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The Ubyssey Mar 10, 1970

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Array Inflation hits UBC— food services raises prices
By BERNARD BISCHOFF
All right, s6 you've just been cramming for an exam
and you>e hungry as hell and you walk into the SUB
cafeteria, purling the change out of your pocket which is
only/35 cents and order a hamburger and - wait!
Hamburgers, ladies and gentlemen, are now
FORTY-FIVE cents, coffee is FIFTEEN cents, coke is
FIFTEEN cents and so on. Inflation (what's that?) has
struck a body blow to the most tender part of the
ordinary Student's being — his belly.
The board of governors issued a statement Thursday
saying there will be an average increase of about 20 per
cent  in  prices  in  campus  food  outlets.   The price
increase, which will aply to almost all items sold in
campus cafeterias and snack bars,- will be effective May
The increase was discussed and approved by the
student-faculty advisory committee on food services and
recommended to the BoG by J. F. McLean, director of
UBC's ancillary services and Ruth M. Blair, director of
food services.
The provincial government requires UBC's ancillary
services (which includes such things as housing, health
and parking) to generate sufficient net revenues to repay
the costs of developing the services, i.e. they have to be
self-supporting.
The outlets which will be affected by the price hike
are the Ponderosa cafeteria, the Bus Stop snack bar, the
cafeteria in the student union building, the old
auditorium cafeteria, the snack bar in the War Memorial
Gym, the Barn snack bar, and the snack bar in Buchanan
Lounge.
See Page 13
p. 3:  A look at the False Creek redevelopment
scene
p. 5:  Squalid symphony meanderings
p. 6;  AUS election results
Vol LI, No. 39
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH   10,   1970
228-2305
NO  IT  ISN'T MARCEL MARCEAU  in quintuplicate
Liberation Movement for the benefit of Open House.
—dirk visser photo
not even the UBC food services kitchen crew . . . It's all part of the abortion skit put on by the Women's
POWELL. MAYNE DENIED TENURE
Two English profs get axe
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
David  Powell   and  Brian  Mayne,   the  two profs
„ involved in the English tenure dispute, have been fired, it
was announced Monday by acting arts dean Doug Kenny.
The two have been appealing a decision made by an
English department tenure committee earlier this year.
The committee had at that time decided not to grant
Powell and Mayne tenure on the grounds that they had
not fulfilled the criteria governing tenure.
The two professors are considered to be excellent
teachers and both have been nominated for the Master
Teacher award.
But they have not published enough, according to the
faculty.
At the time the two were first told they would not be
granted tenure they were told they could take a two year
option. Both refused, and on the advice of fellow faculty
members decided to fight the decision.
-„*■ iSince that time much sentiment has been expressed
by both sides of the dispute. Both sides made their
feelings known to the promotion and tenure committee of
the arts faculty.
The committee was made up of C. F. Belshaw, L. L.
Bongie, Melvin Lee, M. A. Ormsky, B. E. Soule and Kenny
at the head. The committee did little more than look into
whether the procedures applying to tenure were probably
used in the case.
Kenny explained there was little else the committee
could do  since  it could not judge scholarship. Under
normal   procedure   the   case   would   next   go   to   the
% president's desk.
President Walter Gage, however, agrees with Kenny
that no one but English faculty members can judge
English scholarship. He will therefore not reverse the
decision.
Many students and faculty in English are not satisfied
with the decision. These people were not happy with it
when it was first announced and they feel even stronger
about it now.
Anne Jacobs, English honors student, said she was
very disappointed in the decision: "I feel very depressed
about the whole thing it is so disgusting."
Garry Potter, another English honors student, said it
was now up to the students: "We must have student
action-it is the only way in which we can hope to have
this wrong decision reversed."
A meeting of all concerned students will be held
Thursday noon in Bu. 106. All students should be at that
meeting, said Jacobs.
John Steuart, arts 4, explained that the issue was
really quite simple.
"It all comes down to whether or not the university
will allow good teachers to teach or do they have to
publish in order to be allowed to stay at the university,"
he said.
He also emphasized the importance of student
participation in this question. "It's up to the students'
academic integrity to stand up for these professors," he
said. "Students have a right to demand to be taught."
- The situation has become very serious now and we
can't afford to play around anymore," said Potter.
Stueart said that he considers the situation to be
serious enough that he is willing to sacrifice his degree.
"Students who want a degree that says they can
brown-nose through university should stay in the library
and take no action," he maintained.
Bob Calladine, arts 3, said he considered the
reputation of the entire university to be on the line. "It is
our responsibility as students of this university to defend
these two professors who are getting an unfair deal", said
Calladine.
"Non-action is complicity with what the university is
doing," said Dick Betts, arts undergraduate society
president.
"The university has revealed itself to be a prostitute
for the written word above all other values.
"Now that this simple fact has been revealed it is
imperative for students to take action immediately to
redress the unjust firing of these two professors," said
Betts.
"I really believe the wrong decision has been made,"
said Tony Hodge, Alma Mater Society president-elect.
"The whole question of teaching versus research in
granting tenure and student evaluation and participation
in those areas is something we should have gotten involved
in a long time ago but now we have no choice," said
Hodge.
"It's up to us as students to decide what kind of
professors we want teaching us and then stand up in
defence of those professors," said Jacobs.
STUCK IN THE ARM Y Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
—david bowerman photo
THE TRAFFIC OFFICE seems to be impounding any and all illegally parked vehicles. This unusual
vehicle appeared in the traffic control lot after being towed from its 'parking' space in front of SUB.
The excuse offered for the plane being with the traffic control was that it was being kept in a safe place
for the night.
Hfcflft aflva-
Dear Speak Easy:
This May 1 will graduate with a terminal degree
from a professional school at UBC. 1 was recently
informed by a friend of a job opening at a
community centre in Vancouver for which I
appeared to have all the necessary prerequisites and
more - experience, training, age, and education.
Having applied for the job, and hopeful of
success, I was given an interview by the personnel
director of the centre. Point blank, in no uncertain
terms, I was informed that my qualifications were
immaculate, that my references were glowing, but
that I was a female.
"We are really looking for a man, I'm sorry," I
was told as 1 was quickly whisked out the door. Is
this kind of blatant discrimination punishable by
law? Do I have any alternatives?
AN ANGRY WOMAN.
The Human Rights Act, which is supposed to
be honored by the provincial government, explicitly
states that "no employer shall discriminate against
any person in regard to employment because of sex,
age, race, religion, colour, nationality, ancestry, or
place of origin".
A human rights commission has been set up to
look into grievances; however, out of 876
complaints received by that commission in the past
year, they deemed only one serious enough to grant
it a hearing. The commissioners, by the wny, are
government appointees. In your case, Speak Easy
could refer you to competent legal counsel to see if
further action might be taken.
That such discrimination does occur is not only
admitted by our "elected officials" but practiced by
our government. The post office, for example, pays
women $1.25 an hour for the same labor that men
get SI.50 and more for; our newspapers advertise
for help wanted male and help wanted female; and
our universities consciously discriminate against
women by channelling them into courses such as
home economics and education and away from
physics, math, and engineering. Indeed, some
departments have quotas on the number of female
students they will allow.
There are strong and growing movements
against such discrimination, such as the women's
liberation movement, represented in Vancouver by
the women's caucus. These groups are instrumental
in educating women, and men, as to the necessity of
the model-mannequin woman to our form of
society, in psychological and socioeconomic terms.
They have also been running a birth counselling
clinic at the Labor Temple on West Broadway near
Main on Tuesday evenings. Groups like these are
important (and you might want to speak to VWC
about your specific case), for only in solidarity is
there strength, and it's going to take a lot of
strength to change the despicable attitude which
prevented you from getting a job you rightly
deserved.
Speak Easy is now open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
in SUB 218. We can also be reached by mail. Write
to Speak Easy, Box 115, SUB, UBC, or telephone
228-3706.
Park march for survival
The, Festival for Survival will be held Saturday, March 21, the
first day of spring.
Sponsors include the Society for Pollution and Environmental
Control, Richmond Anti-Pollution Association, the Environmental
Crisis Organization and the Unitarian church.
The festival will begin with a march from the courthouse at 1
p.m. and going to Lumberman's Arch in Stanley Park.
At Lumberman's Arch, the organizers plan to have resource
people speak and pass out leaflets.
WHO ARE YOU?
Why not get involved in a unique educational
experience that will help you find out?
Share with others in exploring in depth such topics
as communications, inter-personal relations, theology,
social   issues,   community   life,   creative   expression.
You can do it in the tour month residential
program at Naramata Centre for Continuing
Education, Naramata, B.C.
WRITE US FOR MORE INFORMATION
aaisu
STH.* FIR, VANCOUVER. IX.MJ   \
SWING  IN
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PACIFIC NORTHWEST
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From
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1 THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
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MONDAY  THRU   FRIDAY
No  Admission  to  Persons   Under  21   |
Caribbean  protesters
hit Canadian property
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD (CUPI) - More than 8,000
police and army personnel were mustered over the weekend here in
anticipation of continued demonstrations in support of black
students on trial in connection with the destruction of the Sir
George Williams computer.
At the same time, leaders of the National Joint Action
Committee - co-ordinating group for demonstrations here last week
— charged that the trial of the 10 students — which went to jury
deliberations Monday was "only an extension of the oppression"
exercised for years by Canada in the Caribbean.
If it didn't stop, they warned, the destruction of Canadian
property would be far worse and Canadian people would suffer, too.
Weekend police leaves were cancelled Saturday on the island
and the 5,000-man police force was placed on standby alert.
Elements of the 1,500-man special service police were called to duty
at Chagauramas, 15 miles west of Port of Spain, and 1,500 members
of the British-trained Trinidad Regiment were mustered.
Meanwhile, Trinidad industry and commerce minister John
Halloran said the demonstrations of the past week — aimed primarily
at Canadian banks which control 60 per cent of the local money
market — were engineered by communist agitators trained and paid
by the government of Cuba.
According to Halloran, the Montreal trials were 'red herrings'
put forward by revolutionaries whose real aim is the overthrow of
the National Movement government of prime minister Eric Williams.
1970 GRAD CLASS GIFTS
Cover Empire Pool Fund $6,000
Blind Students Library 4,400
University Day Care   930
Speakeasy                        930
Election Results:
Honourary President        DR.  H. WARREN, Geol.
Honourary Vice-President DR.  G.  SZASZ,  Med.
