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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 1970

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 Dissenting
teachers
to be fired
Any public school or university teacher who
advocates the policies of the FLQ or, the violent
overthrow of any government will be fired under an
order-in-council passed by the provincial cabinet Thursday
night.
Attorney-General Leslie Peterson said that under this
order, "no person teaching or instructing our youth in any
educational institution receiving public support should be
in the employment of that institution if he advocates the
policies of the FLQ or the overthrow of democratically
elected governments by violent means.."
The cabinet move appeared to be a response to
statements of support for the FLQ and criticisms of the
federal government's use of the War Measures Act made
by Ronald Kirkby, an assistant philosophy prof at the
University of Victoria.
Kirkby expressed his views in a letter to the Uvic
student newspaper, The Martlet, saying Prime Minister
Trudeau's response to the Quebec terrorists contributed
to the death of Quebec Labor Minister Pierre Laporte.
The cabinet order to fire FLQ-supporting teachers
came after opposition leader Dave Barrett asked education
minister Donald Brothers to inverstigate the firing of
Dawson Creek high school teacher Arthur Olson Tuesday.
When contacted by The Ubyssey early today Brothers
said only that the order-in-council was "self-evident."
"That's all I can tell you. The order-in-council reflects
the views of our government," he said.
—david bowerman photo
FALSE NEWSPAPER STORIES feed the current mood of hysteria generated by government response to FLQ actions.
Jack Scott tells 600 students in SUB ballroom Wednesday. The meeting was held to hear debate on Quebec and the War
Measures Act. Scott was arrested during the first world war under provisions of the act. He was then a member of the
Canadian Communist Party. He is currently chairman of the Progressive Workers Movement.
'Quebec enemy is structural'
By THOM WESCOTT
More than 600 people came to the SUB ballroom
Wednesday to discuss the War Measures Act and the
struggle for Quebec independence.
They heard speakers declare that the bombings,
kidnappings and killings by Quebec separatists are a
logical result of oppressive government rule in Quebec.
Most of the crowd seemed against the federal
government's invocation of the stringent War Measures
Act, although hecklers interrupted the anti-government
speakers at several points.
Dick Betts of the Left Caucus gave a brief account of
the reasons for separatism. He said that the French
speaking people of Canada have always been colonized.
"The forces which control Quebec are from outside.
They even speak a different language. The people of
Quebec are not allowed to control their lives
productively", Betts said.
Some of the effects of this, he added, were Quebec's
high infant and worker mortality rates, and a standard of
living 25 per cent below the Canadian average.
Betts also pointed out that the average
English-speaking worker in Quebec earns $5,052 annually
while the average wage of the French-speaking is $3,099.
Problems are not being dealt with because elected
representatives themselves are part of the colonizing
structure.
"Quebec premier Robert Bourassa is linked directly
to Reynolds Aluminum, Provincial Bank of Canada, Royal
Petroleum, Consolidated Bathurst, Engineering Products
of Canada, Chemcell Limited and Canadian Advertising
Agency," Betts said.
Betts also said factors working against the French
people of Quebec are not only economic.
"Police repression has existed for quite a while now,"
he said. "The War Measures Act, in its intent, is nothing
new to Quebec."
Betts concluded that "we should support the struggle
for self-determination in Quebec, and realize that there is
an oppressive piece of legislation in action."
D. J. O'Donnell of the Women's Liberation Front
explained why the WLF has aligned itself with the Front
de Liberation du Quebec.
"All oppressed people unite to fight against
oppression," she said. She explained they would not
struggle against people but rather against the power
structure. "Men are not the enemy, tne enemy is
structural."
O'Donnell was challenged by a member of another
women's liberation group to clarify which group had
taken a stand with the FLQ.
O'Donnell said that she was representing the WLF, a
'No tanks for Quebec'
OTTAWA (CUP) - The Trudeau regime is
coming up against the inevitable problems involved in
manipulating an occupation army, and the business
communities protected by the soldiers are,
predictable, setting down to figuring out what it all
means in dollars and cents.
Defence minister Donald MacDonald said he
could throw an additional 1,000 men into the field
without excessive strain on the armed forces.
The minister said Wednesday the troop cutbacks
announced last year would continue, although earlier
reports had speculated the minister might try to get
around the $1.8 billion armed forces budget which
does not allow for major recruitment.
Tanks will not be used to "battle the FLQ",
MacDonald disclosed.
"They would not be useful and they would look
provocative. Besides they would probably rip up the
pavement."
The army - more than 12,000 troops -
provincial and local police — are believed to be
currently posted in Quebec — has yet to battle
anyone. They are however, searching for 22 people
believed connected with the kidnappings.
The minister refused to reveal exactly how many
troops are occupying Quebec. He did day, however,
that some trouble has developed because so few
soldiers speak French.
Creditiste leader Real Caquette, a strong believer
in Canadian unity and bilingualism and bilculturalism,
is being guarded by a unilingual English soldier. He
has asked for a French speaking guard.
Reports from Montreal indicate the population
there is also uptight about the occupying forces,
which include soldiers from as far away as Edmonton.
Police officers are frequently being asked
whether the troops are Vandoos. The Vandoos are
part of the Royal 22nd Regiment, a largely French
unit. They form only a small part of the forces
currently in the city.
After a flurry of panic in the business
community following the kidnappings, the people
who make it all possible are settling back down to
work.
Insurance spokesmen have reassured property
To page 17: see INSURANCE
more militant group than the larger Women's Caucus.
Final rally speaker was Jack Scott, chairman of the
Progressive Workers Movement and a former member of
the Communist Party of Canada who was imprisoned
under the War Measures Act during the first world war.
Scott, began his presentation by appealing for reason.
"Many people have become hysterical. Some of them are
here," he said.
At this point students at the back of the ballroom
began heckling. "What about murder?" "What about
Laporte?" several of them shouted.
Replied Scott: "Allright, I'll tell you about murder.
The RCMP has just called off the search for a man who
killed a whole family in Alberta.
"Murder is murder and we already have laws to deal
with it."
"This is not the first time I have faced hostile people
in an audience," Scott replied, "and I have no intention of
backing down — none whatsoever."
Scott charged that present conditions are the result of
Canadian government protecting American investment.
"We are being asked to support oppression of the
Quebec people on behalf of General Motors, General
Electric, Ford and so on," he said.
"The Parti Quebecois is a problem for people in
Ottawa and Quebec City who want to keep Quebec tied
to the American war chariot, the same way we are tied to
the American war chariot."
Scott also challenged the necessity of introducing the
War Measures Act as a stopgap measure until "more
suitable legislation is passed."
"We're being conned," he said. As an example of how
effectively the government has dealt wich such situations
in the past, he cited the Winnipeg general strike in 1919.
"Ottawa was trying to borrow $100 million dollars
from Wall Street. They told Ottawa to stop the revolution
in Western Canada or they wouldn't get anything.
"Ottawa arrested the leaders of the strike
immediately and then passed special legislation to deal
with it. It took 20 minutes' depate on the floor and was
signed into law in less than 40 minutes."
Scott warned that "special legislation" might be
worse than the War Measures Act.
He said one member of parliament has already asked
for the death penalty for certain political actions which
do not come under the Criminal Code.
"We need no special legislation to provide penalties
for policitical opinions," he said.
During an open discussion after the meeting, ex-Simon
Fraser University prof Mordecai Briemberg said a new
group called Free Quebec, Free Canada will hold a public
meeting at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Fishermen's Hall, 138
East Cordova.
The group supports the struggle for an independent
Quebec and opposes the War Measures Act. Both of these
topics will be discussed. Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
Student action needed for Harger
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
The call is out to muster student support for UBC
assistant zoology professor Robin Harger.
Harger, who is also president of the Society for
Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC) was recently
refused tenure by the zoology tenure and promotions
committee.
A graduate student working under Harger in the
zoology department is asking students who have had
Harger as a prof to write letters to the zoology
department, backing him.
"They (tenure committee members) accept his
teaching ability but he hasn't published enough in their
opinion,", said graduate student Norman Prentice.
Although Harger has not actually published any of
the work he has been doing at UBC, much of it is ready,
or almost ready for publication.
"He has one paper going to press, two in the final
stages, one in the preliminary stage, and data for six more
papers," said Prentice.
Harger has done all of this work at UBC, but has not
been able to find the time to write it up because of his
involvement in the fight against pollution.
Prentice told The Ubyssey that instead of writing in
scholarly journals that no one reads, Harger has been using
the information he has gathered to help SPEC.
Harger took on the Fraser River project using the
$38,000 donated to SPEC by Labatt Breweries in the
summer.
The project involved a survey of all industries along
the Fraser River and the amount of effluent they dump
into the river.
Harger also testified at the forest industry pollution
inquiry held during the summer months.
Harger was the only ecologist who was qualified to
undertake these two projects," said Prentice.
"A vast amount of research was required for both
projects, and these works have opened new areas of
research, which had up to then been masked by the mass
of unrelated data."
Harger is presently working on the publication of the
research he did in the summer.
The faculty of zoology plans to hold a hearing on the
Harger case on the afternoon of October 26 and Prentice
urges students to move quickly.
"If you want to put a word in for Robin, act now, the
department is moving fast," he said.
Students can write letters on behalf of Harger to Dr.'s
C. S. Holling, W. S. Hoar, P. A. Larkin, J. D. McPhail, T.
G. Northcote, C. F. Wehrhain, and R. H. Drent.
War Measures Act regulations — read em
WAR MEASURES ACT
, Public Order Regulations,
1970
Oct. 16,1970
Whereas it continues to be
recognized in Canada that men
and institutions remain free only
when freedom is founded upon
respect for moral and spritual
values and the rule of law;
And whereas there is in
contemporary Canadian society
an element or group known as Le
Front de Liberation du Quebec
who advocate the use of force or
the commission of crime as a
means of or as an aid in
accomplishing a governmental
change within Canada and who
have resorted to the commission
of serious crimes including
murder, threat of murder and
kidnapping;
And whereas the Government
of Canada desires to ensure that
lawful and effective measures can
be taken against those who thus
seek to destroy the basis of our
democratic governmental system,
on which the enjoyment of our
human rights and fundamental
freedoms is founded, and to
ensure the continued protection
of those rights and freedoms in
Canada.
Therefore, His Excellency the
Governor-General-in-Council, on
the recommendation of the Prime
Minister, pursuant to the War
Measures Act, is pleased hereby to
make the annexed regulations to
provide emergency powers for the
preservation of public order in
Canada.
REGULATIONS TO PROVIDE
EMERGENCY POWERS FOR
THE PRESERVATION OF
PUBLIC ORDER
IN CANADA
Short title
1. These regulations may be cited
as the Public Order Regulations,
1970.
Interpretation
2. In these regulations,
"communicate" includes the act
of communicating by telephone,
broadcasting, or other audible or
visible means; "peace officer"
means a peace officer as defined
in the Criminal Code and includes
a member of the Canadian Armed
Forces; "statements" includes
words spoken or written or
recorded electonically or
electromagnetically or otherwise,
and gestures, signs or other visible
representations: and "the
unlawful association" means the
group of persons or association
declared by these regulations to
be an unlawful association.
3. The group of persons or
association know as Le Front de
Liberation du Quebec and any
successor group or successor
association of the said Le Front
de Liberation du Quebec or any
group of persons or association
that advocates the use of force or
the commission of crime as a
means of or as an aid in
accomplishing governmental
change within Canada is declared
to be an unlawful association.
4. A person who
a) is or professes to be a member
of the unlawful association,
b) acts or professes to act as an
officer of the unlawful
association,
c) communicates statements on
behalf of or as a representative or
professed representative of the
unlawful association,
d) advocates or promotes the
unlawful acts, aims, principles or
policies of the unlawful
association,
e) contributes anything as dues or
otherwise to the unlawful
association or to anyone for the
benefit of the unlawful
association,
f) solicits subscriptions or
contributions for the unlawful
association, or
g) advocates, promotes or engages
in the use of force or the
commission of criminal offenses
as a means of accomplishing a
governmental change within
Canada is guilty of an indictable
offence and liable to
imprisonment for a term not
exceeding five years.
5. A person, who, knowing or
having reasonable cause to believe
that another person is guilty of an
offense under these regulations,
gives that other person any
assistance with intent thereby to
prevent, hinder or interfere with
the apprehension, trial or
punishment of that person for
that offense, is guilty of an
indictable offense and liable to
imprisonment for a term not
exceeding five years.
6. An owner, lessee, agent or
superintendent of any building,
room, premises or other place
who knowingly permits therein
any meeting of the unlawful
association or any branch,
committee or members thereof, or
any assemblage of persons who
promote the acts, aims, principles
or policies of the unlawful
association is guilty of an
indictable offense and liable to a
fine of not more than $5,000 or
to imprisonment for a term not
exceeding five years or to both.
7.(1) A person arrested for an
offense under section 4 shall be
detained in custody without bail
pending trial unless the
Attorney-General of the province
in which the person is being
detained consents to the release of
that person on bail.
(2) Where an accused has been
arrested for an offense under
these regulations and is detained
in custody for the purpose only of
ensuring his attendance at the trial
of the charge under these
regulations in respect of which he
is in custody and the trial has not
•commenced within 90 days from
"the time he was first detained, the
person having the custody of the
accused shall, forthwith upon the
expiration of such 90 days, apply
to a judge of the superior court of
criminal jurisdiction in the
province in which the accused is
being detained to fix a date for
the trial and the judge may fix a
date for the beginning of the trial
or give such directions as he
thinks necessary for expediting
the trail of the accused.
8. In   any   prosecution   for   an
offense   under  these  regulations,
evidence that any person
(a) attended any meeting of the
unlawful association,
(b) spoke publicly in advocacy
for the unlawful association, or
(c) communicated statements of
the unlawful association as a
representative of the unlawful
association is, in the absence of
evidence to the contrary, proof
that he is a member of the
unlawful association.
9. (1) A peace officer may arrest
without warrant
(a) a person who he has reason to
suspect is a member of the
unlawful association; or
(b) a person who professes to be
a member of the unlawful
association, or
(a) a person who he has reason to
suspect has committed, is
committing or is about to commit
an act described in paragraphs b)
to g) of section 4.
