Ted
Stoesz at the remaining guard
spot.
For the Birds it represents a
fight against complacency as well
as the talented Bisons. It's been so
long since a team has played
extremely well against them that
they may have forgotten the
tension of a tight game. However
if they continue to play as they
have of late, a good memory will
not be necessary.
Basketball
Friday 5:30 in the Memorial
Gym will see the UBC women's
basketball team clash for the
second of a best out of three game
series. Their opponent, Victoria,
did not prove an easy victory at
the last game. Using constant fast
breaks, Victoria out hustled the
Thunderettes, until Ken Shields
gave his girls a 'talk' at the half
time.
This game is crucial because if
UBC wins they will be
representing B.C. at the Canadian
Finals in Halifax. Otherwise, they
will have to head back to Victoria
for the third decisive game.
OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES—
Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS & FACULTY ON GLASSES
NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
The defensive assignments for
the Birds will probably be much
the same as they were for the
earlier contests. To forward Bob
Molinski will likely fall the
dubious honor of putting
Cornelius in the proverbial bag
while captain Alex Brayden will
endeavour to handle the ball.
A prediction? Glad to oblige.
The Birds, if they play volleyball
on the Bisons' backboards as they
did in both previous games, will
win by 15 points each night.
Intramural
Notices
The Arts 20 relay road race will bi
held on Thursday, March 5, The course
is IVi miles long and teams will be
made up of eight runners. The race
will start at 1:15 and end at about 2:00
in front of the old- administration building. Entries are welcomed from any
undergraduate, faculty, or other organization. Entries must be received by
March 2.
Golf: Entries must be in by March 2
Competition   will   be   held  March  7.
Track and Field: Deadline for entries
is March 5.
Snooker: Competition has started. See
schedule at Intramural office.
Softball: Competition begins March 4,
Watch  for  schedule.
BASKETBALL   RESULTS
Education I won the Division I basket-
ball championship on Wednesday, defeating Engineering I 27-23. It was the
first time that Education has won an
intramural championship.
Union College II took the Division II
championship, defeating Education IV
by a score of 34-31.
Carey Hall beat Engineering V 41-15
to take the Division ni championship.
—keith dunbar photo
DISPLAYING this same form will be high scoring forward Derek
Sankey for the Thunderbirds as they go up against the University
of Manitoba Bisons tonight and Saturday. Starting time for both
games will be 8:00 pm. If necessary, a third game at 2 pm Sunday.
Racquets return
Four members of the UBC
men's tennis team competed in
the Pacific Northwest Invitational
Indoor tennis championships in
Eugene, Oregon, last week.
Wrestlers hopeful
Taras Hryb, UBC's only winner
in the WCIAA wrestling
championship will represent the
west in the 177 pound class in the
Canadian Intercollegiate
championships in Edmonton this
weekend.
Hryb is favoured to win his
weight class against the best from
five eastern conferences.
The western team consists of
six WCIAA champions from the
University of Alberta, and one
each from UBC, Calgary,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
POOL SUPERVISORS
Required
THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF COQUITLAM
PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT
The District of Coquitlam invites applications for the
position of Pool Supervisor, from May 6 — September 6,
1970.
REQUIREMENTS: Must be over 21 years of age, have current
Red Cross Instructors' plus three years experience in Municipal Aquatics.
WAGES: $3.27 - $3.47 per 40-hour week.
Apply in writing to:
M. D. POWLEY
Superintendent  of  Recreation
11T1 Brunette Ave., Coquitlam
Team captain Bob Bardsley
reached the'finals of the men's
singles where he lost to Seattle's
Dick Knight 6-3, 8-10, 6-2.
The team will be travelling to
Seattle this weekend for a return
match with the University of
Washington whom they defeated
last term.
The women's team sent four
members south to play four
California universities. Susan
Eager, Barbara Johnston, Missy
Casement and Joanne Bergstrom
were UBC's representatives. The
women did well against the
American competition defeating
Claremont College 3-1 and Cal
State at Long Beach 4-2, while
dropping decisions to Cal State at
Santa Barbara and USC.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY- 224-1720
4450 W.  10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS  TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
13062   Kirn   G'-crqc   Hwy    —   588-2757
2052   Kintjswav   —  874-3622 Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
All that bush
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J; h^j M.
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*S"**.,,
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~-j.r
""' **" ^^
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.■■^\7.-V::*'fr
• • • what will they do with it?
Since the Point Grey campus opened, UBC has
had its endowment land available for future
expansion.
But will it always?
Not if the Social Credit government gets its way.
Lands and forests minister Ray Williston said in
the legislature last week that developed parts of the
endowment lands will be turned over to the city of
Vancouver.