Valedictorian    JIM   DAVIES,   Arts
Historian       KAREN   GOSHULAK,   Ed.
Prophet    DUANE   ZILM,   Eng.
Will   Writer       BRIAN   TAYLOR,   For.
Class   Poet MICHAEL   FINLAY,   Arts
Ballot results are  posted  outside
A.M.S.  council  chambers
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327-0461 Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— "C
From eyesore
to redevelopment
-david bowerman photo
By JAN O'BRIEN
Fairview Slopes, the residential area of False Creek,
ironically has one of the worst views in the city.
The False Creek area comprises about 600 acres of
land zoned for heavy and light industry except for a
commercial strip along Broadway and the south side of
Eighth.
Development is dominated by railyards, open
storage, lumber mills, heavy metal fabrication factories,
vacant lots and log booms in the water. The Fairview
Slopes consists largely of older houses.
The Vancouver planning department has described
the area as an eyesore and detrimental to the
metropolitan centre.
Vancouver city council has developed the option of
changing the policy on False Creek over a period of
time.
The planning department presented council with
five alternate plans for redevelopment of False Creek.
Five alternate plans
Concept one is redevelopment of False Creek and
the Fairview Slopes for light industrial uses.
Concept two, four and five are basically the same: a
residential area with ancillary public and commercial
facilities.
Concept three allows continued industrial useage of
parts of the area; provides for apartment development
and public and commercial marinas.
In response to city council's redevelopment
concepts the residents of Fairview Slopes formed a
ratepayers' and tenants' association to put forward their
ideas on how False Creek should be developed.
Fairview Slopes is the only privately owned area.
There are only four other major land owners; the
CPR, (Marathon Realty), the city of Vancouver, B.C.
Hydro and the provincial and federal governments.
Marathon Realty has proposed redeveloping its
lands between Granville and Cambie for residential uses.
The Fairview association wants to avoid wholesale land
acquirement by real estate companies which will result in
another West End.
The Fairview assiciation went to the Community
Education and Research Centre to obtain help on
formulating a questionnaire to obtain information for
their submission to the planning department.
in False Creek
"The centre is not registered with city hall, the
Better Business Bureau or the provincial registrar of
societies. It is just a name," said association president J.
H. Davies.
The centre was initiated by several of the suspended
Simon Fraser University political science, sociology and
anthropology professors to get people to do their own
research rather than outsiders.
The brief presented by the Fairview Association
stresses a zoning for human and physical diversity.
The residents of the area would like to see older
homes that are in good shape preserved. The brief
suggests that low income housing, high rises, and town
houses all be built in the area.
The brief suggests the council should take
immediate measures to alleviate the parking problem in
the area.
"The executive has agreed on concept four as it
meets all our requirements and provides the most
revenue for the city," said Davies.
The Community Education and Research Centre
believes the association should get views from the
neighborhood-then formulate their own concept.
Vancouver Inner-City Service Project has proposed a
student research program for the summer.
VISP suggests that various groups interested in False
Creek coordinate their efforts. Among these groups are:
the Architectural Institute, the Company of Young
Canadians, The Community Education and Research
Centre, VISP and the UBC Alma Mater Society.
AMS to help
"The AMS has been asked to provide part of the
operation," said Christine Krawczyk, AMS vice-president
elect.
The program includes an analysis of development
plans and the establishment of what major private
developers are likely to propose.
A sociological analysis of the population potential
and the types is suggested.
The program team could cover proposals for general
city attractions such as open air markets, a boardwalk,
and a large municipal park.
An economic analysis of the rough cost versus
benefit of different types of development is part of the
program. As well as developing the area, the program is
concerned with pollution of the creek. This part of the
program includes analysis of existing pollution sources
and proposed clean up plans.
AMS exec not needed
The program hopes to see that development in False
Creek is carried out according to a plan geared to meet
the needs of the people of Vancouver.
The program wants to hold a watching brief on
developers and investors who seek to manipulate land
holdings and land values in a short term.
The program team as suggested consists of seven
summer students at a salary of $ 1,400 each, an AMS
executive program planner at $ 1,600, secretarial costs at
$ 1,200 and about $ 1,600 for program costs. A total of
$14,000.
The Community Research and Education Centre has
already done a political, historical, economic and partial
environmental study of the area.
"The AMS is interested in the False Creek
development but seven students at $1,400 is out of the
question and the AMS executive is not needed," said
AMS president-elect Tony Hodge. "It would be a
reasonable program at $3,000 with two or three
students," said Hodge.
"We don't need more researchers, we need to self-'
develop cooperatives to control the blocks and pressure
groups," said Bob Batty of the Fairview association.
"The best way to help is to become a resident," said
Batty.
"There are exciting possibilities in the area, it could
be used as an example for other redevelopment
programs," said Ahmad. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE UBYSSIY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH 10,1970
Questions
English professors David Powell and Brian Mayne
have been given the official axe.
And somehow, we still don't know why.
We know that it has something to do with
academic qualifications, teaching ability, research and
publications in scholarly journals, but what exact hybrid
of things has led to the dismissal- or "refusal of
tenure" — we are still mystified  about.
Take Dave Powell, for example.
He has a Ph.D. All response we have received and
all personal conversations have indicated that he is a
great teacher. Our reporters say he seems a very
intelligent, sensitive, articulate man. His friends say he is
a good guy and a fine fellow to discuss fishing with.
Somebody around here doesn't like him.
We all know that there is a new head of the
English department this year and we know that there
has been considerable friction between factions there
for some time.
Whether or not this is the cause of the firings, we
cannot say for certain. But in any case, the English
department and the dean's committee seemed to have
overlooked one important point in their reviews of the
professors' abilities and qualifications.
Put it this way. There are professors in the English
department, among others, who have Ph.D.s, publish
regularly in top academic journals, do research that
amazes their select audiences, have reputations among
their colleagues that no-one will deny.
But there's one problem.
Their classrooms are empty because they cannot
teach.
Perhaps they can teach their peers, as the
expression goes, but when it comes to telling simple
undergraduates something interesting about English
literature, they can't hold a student's attention long
enough to communicate three words.
Frankly, we don't care whether or not Dr. So And
So at Harvard or Oxford or wherever writes letters of
praise about some UBC prof's article in this unheard of
journal  or the other.
We're students and the language of the classroom
is not the language of the academic publication. What
we want is somebody to tell us something that we are
surprised or delighted or angered at hearing.
Everybody says Dave Powell can do these things.
People actually go to his classes. People do not go to
the classes of a great number of English professors.
We suppose we should not be surprised that these
professors have been fired. The people who control the
English department and the university are those who
excel at academia, and academia means being analytical
and destructive as opposed to being intuitive and
constructive.
We wonder if these men will someday institute a
course in the proper "explication du texte" method of
analyzing emply classroom chairs.
They'd all be experts. One of them would
probably write a book about it, to great critical claim,
we are sure.
Editor: Michael Finlay
  _  Paul  Knox
City  Nate Smith
Managing     Bruce  Curtis
Wire    Irene  Wasilewski
Sports      Jim Maddin
Senior    John Twigg
Photo     Dave Enns
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City     John Andersen
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Todays glorious issue was put
together by Brian McWatters, Jennifer
Jordan, Robin Burgess and Sandy Kass
who also did a lot of other things. Bev
Gelfond fell in between classes as Dave
Schmidt looked on. Gin Gait went to
class as did everybody else. Jim Davies
raved about Peppermint Patty. Jocks
Dij Buddon and Tony Gallagher
laughed at Potogs Dave Bowerman,
Dave Enns, Dirk Visser, as Marc
Kenton went to the darkroom with
Maureen Gans. Happy birthday
greetings to John Twigg who went
pubbing for the first time.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Contribute        Boo
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Right! Bus fares have gone up
but so have car insurances, and
you can't boycott them.
The boycott of buses may be a
good idea, but if you promote
hitch-hiking instead, it would only
be fair that the rider (as in a car
pool) contributes in some ways to
the driver's expenses.
Bus riders will soon have to
pay 25 cents, so a contribution of,
say 10 cents per ride, would be
appropriate.
B. BREGAINT
arts 7
An offer to contribute might
be appreciated but we doubt that
it would become the norm. Let's
just hope that since a fellow is
driving in a certain direction
anyway and has room in his car,
he could pick someone up. It
doesn't hurt him and it helps
another. Hopefully and probably,
the rider will do the same if he is
ever driving.—Ed.
Disbelief
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to the refusal of
tenure to several English
professors in the department of
English: I suggest that what
appears to be student apathy is
just plain stunned disbelief. I am
myself just now able to accept
that the ridiculous impossibility is
actually happening. One does not,
of course, expect all of one's
professors to be brilliant teachers
like Dr. Powell (except perhaps in
one's inner, greedy, infantile
subconscious).
One is, in fact, prepared to
accept even the occasional dud.
But one does expect the
university, when it is fortunate
enough to get a man like Dr.
Powell on its faculty, to cherish
him, pamper him, cater to
him .. . anything to keep him
here. One certainly does not
expect it to give him the boot. It's
just not credible. I am still vaguely
expecting the whole unfortunate
situation to turn out to be a
misunderstanding—owing to a
typographical error, perhaps. The
University of British Columbia
needs brilliant teachers like David
Powell as much as we, his
students, do.
JENNIFER HANES
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With a vulgar fingers-in-mouth
whistle and an introduction
reminiscent of ten year old
baseball-diamond dialogue the
Ben Hill-Tout Photo Salon
"officially" opened Monday
noon. More exactly ... it
crashed . .. dismally,
This is not a comment on the
judging. (. . my damned-middle-class restraint). What's lacking
is a responsible approach to the
presentation of a photo exhibit.
Using 'artistic freedom' and
'encouragement for amateurs' as
rationalizing excuses, the
organizers have thrown together a
jumbled, cramped, unrestricted
exhibit that does no justice to the
works of the entrants and
provides little enjoyment for the
viewers. Their 'plaster 'em all on
the wall' technique is hardly going
to encourage or inspire anyone.
There are many excellent
photographs presently pinned up
in the SUB gallery . . . but any
resemblance between Ben
Hill-Tout '70 and a tasteful
attempt at displaying UBC art is
purely coincidental.
RON RUTHERGLEN
arts2
Slums
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am worried about the kind of
development that will soon take
place on the endowment
lands—upper class, single family
dwellings, like that now present in
the University Hill area. Look at
the price of lots in the new King
Edward area.
UBC has the misfortune to be
located in the affluent Point Grey
area. I think, the endowment lands
should be developed into a nice
squdid slum so UBC students
have a place to live.