(2) A person arrested pursuant to
subsection (1) shall be taken
before a justice having jurisdiction
and charged with an offense
described in section 4 not later
than seven days after his arrest,
unless the Attorney-General of
the province in which the person
is being detained has, before the
expiry of those seven days, issued
an order that the accused be
further detained until the expiry
of a period not exceeding 21 days
To page 21: see WM ACT
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SUB AUDITORIUM FRI. OCT. 23   12:30
BRING YOUR AMS CARD Friday, October 23, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
"EGAD,"   SCREAMED   the   terrible tempered  editor,   "not  another construction
shot."  However he relented after hearing how photographer David Bowerman had
almost disappeared in mud while trying to snap this somewhat forgettable shot of the
new residence complex north of SUB.
Teacher Fired For Discussing WM Act
A Dawson Creek high school teacher has been fired
for expressing his views on the Quebec situation.
Chemistry teacher, Arthur Olson was fired Tuesday
after the local school board received complaints from
students' parents that he supported the outlawed Front de
Liberation du Quebec.
Olson said the events started when South Peace
Senior Secondary principal George Hartford decided to
send a telegram to prime minister Pierre Trudeau
supporting his policy on the FLQ.
Students were invited to sign the telegram at five
cents a person.
"I think the principal was playing a little game of
politics," Olson said.
Hartford was trying to please the school board, he
said.
"He announced his telegram over the public address
system and urged kids to sign," Olson said.
The dispute began when Olson tried discussing the
situation in Quebec and the War Measures Act.
He said he never told students to either sign or not
sign the telegram.
He only wanted to make sure students had some idea
of what they were signing, Olson said.
Some students and staff were unaware of what the
initials FLQ stood for, he said.
Most staff members refused even to talk about the
Quebec and the War Measures Act, he said.
"My god, it was most disgusting," he said. "I raised
the question of Quebec and Trudeau's actions with other
staff members in the staff room. They didn't even want to
talk about it."
Olson said a student at the school whose father was a
French speaking Quebecois was being baited by his class
Parks board report proposes gravel road
to counter erosion of university beach
mates.
"He's suffered a great deal of abuse," Olson said.
People have been calling him a "bloody frog," he
said.
Some of the students with whom Olson discussed the
Quebec situation told their parents.
He was subsequently fired at a special school board
meeting Tuesday night.
School board members and Hartford have issued
repeated "no comments" in response to questions about
the firing.
It is unlikely the B.C. Teachers Federation will be
able to help Olson as he does not have a teachers
certificate and is not a member of the federation.
BCTF spokesman C. D. Ovans said Monday if a
certified teacher was fired in similar .circumstances, the
official reason would likely be "misconduct".
In those circumstances, the teacher would have a
hearing and an appeal before the school board, with the
BCTF present to ensure the teacher got a fair hearing, he
said.
By PAUL KNOX
A $235,000 gravel road is the latest proposal to the
city park board for the control of erosion on the Point
Grey cliffs.
Swan-Wooster engineering Ltd., in a report
commissioned by the park board last spring, says this
would be the cheapest and most effective way to stop the
erosion of "sand and silty sand materials" from the cliffs.
The report makes no mention of alternative proposals
such as that of UBC engineering prof Ian Bain, who
proposed that a long row of rocks be placed along the
beach to stop the erosion and preserve the beach in tis
natural state.
UBC geologist R. E. Kucera is listed in the
Swan-Wooster report as a consultant.
Kucera earlier was opposed to any suggestion of a
road around the beach and supported other erosion
control measures.
The road, which will be 15 feet wide, is described in
the report as "a layer of gravel". Board members insist it
is not a road but merely fill covered with gravel.
The report says the gravel should partially cover fill
to be placed along the beach.
A previous Swan-Wooster report has advocated a road
around Point Grey as part of a marina development.
However, this proposal was later modified to include
only an access road after protests from ecology groups
and other citizens.
The latest proposal, according to park commissioner
Sandy Robertson, would "enable us to get a fire truck,
police or ambulance vehicle down there."
The gravel would be one foot thick for 2,500 feet
west from the end of the present Spanish Banks access
road. It would then become three feet thick and continue
west for 3,700 feet to a point just past the westernmost
observation tower.
The report says the area west of this proposed
three-foot thick strip is not subject to serious erosion and
doesn't need the gravel, although consideration should be
given to putting fill there at a future date.
The park board has sent copies of the Swan-Wooster
report to administration president Walter Gage, the
alumni association and student council president Tony
Hodge.
It will now wait for their comments before making a
decision on whether to implement the Swan-Wooster
re comme n dati on s.
But Hodge called the latest beach proposal "a
victory".
"It's a change from a $5 million project to a
$235,000 project. It's a change from the original idea of
developing the beach, to the idea of preserving the natural
environment."
RCMP  threatens
U Vic   paper
Staid Victoria, last stronghold of the British
empire, is feeling the effects of the War Measures Act.
Bob Higginbotham, editor of the University of
Victoria Martlet had several visits from the RCMP and
Saanich police, Wednesday, warning him against
printing a letter that expressed support for the aims
and methods of the Front de Liberation du Quebec.
The author of the letter, Ron Kirkby, is on the
teaching staff of the Uvic philosophy department.
"I showed the letter around after I had written it
and people were pretty uptight. They said I could be
arrested," said Kirkby.
In their visits to Higginbotham the police
indicated that publishing the letter would- be in
flagrant violation of the War Measures Act. When he
asked what penalties he could face the police replied,
"That's not for us to say."
"They visited me three times in all" said
Higginbotham.
"On the second visit they said they wanted to
'reiterate' that I could be in violation of the act if I
should publish the letter." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
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7WFUBYSSEY      Turners credibility gap
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 23, 1970
"This and no other is the root from which a
tyrant springs: When he first appears he is a
protector." - PLATO
Here and now
The provincial government has now overtly
entered the thought control business. With its
order-in-council Thursday night it has taken steps to
ensure the only ideas heard in the educational system
will be those bearing the official stamp of approval.
It has decided that the university cannot exist as a
place where all ideas are expressed freely and openly,
but must only be a place where people are taught only
what those in power wish them to know.
The order-in-council requires the firing of any
public school or university teacher who "supports the
FLQ or the violent overthrow of any democratic
government".
Since education minister Donald Brothers did not
qualify the order, saying it was self explanatory, it is
apparent the order will be enforced to the letter.
That means a teacher who says he supports some
of the aims of the FLQ but condemns their methods is
still supporting the FLQ under the terms of the order. It
is now illegal to make the common statement that the
French-speaking people of Quebec are dominated by an
English-speaking minority and would be better served
by separation.
Conceivably, the order could be used against the
large number of people who support the National
Liberation Front in Viet Nam (the provincial
government probably defines the Saigon military regime
as "democratic").
It can be used against an academic Marxist
professor who says revolution is inevitable at some time
in the distant future.
We have been told that we have nothing to fear
from the War Measures Act, but its implications and
spirit have just taken a large leap closer to home.
Many of our freedoms disappeared last week with
the invocation of the War Measures Act. Many more
disappeared Thursday with the provincial government
order.
Will half the population of Canada have to be
dragged off to jail before we open our eyes and take a
look at what's happening in this country?
Federal justice minister John Turner has
now said the government may never be able
to release the vast amount of evidence it
claims to have on a grand FLQ conspiracy to
take over Quebec.
He says we all must accept on faith that
the government knows something everyone
else doesn't and is taking the correct action
on the basis of its information.
As a matter of fact John, we haven't the
slightest bit of faith in that proposition.
Too may governments have committed
too many crimes under the guise of that old
line that goes "we know more than you do,
but we can't tell you about it so shut up and
let us do what we want."
Lyndon Johnson tried the same trick to
justify increased U.S. intervention in Viet
Nam. A few years later, when much of his
secret    information    was    proven    to    be
non-existent and the Gulf of Tonkin
incident was shown to be largely fictional,
the term "credibility gap" entered modern
political lexicon.
It is a myth that governments necessarily know more about a given situation
than anyone else.
Even if they do have such information,
haven't we always been told that in a
democracy the people have a right to know
the basis of all government decisions?
Governments do not have the right to
decide they know what is best for the people
and act on the basis of some mysterious
knowledge.
Sorry John, but unless you can give us
some idea about the evidence you have, we'll
have to suspect you don't have any. If
people wanted their political system to
be based on faith, they would never have
rejected the divine right of kings.
LETTERS
'Too tar
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Ubyssey has gone too far
this time trying to prove just how
radical your staff really is by
defending an organization who
will resort to such cruelty to
achieve their objectives.
What is your basis of reasoning
to conclude the FLQ as being a
"legitimate political opposition to
the government" when in the past
seven years the FLQ has bombed,
robbed, burned, assaulted,
kidnapped and murdered in the
name of their cause?
Your editor accuses the federal
government of adopting "the type
of mentality that created Nazi
Government" while in truth the
lack of government action in
Germany in the early 1930s led to
the creation of the Nazi
government. Ottawa must remain
strong so the terrorist FLQ
organization will be unable to
create a police or terrorist state in
Quebec.
Your staffer, former AMS
vice-president and unofficial AMS
presidential candidate Christine
Krawcyk, who reasoned three
weeks ago the Jericho kids were
people, has stated she is unable to
decide "what FLQ tactics are
necessary and what aren't" but
feels we should protest the federal
government action anyway.
Christine, have you forgotten the
victims of the FLQ tactics are
people too?
JOHN LAKES
Arts 3
If you would read the editorial
again, perhaps you would notice
that the "legitimate political
opposition" referred to at that
point was the Parti Quebecois and
the Front d'Action Politique,
parliamentary separatist
organizations whose members
have been arrested.—Ed.
Explanation
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to explain why I
opposed motions presented to
student's council which
condemned the FLQ and
supported the government.
The War Measures Act is not
being used just against the FLQ.
Draftdodgers, entertainers, trade
unionists, civic election candidates
and members of the Parti
Quebecois   have   been   detained
without charges or bail.
For several years, police in
Quebec have been attacking
demonstrations, seizing printing
presses and ransacking offices.
Political prisoners have been held
for months awaiting trial. Some
have been beaten, including a B.C.
government official who was
arrested by mistake.
Council expressed support for
forthcoming alternate legislation.
Such legislation will limit the
freedom of all of us and give the
police more power.
The government and media
have created an atmosphere of
hysteria which have clouded over
the issues and centred on personal
tragedy. Most members of council
jumped on the emotional
bandwagon and showed their
ignorance of the situation. AMS
president Tony Hodge claimed
that if we don't support the
government's actions we should
pick up a gun.
The FLQ is just one of a
number of groups opposing
foreign domination and internal
repression in Quebec. It is up to
the Quebecois to accept or reject
the tactics of the FLQ.
BRIAN SPROULE
Arts AMS representative Friday, October 23, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE   LETTERS
'Criminals
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As Donald Borland so rightly
says in the Oct. 20 Ubyssey, your
efforts to justify the monstrous
crimes of the FLQ dishonour the
students of UBC and, indeed, the
entire university. It should be
noted that among those arrested
in Quebec last week was Charles
Gagnon who hardly a month ago
spoke on this campus in support
of the violent overthrow of
Quebec society and the
destruction of Canada. Thus were
UBC student fees used tacitly to
uphold the criminal aims of rhe
FLQ and to lend prestige to that
organization and to its advocates.
It can be presumed that those
responsible for thus misusing the
authority and funds granted to
them by their fellow students are
also those who most fiercely
deplore the Americanization of
Canada. Yet by their actions and
words they contribute to the
weakening of our nation and thus
to a lessoning of our ability to
resist American influence.
In your report of last Monday's
AMS council meeting you, Mr.
Editor, are quoted as describing
support of the War Measures Act
as analogous to public acceptance
of Nazism in Germany forty years
ago. In fact, it was supine
acceptance of storm trooper
violence and terrorism during the
pre-Hitler era that led to the
victory of Nazism. Your argument
leads logically to the conclusion
that the leaders of thee
democractic Weimar Republic
were right to stand helplessly
aside and permit the growth and
final triumph of the same kind of
terrorism that the FLQ seeks to
fasten upon Canada today.
And what are we to make of
the position adopted at the AMS
meeting by Miss Krawczyk who
apparently cannot make up her
mind at this distance about the
FLQ but has no trouble deciding
at the same distance that our
federal and provincial authorities
in eastern Canada are wrong? It is
good to know that Mr. Bob Smith
feels "a little squeamish" about
Mr. Laporte's death but is it not
strange that in criticizing
governmental response to the
situation in Quebec, he is not
disturbed by Bourassa's sanctions
against the medical specialists? I
happen to believe that those
sanctions are probably justified
but they can certainly be
construed'as an attack upon the
civil liberties of the doctors. But
then doctors, in Mr. Smith's
ideology, probably belong to the
wicked establishment. When he
suggests that their strike may have
caused deaths, I wonder if he
protested against the 1969 strike
in the Hospital Employees' Union
in New Westminster?
It is possible that actions less
drastic than invocation of the War
Measures Act could meet the
present situation in Quebec. But
when Mr. Tommy Douglas and his
party berate the government for
not having long ago brought
forward a less stringent set of laws
to deal with terrorism, they strain
credulity. Can one imagine the
outcry from the NDP and its
supporters had Mr. Trudeau
attempted to do so? I am
encouraged by Mr. Trudeau's
promise that such laws will be
enacted,    hopefully    within    a
month. No government in recent
memory has done more to
broaden civil liberties by statute
and to interpret existing
legislation liberally, as shown, for
example, by immigration policies
under which many American
young people have gained
sanctuary in Canada. For these
reasons, and bearing in mind the
gravity of the present crisis, I
believe that pur government
deserves strong benefit of any
doubt.
There are no nations in the
past or at present in which the
right of permitted dissent in
words and actions has been equal
to that obtaining in Canada, the
United States, Great Britain and a
few other western democracies in
recent years.
GEORGE S. TOMKINS
Professor, Education
'Travesty
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The acts of the FLQ terrorists
are despicable. They have
deprived a number of men of their
right to freedom and life (I
include those killed or maimed in
bombing attacks). But the actions
of our Prime Minister, although
hailed as heroic, make our
"democracy" a travesty; he has
usurped the rights of 20 million
people. Suspension of civil
liberties and censorship of the
press are never justified. The most
frightening thing is that such
legislation (the war act may be
invoked by order in council and
doesn't need the support of
parliament) is allowed to exist at
all.