"There hasn't been a formal bill introduced yet,
but government policy is to eventually turn all the
endowment lands over to Vancouver," said provincial
Liberal leader Pat McGeer.
Story by
Ginny Gait and Jan O'Brien
Photo by Dave Enns
The provincial government endowed the
university 2,700 acres of land on Point Grey in 1923.
Now, 47 years later, 1,700 acres remain undeveloped.
About 700 acres have been developed into
residential lots. Although profits from leasing or
selling the endowment lands were to add revenue to
the university, none of the money ever came to UBC.
"The lands were given to produce revenue but
they never have," said UBC information director
Arnie Myers.
Said Alma Mater Society president Fraser Hodge:
"During the 1940s the provincial government offered
to sell the land to the board of governors for an
absurdly low price, but they just didn't have the
money then. This is unfortunate because if we had a
clear title there would be no problem."
University president Walter Gage said the
university has no control over the use of the
endowment lands.
Vancouver city council is currently negotiating
with the provincial government for control of the
land. Alderman Halford Wilson, chairman of the
council's university endowment land sub-committee,
said the council was motivated by a government
proposal that the boundaries of the city be extended
to include the developed areas of the endowment
lands.
"The architectural firm of Webb and Knapp who
developed Place de Maria in Montreal for Expo '67
have a comprehensive plan for the whole of the
endowment," Wilson said.
"The plan includes single family dwellings, town
houses, high rises and shopping centres. It was
estimated that this development would have a
population of 70,000 including university students."
Wilson said the government doesn't want to put
the undeveloped endowment lands on the market
until other undeveloped land such as the Canadian
Pacific Railway land in the city has been utilized.
By doing this he said the endowment lands will
be more valuable and Premier Bennett will make
more money.
Hodge said "Bennett couldn't give a flying god
damn about the university.
"The part already developed doesn't make much
difference to the university. It's just a matter of
administration and maintenance. But the whole
developed area is a tremendous source of potential
revenue. If the government turns over the whole
works to the city we'll just lose out on everything."
Said aid. Harry Rankin: "there is no policy yet,
negotiations will go on for another couple of years to
find one that is compatible with Vancouver
residents."
The committee for retention of university
endowment lands sent out a flyer to endowment land
residents Thursday supporting the retention of the
area as a separate entity (a university municipality).
Would the city want it?
The committee said one reason is the
opportunity it presents for the development of an
industrial park where very specialized industries such
as electronics could be developed in conjunction with
the various faculties and schools of the campus.
The committee is meeting with government
representatives in Victoria March 4.
"I'm not sure the city would want the already
developed land. It would only turn into a liability as
the endowment land will not provide enough money
through taxes to pay for policing and other services,"
said Aid. Ed Sweeney.
The property owners association of the
endowment land already has its own work crews, fire
department and garbage collection arrangements. It is
a member of the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and
Drainage Board and buys its water wholesale.
Universities in the U.S. which started off with
large areas of publicly owned land that was sold to
raise money are finding that expansion is a problem.
They have had to buy back developed land that they
originally owned at a much higher price.
This has also happened at the University of
Alberta in Edmonton.
McGreer suggested a university city where the
university has complete control of the land.
"This can be done if the university bids for all
the houses as they come up for sale and leases them
to residents. In this way the university can regain the
lands already alienated in a matter of a generation," he
said.
"The city of Vancouver is very imperialistic
about the endowment lands, they want control of
zoning, but this can't be the purpose of the
university.
"If the university doesn't take initiative the land
will fall to the city."
Taxes will go up
Rankin said one problem is that people are afraid
of zoning because they don't understand it.
He said if the land is turned over to the city this
will be an ideal opportunity for the planning
department of the university. "It will move the
planning department out of the academic and into
the practical," he said.
Aid. Hugh Bird said: "My main concern in this
settlement is the city's great need of undeveloped
land for housing. There are hardly any vacant lots in
Vancouver."
He said an area should be put aside for scientific
research and the rest should be used for housing. "I'm
not concerned about who runs the land, just that it's
developed," he said.
Sweeney said endowment- land residents are
enjoying a tax concession while similar city properties
are taxed much higher.
"Someone is obviously subsidizing this property
and it must be the lands and forest department," he
said.
Taxes will go up for endowment land residents if
they become part of the city.
"The position of the university is being eroded
because the provincial government has made the
decision to get rid of these lands," said McGeer.
Williston was unavilable for comment to The
Ubyssey. After reaching the minister's office by
phone, The Ubyssey was asked to hold on while
Williston talked on another line.
After two minutes a secretary said Williston had
gone to a meeting.

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