PETERJORDAN
Weapons
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The American and Russian
initiatives towards removing the
world's stockpiles of chemical and
biological weapons are bold stems
for peace by those two major
powers. Certainly the moment is
ripe for smaller nations, like
Canada, to press these two giants
towards a complete disarmament
of CPW weaponry as part of the
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks
Other nations with these weapons,
such as China, should be included
in an international discussion to
air this matter.
Canada is uniquely situated to
press these points as we have
already taken initiatives with
Britain for disarmament of the
weapons. Furthermore, Canada
has tied itself to the CBW research
programs of the United States,
Britain and Australia by a formal
agreement known as the Technical
Cooperation Program. Our
Defence Research Board does its
CBW research, mainly testing of
the dissemination of these agents,
at the Suffield site in southeastern
Alberta at a cost of about $4
million a year. Dr. R. J. Uffen,
Chairman of the Defence
Research Board, testified ata 1968
hearing of the Senate's Special
Committee on Science Policy that
Canada is bound by this
agreement to collaborate with the
other three countries "in defence
science with the aim of improving
their (sic) combined efficiency of
these four countries and
minimizing duplication of effort.
It is probably our most important
international program at present."
I should think that before
patting Canada on the back and
saying that the US is finally
catching up with us, Defence
Minister Cadieux could set a
proper example for the Americans
by calling for a complete halt to
Canada's research program in
CBW. Accidents will continue to
happen as long as this research
goes on, witness the killing of
thousands of sheep at the Dugway
Proving Grounds in Utah when an
airplane sprayed nerve gas in
nearby grazing areas. But more
important is the needless diversion
of funds to research on CBW
during an anti-inflation campaign
by the Federal government and at
a time when the poor need more
financial support from the
government. If we are really
serious about contributing
towards world peace and
improving the welfare of our own
society we should urge the Prime
Minister to close down the secret
CBW researcy presently
undertaken at Suffield, pull
Canada out of its quadripartite
agreement on CBW and join with
Sweden and other neutralist
nations in calling for a total
abolition of CBW warfare.
DR. HAROLD KASINSKY
asst. prof
zoology Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
PFage Tuesday
Symphony
Triumphs
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Last season at the Vancouver Symphony, the violin and
cello duo of Young Uck Kim and Stephen Kates was forced to
opt out of their appearance because Young Uck had an exposed
nerve ending in one of his fingers, which made playing rather
difficult.
Sunday afternoon it appeared for a while as if a jinx would
further prevent the team from performing. Near the end of the
first movement of Brahms' Double Concerto for Violin and Cello,
Young Uck suddenly stopped playing and left the stage, victim of
a nosebleed. There was a smattering of applause from the
audience, much as if a baseball player had been injured during a
game and had left the field.
Conductor Meredith Davies, not known for losing his cool,
left to the check the violinist's condition, and returned
momentarily to announce that the rest of the programme would
be played, with the concerto following after the intermission.
Aside from a bit of shakiness in the piece that followed,
Dvorak's Scherzo Capriccioso, the symphony was in top form for
the afternoon, sounding like the VSO should sound. Especially
remarkable was the fullness of the string section in Beethoven's
Consecration of the House Overture and the Sibelius' Third
Symphony.
The Sibelius is a work which can't really be described as
overwhelming or spectacular but is instead a solidly constructed
piece which gives an orchestra a good chance to just dig in and
play.
- in spite of jinx
The balance, logic and general musicality displaying during
this piece Sunday produced one of the better performances of
this season, well on par with the playing during the Akiyama
concert last January.
The full sound of the orchestra also extended into the
Brahms concerto, producing a richness I might have heard during
the Lixzt E Flat Concerto of the Bela Siki concert two weeks
before if I hadn't been worrying so much about that soloist's
insecurity.
Insecurity was no problem with Kim and Kates, however.
This dynamic duo combined the soulful lyricism of the cello and
the rich lushness of the violin with the orchestral magnifieance to
produce music well worth waiting for.
In fact, the only bummer of the afternoon was the insipid
Queen Elizabeth Theatre Muzak which persisted in being played
on the plaza outside. The sonic effect on this occasion was much
like finding a lump of excrement in a plate of caviar.
* * *
HYPES AND RAVES: Chicago, one of the top groups in
the States, will make their third local appearance this Thursday
night in the Agrodome. Chances are that the sound will be better
than usual, since the PNE has recently added some acoustical
panneling which will be combined with weather balloons floating
behind the stage, all of which will hopefully help. As well, there
will be no seats on the floor, making it possible for one to sit,
stand, dance, or . . . Material to be performed by Chicago will
probably consist mainly of material off their new album which
hit the local stores last week. .. Today at noon in the
SUBAuditorium, Special Events presents Vern and Ray singing
bluegrass music ... Flute fiend Paul Douglas points out that this
Wednesday night in the Music Building Recital Hall at 8 PM
there'll be'a Mozart recital of interest. . . watch for performances
of Lloyd Burritt's Icon for Organ and Four-Track Tape which will
be given at various places around the city in the future, one of
which being at St. Andrew's-Wesley United Church . . .
NEW REELS ROLL IN SPECIAL SCREENING
A package of films is what awaits you, ladies and gentlemen, four films precisely on Thursday and
Friday March 12th and 13th at 12:30 noon in the SUB Auditorium Theatre.
Included in this bundle of goodies are Choke, a film created by Eric Green, a graduate student in
the English Department of UBC, which was made in the summer of 1969 in Los Angeles, where Green
took a film production course at UCLA. Vancouver photographer Bob Flick-whose work you see
displayed above—was cinematographer for Green's film.
Yet more includes Woman-Woman produced and directed by Marilyn Miller, Warren Hamilton by
Brian McMaster, and Children by Y. R. Fukuhara.
(Look for more on Green and his films in this week's Page Fri.)
Wise wording with William
on   stage   at   Fred   Wood
There was once a (if you have not already
forgotten) forest in which actually very little was
happening anymore. All the people in it had
gradually moved away into the safe walls of a
court. They spoke of our forest as a "desert".
The forest was desperately unalive!
One night this forest dreamed that the court
fool, who was wise to the lies of the court and
the only one who ever came to the forest, came
and danced in one of its shaded glens.
The forest was happy because the fool
jumped around and acted as if he were many
different people (from the court) just like it had
been before they went away.
One of the people the fool pretended to be
was a young lover who, in his anguish at being
separated from his loved-one, sat in a forest and
wrote long poems to her.
The poems sang of a young girl and her
cousin, who had been banished from court by
their wicked uncle the Duke. While the young
girls were searching through the dark forest they
suddenly saw scores of trees with pieces of paper
hanging in them.
On these pieces of paper they read stories
which told of a fool who came into a long
forgotten forest to enchant it back into life. The
fool pretended to be a poet and wrote a dramatic
poem about a young Duke and his loved-one
who are banished from court and must search for
each other and their love in the wicked forest
among the wild animals and mean peasant folk.
(When they finally meet, the young girl is
disguised as a man (because it is safer) but she
agrees to act as the young man's loved-one in
order to assuage his longing.)
But in the end they find each other in the
glen of an enchanted forest and (of course) live
happily thereafter.
It was exactly as the forest liked it.
N.R.
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PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT
The District of Coquitlam invites applications for the
position of Pool Supervisor, from May 6 — September 6,
1970.
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Red Cross Instructors' plus three years experience in Municipal Aquatics.
WAGES: $3.27 - $3.47 per 40-hour week.
Apply in writing to:
M. D. POWLEY
Superintendent  of  Recreation
1111 Brunette Ave., Coquitlam
IMPORTANT
U.C.C. FINAL
GENERAL  MEETING
MARCH 10 — 12:30
SUB 207 - 209
ELECTIONS
>*««<i^^«« Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
AT  OKIE  COLLEGE
Student union voluntary
By MICKEY KINAKIN
This year Okanagan College has attempted a
revolutionary change in the formation of a student
organization — namely, a student society. The thing
that is new about this society is that, unlike other
college organizations, no student is forced to pay
fees; the choice rests entirely on the student.
The author is a student at Okanagan Regional
College in Kelowna.
Many students have been asking why join the
society. The purpose of a student society is to aid
the formation of association between students. Most
of the students in our college are in first year. Most
of these students do not know one another. The
society by providing functions serves these students
by helping them to get to know one another. Th6
arranging of the functions is performed by the
student executive of the society, who have been
elected by paid-up members of the society. The
executive is there to serve the students by
co-ordinating the activities of the society and
helping to form and finance clubs. The executive is
not the government but only a committee placed to
head the affairs of the society members.
I, as a student, am proud of the attempt by this
college to form a free society of students. As a
student, I am not forced to join any group I do not
feel like joining. I do not have a government over
my head to whom I may not owe anything. This
new attempt at student organizations should be
heeded by some of our colleges and universities.
The guidelines of our student society are very
simple and are as follows: The student society is
made up of students who have voluntarily paid
student society fees. Society members have the right
to vote and to receive money discounts on society
functions. Non-members do not have this privilege.
The society members will elect an executive to run
day-to-day affairs and planning of society
functions. The executive is not the government of
the college. If the society has the majority of the'
college students as members then it becomes the
government through its executive.
Students who do not belong to the society still
have the right to have their grievances heard by the
members of the executive. They also can make
suggestions to be acted upon by the executive. The
only thing they can not do is vote for the executive
or get reduced prices at society functions.
ATTENTION!!
Anyone interested  in taking
a
UKRAINIAN
LANGUAGE
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327-7642
or 227-7248
or 325-0872
BEFORE MARCH 12th
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New arts undergrad president
elected in weak voter turnout
Only 253 students out of over 5,000 voted in
Monday's arts undergraduate society elections.
Don Palmer, arts 3, defeated student senator D.
J. O'Donnell, arts 2, to become the new AUS
president. He received 135 votes to O'DonnelPs 87.
"I'm very hopeful about changing the whole
situation on the AUS next year," Palmer said,
"We're going to have to look at the direction we're
heading next year.
Palmer's running mate, David Sigmund, arts 2,
defeated Brain Sproule, arts 3, for vice-president by
a vote of 141 to 85.
"We want to make undergraduates aware of
what the AUS is," Sigmund said. "I want to get the
AUS on its feet."
In   the  preferential  ballot  for secretary. Dale
Wik, arts 2, was eliminated on the first round.