I have agreed with a number of
people — graduate students and
supposedly intelligent — stupid
enough to say "line them all
(FLQ) against the wall and
shoot", presumably because these
people do not consider the FLQ
members to be acting in a sane
manner or something. These
"sane" people do not believe that,
should the situation be reversed,
the FLQ should have the same
rights and advocate the wall and
shoot treatment, nor would they
be willing to spend 21 or 90 (since
charges are easy to lay and drop
again) days in jail to facilitate
capture of the terrorists in the
hypothetical situation of B.C.
being the site of the kidnappings.
It is very convenient that it
happens so far away — we can all
sit here in judgment like little
self-styled gods and declare that
we, and of course, Hitler, Stalin,
Franco etc. ad nauseum, are/were
right. We have watched, (smugly
and self-righteously), the
Americans become gradually more
fascist but fail to realize that
Canada has suddenly, in one
night, passed the U.S. in the race
for democracy. It is clear we have
learned from history. Today the
FLQ. Tomorrow it may be me —
or even you
KEN HALL
Grad Studies
Ruthlessness
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
"The type of mentality that
created Nazi Germany is alive and
well and living in Ottawa." —
from The Ubyssey editorial "The
First Roundup", Oct. 20.
Instead of expanding your
editorial on this theme it might
just as easily have read:
The same type of tyranny,
ruthlessness, and fear that led
Adolph Hitler to power in
Germany is alive and well in
Quebec. Hitler's terrorists were
known as the Sturm Abteilungen
(meaning storm troopers). They
burned buildings, broke windows,
and beat up political opponents.
But in 1930 the S.A. was not
stocked with dynamite and
weapons. And in 1930 the S.A.
did not plant bombs in buildings
or use murder as a tool for social
change.
But they were ruthless. They
were feared. They built social
change on violence, as the FLQ is
now doing. And the Weimar
Republic of Germany did nothing.
Alan Bullock, author of Hitler,
a Study in Tyranny, commented
on the government of Germany
and Nazi terrorism. "No
government of any determination
would have tolerated such
methods." (from page 63).
Although references to Nazi
Germany and Ottawa make good
Employment Interviews
Representatives   of   Cominco   Ltd.   will  be   interviewing
employment candidates on campus
on the following dates:
November 3,4,5 and 6
Requirements are in two categories:
1. Graduating and post-graduate students in Honours
Geology, Honours Geophysics, and Geological
Engineering for summer and permanent employment.
2. Graduating students (Bachelor level) in Mechanical
Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Mineral
Engineering, and Chemical Engineering for permanent
employment only.
PLEASE MAKE INTERVIEW ARRANGEMENTS AT THE
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE.
Tcominco
print for an editorial, it is stupid
to compare any actions in Canada
today with the actions of Adolph
Hitler 40 years ago (as I have done
in my letter and you in your
editorial.)
Circumstances and events of
years ago can be twisted and given
new meaning (i.e. quotes from
Bullock's book give completely
different meaning in my letter and
your editorial.)
Thus in future editorials I
suggest you stick to the facts.
KENT SPENCER
Science 1
Thanks
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As the Quebec government has
no jurisdiction in criminal law,
and as criminal law does not
permit the government to
effectively combat terror and
possibly further political
assassinations by the FLQ, it was
probably necessary for the
government of Quebec to call on
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     John Gibbs
Wire     John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Ass't City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Notorious Nate with his able (and
willing) bodied lackeys Ken Lassasen,
Elaine Tarzwell and John Andersen
fended off the enthusiastic advances of
Thom Wescott, Jennifer Alley, David
Schmidt and intrepid Jennifer Jordan
who mistook them for a travelling
animal act. Gibbs tried, but he couldn't
come. Jan O'Brien and Leslie Plommer
rapped   Peter   Kennedy,   Sandy   Kass,
the federal government to bring in
the War Measures Act.
At the same time the Canadian
government and Quebec's
attorney-general owe us an
explanation of the type of threat
the FLQ represents and the ways
they are dealing with it. None of
this was forthcoming from
Ottawa. There is no justification
for stopping dissenting opinion, in
the student press or among the
citizens of Quebec. Opinions are
neither bombs nor murder
weapons.
Moreover, since when,
Vancouver Police, is a
demonstration for environmental
control unpatriotic? Since when,
is it even illegitimate for people to
discuss the legitimate side of FLQ
demands?
Without The Ubyssey we would
never have known the extent to
which the government and police
are using the War Measures Act.
Thank you.
JENNIFER ALLEY,
Arts 3
Michael Quiggles and Dave Blair.
"They loved it!" gurgled Nathalie
Apouchtine and Dave Enns.
Wild Nettie and Jim Davies leaped
onto the newsdesk and danced the
AMS waffle to the loud growls and
obscene slurps of Kathy Carney and
Dick Betts. Josephine Maraolis
interviewed nudists while Scott McCloy,
Don Gardiner, ana I ony Gallagher
sported. Pious Paul Knox surprised
Maurice Bridge with a right jab to the
pickle, all the while screaming sweet
rhetoric in his left ear.
David Bowerman didn't want to be
in the masthead. Christine Krawczyk
and Maureen Gans sang "Hold that
Tiger" in two part harmony but
beautiful Bruce Curtis, "the people's
choice" hid behind the telex and
refused to play. Any staffers, old or
new, who miss the meeting Sunday
noon at Curtis', 2005 W 45th, will have
to answer to Maurice's typewriter.
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offering careers in
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NOVEMBER 3, 4, &5
FOR
Post Graduates 'Graduates'Undergraduates
Honours Geology
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Geophysics
Physics and Geology
Mathematics and Physics
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Permanent and summer
employment in geology
Permanent and summer
employment in geology and/or
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Permanent employment in
geophysics
Permanent employment in
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Arrangements for personal interviews
may be made through the UNIVERSITY
PLACEMENT OFFICE Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
Rankin says War Act allows power abuse
By DAVE BLAIR
Once the War Measures Act is
proclaimed, the neo-fascists start
coming out of the woodwork,
warned Vancouver alderman and
lawyer  Harry Rankin Thursday.
"Abuses of power" are taking
place, Rankin told a gathering of
students, in the law building.
Rankin drew on many
examples of the "insidious erosion
of civil liberties" that have
occurred across Canada since the
proclamation of the act last
week.
They give a most disturbing
picture of the serious side effects
of the War Measures Act that are
simply passed off by the
government as a necessary evil, he
said.
Rankin pointed out that the
problem is not limited to Quebec.
Vancouver's mayor and the
province's attorney-general have
made statements about possible
use of the act against "hippies and
dope-pushers".
A schoolteacher in Prince
George has been fired for
statements about the FLQ, he
said.
At least two university
newspapers have been seized or
censored as a result of publishers
fearing police action, said Rankin.
"For the first time there are
many who feel that they must be
at least a little careful about
expressing their opinion".
Rankin said that hundreds of
people    in    Quebec    have   been
arrested without charge, without a
hearing, or bail, and that no one
can find out their names.
He made short shrift of the
government's justification for the ■
act. He noted the government
already has unlimited right of
search power through writs of
assistance.
Other necessary powers could
have been granted within
seventy-two hours by submission
of Criminal Code revisions to
Parliament, Rankin said.
The implication of "other facts
we may never be able to disclose"
is no justification, he said.
He pointed out that two
Liberal cabinet ministers, who
must have known those facts were
conspicuous    by    their    absence
when the Commons voted on the
Act.
Rankin   said  the   promise   of
Free medical service for youth
RANKIN
A new service supplying free
medical care and consultations for
students and young people has
started in Vancouver.
Project Reach is a
comprehensive health service
supported by a variety of
agencies, including UBC.
It began as an extended form
of study for fourth year clinical
clerks enrolled in medicine at
UBC, but has been expanded
greatly over its one yea of
operations.
Classes arc now being hr i for
students in dent r y,
rehabilitation,     social        ark,
nursing and all other related fields
through the efforts of volunteer
physicians.
As an extended community
service, Project Reach has, for the
past month, been operating a
clinic for young people on a
drop-in basis. It is open every
Thursday evening to help with
any     problems,     physical     to
psychological, in strict
confidence.
The service is free, although
donations will be accepted, and
pregnancy tests are given for $2.
To get in touch with Project
Reach, call 254-1354, or drop in
at their office at 1144
Commercial any Thursday
evening.
Advance senate polls today
Advance polls for the senate elections will be held in the
education building today from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. because of the
education practicum next week.
The cannabis referendum will not be included at this time.
The regular senate elections will be on Oct. 28 and 29.
CTC funds new transport centre
A transportation studies centre has been
formed at UBC with a $360,000 grant from the
Canadian Transport Commission.
The purpose of the centre will be to encourage
and organize inter-disciplinary studies in
transportation.
UBC deputy president William Armstrong has
been appointed as acting director with a
consultative committee make up of faculty
members, representatives of federal and provincial
government transportation officials and members of
corporations within the industry advising the centre.
"Vancouver is now the largest port in the
nation." Armstrong said. "It is through Vancouver
that Canada's growing interest in Pacific rim trade is
directed."
Research projects will be directed towards total
transport systems. Some of the projects so far
include: trans-Pacific trade and shipping to the west
coast of North America using linear services and
Canadian intercity transportation.
.. liberties eroded
WMMMMMMH
reasonable application is scant
protection, and that the measure
itself is unreasonable.
"Our reasonable Prime Minister
behaved incredibly childishly in
thumbing his nose and walking
out on Mr. Diefenbaker," said
Rankin.
The present emergency is so
critical that the government of
Quebec has found it necessary to
arrest prominent members of the
Montreal Front d'Action Politique
party and seize their election
literature a week before the
Montreal civic elections, he said.
The Front is Montreal Mayor
Jean Drapeau's chief opposition,
he said. Strangely the emergency
is not thought great enough to
cause the election to be
postponed, he added.
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CHA«<5EX Friday, October 23, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
WMAct to deport U.S. man
By BRIAN JOHNSON
CANDIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
TORONTO (CUP) - Despite reassurances from
prime minister Pierre Trudeau to the contrary, police are
using the War Measures Act to deport Americans seeking
political asylum in Canada.
George Harrington, an American citizen living in
Toronto, was arrested by police here Wednesday under
the act and was told he would be extradicted to the
United States, where he faces charges resulting from last
May's protest at Kent State University against the
American invasion of Cambodia.
Harrington was living at Kent State as a
"non-student" when four students were murdered by
National Guardsmen.
"He fled to Canada last month after receiving a
subpoena from state authorities.
"And ever since, Canadian and American police have
been following me from Vancouver to Toronto,"
Harrington said.
Two Toronto police picked up Harrington at a
boutique in Yorkville Village and charged him with assault
and battery. The charge - an excuse to get Harrington
down to the station — was dropped as soon as he arrived.
"When I asked what I was being charged with, a cop
told me that under the war measures act he didn't have to
tell me anything," Harrington said. "The cop then said,
'We don't like Americans'."
Harrington said when he asked to call his attorney,
the policeman replied: "You call your attorney and I'll
kick your balls right mp your throat."
"I looked at him and he was ready to do it," said
Harrington.
Police released Harrington and told him he would be
extradicted as soon as possible.
"But since then, I've been followed everywhere I've
gone. My sister-in-law has also been watched. And there's
been a cop car outside my apartment all the time," he
said.
Police broke into and ransacked the apartment of
Harrington's girl friend Carol Grafton.
They told neighbors they were looking for a
member of the FLQ.
On the advice of his lawyer and friends and parents in
the United States, Harrington flew out of Toronto
Wednesday night to return to Ohio before he could be
extradicted.
"My main objective is to get political asylum in
Canada, but that's impossible now."
Harrington is charged in Ohio on nine counts:
First degree riot, outside agitation, intention to incite
a   riot,   inciting  a   riot,   arson,   obstruction   of justice,
assaulting a police officer, assaulting a fireman, and illegal
flight to avoid prosecution.
Eleven students are already in jail on charges arising
from the protests at Kent University and 14 more are
being sought.
Although a federal grand jury, presidential
commission and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have
found the National Guard responsible for the deaths, the
authorities have found them innocent and are charging
students and professors instead.
To protest the indictments the student government at
Kent State called Wednesday for a non-violent
moratorium by students today.
One of those indicted by the grand jury was student
president Craig Morton, who is an air force training officer
cadet.
Speaking to a student meeting Wednesday Morton
asked that students across the nation demonstrate their
unity in whatever manner they desire, whether that be
through fasts, teach-ins, rallies or other actions.
"There is only one restriction - it must be done
non-violently," Morton said.
"There are politicians in this nation who are banking
on a violent upheaval on any campus in America in order
to get themselves elected on Nov. 3. We can't give them
that opportunity."
Student apartments
using ' early-SUB'
There may be dire consequences if light-fingered UBC students
persist in decorating their apartments in early-SUB.
On Oct. 3, Constable W. Rennie, of the University R.C.M.P.
detachment, apprehended two students with SUB captain chairs while
checking cars on campus. The chairs were returned, and no charges
were laid.
On Oct. 16, a student absconded from the mechanical engineers
dance with a cafeteria chair. He was followed by Vancouver City Police
and apprehended at his girl friend's house on West 6th.
And again, the chair was returned and there were no charges laid.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Hanson Lau warns that this year
security measures are getting tighter.
If charges were laid, the person would have a permanent criminal
record, Lau said.
"Kids don't realize how serious this is. They move into a new,
unfurnished apartment and think nothing of taking a chair. It's just not
worth it. The chairs only cost about $7."
But chairs aren't the only hot items in SUB.
The cafeteria loses thousands of dollars through thefts each year,
and students have to pay for the loss.
"We've lost so many mugs and dishes that we've just lost count.
People are even walking out with food under their coats," a UBC food
services worker said Thursday.
"I would charge them even if the theft was something like two
glasses of milk. These thefts just have to stop," she said.
Meat prices drop at food services
In case you haven't noticed, it's getting
cheaper to eat meals on campus these days.
On Oct. 5 meat prices were cut in SUB, the
Ponderosa cafeteria, and Bus Stop cafeteria
(next to the bookstore).
Ruth Blair, director of food services, said
prices off campus went down on Oct. 1.
"We sign new meat contracts every three
months and always try to have prices changed,"
she said.
Roast beef, which used to cost 83 cents a
serving, now sells at 78 cents. Roast pork has
gone from 73 cents to 60 cents; pork chops
from 88 cents to 75 cents; hot pork sandwiches
from 38 cents to 36 cents; baked ham from 70
cents to 58 cents; and ham steak from 80 cents
to 58 cents.
Vegetables, sold a la carte, remain at the
same price. All vegetables are 15 cents a serving,
except potatoes, which go for 10 cents a
serving. Baked potatoes cost 15 cents.
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CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your plans for a
career in Chartered Accountancy during their annual recruiting
visit at the University of British Columbia.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1970
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1970
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4,1970
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of our Firm as
well as throughout Canada for 1971 graduates in Commerce,
Science, Arts, Engineering and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a
convenient time for a personal interview on campus or to
obtain a copy of our recruiting brochure.
If the dates of our visit do not suit your time schedule, you are
invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our Vancouver office,
at 682-7821.
Wouldn't you like
to graduate?
Saving is a lesson everyone should learn. And the
Toronto Dominion Bank is prepared to show you all
you'll ever need to know about it (incidently, it's a very
rewarding subject).
Once you understand what Saving is all about, we'll
show you a couple of things about Chequing and
Borrowing (we've got our Masters in making Student
Loans). There's no enrollment fee. Simply visit a near-by
branch and open an account.
Do it soon. It's the kind of thing you can take an
interest in for the rest of your life.
Toronto Dominion
the bank where people make the difference Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
NDPer raps B.C. colony,
Socred 'trained seals'
By JUDY McLEOD
B.C. does not run its own
economy, says Vancouver-East
MLA Bob Williams.
Speaking to about 100 people
in    SUB    auditorium   Thursday
BOB WILLIAMS
. . . "new sacred cows"
noon, Williams said B.C. is in the
grip of foreign control, alienation
and monopoly situation in which
public resources have been turned
over to a few decision-makers.
Williams was one of four
political party representatives
speaking at noon.
He spoke of the "new sacred
cows" in society.
The university is a new church,
a determiner of status and a cause
of alienation, he said.
Williams also said the sacred
cow of the "doctor
establishment" in the province's
health service should be dealt
with.
Vancouver-Burrard Socred
MLA Harold Merilees agreed with
most of Williams' statements,
pointing out the inadequacy of
health, education and welfare
services despite the vast resources
he claimed are spent on them.
Merilees said there is a need for
management, labor and the
government to sit down together
to solve labor problems.
Provincial Liberal leader Pat
McGeer turned to the question of
the Front de Liberation du
Quebec and the problem of
dealing with the tactics of
confrontation in Canada.
He said the way democracy is
maintained in Canada will depend
largely on the way the current
situation is handled.
Progressive Conservative
John DeWolf, whose party is not
represented in the legislature,
picked up on the FLQ point.
He said there is a need for "a
nation sufficiently dedicated to its
goals so that terrorism will find no
place."
The federal government must
come up with a policy, he said, to
deal with this type of problem
PAT McGEER
. . . turned to question
should it arise again.
The pollution problem received
most attention during the
question period.
When Merilees was asked if he
would do something about the
problem in the coming legislative
session, he said he would like to,
but his power was limited by
being a "mere backbencher".
Both Williams and McGeer
jumped on the government's lack
of action on air pollution.
Williams pointed out that
backbenchers can take real action
on such questions if they make
the effort instead of being
"trained seals of the premier".
Nudists gather for support
The Free Beach Defense is trying to retain Gun
Tower Beach as a liberated area for nudists.
Philosophy teaching assistant Mark Battersby,
organizer of the Free Beach Defense, is appealing
for legal and financial support.
Complaints this summer from people in the
university endowment lands prompted the arrest of
several nude bathers for indecent exposure. The
conviction of bather Sheila Beaupre by Judge
Fergusson of the University Magistrate Court will
probably be used as a precedent for other related
decisions.
Don Rosenblaum, a young lawyer, has assumed
legal representation of those convicted.
"We have potential support of the nudist
colonies and hope to realize support on campus,"
said Battersby.
"The fact behind the convictions is that they
are based on a law which was originally directed to
perverts.
"If  the  community   is   really   uptight about
nudity an applicable law must be devised. The
weather and not selective enforcement of the law
will keep bathers away."
The Free Beach Defense Fund has been
established to cover the legal costs and fines of
those arrested and convicted.
The Free Beach Defense is urging all interested
people to come to a meeting Tuesday, Oct. 27 in
the philosophy common room in west mall annex.
Robens begins lecture series
Dr. A. Robens, a. senior psychologist with
Metropolitan Health Services of Greater Vancouver
will speak at 8 p.m., Nov. 3, in the British Columbia
Teachers' Association auditorium, Sixth and
Burrard.
Robens' topic will be the social implications
for children with learning disabilities at home, at
school, and in the community.
This is the first of a two-part series sponsored
by the Vancouver Association for Children With
Learning Disabilities.
HURRY!     Attention English 200
Shakespeare's
TWELFTH NIGHT
( ALL MALE PRODUCTION )
NOV. 13-21       8:30 p.m.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
STUDENTS-$1.00 - Box Office -  Room 207
* There are very few tickets left for the scheduled performances but a holdover is planned. U.B.C.
students are urged to purchase tickets as soon as possible as there are many requests for tickets from
the high schools. Any seats not sold to U.B.C. students by Oct. 26 will be made available to high
schools.
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Abstract
A lot of space this week is taken up with book reviews
and articles. That's because we think the people and the
books involved are important. John Newlove, for instance,
is easily one of the most important influences on
contemporary Canadian poetry today. His books have won
wide acclaim and his poems have been reproduced in
translation all over the world. He's coming here and we
think it's important that anyone interested in seeing him
gets the chance.
Charlie Leeds' book is interesting on both a literary
and social level. Charlie has spent most of his adult life in
one jail or another and when he wasn't in jail, he was
playing music — jazz — and many musicians considered him
one of the best bass players of the day. He is currently
serving 9-13 on a drug conviction. His is a very weird book,
and it is a weird but beautiful departure for Prism
International Press to bring it out.
Also reviewed in this issue is J. Michael Yate's new
book Great Bear Lake Meditations. It's not so much a
review really as an observance. It's a good book and breaks
new ground in the ongoing study of the northern wilderness
which intrigues men everywhere.
The rest of this issue is poetry. Poetry from very
different kinds of people and very different points of view.
Below on this page is one poem which may interest many
UBC students who have been following the crisis facing the
residents of the Jericho Hostel. Just before the students
turned down a request two weeks ago to turn SUB over as a
hostel to these people, hostel staffer Teddy Mahood wrote
this poem. It is a real attempt at real communication,
something not often doen at universities:
-F. CAWSEY
EDITOR
In Old Jerusalem
Life was a circle
Life was a turtle
And about to curdle
Perhaps I should see
Perhaps there's me
Perhaps I can be
In Jericho I could be me
In Jericho I could be free?
Along the way
Terrible Tom Terrier
A night-stick mace carrier
Set up His Barrier
PLEASE MAY I SEE
PLEASE LISTEN TO ME
PLEASE LET ME BE
I JUST WANT TO LEARN AND BE
I'M NOT HERE TO BURN THEE
0 HELP ME PLEASE
Brother of the cloth
Shake off the moths
Remember what he taught
BLESSED TRY TO SEE
BLESSED SEE TO ME
BLESSED HELP ME
BLESSED HELP ME BE
UNORTHODOX though I may be
Is the kingdom supposed to be free?
Try to understand
Learned one & please see
1 want a full P.H.D.
Classrooms may be, but at a fee
Please students we try to see
Please students see all of me
As lessons are learned
Is ignorance burned?
As knowledge is earned
Is conscience turned?
The Samaritans Love
Is not learned
Is not earned
Is not turned
Is not right
Is not left
Is not old
Is not young
It just is.
Jaddif Vnohood
synch  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,   1970 Poetry
The Cluck Beforehand
up there condors coo
if you look down beware
here one cymbal in still air
and the ground is shaking
white fingers in my mouth
are chickens necking
over the nest and out
their coop is flocking south
I'll wind up in Liverpool
with a bellyful of crow
crow's feet and crow's soul
and a crow tattoo
(David _}ma&
The Bark Is One-Half the Bite
so they say, not noticing
the box of plum trees on the perch.
& inside the hand I imagine Picasso
bulb-white thru a blindfold:
he is easier done than said, line-in lightning
already hurled at 20th century backwardness,
a cold bath in a sleep-broken appetite
for dove meat and hot toddy.
A shaggy blue dog comes out
of the box, shaking off static.
He gets in the way of
the moving men's curse; I
close the door. My hand itches
for a pull at yesterday's jug.
& every early orchard in a week
I want to invest a rapist
with a tongue, uncanny memories of smell
around his knees like a rope. Flea-wise,
he will not leap
across the black roofs to potential
postmen in plastic slickers
but will bake his oceanic hunger
with an apple between his cheeks
& send the recipe to his congressman.
Well, little handful! Go ahead, I can wait
while you catch up. Only clouds escape form.
Just don't stand too long, a pencil
on the same sketchy panic,
a thin cigar in baggy pants full
of piss and steamed Picasso.
The world's not big enough for gentleness
or the idiocy of miniature myth
on a three-cent memorial stamp.
Listen, I have mythologised myself.
Last night I could even walk
backwards on razors, Orpheus among blossoms
with the blues. Around me hair took root
like willow in a swamp of dough; I kept
reaching for more paper
under the pillow, losing
myself in a soft snarl of wire.
I woke the poltergeist in the basement
with a two-legged bark, while overhead
the other forms of unreal mimicry
pattered into morning ampersands.
Did I say mythologised? I meant
reported missing with a heavy-duty dream
& woman.hounding the pounds for a parsley-colored bite.
(David _laiiA
(David Zaiss is a graduate student in Creative Writing at UBC. His
poems have appeared in major poetry quarterlies throughout Canada
and the U.S., including Poetry (Chicago).
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
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for that smart look in glasses ...
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CATCH-22
I IS THE MOST MOVING, MOST
ft INTELLIGENT, THE MOST HU-
' MANE-0HJ0 HELL WITH IT!
-IT'S THE BEST AMERICAN
FILM I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!
rt
—Vincent Canty, M. f. Timet
"IT'S ONE HELL OF A FILM! A
. COLD SAVAGE AND CHILLING
COMEDY! Firmly establishes
Nichols' place in the front rank
of American directors. Alan
Arkin's finest screen performance to date. 'CATCH-22' would
be an important event in any
mOVie  year. "-Bruce W./I.amson   PLAYBOY
'"CATCH-22* says many things
that need to be said again and
again! Alan Arkin's performance as Yossarian is great!"
-Joseph Mofgenslern. NfWSrVCCK
PHRAM0UN1 PICTURES COHPtlBiniON IN *SS0C1«1I0N W1IH [IIHTWTS IK PHISHIS
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALANARKIN
\,9* BUSf D ON THE NOVEL B
JOSEPH HELLER*
MARTIN BALSAM. RICHARD BENJAMIN; ARTHUR GARFUNKEL, JACK GILFORD; BOCK HENRY, BOB NEWHART;
ANTHONY PERKINS, PAULA PRENTISS, MARTIN SHEEN, J0NV0IGHT8 ORSOIM WELLES AS0R™
SCREENPLAY BY BUCK HENRY PRODUCED BY JOHN CALLEY 8 MARTIN RANSOHOFF DIRECTED BY MIKE NICHOLS
WARNING — Scenes of
nudity, disgust and violence.
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
STANLEY  733-2622
GRANVILLE AT 12rh AVE.
PMCTIMSICNfft KMNSMflll ItCMWOlM *- MMWSIOM '
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER 18
Evenings — 7:20, 9:30
Mat. Sat., Sun. 2:00 p.m.
Friday,  October  23,   1970
THE       UBYSSEY
synch   3 Reading
John Newlove
John Newlove, one of the great contemporary voices in
Canadian poetry, brings himself and his poems here next
Thursday in the first poetry reading of the year at UBC.
At 8 p.m., Oct. 29 in Henry Angus 104 the voice and
author of seven books of poetry will present his wry sensibility to
all those interested in what's happening in poetry today.
Newlove recently moved from B.C. to Toronto where he is
working as a senior editor for McClelland and Stewart publishing
company. He has had poems published and broadcast or recorded
in Canada, the U.S., England, France, Mexico, Romania,
Germany, India and Australia. His work has appeared in
numerous anthologies, including Contemporary Poetry of British
Columbia, The Penguin Book of Canadian Verse and Modern
Canadian Verse.
He is currently at work on a new book of poems titled,
Lies.
The reading is the first in a series of readings to be
sponsored this year by the Creative Writing Department.
(The Cave; by John Newlove; McClelland and Stewart, Toronto;
$4.95)
In 1966, John Newlove came to the high school I was
attending. John Newlove? Like most of the people in the school,
I didn't have a clue who he was. They said he was going to read
his poetry. I still didn't know who the hell he was, so I didn't go.
On Thursday he will come to read at UBC and this time I'll
make a point of listening. Since 1966, Newlove has received some
Canad Council grants, published two fine books and sold his
personal papers to a university at what most people would think
is an outrageous price. He has been acclaimed as one of the most
sensitive and dedicated Canadian poets and has recently been
hired by McLelland and Stewart as a senior editor.
One of the reasons for this recognition is The Cave,
Newlove's latest volume. It's a good book. Between the covers,
you can join Newlove — who spent the last several years living in
B.C. — in experiencing virtually every kind of emotion. It's a
book that moves like a butterfly, witty, sardonic, self mocking.
Consider Early in May:
"Early in May my flesh shines
As if it were blessed.
A quick kiss on the neck
does it."
And it is also a book that moves happy but tired old man,
like Song Of The Man Who Just Came In To Say He Wouldn't Be
Getting A Telegram For Money:
"There's nothing decent
to look at on T.V.
I'm going into the bathroom
to cut my wrists.
You can have
the rest of the beer."