In the second round Jerry Hockin, arts 2,
defeated Barnard Bishoff, arts 2, by a vote of 118 to
72.
"I was definitely not running on the slate with
Palmer," Hockin said. "Larry (Okada) and myself
are less political than Don or Dave."
Fred Irvine, arts 2, was eliminated in the
preferential ballot for treasurer. Larry Okada, arts 3,
defeated Ellen Woodsworth, arts 2, by 2 votes in the
second round. The final result was Okada 101,
Woodsworth 99.
"The most important thing is to do
something," Okada said. "I have no definite plan! I
have to find out what I can do."
TUES.
WED.
THURS.
Caps off 4 p.m.
Membership
pictures taken Thurs. March  12
SUB Parry Room                   1 IIL     ill
-
PLACE VANIER
-CYVR-UBC Radio is on the air 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. MONDAY through
SATURDAY.
-CYVR-UBC Radio will commence broadcasting   to   the  students   living   in   Place   Vanier,
TODAY AT NOON.
-You can listen to CYRV-UBC Radio at 650 on any radio receiver (electric, transistor, crystal,
razor blade, etc.)
-CYVR-UBC Radio is programmed tor student  audiences . . . your kind of music .
kind of information — news and sports.
your
. . . PLACE VANIER RESIDENTS, LEND US YOUR EARS
A new service from
CYVR - UBC  RADIO
TOTEM PARK IS NEXT Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Geology students stake out
claim to geology building site
Three UBC geology students
have taken the first step of what
they hope will turn out to be a
get-rich-quick scheme.
They've staked a mineral claim
on the site of the new geology
building, to be built later this
year.
The argument set forth by
spokesman Bob Chataway, in
whose name the claims were
staked, is that when construction
is started on the new building and
the foundation is dug, the group
* will have a very good opportunity
to study the structure of the
ground in their claim and decide if
there is anything valuable.
In particular, they are looking
for placer deposits of heavy
minerals. Free gold, tin and
platinum are often found this
way.
The initial claim post is located
in the south-west corner of the
geophysics department parking
lot, and the number two post is in
a parking lot behind the education
building. The claim extends 1,500
feet west of the base line defined
by these two posts. This area
includes the site of the new
geology building which will be
located where the physical plant
electrical shop is now situated.
Geology department head W.
H. Mathews refused to comment
on the claim staking. He noted
that nothing of value has ever
-^ been found on campus, and that
he had nothing to say as he didn't
know what the students were
looking for.
Geology prof R. E. Kucera, a
noted glacialogist, stated that
conditions are unfavourable on
the UBC campus for placer
deposits to have formed, but did
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
VERN & RAY"
-authentic Kentucky Bluegrass
-direct from UCLA Pop Festival
SUB AUDITORIUM           /
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
12:30 noon                                            50*
—dick button photo
GEOLOGY STUDENTS Bob Chattaway, Darrel Johnson and Ace
Yeager plant cornerpost to their mineral claim on the site of the
new Geology building to be built later this year.
not rule out the possibility.
The legality of the claim
staking on university land has not
been made completely clear yet.
There is a bylaw in Vancouver
which    does    not    allow   claim
staking within the city boundaries
but this does not apply to UBC.
The other members of the trio
are third year student Darrel
Johnson and second year geologist
Ace Yeager.
Yacht club development:
to construct scenic parking lot
By SANDY KASS
Enraged residents of the West Point Grey area
are protesting the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club's
proposals for the development of the controversial
Point Grey beach.
Appeals are being sent to the West Point Grey
Area Council and petitions have been distributed
throughout the residential area.
About 1300 signatures have been obtained in
protest.
In an application sent to the Vancouver
Technical Planning Board, the RVYC requested a
development permit for the undeveloped Jericho
beach area below Pioneer Park.
The permit, if approved, would allow the
RVYC to begin work on the following proposals:
* dredging of the shallow basin enclosed by the
present rocky breakwater;
* pumping of the dredged sand along the beach
area from Alma to Highbury extending 160 feet out
towards the water, and eventual blacktopping of the
same area;
* planting of foliage along the face of the
cliffs;
* building of a blacktopped walk above the
cliff enclosed by a protective fence; and
* building of a paved ramp from the Alma end
of the park to the beach, and another ramp between
the cliff and the blacktopped area of the beach
which will be raised three feet above ground level,
so a good view may be obtained.
1'he RVYC at present has the water rights along
the foreshore from approximately Wallace to Alma,
which is leased directly from the provincial
government.
Spokesman for the West Point Grey Area
Council,  Mrs.  Daphne   Solecki  said,  "As  far as
residents of this area are concerned, we just don't
want it."
The blacktopped area replacing the beach
would be used as additional parking space,
accessible to RVYC members only.
Non-members would receive no benefit from-
this area, apart from a view of 175 parked cars along
the waterfront.
The RVYC also plans to build a driveway
connecting their clubhouse to the new parking area.
Plans for a new clubhouse in the area are
already underway.
The RVYC has presented this plan to the Parks
Board as a courtesy, and has received their approval.
Representatives of the West Point Grey Area
Council stated that a private parking lot along the
waterfront is a undersirabile development.
In a report made February 25, the council said
Vancouver is fortunate to have an foreshore area
where citizens could go to get away from the noise
and fumes of city traffic, and in view of the fact
plans for a beach road had been set aside. A private
parking lot would be somewhat of a retrograde step.
The RVYC proposals were approved by the
planning board February 20, subject to appeal.
Appeals are being sent to the Board of
Variance, which will discuss the relevance of the
protests, and make its final decision at a meeting
March 19.
Bayview Elementary School Parent Teachers
Association have sent a formal protest on the
grounds that the beach area should be preserved for
all citizens—not just selected members of the
RVYC.
A Bayview PTA spokesman said. "That beach is
the children's best fishing beach. It's a place for
them to go."
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Op»n Film Dayt a W—k—Friday untiJ 9.00—Clottd Wed. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
Ex-Angel
quits cooking,
germ-warfare
training
By Murray Kennedy and Byron Johnston
There are upwards of 10,000 deserters from the
United States military living in the Vancouver area now;
lots have been here for a long time and so people aren't
getting as excited about it as they used to.
Everybody's got a friend who's a draft dodger and
that sort of thing. Stories about Vietnam don't seem to
excite too much, just more stories about American
imperialism and brutality and corruption and fascism.
Now it's more like shaking one's head in resignation and
waiting for the first news of the revolution. There is so
much propaganda from both sides that it is difficult to
grasp what's really happening. But the other night we met
a cat who told us about places like Fort Lewis and Fort
Hauchuca, USA. This is his story, as he told it, and we've
tried to keep our own judgment out of it.
Q. Well if you're so uptight about the whole thing
why did you join in the first place?
A. Well, 1 wasn't drafted but 1 didn't really join
either. You see my father died when I was fourteen so I
quit school and left home. I went to live with my uncle
who just happened to belong the the Oakland chapter of
the Hell's Angels and so I got into all sorts of groovy
trouble. I hung around the Haight scene in 'Frisco right
about the time that it was really moving - around '65 and
'66.
I had a car at the time and quite often would give cats
lifts to Reno or some place like that. But they've got this
groovy law called the white slave act that they use to bust
you for crossing state lines with juveniles and so I got it a
lot.
Q. How often?
A. Nine times..
Q. Why did you keep doing it?
A. Nothing else to do. These kids used to ask me for
rides and offer to pay the gas. And all of them were
groovy people. Some of them were runaways, but I didn't
ask anybody where they came from.
Q. What happened when you got busted?
I   HAD   NO  CHOICE
A. Nothing much the first times, but the last time
was just a week before my eighteenth birthday. They were
going to hold me over and try me in adult court, but the
judge said he'd drop the charges if I joined the army. I
didn't want to go to jail so I joined. That was Aug. of '67.
Q. So what happened when you went in?
A. Started just  like  everyone  else   -  with  basic
training.  That  was at Fort Lewis. It's two months of
physical training with an exam at the end. Regulations
guarantee four hours sleep a night and believe me that's
exactly what you get. At the end you have to get 70 per
cent to pass or you get recycled. That means two more
months of the same bullshit - like they really make you
want to pass.
Q. What sort of things do they test you in?
A. Regular army stuff, you know - hand to hand
combat, silent combat and kill methods, guerilla warfare,
espionage and counter espionage basics, disassembly and
cleaning of all weapons. Oh, and one very important one
actually — chemical, biological, and radiological warfare
technique — like how to wipe out a continent with three
ounces of germs.
Q. Do they actually teach you those things?
A. Yeah man, it's all part of basic training. Graduated
in the top five per cent of the class, too.
Q. What came next?
A. Moved on to advanced individual training, where
you learn your skill that you're going to use. Some guys
are radio operators or truck drivers or whatever. Because I
enlisted I got to choose my field, so I wanted to be a cook
and got shipped to cook school in Fort Hauchuca,
Arizona. The thing lasted two weeks and I came out first
in my class so they kept me as an instructor.
Q. I guess being cook is a pretty good job — not too
much fighting?
A. No, not really. Like every company has a cook so
you're right out in the middle. The only difference is that
you're cooking all the time so you don't use your rifle too
much. You've just got your pots and pans; you've always
got a rifle sitting in the corner but you don't get to use it
unless something big is happening.
Q. So, what happened at cook school?
A. Well, I stayed as an instructor for five months and
then went AWOL.
0. Why?
THESE  GUYS  HAVE   POWER
A. I came to the realization that no one man has the
right to force his principles on another Like here were
kids just out of university or officer school, running
companies of men. These dudes are only 19 or 23 and are
suddenly given power over every guy in the place — like
over sergeants with 15 years experience. And you better
believe they have power. If you don't do things exactly to
their letter they have you doing exercises til you drop.
Like one time I had to bury a cigarette butt in a six foot
hole just because I threw it away on the base grounds.
Little things get real heavy. Like you're tired, beat, man,
and you've got this dude telling you to dig a hole so that
you'll learn not to deface army property. These guys stare
you right in the face and say things like that. It's really
too much. And it happens all the time. They're not all
ego-trippers, but there's enough of the mothers to make
life miserable for everyone.
Q. If it's that bad why do guys stay in so long?
A. Most of them just don't want to face the hassle of
the outside world. You know, it's easier for them.
Q. Where did you go after you went AWOL?
A. Back to my uncle and the Angels. I wasn't being
super careful or anything. Like I said, I was really fed up
with the whole system. I had it pretty good. I had
seniority on about 80 per cent of the base, but it was a
matter of principles. I figured if I went AWOL enough I
could spring a discharge. It seemed like a good idea at the
time, but I didn't know what I was getting myself into. So
CHAIN
cam
I more or less let myself get picked up. I was gone for
three months.