And it's a book that can take you on a little journey, with
fine language, sensitivity, and appreciation and disgust with life as
vehicles. The Cave is a very readable book of very readable
poems. Newlove reading them should prove an even better
experience. Think about The Cave, hearing it, aloud:
-MIKE FINLAY
The Cave
The stars are your death-bed.
You rest from the cave
to Pluto or whatever dark planets
lie beyond. No ideas trap you.
In the unobstructed sunlight miles high
the Earth is beautiful as a postcard.
Sinai looks as the map says it should,
and people are too small to be observed.
In Africa there are no trees to see.
It is a map world.
The sunlight is brilliant
as a two-carat diamond on a girl's hand.
The girl is young, visible to your mind,
growing older. Beyond Pluto
and the darkest planets, children surround her.
The diamonds glows on her finger
like a worm. The stars, the stars
shine like one-carat diamonds. Beyond
Pluto and the darkest planets the stars shine.
The diamonds shine in wormy rings
on fingers, in coffins of unobstructed space.
The flesh circles the bone in strips
in the coffin as the ring circled flesh.
The two-carat sun hangs loosely,
just restraining the Earth. Beyond the planets,
beyond the dark coffin, beyond the ring of stars,
your bed is in the shining, tree-lit cave.
synch  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  23,   1970 Poetry
Titleless
There's been a car sitting,
out front all day. It doesn't
seem to have moved an inch.
I think it must be parked.
£aU (papAdoAtf.
(Eric Papsdorf is student No. 6903663 at UBC. His was one of the
few legible replies to our request for manuscripts.)
Cycles
Waged seige, long drawn seige, sets.
No ill-willed wind to Agamemnon blows
as Odysseus' wandering craft attests.
Home, upon palace steps, loved wife in silk folds
found Agamemnon's hand and held
his hand and heart near her heart
in close embrace, fast and false embrace,
upon throng girded steps.
She, deceptive as father, when
in feathered from, Leda he left,
womb warm with death.
That death, that swan-fathered child's
cycle matures — engendered in
Leda's shuddering loins - full circle.
Three Furious forms fly,
mauling memories of Orestes' mind.
His cycle full circle —
from every sin comes fresh sin's cry.
/S/ajard JCtwx
One Bitter Bite
For one bitter bite, for one bite
did all this thorn and thistle
thrive through time?
For a crunch the serpent's slither styled, belly-bound
to dine on dust,
and forked flicker to hit the heel and heel
to hit the head.
And first women's way the lesser now, for men
shall she serve:
for one bitter bite—inequality eternally.
Conception's child conceived in sorrow
and Adam's sod in sorrow sewn,
raised, ripened, beaten, eaten
in God sent sorrow's home.
Dust to dust — toiling dawn to dusk reminds.
For one bitter bite — death is dealt.
For one bitter bite paradise lost,
and Cherubim sentry wings
keep tree of life's way
alive life's length.
Does not the flaming sword
see sin in sorrow's name?
What God for Nature's arm
knits strong a steel sleeve.
Bmpani JOvox
(Bryant Knox is a Simon Fraser University undergraduate in English.
His studies have led him to experiment in more classical forms of
poetry.)
Praise for a Circle
The tense January light
Streaked hard-blue across the snow
And into the core of darkness
Like a ptarmigan
Gone over the crest.
Now this moon-walk home
Through a long ruin of snow-broken shapes.
As I descend the last drifted slope,
A net of pines receives the moon,
A circle of eyes I cannot see
Howls a long silence beneath
My breath.
U}.(D. lAhich
Record
The millstone of the moon
Turns upon the hill.
Pieces of shale
Arch out
And down.
Water twists
A new scar.
The wheel spins.
A wind crashes
Across fields
And around trees.
The body of silence
Is seen.
iO.O. Wjuxh
Ulla
Another sun
Heats the glass.
I sound the deepest crowds
For her voice.
Days are too long
That disintegrate
In light and silence.
What is she
That filled
These rooms?
On the wall,
Calendar and clocks.
The one records seasons
As if they were shorter.
Its notations fall from me
Like leaves falling from their trees
As the air freezes.
On remains
All winter.
r~
(0.4). WAich
(W. D. Ulrich is a UBC graduate student in Creative Writing.)
Friday, October 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
synch  5 This
is the man
with no name.
Danger fits
him like a tight
black glove!
A FiSIfUl
SfBOUARS
is the first motion
picture of its kind.
It wont be the last!
CUNIfUIWDOft
IHSIHILSfDOUMOJU
a SUB Film Soc. Presentation
Fri. 23 & Sat. 24
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 25
7:00
Students 50c
Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM
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Boohs
Tillie's Punctured
Romance
(Charlie Leeds: Tillie's Punctured Romance, Prism
International & November House (Vancouver 1970),
$5.95.)
This is a Charlie Leeds production, and it's a
wild, bitter, weirdly humorous collection of fictions.
Soldier, drug addict, jazz musician, convict, writer:
no matter how you look at it, Leeds is a virtuoso, and
Tillie's Punctured Romance is full of his poetic
improvisations on religion, love movies and show
business. "I made it up," Charlie says. "It's my
movie, Baby, and whoever I want to put in it, I put in
it." And that's just what he does.
In the title piece, which comes from Chaplin's
first feature film, Noah docks the ark in Atlantic
City. He squats next to Charlie on the Chelsea
Avenue beach and raps about that weird thing he's
been through with the animals and God, who "just
sits up there on His Ass, thinking up nutty things to
do." Yes, Leeds is comic, yet beneath the humor,
there's an under-current off grey desperation that
makes his odyssey not black, not white, but
definitely his own.
Generally, Leeds' pace is electronic. But there are
times when the upper-case type get in the way of the
language, and the slang and jive get a bit too
artsy-fartsy-jazzy. In "The Love Song if Rotten
Calabrese" for example, John says:
"Just as I THOUGHT! You went back THERE,
didn't you? Oh how COULD you? How COULD
you, when - when you-knew-so-WELL!?"
But because it's a spoof on "love songs" (among
other things), because Prufrock — John comes off as a
goofball freak pontificating in accents of W. C. Fields,
Leeds scores once again.
The shorter pieces in this extravaganza vary in
form from short prose poems to an "obscene letter."
Toward the end of the book, the style become more
epistolary, and the great movie flashes though the last
of its montages: someone called Texas shouts Hello
Sucker from the top of a church steeple, and George
Raft heads down the boardwalk, perhaps, for the
Steel Pier.
-R. W. STEDINGH
synch  6
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday,  October  23,   1970 KEV'S AUTOMOTIVE
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Great Bear Lake Meditations
Alcohol is what this village died of. When they made the
pubs legal for indians, they got in their boats and headed
for the mainland, every one of them, right down to the last
clootch and papoose. A wind of silence blows across the
point, broken only by the seething clouds of black flies
which rise out our steps in the deep grass. Or religion.
Maybe they were dying of religion anyway. Look at that
church. The church, the broad-axed cabins, and the
smoke-houses have weathered well. But the grass and weeds
are pulling this clearing back into the bush. They left
every thing-haying equipment, tools, horses, dogs nets,
boats—everything they couldn't take in one trip. Nobody
much has been here in ten of fifteen years. In the
chartreuse light between two cabins, a fat white horse stares
at us, undecided, then gallops up the mountain through the
high growth of the hay-fields toward the pines. A man
could make a good ski-resort on that slope, with a little
backing. But it's reservation; even though they don't live
here anymore, it's still reservation land. Over there's the
cemetery; the black flies would be even worse there. We
push off past the fossils of boats whose prows are just
visible between waves.
9
These are the poisoning grounds, here where the birds nest
at the northern terminus of the long flight. It would be
hard to see from the air, if planes flew in this direction. The
reek of carrion is overwhelming. Bones and flesh are
dissolving into the earth. Only the feathers live on beyond
the rest of living—the things that made them fly. There are
few flies or other insects; presumably they die too like the
foxes and shrews whose skeletons have joined those of the
ducks and geese. The occasional moose or bear blunders
here. After the long, slow death is over and the sea-flats
have received these fauna and flora, what are these shadow
shapes inside me stepping through putrefied grounds with
their bags of quill and down?
O
(The Great Bear Lake Meditations; by J. Michael Yates;
Oberon Press; $5.95 hardbound, $2.95 softbound.)
The Great Bear Lake Meditations is J. Michael Yates'
fifth volume of writing. It is a book about the north, about
wilderness which both surrounds and permeates the minds
of all who venture there. It is a continuation of the war
between the nothing and the nothingness which Yates has
pursued through Hunt in an Unmapped Interior and
Canticle for Electronic Music. The writings contained
herein may be poems or they may be fictions; the label is
not important. What is important is the bold power, so well
honed, articulated, and which has made Yates' presence felt
in recent years on the Canadian literary scene.
The tv/o excerpts above are better than a description. It
could, as a poet once said, only be in worser English.
The Great Bear Lake Meditations is available at the UBC
Bookstore and the Creative Writing Department in South
Brock.
-F.C.
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Friday, October 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
synch  7 WE'LL MAKE IT EASY FOR YOU:::
In the space at the right, write Synch
a poem, or a letter or even an aphorism.
Then drop it in the campus mail or
bring it to: ROOM 241 - K
SUB
If we like what you send us we'll print
it. If we don't, you get a full year's
subscription to Synch — FREE!!
Don't feel restricted, however, to
the space provided; if you want to
try something longer use your own
paper. Won't that be fun?
If you're about to graduate, you're also about
to move into a corporate world dominated by older
people. Older people have been known to get quite
tense about long hair and beards.
What do you do if your hair is longer than
theirs? Cut it off and feel like a cop out? Leave it and
risk losing a fine job?
Not shattering questions. But they may be
part of a thicket of little problems, all twitching at you
as you start those job interviews.
We wrote a booklet about going to job interviews. Eight pages only, but we packed it with what
we've learned about coming face to face with strangers. The thrust is simple: how to approach, engage
in and leave an interview on your own terms.
It's called "How to separate yourself from
the herd." It talks about handling nervousness,
money, and the guy across the desk from you. It
talks about hair and how to turn an interview around.
Things like that.
You'll find it tucked into a much larger book,
also new, called The Employment Opportunities
Handbook. The handbook is yours for the asking at
the placement office.
Please understand, though. We don't kid
you that eight pages, packed or otherwise, are going
to pull off a miracle between now and the time you
take your first interview.
But they just might help.
UteONVE
InsuranceCompany^ondor^Canada
synch  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  23,   1970 Friday, October 23, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Developers try for endowment  lands
Better watch out, UBC,
Vancouver is coming to get you.
That is the theory behind the
organization of a Society for
Pollution and Environmental
.Control chapter at UBC.
"Perhaps the greatest aspect of
this university is its natural
setting. There are forests, beaches,
and lots of little places where
students can go to get away from
it all," said SPEC organizer David
Bouehm to about 50 people in
SUB 211, Thursday.
"These are certainly worth
protecting," he said.
The   city   of   Vancouver   is
expanding on its last frontiers, he
said.
"There is little developable
land left anywhere near the city,
and the city's actions within the
last ten years are certainly an
indication of its intentions,
Bouehm said.
"About ten years ago, the city
began its plans for development of
a four lane highway connecting
Marine Drive with Forty-First
Avenue. Several years later this
was accomplished, with little
dismay from anyone.
"It improved traffic conditions
for the morning and evening rush
to and from classes, but destroyed
countless vegetation, and easily
facilitated the present
development of Musqueam Park
residential area, on formerly UBC
endowment lands."
He cited Sixteenth Avenue
extension as another example of
endowment lands being taken
over by futuristic city developers.
"That gravel road system
linking Sixteenth Avenue, Marine
Drive, and Wesbrook Crescent is
destroying more forest and what
little natural wildlife is still left."
"The small number of cars that
Zaozirny s parting shot:
'AMS virtually powerless'
John Zaozirny resigned as
Alma Mater Society external
affairs officer last week because
he no longer believes that the
AMS can make changes on
campus or in the community
beyond the campus.
"The AMS has virtually no
power to change the academic
sphere or the external
community," Zaozirny said in a
letter to The Ubyssey, Thursday.
"The   only  people   that   gain
from     the     AMS     are     the
-administration    and    the    AMS
student-administrators-in-training.
"The administration needs the
AMS. It lends legitimacy to their
decision-making processes, it
permits them to slap the student
seal of approval on their
decisions."
"Hell, the administration
doesn't ask the AMS about
anything, they tell them,"
Zaozirny said.
"The AMS can pass motions
and argue about whether it should
demand action or request action
by the administration and/or the
board of governors, but that
doesn't change anything.
"The power is not vested in
students and the AMS record
speaks for itself."
He said the only real power in
a student union is derived from
numbers. And given the
complacent attitude of students at
UBC, that means no power at all.
"The AMS will continue
running around building a bigger
and better SUB, putting out bush
fires like the Jericho Hostel —
SUB situation and appearing to
negotiate with the
administration."
The AMS is damn fine
adminstiative training, but what a
poor reason for a compulsory
organization said Zaozirny.
"The administration could run
SUB at least as efficiently as it's
being operated now; the students
pay the tab either way.
I'm not calling for a
non-compulsory union, because
apparently a lot of students want
Insurance uncertain
From page One
holders that there is little chance
the War Measures Act would
cancel property insurance
protection.
But it appears that if a
company can prove that damage is
due to "insurrection" then
coverage can be denied.
The government has referred to
the situation as an "apprehended
insurrection." A spokesman for
the Ontario Insurance Agents
Association said it was the "grey
area between a full fledged
insurrection and the pint-sized
variety "which the insurance
agents want to explore.
Wednesday saw a tightening of
■ security   in   Ottawa.   Guards   at
public    buildings    began    asking
employees   they  had  seen  every
day for years for their passes.
In addition, more machine-gun
toting troops were moved into the
city from Camp Petawawa, 90
miles north of Ottawa.
More than 500 troops were
moved into the city about 10 days
ago, just after the Laporte
kidnapping.
Minister John Munro told
reporters that maybe one day the
public would find out why the
government felt it had to impose
the war measures act. But, then
again, maybe it wouldn't.
A document romoured to be
.an impetus for Ottawa's actions is
a secret report by Montreal police
warning of an impending
insurrection. Although none of
the "Canadian people" have been
allowed to see the report - in fact
its very existence has yet to be
confirmed — it very likely
resembles the one and one half
inch think brief that Montreal
mayor Jean Drapeau submitted to
the government last year.
That brief asked the
government to set up a royal
commission to investigate various
left wing groups because they
were trying to foment revolution
on government money.
The report charged that
volunteers for the Company of
Young Canadians were involved in
planning anti-government
protests. Soon after, Ottawa
quietly withdrew its CYC projects
in French speaking areas of
Quebec.
While the French press has
condemned the FLQ, it has also
described the French in Quebec as
an oppressed people, exploited by
an Anglo-Saxon establishment.
Wednesday the Gaullist
newspaper La Nation ran an
editorial which commented that
as deplorable as Laporte's death
was, perhaps the crisis would
unify Quebecois to fight for
Quebec's destiny.
And Quebec's destiny, it made
clear, was not as a part of
confederation.
a student run service station and
there are always enough bodies to
fill the council chairs."
Zaozirny said he didn't like
quitting but he decided it would
be grossly dishonest to continue
his term.
He said he was surprised that
AMS president, Tony Hodge
announced his resignation as
"personal reasons."
"Perhaps he thought my letter
would be damaging to the AMS."
Zaozirny said the program
initiated in external-affairs would
be completed.
"My departure merely
necessitates filling one position,
not starting from scratch."
travel that road each day,
certainly does not warrant that
kind of destruction," Bouehm
said.
He cited the major problem as
control of endowment land
administration.
In the 1930's, the provincial
government offered to turn
control over to the UBC
administration, who refused the
offer, saying "they had enough to
worry about running the
university, without hassling over a
lot of useless land."
The provincial government has
not made a similar offer since.
"Perhaps by forming an action
group on campus, we can pressure
administration to re-consider its
decision," he said.
"We must take the
responsibility of evaluating future
development proposals according
to their environmental status and
immediate needs. What we don't
need is another Musqueam Park."
"If we don't show concern and
try and prevent this mindless
expansion, future city
developments and incorporation
into the city of Vancouver itself
are inevitable."
He suggested the chapter get
started on a project to plot the
history of the endowment lands,
and  to  try  and formulate new
proposals as to its future.
"The notorious problem of
erosion of the cliffs below Fort
Camp is something big we should
be working on right now," said
Bouehm.
"City planners want to put a
road down there, which would
effectively prevent its erosion, but
would just as effectively destroy
its scenic beauty as well," he said.
"This is something which must
be prevented," he said.
He further condemned usage of
land at UBC almost fifty per cent
of it is being used for parking lots,
he said.
"Instead of organizing more
teach-ins and rallys, it's time we
started activating, and coming up
with concrete proposals which can
back up our philosophies," said
Bouehm.
Vancouver SPEC organizer and
UBC prof Robin Harger, said,
"when SPEC first started there
was a big scare about
'environmental collapse'."
"The scare may have died
down in light of other crises, but
the reasons for it have not."
Students interested in joining
the UBC group are asked to call
the SPEC central office at
876-4131, or drop in at 44 West
Sixth Avenue.
SPEAKEASY    SPEAKEASY
We have confidential
answers to questions on:
birth control
tenant rights
abortion
legal problems
money
We also have friendly
people to talk to.
SEE US in Room 234, SUB from 10:00 a.m. to
8:30 p.m. every weekday.
CALL US at 228-3700
WRITE US at Box 115, SUB, Campus Mail.
"SPEAKEASY  SPEAKEASY
'THE PIT9
IS OPEN
S.U.B. PARTY ROOM
Tuesday & Thursday
4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
No Membership with Current A.M.S. Card Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
DAVIES RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Campus blatherings
More general irreverence . . .
• One has to wonder at the
validity of the campus classroom
reporting in The Ubyssey. Not
because it is overly flippant or
harsh, but because the profs come
up with "new improved" lectures
whenever the familiar face of
Ubyssey staffer Leslie Plommer
appears among the class.
The latest report, on
Geography 371, taught by one
James Claus illustrates my point.
Claus phoned Plommer the night
after the report was published,
and said during subsequent
lengthy discussion in the faculty
club that he knew the review was
coming.
There have been three letters
written to The Ubyssey since the
review complaining that the
lecture was unrepresentatively
good. (Good?).
• A mention in this column
a week ago stated there were
petitions circulation demanding
the recall of neAvly-elected (by
acclamation) Alma Mater Society
ombudsman Hamish Earle.
These petitions have
apparently submerged for the
time being (awaiting another
blunder), however, there are
several petitions around
demanding new AMS
vice-president Mr. Scott-Mitchell
be recalled.
I have personally seen over 100
names on these petitions, 500
being tire number needed for
recall.
• Two AMS executives (one
past, one present), have also been
under fire lately.
Christine Krawczyk, ex-AMS
v.p. received a phone call from
somebody identifying himself as
RCMP and demanding to know
what connection she has with the
FLQ.
Hanson Lau, AMS
co-ordinator, has been receiving
several notes from AMS president
Tony Hodge reminding him of his
duties.
• Letters concerning
Ubyssey editor Nate Smith's
editorial drawing comparison
between Nazi Germany and War
Measures Act Canada have been
overwhelmingly against this
sentiment.
A revolutionary spirit at UBC?
Hardly.
• At the final civic politics
selection meeting held by the
NDP , tonight, look for
ex-Mackenzie NDP MLA
(1952-66) Tony Gargrave to take
the mayoralty bid.
• The grand re-opening of
the Georgia Pub provided quite a
study in contrasts. The sitting on
the floor, dancing, and wearing of
Mickey Mouse T-Shirts by
Ubyssey staffers didn't go over
very well with the
white-shirt-and-tie set present.
Mayor Tom Terrific, who had
been invited to the debacle was
advised to stay at home by the
pub manager during a hasty phone
call.
The Georgia a haven for
students? Not right now. The
stock-broker, junior-executive,
purple-panty-hose set has taken
over the premises, making the
clientele rather similar to the
swingers who hang out at the
Ritz, Devonshire, and Windmill
pubs.
Meanwhile, no campus pub for
UBC students.
• "Why don't you crap on
frats again," a colleague of mine
inquired during the height of the
Rush Activities.
The reason? There's no need; I
couldn't do a better job on them
than they're doing to themselves.
Case in point. The latest
edition of The Shield, the Phi
Kappa Psi national magazine,
which features three gun-toting
Phi Si navy pilots grinning on the
cover, features such articles as:
"Modern-Day  Campus Attilas or
Lapidary Displays & Demonstrations, Hand Crafted Jewelry,
Carving, Faceting, Crystals, Artifacts, Fossils, Dealers
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Friday, Oct. 23
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Saturday, Oct. 24
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 25
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Adults $1.25
HOURLY DOOR PRIZES
MAIN PRIZE JADE BRACELET
Students 75c Children 6-16 25c
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iOQQOOQOOOOflOQOQODOQQGPDPQPOW
Dance Oct. 31
SUB BALLROOM
9:00
SPRING
12:30
SDS in Action" by J. Edgar
Hoover, "The Long Lost
Brother", and the ever popular
"The Politics of Hazing".
My favorite article was,
however, the special two-page
feature, "Statement of
Obligations".
Excerpt: "Finally, you should
understand that no one has a right
to join Phi Kappa Psi. Membership
is a rare privilege and an honor.
We owe it to our brothers to
repay them for the honor of
brotherhood, which they have
conferred upon us, by submerging
our own personal wishes and
desires in the will of the majority
of our brothers, so that the
Fraternity may speak with one
voice in supporting the ideals of
our Founders, the principles of
our Fraternity, and our
commitments in the service of our
membership to our sheltering
institutions, and to the world in
which we live."
Egad.
• Important news picture
and item of the week from the
same rag:
Mississippi Alpha pledge Kent Doyle has
been named Greek God at the University
of Mississippi.
BUY NOW AND SAVE
FIRST AND ONLY Vancouver Concert Appearance
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group consists of rock quintet, string quartet
and brass quartet (13 in all)
& $42,500 worth of sound equipment
Music in the "Chicago" tradition
Monday, Nov. 2 - 8 p.m
UBC War Memorial Gym
$1.50 (Student advance) - $2.50 (Student at door)
$3.00 (Non-student)
Tickets at: Information Desk in the
Student Union Building; (8 A.M.-10P.M.)
A.M.S. Business Office (10 A.M.-4 P.M.)
For further information call 228-3708
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Age    Male G   Female Q
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Date first licensed to drive    -
Give number and dates of accident In last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
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Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
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One way driving distance
Is car used in business
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a
tfl Friday, October 23, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   19
C/Mxal ODEOIM
ITS A MAD, MAD, MAD, ,TS ™ B,GGEST
MAD WORLD"
Vogue I NEwwBst
ENTERTAINMENT
EVER TO ROCK THE SCREEN
WITH LAUGHTER!
Vl> WKANVIUE
«t3-5434
Vogue: 12:00, 1:35, 3:35
5:30, 7:25, 9:25
New West: Fri. & Sat. 6:15, 9:00
Matinees: Sat. & Sun. 2:00
CiWrf   WARN?NG•,,kP•r^,,l,,,,  CHary
MUCH  SWEARING
COARSE LANGUAGE AND __ .-
SIMULATED SEXUAL SCENES.  B.C. Director tlOUSGWlffl
off a mad
Odeon
Ml   GRANVILLE
682-7465
Show Times: 1 2:00, 1 :35
3:35, 5:30, 7:25: 9:25
Sunday: 2:00, 3:35, 5:30, 7:25, 9:25
YOU MUST SEE THIS FILM!"
JACK -,
- Richard Schickel, Life
NICHOLSON
FIVE
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Coronet
| Show Times: 12:10, 2:05
    3:55, 5:50, 7:45, 9:40
851   GRANVILLE        Sunday: 2:05, 3:55
685-6828 5:50,7:45,9:40
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNIAR at 30th
Warning: nudity, sex and
hrutullty.      —B.C.  Director
C&&.
Oliver Reed     *     Alan Bates
"WOMEN IN LOVE" Color
Show Times: 7:30, 9:30
CAMBIE at 18th   ""
876-2747
frequent ivearin* and very
coarM lanjuaft.
-B.C. Censor
Show Times:
7:30, 9:30
DONAkO SUTHERLAND
ELLIOTT GOULD
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4375 W. 10th
FELLINI SATYRICON
(English Subtitles)
Show Times: 7:30, 9:40
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"An exceptionally fine movie, quiet, lyrical,
bawdy, funny and sad.'!i
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4JS-3112
Time Magazine
Show Times:
7:30,  9:30
—daryl tan photo
THE SHIPWRECKED crew of a North Calamantan navy aircraft carrier? Quebec separatists on the
look-out for Trudeau'sarmy? Not quite. It's the mime troupe Les Jeunes Comediens performing in the
SUB auditorium Wednesday noon.
THE DOLPHIN THEATRE     proudly presents
A DECADE OF CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
WINNERS
Sunday 2 p.m.
Dolphin Theatre
299-3703
'LA GUERRE EST FINIE"
1966 Jury Prize Winner
directed by: Alan Resnais
Tickets Now On Sale For . . .
DR. WON-KYUNG CHO
KOREA'S GREATEST ARTISTE
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TUESDAY—NOV. 3
Dr. Cho in a Korean Dance program. Return visit
after a fantastic success 2 years ago. 8 P.M.
WEDNESDAY—NOV. 4
Dr. Cho in a poetry Recital, "Secret Yearning".
Seldom heard readings from Korean Poetry. A new
Sound experience.
| STUDENT UNION BUILDING AUDITORIUM — 8 P.M. |
PRICES FOR BOTH EVENINGS - Students (in advance), $1.50
Students (at the door) $2.50; Non Students $3.00.
AVAILABLE AT: Student Union Building Information Desk 8 A.M. to 10
P.M. Alma Mater Society Business Office 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
ASIAN STUDIES STUDENTS TAKE NOTE Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
Seale charge dropped
CHICAGO (CUPI) -
Conspiracy charges against Black
Panther national chairman Bobby
Seale have been dismissed at the
request of U.S. attorney William
Bauer.
Judge     Julius     Hoffman     in
granting the request for dismissal
made    no    comment-
Seale however, still faces a
four-year prison term for
contempt of court imposed by
Hoffman during the trial of the
Chicago 8 last winter.
VCC supports Act
Vancouver City College
students do not condemn the War
Measures Act.
•A motion proposing that the
students endorse and send a
telegram of protest to Prime
Minster Trudeau was defeated at a
VCC general meeting Thursday.
VCC student Glenn Bonesky
told The Ubyssey the students
supporting the motion "felt that
their liberty was endangered by
the government's freedom to
arrest, and by censorship of the
press."
"However, they were a
minority. The majority of the
students    felt   dissention   would
divide public support during this
crisis," Bonesky said.
"They felt that the eradication
of the Front de Liberation du
Quebec must come first, and civil
liberties second at this time."
Seale is now being held in New
Haven on charges of murder and
kidnapping.
In his request for dismissal of
charges, US. attorney Bauer said
it would be "inappropriate" to try
Seale after the seven other
defendants had been acquitted of
conspiracy.
Seale was cited for contempt
after the Panther leader
repeatedly demanded his
constitutional rights to defend
himself or be defended by a
lawyer of his own choice, and to
cross examine witnesses who were
testifying against him.
'Radical  Error'  talk
The UBC graduate students' representative assembly voted to
condemn the Trudeau government for invoking the War Measures Act,
at a meeting Wednesday.
Allan Robbins, vice-president of the grad students' association
said the GSRA also voted to support the Alma Mater Society grad
student representatives who opposed student council's decision to
support the federal government.
Robbins said the GSRA, which is composed of students from all
departments, acts as a check on the grad students' association
executive.
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4556 West 10th
Phone 224-1912
A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Forces. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will  provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
• SEA OPERATIONS •  AIR OPERATIONS
•  LAND OPERATIONS •  ENGINEERING
• SUPPORT SERVICES
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
Why not ask one who serves?
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St. - Vancouver
THE CANADIAN
ARMED FORCES
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Puts Them
All Together
Now Available at
THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
Pre Sale Tickets Will Be Redeemed
Only at Publications
Office, Room 241, SUB
THE UBC's "WHO'S WHO"
BIRD CALLS
This is the bottle
for the
Age of Ecology.