Q. What happened when you got back?
A. I got thirty days in the stockade and a dock in my
pay. After that I went back to my old job as a cooking
instructor again. I stayed about thirty days then went ,
AWOL. That was April 17, '68. That time I stayed away
for six months — yeah they got me on Aug. 14.
BACK  TO  THE  ANGELS
Q. Did you go back to the Angels?
A. Yeah, sort of. Like they were the only family I
had. It wasn't so much that I followed them, I just lived
with my uncle.
Q. How did you get caught that time?
A. Oh, I didn't pay a traffic ticket and they ran a
check on me or something and that was it. I got six
months that time.
Q. Tell us about the stockade.
A. It's hell, man. You've got everything that is
military and everything that is prison mixed together.
Guys are getting beaten up every day and there's nothing
you can do. If you so much as open your mouth you get
segregation.
Q. What do you mean?
A. By segregation? Oh, it's just isolation - solitary
confinement. That's when they stick you in a little six by
six room with bare walls and no windows. They put you
in for fourteen days to start, but if you break any
regulations they tack on more. I spent 63 days straight in
there.
Q. How do you go about breaking regulations when
you are isolated in a six by six room?
A. Christ, man, like you've got this bed hanging on
the wall, right? But you're not allowed to lie down during
the day — you've got to stand up or just sit in the corner.
And every time you hear the guard come around you have
to get up and poke your nose to the opening in the door
so he can see that you're not lying down. You're also not
allowed to sing or even talk to yourself.
Q. Did you have anything to read?
A. Man, you can't even have a Bible. Yeah, they've   .,
got plenty of regulations.
Q. What did you eat?
A. Oh yeah, the meals. They really feed you. For
breakfast you get one of those small boxes of Kellogg's
corn flakes — you know — like out of the variety pack — Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
he frosted kind, man, just plain; five slices of bread
cup of water. For lunch, you get some lettuce or
vegetable, unseasoned; some peas or some cooked
ible, unseasoned, five slices of bread and a cup of
. And for dinner you get the same.
|..No meat?
l. No meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk or any
ling. It's bread and water with a little greenery in the
or looks. They call it rabbit food. By eating that shit
are supposed to realize the evil of your ways.
Mlitation, they call it - Jesus!
FIGHT   YOUR   OWN   WAR
\. What are the guards like?
i. They pick the meanest mothers they can possibly
:o-fill that role. Only they're not just mean, they're
You know, the guys who are real bastards, but not
man enough to be marines. Some pretty wicked ego
levelop among these cats, I'll tell you.
t. Let's get back to you. You did six months, right?
.. Thats what they gave me, but I only served four,
released me on Jan. 3, 1969, with a direct order to
Vietnam. They released me and I was to be on the
in 48 hours. 24 hours later I was gone. I brought my
) to the colonel's office, ran inside and handed him
liform. Told him to go and fight his own war if he
d one so bad and I split. Just drove right out. And I
have any intention of going back this time. I'd
yed a direct order as well as going AWOL-that's
ign, really bad.
. What then?
. Well I tripped around for a while, then I got
;d in a roadblock on March 27 in Sacramento-so I
to run and they took off after me. By this time I
i I had nothing to lose. I even had a .22 with nine
and so I emptied it on them—nine shots. But they
e anyhow and obviously I was really screwed this
The civilians were going to charge me with assaulting
and  possession  of a deadly weapon, but they
id the charges and turned me over to the MPs. I was
0 the Presidio in San Francisco and was court
ll§d. I got four years at Leavenworth.
. What sort of laywer did you get?
. The first two times (AWOLs) it was just a special
martial—small time—and you just get some dude
1 or major, give him a book on procedure about two
iefore the session and tell him to defend you. The
last time was a general court martial. You're allowed your
own lawyer for that but who's got the bread? Besides, I
didn't see what good it would do. They gave me a military
lawyer-you know-some cat who got a law degree fifteen
years ago and has been in the service ever since.
Q. Did you ever get to Leavenworth?
A. No. I was awaiting transfer from the Presidio when
they closed it down for a congressional investigation. No
one was allowed to be moved in or out and so I was there
for eight months. There were 14 suicides in one month
and three guys were beaten to death. I'd say there were
five to six beatings a day on the average. And there were
only about ninety guys in the place. They finally closed
the place down for good and I got sent to the stockade at
Fort Lewis. They were still tangled up in red tape
somewhere so I didn't go to Leavenworth.
DECIDED  NOT  TO  WAIT
Q. What happened at Fort L^wis?
A. I stayed there until Dec. 18 when I escaped and
got up here. I was still waiting to be sent to Leavenworth
and there was a rumour going around that, it would be any
day so I decided to take the best opportunity to escape.
Q. Well, I was a cook in the stockade, you know. And
I had been sort of playing it cool for quite a while so they
had me on parollee status. You know, that's when they
trust you a little bit, so I knew the general setup. The
stockade was surrounded by two wire fences with barbed
wire on the top, but where the fences met the building at
the mess hall they came together. That's so they didn't
have to open two gates all the time when trucks came to
the mess with supplies. I figured I could pick the lock so
that was the place I decided to try. It was about 5:45 p.m.
and we'd finished dinner and everyone was sitting around
and drinking coffee, waiting to go back to their cell
blocks. So I said I was going back into the kitchen to get
some crackers or something, nipped out the back door,
picked the lock and ran like shit. It took about three
seconds.
Q. How did you pick the lock so fast?
A. Well, it was one of those old Juliette locks, you
know, if you've ever done anything, they're pretty easy.
Q. How long did it take them to find out you'd
escaped?
A. About five seconds. As soon as I started running I
caught the attention of the two tower guards and they
turned on the siren and started firing. I had to run about
200 yards to the cover of some warehouses, but like I
said, it was quarter to six and pretty well dark. Each of
those guards had fifteen shots in his rifle and with those
M-14s you can hit a guy a mile away if you're a good
enough shot. And you know the types they pick for
prison guards. Those cats get a promotion in rank and an
increase in pay if they stop a prisoner who's trying to
escape, so they don't bugger around.
0. Where did you go then?
A. I made it to the warehouses and I crawled
underneath one of them and stayed there til two o'clock.
They figured that I would try to head off base
immediately so that's where they started looking. It's a big
base, like 30 miles across, so they had a lot of area to
cover.
Q. Didn't they use dogs?
A. Naw. Hell, man, only the air force uses dogs. The
army dudes just cruise around and alert the guards. So I
just stayed put. At two I came out, went to the nearest
company and found some civvies that some cat had left
out. So I stole them—you know, the whole creeping across
the floor bit and all that. Then I went back to the
warehouse and stayed put 'til nine in the morning—It was
kind of a long night. In the morning I made it down to the
PX and panhandled two bucks in twenty minutes. I just
prayed that no one I knew would recognize me, went
straight to the bus station and bought a ticket to Seattle. I
was hoping they would think I was long gone by that
time; I figured that a bus would probably be the stupidest
thing that I could chance, and so I did it. Luckily I was
right. Just got on and a ride right to Seattle.
FORCED  UNDERGROUND
Q. What did you do in Seattle?
A. I headed for the university area. I figured if I got
where the heads were I would be alright. I got in touch
with the underground railroad and they got me here.
Q. What did you do when you first got here?
A. I lived underground for a while and then tried to
get landed immigrant status. I got refused and so now I'm
underground again.
Q. What will you get if you go back now?
A. About twenty-three years.
Q. Are you going to go back?
A. Not if I can help it.
Q. What do you do now?
A. Jesus, man, I don't know. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
—david bower man photo
HEY BIG BOY . . . wanta have some fun was the proposition
levelled by Ellen Seaborn at the crowds Friday and Saturday at
the Mussoc Open House revue .. . and they really did have some
fun.
TEACHER INTERVIEWS
For SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 89
(Shuswap)
MARCH 12 & 13 - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Office of Student Services, UBC
Mr. C. C. Wright - Mr. W. Nesbitt
MARCH 13 & 14
Doric Howe Motor Hotel
Mr. C. P. A. Clarke
AREAS OF SPECIAL NEED
Grade I, Jr. Sec. En.,
Home Ec, Occ, Special Education
Written applications to: C. C. Wright,
District Superintendent of Schools
Box 699, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Close the 49th parallel etc.,
The Americanization of Canada
Editor:   IAN   LUMSDEN
Nineteen timely and controversial essays
on American penetration into all aspects
of Canadian life—our unions and universities, arts and economy, science, sports,
communications, and politics.
$3.75 paper - $10.00 cloth
At Your Bookseller
University of Toronto Press
The Studentbank closes in
5 minutes and this idiot's got to
prove himself!
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
tt
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
We relate to students.
Student Union Building Branch — T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch — G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr.
You didn't really
think we'd forget
the Ethanol
Chlordyhydrate
Acetylphosphorium
did you?
You don't have to leave HOME to enjoy new motoring
products and services. We have a special understanding of
British Columbia motoring needs, so we're usually way
ahead with products that fill those needs.
Products like HOME Premium gasoline with its detergent
additives to give you a cleaner engine-for easier starts,
better mileage, longer engine life. Products like HOME Exel
Long Life Motor Oil. Up to 6,000 miles of protection
against rust, engine deposits and w.)ar.
Go HOME just once. There are 298 HOME Oil Service
Stations throughout British Columbia, so wherever you are,
you're not far from HOME. And you'll find we try harder.
Apply for a HOME Credit Card.
Write, or phone HOME-685-9131.
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400  ONE  BENTALL CENTRE,  505   BURRARD  STREET,  VANCOUVER  1.   B.C.
HOME Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
Jranscendentalist Horn proclaims
joy as mankind's  natural state
The natural state of man is joy,
not suffering.
Jazz musician Paul Horn made
this claim in a lecture on
transcendental meditation
Thursday noon in SUB ballroom.
Horn   said  man has to learn
»how to experience joy.
"This type of education should
be given in kindergarten," he said.
The lack of this in the school
system is hindering education
from achieving its goal which is to
help man achieve a fulfilled life.
Transcendental meditation is a
^ technique a person can learn to
oecome bliss-conscious.
--     He  said  an abstract field of
pure   existence    lying   in    the
sub-conscious is the source of this
bliss.
"Transcendental meditation is
a    physiological    technique    to
expand   consciousness,    not    a
philosophy    or    religion,"    said
* Horn,    flautist   with   folk-singer
- Donovan.
Horn became a pratitioner of
meditation when he heard the
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi speak in
the United States.
Horn said, "1 was tired of
intellectualizing and he gave me
experience."
Horn then went to India to
study under the Maharishi.
"I didn't intend to become a
teacher but it worked that way,"
he said.
Horn lectures only for living
and travel experiences because he
believes meditation is of real value
in everyday life. He claims it
increases efficiency, creativity,
and peace of mind.
HORN . .. transcendending
because we need a technique that
will not cause us to withdraw
from life," said Horn.
He said the technique was to
follow a thought process in
reverse, from the conscious to the
iiuvau. itvcisc, I1U11
"It is suited to us in the west   unconscious.
Tax proposals discussed:
'students don't need aid'
KINGSTON (CUP) - Federal finance minister Edgar Benson
said Saturday that he expects to rake in an extra $5 million from
students under his new tax proposals.
Student fellowships, scholarships, bursaries and research
grants, tax-exempt under current legislation, would be taxed under
proposals in Benson's white paper on tax reform which was tabled in
-.the commons last fall.
Benson justified the tax increases by arguing that some
. students who get scholarships, bursaries and grants also have
"substantial" outside income and should pay taxes on their total
incomes "like other Canadians."
The finance minister also rejected a suggestion that students be
allowed to deduct interest on student-aid loans.
Unorthodox cosmologist
to speak on  campus
Dr. Immanuel Velikovsky, author of "Worlds in Collision" is
coming to town.
Velikovsky, 74, the introducer of several unorthodox
cosmogonal theories will be speaking on campus Wednesday at noon
at a location to be announced.
He has been a centre of controversy ever since the publication
Of his books "Worlds in Collision" and "Earth Upheaval" in the
early fifties.
-pxrra
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT- DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
LL
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
ffrbonks
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
BOYD GRAFMYRE PRESENTS
In Vancouver
(Columbia   Artists)
with
"The Illinois Speed Press"
THURSDAY MARCH 12 — 8:00 P.M.
IN THE AGRODOME
Tickets  In Advance $3.50
TICKETS  AT  FAMOUS  ARTISTS
Tickets at the Door, $4.00
Give us a chance to let our hair down, too.
We're not as square as you think! Behind our
seemingly straight-laced image, there throb some
pretty way-out projects. And people.
Alcan is involved in many unexpected areas.
Because we do a lot more than just produce
aluminum. We and others try to find new uses
tor it.
For example, one new use that came to our attention was developed in Belgium and refined by a
Montreal artist. Through a process called
Aluchromie, he "paints" on specially prepared
aluminum panels. The resulting work of art has
a water-colour effect with unusual depth and
perspective, and endless applications in art and
architecture.
And that's just one of the exciting new developments in aluminum.
Alcan researchers and scientists are continually
searching for better ways to do things with
aluminum. And it's not always easy. Often they
have to struggle for years to find ways of making
their ideas come to life.
So you see, they aren't the only ones who have
to cope with hairy problems.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA. LTD   'ALCAN
'ALC/
,\ Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
Citizens   rights  book
to he issued by SPEC
The fight against pollution has acquired another weapon.
A handbook will be released by the Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control informing citizens of their legal rights in the
battle against pollution.
The 20-page handbook will follow the pattern of the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association release dealing with arrest, said Sid Filkow,
chairman of SPEC's legal committee. He said that all B.C. and
federal statutes relevant to the control of pollution will be listed.
"An assistant law prof and two senior law students helped in
the preparation of the clearly written booklet," said Filkow.
"Because enforcement of existing laws is so difficult the names
of fisheries and health officers responsible for upholding the laws
will be included," he said.
Anyone interested in further information on the booklet can
contact Derek Mallard, president of SPEC at 437-3307.
SKIN DIVERS
1st Birthday Sale
Lifetime guarantee Scuba tanks with reserve valve, including
pack and boot     $130.00
Regulators, finest quality on the market, your choice 20#> off
Wet suits, top quality nylon lined with sewn seams, including
hood, boots, gloves and 1 year guarantee _ $85.00
Safety vests, only $25.00
Guns, (Ling Cod season opens March 1st!) from $12.95
SALE ENDS SATURDAY, MARCH 14th
WILLOUGHBY'S
DIVERS DEN
2745 W. 4th AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C.
7&6929
Open 9 - 6      Friday til 9
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
Operated by  Young  People  for  Young   People
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS - SMALL GROUPS
3 WEEKS-ENGLAND-SCOTLAND-WALES $99.00
5 WEEKS-N. AFRICA-SPAIN-PORTUGAL $179.00
5 WEEKS-SCANDINAVIA-RUSSIA $205.00
9 WEEKS-GRAND EUROPEAN TOUR $367.00
Visiting   16  Different  Countries
Food Kitty Keeps Food Costs to a Minimum
All Cooking Equipment Supplied
We   also   assist   with   Charter   Flights
For   Full   Information   &   Daltes,   Etc.,   Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie at  41st 327-1162
UBC  FILM  SOCIETY  presents  ROMAN   POLANSKI'S
ROSEMARY'S RABY
-WITH   MIA  FARROW-
FRIDAY THE 13TH
AND SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY
7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM - 50c
Good Students
Make Good Drivers
and SAVE MONEY with
Baker & Russell
The "GOOD STUDENT" Policy is for high school and University male students
under 25 in the upper 20%   of their class or on  Dean's list or with  a   B
average . . . and a good driving record.
Even if your grades aren't' that high you may qualify for OTHER young driver
savings. Phone us at 684-1457.
See us and cut Auto Insurance Costs as much as 25% Or more.
B.C.'s NEW LOW-COST
CAR INSURANCE
As your auto insurance priced too high?
Shop for a better rate.
DEAL DIRECTLY WITH WESTCO AND SAVE $20, $30,
$40, $50 OR MORE THIS YEAR ON CAR INSURANCE.
A phone call may save you hundreds of dollars
over the years on auto insurance. Compared to
the rates of most other insurance companies you
can expect a saving of $20, $30, $40, $50 or
more      tor the same protection you have now!
This is not so-called "good driver" insurance. You
need not be accident free or over 25 years of age
to qualify. Even if you are currently on a preferred
risk type of insurance, WESTCO may still save
you a substantial amount of money
HOW CAN WESTCO OFFER
LOWER RATES?
Under the new car insurance legislation just
proclaimed and soon to be implemented by the
B.C. government, all motorists in this province
must carry auto insurance The driver who fails to
do so will face a fine of not less than $250 or
imprisonment of not less than three months or
both fine and imprisonment On January 1, 1970.
car insurance will be compulsory in B.C. — it no
longer needs to be sold.
So, WESTCO is a direct sales company with head
office in B.C and without salesmen or agents
In this way, WESTCO does not have to pay sales
commissions, one of the most expensive operating costs of typical insurance companies. This
saving is passed directly to you in the form of
lower rates.
These lower rates are available to you now.
WHAT ABOUT CLAIM SERVICE?
Should you be involved in an accident, again you
avoid the middle man. You don t contact a sales
person, you speak directly to a specially trained
WESTCO claims adjuster
WESTCO has reorganized the entire claim
service system, including their own Claim
Adjuster Training Program, to eliminate delays
and excessive paperwork which are the major
causes of the increasing costs of claim
adjustments which in turn cause higher insurance
rates.
WESTCO s approach is to settle claims quickly,
fairly, without red tape. You II appreciate the
service as well as the savings
CAN YOU QUALIFY FOR
WESTCO S LOW RATES?
If you are presently without auto insurance, if
you need additional insurance to meet the new
government requirements just  proclaimed,
or if you plan to change or renew your present
coverage in the next few months, phone
WESTCO today and find out how much you can
save.
There is no obligation and, of course, no
salesmen will call because WESTCO doesn t
have any.
ACT NOW!
MAIL THE  COUPON  OR  PHONE  TODAY
NO SALESMEN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
COMPLETE AND RETURN TODAY FOR WESTCO RATES.
No obligation-No salesman will call.
(Please Print)
Prov._
Name      --	
Residence
Address.  - 	
City      _      _.
Occupations                 	
Phone: Home        . _ Office	
. Married   □      Single   H
Male   G     Female   □
Number of years licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accidents in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your fault).
In the last five years
Has your license been suspended'	
Are you now insured?    __ ITste it expires 	
This coupon is designed solely to enable non-foiicy-holders to obtain
an application and rates far their cars.
Year of automobile —
Make of automobile.
No. of cylinders 	
Model (Impala. Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv. 	
Days per week driven to work, train
or bus depot, or fringe parking area
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business (except to
and from work)?	
Car No 1
Car No 2
Yes r. No rj
Yes H No □
Give number and dates of traffic convictions in last 5 years.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years     j~ Married  ~~[    Vz of Use
Licensed   j   or Single    j     =0       ^2
._!
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
BCLC  9 Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
13
Gone are the good old days
of the 35 cent hamburger
PRICES
TYPEWRITER TOWN
Continued from Page 1
Nowhere in the report was it mentioned that
this is the second price increase within the last year.
Here are examples of some of the price
increases which will come into effect on May 1:
Coffee   —  up  from   10  cents  to   15  cents;
"milk-from 12 cents and 24 cents to 15 cents and
25 cents; soft drinks — from 10 cents to 15 cents;
entree — prices remain at 65 cents but bread and
butter are no longer included; soup - from 15 cents
to 18 cents; bacon, eggs, and toast — from 70 cents
to 85 cent hamburger — from 35 cents to 45 cents;
grilled cheese sandwich — from 25 cents to 30 cents;
French fries - from 15 cents to 20 cents; lettuce
*nd tomato sandwich — from 25 cents to 30 cents;
egg sandwich — from 25 cents to 30 cents; ham
"sandwich — from 35 cents to 45 cents; cinnamon
bun — from 13 cents to 15 cents; muffins, donuts
and tarts -■ from 8 cents to 10 cents; pies — from 25
cents to 30 cents.
The reasons given for the price increase were
the increased cost of food, a 10 per cent increase in
labor   costs   and   a  jump   in   general   operating
expenses.
Blair said that a complete statement of the food
services budget was at present not available but
insisted that they were not operating on a profit
basis. She explained that as the government refused
to subsidize them they had to make enough money
to pay their own expenses. An example of an
expense, she said, was the $1.5 million food services
had to pay to rent 32,000 square feet in SUB.