What the world needs today are containers that re-cycle.
Because every container that isn't re-cycled becomes a refuse. Or worse still, litter.
That's why the reusable, returnable bottle for Coke is the answer to an ecologist's prayer. On the average, it makes
about fifty round trips before it's through. And that means fifty less chances to add to the world's litter problem.
So buy Coca-Cola in returnable bottles. It's best for the environment—and your best value.
It's the real thing. Coke.
^mW Tud,'Mark Hcg.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd,
WOAAETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd. Friday, October 23, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
Political Science teach-in discusses government dilemma
By NETTIE WILD
Canadians must trust the
Trudeau government's statement
that the information leading to
the invocation of the War
Measures Act cannot be released
for security reasons, UBC political
science head Walter Young said
Thursday. Young and political
science     prof    Mike    Wallace
conducted a teach-in on the War
Measures Act in Angus 110 after
students in Wallace's political
science 204 class expressed a need
for further discussion on the
controversial issue.
Invoking the act was a better
solution than interpreting the
criminal  code  more  liberally —
which is being considered for the
future, Young told students.
"At least the act can be
withdrawn once the emergency is
over. However, if the criminal
code is allowed to be liberally
interpreted at any given time
there would be no control, as it is
here to stay," he said.
WM Act regulations
From page 2
after his arrest, at the "end of
which period the person arrested
shall be taken before a justice
having jurisdiction and charged
with an offense described in
section 4 or released from
custody.
10. A peace officer may enter
and search without warrant any
premises, place, vehicle, vessel or
aircraft in which he has reason to
suspect
(a) anything is kept or used for
the purpose of promoting the
unlawful acts, aims, principles or
policies of the unlawful
association;
(b) there is anything that may be
evidence of an offense under these
regulations;
(c) any member of the unlawful
association is present; or
(d) any person is being detained
by the unlawful association.
11. Any property that a peace
officer has reason to suspect may
be evidence of an offense under
these regulations may, without
warrant, be seized by a peace
officer and held for 90 days from
Nominations
open today
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Ubyssey Wire Editor
Nominations open today for
the position of Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer
following the resignation Monday
of John Zaozirny.
Eligibility forms are available
from AMS secretary Anne
Clarkson in SUB 248.
Candidates should have
attended UBC for at least one
year.
Nominations close Nov. 3 at
noon.
the date of seizure or until the
final disposition of any
proceedings in relation to an
offense under these regulations in
which property may be required,
whichever is the later.
12. These regulations shall be
enforced in such manner and by
such courts, officers and
authorities as enforce indictable
offenses created by the Criminal
Code.
Grads condemn Act
The UBC graduate students' representative assembly voted to
condemn the Trudeau government gor invoking the War Measures Act,
at a meeting Wednesday.
Allan Robbins, vice-president of the grad students' association
said the GSRA also voted to support the Alma Mater Society Grad
student representatives who opposed student council's decision to
support the federal government.
Robbins said the GSRA, which is composed of students from all
departments, acts as a check on the grad students' association
executive.
Dear Speakeasy:
I am desperate. I think I am pregnant. I am single and I am
a student. It would be impossible for me to have a child. Where
can I obtain an abortion? I have considered all possible ways out
and an abortion seems to be best. I have just enough money to
last through the school year. Please help me."
First off, do not do anything drastic that will endanger
your health or your life. If you have not done so already, have a
pregnancy test as soon as possible.
Most physicians will do that much for you.
If you are pregnant, get in touch with Women's Caucus at
684-0523 immediately. The Abortion Information Centre is open
for counselling on Monday 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. to
9 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m. to 12 noon.
The people will explain to you how to obtain an abortion
through legal channels and direct you to those who can help you.
An alternative to having an abortion here is travelling to a
clinic in California. The addresses of these clinics are available
from Women's Caucus. The only problem is money. If you have
medical insurance the abortion in Vancouver will be covered
whereas the one in California will not.
Finally, do not give up — time in your situation is of
extreme importance. Please, no matter how desperate you
become, do not resort to a back street abortionist, it could be
fatal.
Speak Easy is open Monday to Friday 11:30 a.m. to 8:30
p.m. room 234, Box 115, phone 228-3700.
Wallace said that the
contradicting data available on the
Quebec situation only served to
confuse the issue. On the one
hand we see the Front de
Liberation du Quebec as an
organization that is capable of
evading the extensive search of
the police for seventeen days now.
But on the other hand, alleged
members of this same conspiracy
(referring to the arrests in
Montreal) were caught completely
off-guard, offering no resistance.
These    two    instances    are
lsupposed to be related to one and
the same thing he said.
Wallace place Canadians
reacting to the War Measures Act
into two categories: "the less
paranoid who believe that there is
indeed a conspiracy and the act
was the only alternative open to
Trudeau: and the more paranoid
who feel the government is not
using the act to counter a terrorist
conspiracy but rather to attack
radical nationalism."
Wallace said he is in agreement
with the latter opinion.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. -Just outside the Gates
SPEAKEASY    SPEAKEASY
No Files, No Hassles
Student-Run "Talk-Service"
Whatever Your Concern Is;
Academic Problems, Drugs,
Loneliness, Alienation and Uncertainty
We Can Try To Help You
We also have friendly
people to talk to
SEE US in Room 234, SUB from 10:00 a.m. to
8:30 p.m. every weekday.
CALL US at 228-3700
WRITE US at Box 115, SUB, Campus Mall.
SPEAKEASY    SPEAKEASY
mm i mi iiiiniimiiiMnmiimitmniMiiimiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiimimniii iiimmiiii iimiiiiiiini m iimmf
F IT L A IV O
FINE THINGS
FROM MEXICO
No.
4 Powell
Gastown
Can You Dig It?
CHRISTMAS VACATIONS
1. DISNEYLAND—Dec. 26-Jan. 4
All inclusive bus trip, meals and hotels to Disneyland, Rose Bowl Parade.
2. HAWAII—Dec. 19-Jan. 3
including Air Fare, hotels, transfers.
3. MEXICO—Dec. 20-Jan. 2 mcoudhw
Air fare, hotels and tours to Acapulco, Mexico City, Taxco, Oaxtepec.
4,  SPAIN DeC.   26-Jai1.   9   including Air fare, hotels,
breakfasts, visit in Copenhagen and 12 nights at Torremolinos near Malaga.
$]92.oo
$339.00
$399.00
$46500
WE SPECIALIZE  IN
STUDENT TRAVEL
For Further Information on Tours Cruises Charters
Phone Mark Alan - 261-7221
ADVENTURERS TRAVELAIDE
8710 Granville St., Van., B.C
or
LTD.
___ Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
FRIDAY
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
AU welcome to hear suggestions for
constitutional reform in SUB 125 at
noon.
SIMS
Advanced lecture  for mediators only
in  Buch.   203 at  noon.
UBC   COMPUTER   SOCIETY
Mr. J. Leigh speaks on The Graphics
Facilities at UBC in Chem. 250 at
noon.
NEWMAN   CLUB
Regular practice for Folk Mass in
St.  Mark's College, Music Room.
CHINESE   STUDENT   ASSOC.
Skating Party in Thunderbird Arena
from 7:30-10 p.m. followed by after-
party in SUB 212.
PHOTOSOC
Studio classes in SUB 245 at 7:30
p.m.
VCF
Meeting in  Ang.   104 at noon.
DEPT.    OF    HISPANIC    AND    ITALIAN
STUDIES
Prof. Enrique Gajardo of Chile speaks
on   Easter   Island   in   Buch.   204   at
2:30   p.m.
CLASSICS   CLUB
Friday's meeting has been postponed   until   Nov.  6.
UBC   N.D.P.
Exec meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
F.I.C.-TRANSPORTATION    CLUB
An audio-visual presentation on Vancouver's   rapid   transit   proposals   in
Civil Eng. 201 at noon. All welcome.
N.V.C.
Roller skating from  7 to  10 p.m.   at
the Stardust in North Van.
'tween
classes
VCF
Communion at 7:30 p.m. in the Lutheran Campus Centre.
FILMSOC
Clint Eastwood in "A Fistful of Dollars" in SUB theatre. Fri. and Sat.
at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Sun. at 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
FINE ARTS  GALLERY
Everyone   welcome   for   an  exhibition
closing   und   refreshments   at  8   p.m.
in the  Library basement.
CUSO
Poster party in SUB 130 from 10
a.m.   to   4   p.m.
SAILING CLUB
Wine and Cheese party in SUB club's
lounge at 8 p.m.
SUNDAY
SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
Totem Rally at Brentwood Shopping
Centre. No more entries can be accepted.
NEWMAN  CLUB
Folk    Mass   in    St.    Mark's    College
Chapel   at   11:30  a.m.
FIRESIDE
Speaker from the Women's Caucus at
8 p.m. in the Reception Room at
Union College.
MONDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Discussion on Cuba in l.H. upper
lounge   at   noon.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.     '   224-6121
UBC    LIBIDO   SOCIETY
Illustrated   lecture   in   Buch.   2241   at
exactly  12:47  p.m.
UBC   PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
General meeting in SUB 215 at noon.
TUESDAY
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
Opening  of John  and  Joice  Hall exhibition at 8 p.m.
PHYS-SOC
Coffee party for all physics students,
profs,    and   grad    students   in   Hen-
nings 307  at noon.
GERMAN   CLUB
Everyone welcome  to slides  of Expo
70 and coffee in l.H. 402-404 at noon.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
All  years   welcome  to  come  and rap
about   papers,   problems,   or   projects
in Ang.   24  at noon.
CAMPUS   CRUSADE    FOR    CHRIST
Josh   McDowell   on   basic   errors   of
student revolutionary movements on
SUB Plaza South at noon; and on
"World War III; Will It be the Last?"
in Buch.  Lounge at 7 p.m.
CANOE  CLUB
Regular meeting and plans made for
Skagit Valley in SUB 209 at noon.
UBC ANTI-WAR COMMITTEE
The widely acclaimed film documentary of the Vietnam War, "In The
Year of the Pig", will be shown in
SUB 125 (back of cafeteria) 10 a.m.,
12:30 p.m., 3 p.m.  Admission 50c.
SAILING CLUB
Lecture on sailing in Buch. 104 at
noon.
WEDNESDAY
CAMPUS   CRUSADE   FOR   CHRIST
Josh McDowell: "Sick of Hypocrisy"
on SUB plaza south at noon. Also
"Midnight of History" in Buch lounge
at  7  p.m.
MARKETING CLUB
Lee Pulas of the Old Spaghetti Factory in Ang.  215 at noon.
UBC   TEAM   CLUB
Everyone welcome to meeting of all
members and those interested in
working in the Dec 9 civic election.
SUB 205 at noon.
ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY
Meeting  in  SUB  213   at  noon.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Tory MP, Robert Thompson, speaks
on the recent FLQ uprising in SUB
Ballroom  at noon.
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY
Organiaztional meeting in SUB 130
at noon.
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting in  SUB  105B   at  noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
UBC    CAMPUS    MINISTRIES
Ministers   are   available   in   SUB   228
Mon., Wed., & Fri. from 10 a.m. to
12 noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Tues. and Thurs. from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Road Runner cartoons in Buch. 106
on the 23rd, 26th, and 27th at noon.
L'ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Free coffee  and French conversation
every    Friday    noon    in    l.H.    upper
lounge.
LEGAL   AID
Every Mon., Wed., and Fri. at noon
in SUB 228-232.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Halloween party, October 31 — everyone welcome, directions and advice
in SFFEN office (SUB 216E). New
and old members and- any guests
welcomed by the lavish exec (paid
advert.). See John Thomas for details
of the orgy.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, t day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial-3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional tines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications OUice, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Closing Deadline ia 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
ELECTIONS FOR GRAD CLASS
bureaucrats are happening noon in
SUB auditorium, October 23rd.
Corne on Education, don't let the
Engineers rule again!
Lost & Found
13
LOST    KONICA   AUTOREFIEX    T.
Vic.   bus   loop.   Reward.   Call   Tom
room  112,  224-9525
LOST, OCT. 16, BLACK LEATHER
zip folder; between Angus and
Wesbrook. I'rgenlly needed. Call
A.   Shanks,   266-7265
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK
pipe and humidor l'rom Ubyssey
office, Saturday afternoon, please
return   to   Lost and Found.
LEFT DISSECTING KIT IN
sportscar, Thurs. a.m., Oct. 15.
Would girl in Librarianship please
phone  I'arlis,  224-7438
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
ENCOUNTER GROUP. THOSE IN-
terested in Student Encounter
Groups please phone 228-8164.
GREAT SHOWS PRESENTS ROD
Stewart, Small Faces, Redbone &
the legendary Seeds of Time,
Sun., Nov. 1. Tickets at The Bay,
$3.50, at the Agrodome, $4.25.
GRAD CLASS BUREAUCRATS TO
be chosen October 23rd, SUB Auditorium at noon. Come on Commerce, don't let the Engineers rule
again!
NEW — DIFFERENT
Character profiles on V4 hr. cassettes.
Comprehensive analysis of your
page of handwriting. Know your
potential! Confidential service.
State age and sex. Send M.O. only
for $10 to: E.D.V. PERSONALITIES, BOX 128, Richmond
JOIN THU SIT55MARK SKI CLUB
and ski Mt. Baker. 6 chairs — 4
ropes. $10.00 annual dues — $2.00
per weekend for sleeping and party
facilities at Glacier — 20 niiji. from
the top. For information phone
Stan Lloyd, 929-3441 or .lean Boy-
chuk, 526-3641 between !):00 and
1:00.
NEED RII)I<: FROM 25th & WIND-
sor,  one way, S:30's.   Ph.  874-4362
THIS WEEKEND—SUB THEATRE
— See "A Fistful of Dollars", Fri.
& Sat., 7-9:30: Sun., 7:00. AMS 50c.
Non-AMS 75c. St ill the cheapest
and the best!
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
a panel discussion on the "Aims
of Cuso '•'??" Wed., Oct. 28, 7:30
p.m.  International House, Rm. 402.
FIRESIDE: A DISCUSSION GROUP
will have a speaker from the
Women's Caucus, Sunday, 8:00
p.m., at the Reception Room at
Union College (on campus).