When questioned further about the budget she
answered that the budge was essentially a private
matter and not a concern of students.
However she said later a detailed financial
statment of the food services would be published
later in the year.
"And don't let anyone tell you that those
financial statements are cooked," she warned.
"They are honest and completely correct."
"What guarantee do we have that they haven't
been cooked?" The Ubyssey asked.
"You'll just have to take my work for it", she
answered. She claimed in conclusion that food costs
would be lowered if students were more tidy and
cleaned up the mess in the cafeterias and if they
stopped stealing china and cutlery.
The food services have a rival on campus —
Black Cross. Dick Betts, Black Cross representative
said: "That's a lot of bullshit. Come and buy
cheaper food at the Black Cross instead."
"The reason we sell cheaper food is that we
don't have labor costs. It's a co-operative effort.
This shows in a small way the superiority of
socialism over capitalism."
Black Cross representative Don Sawyer
elaborated: "They're exploiting students to pay for
something government should be paying for in the
first place.
"Here at Black Cross we found that a cup of
coffee in a styrofoam cup has a maximum cost price
of four cents. We buy high-quality bakery bread at
24 cents a loaf — food services probably pays iess
for theirs — and we still manage to sell sandwiches
for 15 cents.
Black Cross operates from Tuesday to Friday at
the south entrance of SUB.
New & Reconditioned
Typewriters & Adders
All Office Equip.
Trades  Welcome
REPAIRS
2151 West Fourth Ave.
ENTERPRISES  LTD
OLYMPIA
SMITH-CORONA
SPECIALISTS
731-0621
*°fIZtt
PATI0
EAT IN •TAKEOUT^ DELIVERY'
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. St Sat, 3 a.m.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS, DARK SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
'Group 80'. Air Canada's
$ 2 71 -way to Europe
and back
This amazingly low new group affinity return fare is yours when you
organize and fly with at least 79
other members of a bonafide association or organization, the main
aim of which is not travel, and of
which you have been a member
for at least six months.
You go and return as a group on
regularly scheduled flights. And
you can stay as long as a year.
Air Canada affinity 'Group 80'
Economy Class fares apply from
major cities in Canada to dozens
of exciting European cities. Start
your 1970 holiday planning now.
Air Canada can clear up any questions you may have about organizing your group. But do it now
and make your arrangements very
soon to get the benefit of the lowest affinity 'Group 80' fares of the
year.
In effect from
Now to Mar. 31
Nov. 1 - Mar. 31/71
Apr. 1 — May 31
Aug. 10-Oct. 31
June 1 — Aug. 9
London
Paris
$271
$277
$294
$300
$342
$352
Ask about affinity 'Group 25' and 'Group 40' fares as well. For all the details, call Air Canada.
Fares subject to Government approval.
Go Group 80'   AIR CANADA
It's a crisp 38°
The sun is bright
Sky's clear
And you've got
your period
So what?
You use Tampax tampons, so
go ahead and do your thing.
Go hiking, skiing, riding . . .
anything you please. Comfortable, convenient, internally
worn Tampax tampons can't
chafe or irritate like bulky
pads. In fact, you may even
forget you have your period.
Tampax tampons, used by
more active women around
the world than all other tampons combined.
DEVELOPED   BY   A   DOCTOR
NOW   USED   BY   MILLIONS  OF   WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD.,
BARR1E.   ONTARIO Page   14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
TUESDAY
ucc
Fina!  general  meeting,   SUB  207-209.
INTRA-PROFESSIONAL     EDUCATION?
Executive   meeting,    6:30   p.m.,   SUB
10SB.
DEPARTMENT  OF  MUSIC
Beethoven Recital, noon,  recital ball
of  music   building.
SUB-CRAFTS
Workshops   on   hand   building   class,
7:30  p.m.,   SUB  251.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, l.H.
FILM SOCIETY
"Rosemary's   Baby,"   Fri.,   and   Sat.,
7  and  9:30  p.m.;  Sun.,  7  p.m.   SUB
theatre.
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY?
libertarian  perspective,  noon.  Room
113. SUB
COSA
Movie,  8  p.m.,   SUB   auditorium.
UBC WOMEN'S LIBERATION
MOVEMENT
Anne   Messenger   speaks,   noon,   SUB
207-209.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting, noon, Bu. 104.
UBC SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Lion-lamb gymkhana meeting. 7 p.m.,
SUB 212A.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Faculty flute   chamber music recital,
8 p.m., recital hall of music building.
SUB-CRAFTS
Workshop  in  cylinders,   handles,  and
spouts,  7:30 p.m., SUB 251.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE    CLUB
Meeting,  noon,  SUB  130.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
Wednesday noon hour concert series,
recital hall of music building
THURSDAY
DEPARTMENT   OF   ASIAN   STUDIES
Dr. Seal lectures, noon, Bu. 223, and
seminar, 3:30 p.m. for faculty and
graduate  students, Bu.  1278.
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
"See-Hear"  by Wayne  Carr and Ross
Barrett,  noon. Lobby of Music Building.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL    EDUCATION
Executive    meeting,   6:30   p.m.,    SUB
105A,
SCIENCE   FICTION   CLUB
General meeting,  noon, SUB 119.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting to select new officers, noon,
SUB  125.
UBC  SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Noon    Hour    Rallyete,    noon,    North
SUB Loop.
ENGLISH DEPT.
General meeting regarding tenure
conflict. Speakers present from concerned faculty. All English students
—come out! This concerns you. Bu.
202, noon.
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
Election  meeting, noon,  SUB  212.
FRIDAY
LEGAL AID
Campus legal aid panels, every Mon.,
Wed.,  and Fri.,  noon,  SUB 237-237A.
ONOTOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
Life   —   the   essence    of   Ontology,
noon, Bu.  234.
UCF
Paul Stevens speaks,  SUB 125.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting, 8 p.m., 3387 W.  14th.
SATURDAY
Cosa, movie, 2 p.m., SUB auditorium.
CAMPUS LAUDROMAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   &    Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant  Service
"Clean As A  New Pin"
4354  W.   10th 224-9809
SONG F EST
is
U       Here Thurs.
8 o'clock
^   JU.    QE. Tickets AMS
*l£uu£l\
EAT IN ♦ TAKE OUT • DELIVERY •
3261 W." Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3  lines,   1   day 750,  3 days  $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Wanted Information
13
INFORMATION WANTED ON
trail from Port Renfrew to Clo-
oose. Please phone Dan or Liz,
228-9891.
Lost  8c  Found
14
LOST: FEB. 24, GOLD CUFFLINK
With naval (-rest, Brock Hall or
parking  lot.  206-6070
LOST: ONE FINE~ARTS 125 NOTE
book. Please call 261-8533. Mary
Locke.    Reward — desperate.
Special Notices
16
LOLA'S  DATING CLUB
New  modern fun way to  meet
UNATTACHED LADIES
AND   GENTLEMEN
Ages 18-70 Welcome
Op«n   9   a.m. - 9   p.m.   314   West
Hastings,  .£103   or   call   688-0396
JOSEPHINE BARCLAY—I'LEASE
call Barbara Claghorn in the in-
formation   office,   228-3131.	
WANTED — WALKERS OR SPON-
sors to participate in the Moccasin Miles Walk, April 3rd, 4th,
and f>th: From Vancouver City
Hall at 7:00 a.m. to Hope. The
money raised will go to Indian
organizations to help them in their
fight for social justice and community development. For sponsor
forms or to make pledges, phone
6N5-4730 or write: Resource^ For
Native Progress Association, Box
8746, Postal Station H, Vancou-
ver   5,   B.C.	
BOUND FEET & BOUND MINDS:
An exploration of women's roles.
Mar 11—A. Messenger: As You
Like   Her.
Mar.     IS—A.     Liljegren:     A    New
Style    of   Marriage    in    Sweden.
SUB   207-209;    12:30   p.m.
UBC    Women's    Liberation    Movement.
PLACE VANIER HAS GOT IT?
Totem is next. CYVR-UBC
radio   at   650   on   your   radio.
BIKTir^ANNCTl A-"BABY R.F.
distribution amplifier was born to
CYVR-UBC radio at Place Vanier
at noon today. The little fellow
gave out a tremendous cry at 650
on his dial. He is now alive and
well Monday through Saturday,
8   a.m.   to   10   p.m.
FILM SOC. PRI'TSENTS ROMAN
Polanski's "Rosemary's Baby"
with Mia Farrow, John Cassa-
vettes, Fri. and Sat. 7:00, 9:30
Sun. 7:00. SUB theatre still the
cheapest   and   the   best   at   50c.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: WOMEN'S THREE
speed bicycle. Phone 731-2872
evenings. ____
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to  U.B.C.  Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30 p.m.
T>7 PLYMOUTH 2 DR. H.T. with
'62 Chry. 383, 3 spd. auto., Dual
exh.,    H.P.    Susp.    $350.    526-6073.
1954 CHEV. WELL MAINTAINED.
Above average condition, can
demonstrate.    929-4129   nites.	
f9~61 FORD FAIRLANE. AUTO.
4-dr., 6-cyl., radio, snow tires.
228-8562.	
1961 VAUXHALL. BODY' AND
motor in good condition. Price,
$175. Phone 228-9398 evenings.
1962 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE. AUTO-
matic, excellent condition. Anyone
interested please call Pam or Bar-
bara at  684-4679.	
'59 MATCHLESS 500 SINGLE,
good condition, $350.00; '60 Falcon
2   dr.   std.,   as   is,   $150.00.   263-4803
1967 HONDA S600. PERFECT RUN-
ning condition, 19,000 miles, $1,200.
Call Ellen 872-5494 days. 736-5377
nights.	
196S EPIC DELUXE STILL UNDER
warranty. 4 new tires, 2 good
mounted snows. Good shape
throughout.   Call   738-1156.	
MGA—MUST SELL, $75. RUNNING
condition.    733-3702.	
64 FALCON 6 STD. GOOD CON-
dition.   Must   sell,   684-0609,   Brian.
57 CHEV. 6 CYL. PARTS OR AS
is.    Steve,   224-1692.	
1965 FORD FALCON 2-DR. SEDAN,
6-cyl.   Auto,   radio,   $800,   732-8128.
1964 CHEV. 6. STD. RADIO, NEW
tires, good condition, clean. Of-
fers.   879-0372.	
1961 SUNBEAM RAPIER — VERY
economical transportation. Jim,
228-3898,   or   228-9609.