ROBERT THOMPSON^ FEDERAL
M.P., speaks on current Canadian
political issues. Wed., Oct. 28,
12:30.   SUB    Ballroom.
Travel  Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2855 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St.  Mon. - Sat.,   9-9.
LONDON   RETURN  $225
also   other   destinations   —   1-ways.
687-1244  —  224-0087
STUDENTS     —     EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights. Discounts. Write for
information (air main Anglo-American Assn.. 60A Pyle St., Newport   I.W.,   England.
Wanted—Information
  17
ANYBODY WITNESSING C A~R
accident Tuesday. Oct. 20, '70, at
approx. 8:15 a.m.. at 10th and
Tolmie,   please   ph.   321-6283
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
POETRY WANTED FOR POS1-
sible Inclusion Cooperative Volume. Enclose stamped envelope,
Editor, Box 4444, Whittier, Calif.
90607.
REGULAR MOVIEGOERS START
saving cash now. Prices can be
drastically cut for you and your
date.  Ph.  228-9263 after 6.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969   MORGAN  PLUS  FOUR.   LIKE
new,  $3000.  Call Bob, 733-4585.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
SELLING     A     MORRIS.     PARTS?
Offers!    524-3550
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — PRO-
duction of Graphs, Maps, Text-
Book Illustrations and Formulations.   Advertising.   Phone  980-2928
Day Care & Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
CUSTOM PHOTO WORK: ALSO
your film developed and printed.
Phone 733-9423, Steve.
Scandals
37
COME TO THE OCTOBERFEST
at International House, Friday,
Oct. 23, from 9-1 a.m. Great refreshments.
GRAD CLASS BASH, OCTOBER
23rd noon in SUB Auditorium.
Executive will be elected as well.
Come on Aggies, don't let the
Engineers  rule  again!
COME AND SEE THE ROAD-
runner and his friends, Oct. 22, 23,
26, 27 at noon in Buchanan 106.
Compulsory for En. 100 students.
Warning suggestions of violence
and  brutality. c
DON'T BE ALONE — WALK TO A
phone — P.Y.C. Dating Club —
434-2636.
CLINT EASTWOOD TS THE MAN
with no name: danger fits him like
a tight black glove; see him in
"A Fistful of Dollars". SUB Theatre this "weekend.
CORKY'S MEN'S HATRSTYLING.
Corky makes the growing great,
3644 W. 4th, Alma on 4th. Appointments,  731-4717
SPRING TS COMING ON HALLO-
we'en ?
HASSLED BY THE "CAN I HELP
you, sir" routine when shopping?
Browse unmolested thru Pier 1
Tmports in Gastown — Powell and
Columbia — with items from 63
countries.
WHO TS JOSH ANYWAY? CALL
228-2050 if you want  to know-!
THIS IS NOT A PIZZA AD! CHAPLAINS can be found in SUB 228
everyday.   Today:   Bob  Pearson
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters St Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche  — 437-1355.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home: essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING . . .
fast, accurate work, theses, essays,
papers: 35c per page. Call Mrs.
Duncan,   228-9597
Typing (Cont.)
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter; shorthand.
325-2934.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
neatly, efficiently and quickly —
30c per page. Phone 224-0385 after
5 p.m.
EXPERT FAST TYPING. THESES
term papers, essays. Pick up and
del. Selectric machines. Miss Butler, 681-4888 — 24-hr. service.
—   TYPING   SERVICE   —
Mrs. Gail Symons
224-6435   —   3885   W.    12th   Ave.
NEED  TYPING DONE?
CALL  731-8096
EXPERIENCED TYPIST
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Anne  Treasy,  738-8794
EXPERIENCED IBM SELECTRIC
typing service: theses, essays, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.  Mrs.  Troche, 433-1355
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
REQUIRE IMMEDIATELY PART-
time light house-cleaning 8 hrs.
per week at 11.75 per hr. Mr.
Norton, 688-3411, 9-5 or 263-5079
after  6:00.
NEEDED: MEN AND WOMEN
for part-time work in Canadian
and International Company leading to career possibilities at executive level If interested, present
this Ad. on any of the following
nights at 7:45 p.m., Oct. 22, 26,
29 at Golden Canada Product
meetings held at the Blue Boy
Hotel. Sponsor: Doug McDougall,
General  Distributor.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
THE MEDITERRANEAN
GUITAR SHOP
instruments * lessons
repairs
fine imported strings
hand built Spanish guitars
(10% discount with AMS card)
77 Powell St., right in Gastown
687-2328
Special Classes
63
SPANISH CONVERSATION, THE
shorter way to speak. Prof. Pareja
(Colombia, Argentina & UBC) will
tutor $3 hr., Individual, no groups,
M to S, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 12
hours minimum paid in advance.
Limited number. 1405 Cypress (nr. i
Cornwall)   738-5C92.
TWO STUDENTS FROM PARIS
will help you to learn French.
Denis  or  Daniel,   738-3377.   Cheap.
Special Classes (Cont.)
63
FRENCH TUTORING & TEACH-
ing.  Minimum  fees,   988-2691
SPANISH TUTORING & TRANS-
lations — Spanish native. Have
Cambridge University certificate
in  English;   $3/hr.  Phone  732-5754
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
STEREO RECEIVER AND AMPLI-
fier. 80 watts IHF power. Superb sound production. Call
Byron, 738-1957 aft. 6.
ONE STANDARD, ONE HUNDRED
pound Weider vinyl weight set.
Like new condition, $20. Telephone
263-9709
1000-WATT OVERHEAD PROJEC-
tor — mix your own media —
$75. O.N.O., 434-8136 eves.
16 MM BOLEX MOVIE CAMERA.
3   lenses,   $250.   Ph.   274-3303
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone  Directory
NOW AVAILABLE $1.00
at the  Bookstore  and
AMS  Publications  Office
Pre-sale tickets redeemed only at
Publications Office
KLASSEN'S BARGAIN WEEK . . .
Widest selection of ready-to-finish
furniture in Western Canada,
3207 W. Broadway. Phone 736-0712;
Beer-cans and Bottle Drive-in at
rear.
CIVIL ENGINEERING BOOKS FOR
sale at Great Reductions, by family of deceased engineer. Ph. 228-
8104 after 5 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LARGE CLEAN FURN. BEDROOM
with shared kitchen and bath.
Quiet UBC girl preferred, ?70 per
month.   Call   224-1727
TIRED OF COMMUTING? LIVE ON
campus for less. Quiet rooms with
kitchen privileges, linen changed
weekly. Large TV & study rooms.
Phone Hill Dinsmore, 224-4530, 5760
Toronto Road.
MALE STUDENT, NON SMOKER,
light housekeeping room with frig,
private    entrance    and    bath.    RE
8-1576.
ROOM NEAR UBC —MALE STUDENTS. Quiet, abstainers, non-
smokers.   Meals  possible.   738-2305
AVAILABLE NOV. 1, 2 FEMALE
students: Room & kteh., priv.—-all
equip, provided. On Campus, ph.
224-7230.   $50/mo.,   student.
Room & Board
82
DUE TO THE NUMBER OF STU-
dents who were unable to occupy
residence accommodation for the
Winter Session, there are a number of vacancies for female students. Please contact Housing
Office in the New Administration
Bldg or phone 228-2811
Furnished Apts.
83
MALE GRAD STUDENT NEEDS
second to share two bedroom apt.
Marpole.  325-3170 or aud.-ann. 127.
MALE WANTED TO SHARE APT.
in Kits. Furnished. Available im-
mediatly.   Call  .Tim,   733-3446
Unfurnished Apts.
84
TWO BEDROOM APT. AVAIL-
able Nov. 2. Unfurnished, 5516
Dalhousie.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86 Friday, October 23, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  23
speaking
frankly
Tony  Gallagher
Although one hates to mention it, there should be something
said on the upcoming football meeting between these Thunderbirds
' and the talented players from across the city.
Yes, on Saturday night, the 31st of the month, those two
teams will crash into each other at Empire Stadium, and the ensuing
action could resemble a cement truck colliding with a Volkswagen.
As all those who follow these pages well realize, the
Thunderbirds have been brilliant in gaining their one win and
somewhat less than exquisite in taking their five losses.
Mr. Davies' crew has won five of their five games inciuding
k rather impressive showings against teams like Portland State and
Oregon College of Education. They possess the 16th ranked
quarterback in total offense in the NAIA. His name is Dave Syme.
They possess a running back that is in the process of making the
SFU record book look like the Dead Sea Scrolls. His name is Terry
Bailey.
There is another guy named Glen Colwill. Having seen him
only three times, he appears to be able to doeverything but cure the
lame, and being a conservative fellow, I wouldn't bet against that. .
He plays as the other running back with Bailey but is used
mainly as a pass receiver along with Mike Begg, who also does many
things.
To further this one-sided pseudo-comparison, their secondary,
led by Tim Smith, Brian Donnelly and John Steele, is quick, large,
experienced, and intelligent beyond belief. Every other position on
the Clan starting lineup is solid, according to various
-correspondents run into in this community.
My prediction? Well, not wishing to pronounce the Birds dead
before arrival, it would seem that their chances at attaining even a
moral victory are imaginable only under the most potent LSD. There
are some around this establishment who desire me to pin myself
. down to a numerical figure. Of course I won't. I don't think I can
count that high and if I could, I would have difficulty getting all
those numbers onto the page.
FOOTNOTES - Things don't look all that encouraging on the
basketball front when one considers the meeting between the Clan
and the Birds.
The Clan are extremely large up front with the readdition of
Frank Rotering, the growing talent of junior Larry Clark and the
experienced gained by Mike Charles and Wayne Morgan. Combine
that with the UBC loss of Derek Sankey and Bob Molinski at the
forward positions and things look bleak for the locals.
Gnup braces for SFU
By DON GARDNER
The UBC football Thunderbirds will have their final tune-up
this weekend before they face
their crosstown rival, Simon
Fraser, in the annual Shrum Bowl.
On the basis of the
comparative performances this
season, it looks more like the
Birds could use a complete
overhaul. But they don't have
time for that.
Saturday the Birds will be in
Calgary for a rematch with the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs.
Earlier this season, the Dinosaurs
gobbled up the Birds 21-10.
So far this season the Birds'
most successful offensive play has
been the roughing penalty. If the
Dinosaurs can refrain themselves
from piling on after the whistle,
they'll have stopped one of UBC's
main scoring threats.
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10% Labour Discount to all UBC Students
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Telephone 736-9804
Sports Car Accessories, also goodies for Datsun — Mazda —
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IN     IV I    «    I *. N    I   t n rv | ', \ | , I .    i  i :   \ \l     1^' >!.
M. A. I'ltHKC
K. It. M.Mi.ii*. N. U-H.
(.-LtTtA       U J. Akhmm. B.A.. frwiM
W, Laiwlaw.
(i.  I. PMItlL K. U. Mmh. W.  L  lMjI'lNBll'.
V, tU BvktisO, C4pt II. k. Bankkn. Hwl-1 rw       W. II. I
'. A. (IlLM.N N. J-  W.   IUl«.
«. U Wow*.
RUGBY IS THE OLDEST SPORT played on campus as this photograph shows. This Saturday, 2:30, at
Thunderbird Stadium, UBC and the University of Victoria Vikings will clash in the annual
Homecoming Game. The teams will be playing for possession of the "Boot" Trophy which was
donated in tribute to former UBC rugby coach, Brian Whiteman, in 1966. Admission is free.of course.
Rugby men ready for UVic
in annual homecoming
The undefeated Thunderbird
rugby team faces their annual
rival, The University of Victoria
Vikings, in exhibition rugby
action this Saturday.
UVic will provide a tough test
for what is possibly the best UBC
side assembled in several years.
Both matches last year saw
convincing wins by the
well-conditioned and well-trained
Vikings.
UBC coach, Don Spence, has
concentrated on the dominant
Bird asset, speed and mobility, as
the key to UBC re-asserting
varsity collegiate dominance in
rugby.
Basic pillars of rugby, quick
rucking and balanced
three-quarter line play, has
contributed much to the Birds'
success this season. Both of these
essentials will be necessary for a
win over UVic. The pack will face
experienced and seasoned
opposition. The Viking backfield,
basically intact and balanced, will
be the best that UBC has faced
this year.
Game   time   will   be   2:30   at
Thunderbird Stadium.
. NOTE: UBC II and III sides
face tough opposition from
Western Washington State College,
Saturday, 1:15 at Wolfson Fields.
Intercollegiate Football
4th Annual Shrum Bowl Game
U. B.C.
THUNDERBIRDS
vs
S. F. U.
CLANSMEN
Saturday, Oct 31 at 8 p.m.
EMPIRE STADIUM
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.00 Seat
on presentation of A.M.S. Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
UP TO AND INCLUDING FRI., OCTOBER 30th Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1970
*-:*WV«hK£l
Is the current
trend in Canada
bothering you?
When you read the news last week did you feel a
sudden surge of confidence in your government? Did the
Trudeau press conference on Sunday really make you
feel that the whole incident was under control? Did the
knowledge that over three hundred of those nasty FLQ
subversives had been arrested let you finally get some
rest? Were you happy in the safety of your own home
knowing your children were safe from terrorist
bombings and murders? You were, weren't you? You
weren't dragged out of your home and thrown in jail
with no formal charge and denied even a phone call,
were you? When your Cabinet decides that there is a
state of "apprehended insurrection" you can rest
assured that we looking after you and your loved ones.
You're in good hands with
POLICE STATE
Police State is a wholly owned subsidiary of the American
Empire (Canada Ltd.) with branch offices the world over to
serve you best.
^i,,™^
Washington. Ottawa. London. Lisbon. Madrid. Rom*. Bonn. Born. Th* Hague. Copenhagen. Brussols. Vionna. Oslo. Ifeblin. Canberra. Saigon. Manilla. Bangkok. Seoul. Rangoon. Kuala Lumpur. Taipoi. Now Dolhi. Tol Aviv. Karachi. Johanessburg. Logo*. Salisbury. Braxilia. Buenos Aires. Quito.
Panama Gty. Lima. Bogota. Santiago. Mexico Gty. Tegucigalpa. San Juan. Guantanamo. Paris. Vientiane. Caracas, and many, many more to servo
ys-you.

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