Autos For Sale (Cont.)
21
1964 ECONOLINE VAN. RECOND.
gears, steering, muffler, etc., $700,
224-4846.	
1964 PLY. 6. AUTO. MUST SELL,
$550   or   best.   224-0684.	
MUST SELL BEAUTIFUL 1966
Corvair, far below market value.
224-3121.	
1967 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS —
31,000 miles. P.B., P.S., radio,
air conditioning. Best offer. Call
collect  532-1071.	
'63 AUSTIN 850 S.W. REBUILT
motor 1968, trans. 1969, exc. cond.
Phone   Ross,   261-5940.	
•63 VW, EXCELL. SHAPE. RADIO,
gas heater, etc., $600. Phone 872-
5931.     218   E.    11th   Ave.   Apt.   C.
'63 ACADIAN 6-CYL. STAND.
New clutch & brakes. Excell.
mech. cond. Clean int. Radio,
good tires. Econ., depend. Leaving country, must sell! Greg, at
922-9450.	
1961 V.W. GOOD COND. RADIO.
Will trade for V.W. Van, S.W. or
Panel.    228-8572.	
'54 METEOR, $50. '59 FORD, $250.
Barrett,   224-1581.
Motorcycles
25
■67 180 YAMAHA. 7,000 MILES
Electric start. $285. '70 plates
526-6073.	
FACTORY YAMAHA DIAL
gauge (for ign., timing) $25. 435-
2970.	
LARGEST SELECTION OF 10
speed bicycles, French and Japanese.  As low as  $69.00.
THE   CYCLE   SHOP
5895 Fraser St.        (4:5rd & Fraser)
 327-4229	
WANTED: VEZPA MOTOR SCOOT-
er.   Phone 731-2872  evengins.
'66 "100 CC" ZUNDAPP SCRAMB-
ler, ■ $200.   Barrett,   224-1581.	
1968 NORTON 650. ONLY 1700
miles. Asking $950. Phone 261-
1903.    Ask   for   Bruce.	
'67 HONDA 250CC SUPER HAWK,
$350. Bell 7V8/500TX helmet, $25.
Leather jacket, med., $15. 1849
Trafalgar St., Apt. No. 1, after 6
p.m. weekdays.   Anytime  Sat., Sun.
1969 B.S.A. 250. EXCELLENT CON-
dition '66 Honda 350 S.S., very
good. $600: $450, respectively. 732-
9914.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
VOC       BANQUET. MARCH       13.
Tickets   available   from   executive.
Contact   Jim,   224-9955.	
CYVR-UBC   RADIO   COMES   ALL
over  Place   Vanier  today  at   noon.
Tune  650  on  your wireless.	
ROSEMARY      HAS      AN     AFFAIR
with     someone     "different"     this
time — the    result?     You    guessed
it — "Rosemary's     Baby"    —    See
him  this  weekend.
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.    Phone   263-5317.	
ON-CAMPUS ACCURATE EXP.
typing. 40c per page, IBM selec-
tric.   Phone   224-9183   after   5   p.m.
FAST, EXPERT TYPING DONE
at a reasonable price. Will pick
up   and   deliver.   Phone   988-9781.
ACCURATE TYPING — GERMAN,
Dutch, French, English. At home.
Reasonable   rates.   Phone   261-3751.
"FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST —
will do typing in my home. Please
call   263-0196.        	
ELECTRIC   TYPING;   UBC   GRAD;
English   major;   35c   a   page:   736-
9874.	
QUALITY        TYPING        SERVICE.
(Private). 681-1805 after 6:00 p.m.
ESSAY   TYPING.
3589 West 19th Ave.
733-5922
ESSAY TYPING FOR FACULTY
of Arts. Phone 732-6739 evenings.
IBM   Selective   typewriter.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
theses, essays, term papers, docu-
ments.   Reasonable   rates.   266-4264
"ACCURATE ESSAY TYPING" —
Mrs.   Pasqualotto,   434-1402	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.
Typing (Cont.)
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED T Y P I S T, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable   rates.   In  my  North   Vancou-
ver home.   988-7228.	
ACCURATE,   EXP.   TYPING FROM
legible     work;     reas.    rates.     738-
6829   after  nine  a.m.   to  nine   p.m.
TYPING SEEVICES
Electric   machine
Phone:    526-9842
EXPERIENCED ELEC. HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work, reasonable
rates.   Phone   321-2102.	
ELECTRIC TYPING. ESSAYS AND
term   papers,    35c   page.     738-2834.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING" 35c
a page; 5c copy. Mrs. Stewart,
733-6098.	
NORTH VANCOUVER. PHONE
988-5420. Experienced typist. Thesis, manuscript, essay. Reasonable   rate.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist, I Italics, symbols, other types).
Experienced essay and thesis typist.   Reasonable   rates,   321-3838.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work. _^___
NEEDED-^SOMEONE TO COME
in five afternoons a week to do
housework and cooking for professional family. References need-
ed.     224-7714.	
ATTRACTIVE WOMEN FOR
florigt firm. Evening work, Wed.
to Sat. Car or driver's license an
asset.    Call   684-2618   or   684-5612.
Help Wanted—Male
52
FULL TIME MALE LIFEGUARD
required May 17-Sept. 7, Langley.
Phone Linda, 733-2004 wkdys.,
after   5:30   for   information.
Male or Female
53
MARRIED COUPLE ATTENDANTS
for campsite on Hornby Island.
Graduate student preferred. Trailer provided; leisure time; available June 19 - September 8. Applicants phone Saunders, 224-7355
between 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   Wednesday,   Thursday.
PART-TIME KEYPUNCH OPERA-
tor wanted for commerce faculty
research   project.     RE   1-4446.
PART TIME WORK
April 1st - May 15
5 Students (3 Men, 2 Girls)
Thurs., Fri., 4-9 p.m., Sat., 10-6.
Promotion-minded extroverts to
promote new toy item around
metropolitan Vancouver shopping centres. Toy item on TV.
Students chosen will be trained
to put this item across by holding contests for children and
giving away prizes. Salary $2.00
per hour. If you have a car we
will pay car allowance. Contact
Mr. Gallo, 6-7 p.m., Mar. 10th,
11th,    12th.     Phone    681-2331.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
PREMIER DRUMS. L U D W I G
Snare. Ziljian Cymbals. Hard shell
cases. Excellent condition. $350.00
Phone  266-5025  eves.	
PIANO VOICE THEORY COACH-
ing by qualified teacher. Colling-
wood  and   Fourth.   731-5459
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats. by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00   per   hr.   Phone   733-6037   eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
WANTED  — A GOOI> QUALITY
portable stereo tape  recorder.  Cash.
733-4013.
"TERINIT" TRACK SUITS — IM-
ported from FINLAND. Assorted
colors and sizes. Also brand name
camping and outdoor equipment at
207c savings. See Hank, room 305,
Memorial Gym, Mondays and Wed-
nesdays   (12:30-2:00). __*•
KNEISSEL  RED   STAR  SKIS  AND
step-in  binding,  used two seasons, -
$85.    3565  W.   1st Ave.	
AMPEX  TAPE  DECK  WORTH
$375.  Now $175 or best offer.  Phone
263-9609.   Ask   for   Dave.     	
CORONET DRUMS. FULL SET.
New condition $200. Phone Steve
Deering, 224-9880, Fort Camp.
Hut   6.	
DECORATE   YOUR   DOMICILE.
Black     and     white     photographic
prints  for  sale-    H"xl4",  mounted*
for hanging',  only $5.  Don Guthrie,
228-3189.   Come  and   look.	
SCUBA EQUIP.: TANK, REGULA-
tor;   wet   suit.   Ex.   cond.   683-8077.
FENDER STRATO-CASTER WITH
case. Cleveland trumpet, blues,
rock albums. Contact Leech 224-
9064.    Robson   225   P.V.
BIRD CALLS
Your   Student   Teltphono
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
at  th«  Bookstore,
AMS  Publication!  Offic*
and Thunderbird  Shop
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GRAD. STUDENT & WIFE NEED
room with kitchen facilities. Phone
224-9774  after  7  p.m.   Ask for  Chua,
room    316/leave   message.	
FURNISHED ROOM. POINT GREY
and MacDonald. Private entrance,
laundry.      Available     immediately,
$45.    After   6,   738-1770.	
SLEEPING ROOM IN OLDER
West   End   home.   No   hassels.   $50
per   month.   Call   684-2618.	
SHARE HOUSE (MALE). OWN
bedroom,   $65.     876-2366.	
FURNISHED ROOM AND FULL
cooking facilities. 2038 W. 5th.
Phone after 5 p.m. Single girl
only.    733-5156.	
FULLY FURNISHED — PHONE,
light, heat included. Share house
facilities. Guy(s). Kitsilano. Study-
ing   facilities,    etc.   Ph.   738-0784
THIRD AND ALMA. HOUSEKEEP-
ing room.  Priv.  entrance.  228-8759.
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM WITH
bathroom en suite in lovely South
Granville     home     for     responsible
student, on bus line. No cooking.
Phone   224-6090.
Room  & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student.   $80  per month.   Fraser &
22nd Ave.  Phone 879-7061.	
GIRL WANTED, SHARE APT..
Furnished 3 rms. Breakfast provided. Cheap. Near UBC. Phone
Jan,   738-2622.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
HOUSEKEEPING      ROOM      WITH
TV    and    rec.    room,    $60    month.
263-9609.	
3 FEM.  GRADS  WANT HOUSE  OR
apt., pref. furn. Kits,  or Pt. Grey.
Immed.     733-3601.	
FURNISHED, CLEAN, 2 - ROOM
suite. Female grad. student.
Available immed. 731-9841. 2525
West   7th   Ave.,   after   1   p.m.
FEMALE WANTED TO SHARE
house.    224-7745,   evenings.
Unf. Houses & Apts.
84
UNFURNISHED SUITE, 1 BED-
room. $105'. 2 bedrooms, $120. Self-
contained.     Kits,    area.    733-3767.
WANTED    GIRL    TO     SHARE    3~-
bdrm.   apt.   with 2  others,   $60  mo.
685-0735,   after  6.	
HOUSE   NEAR   UBC,   2   BEDRMS.
on   main   &   2   more   down.   Dble.
plmbg.,   fridge   &   stove,   $250   mo.
Phone 224-3666 eves. & weekends-
THIRD AND ALMA—UPPER TWO-
bedroom     duplex,     $175.    Includes
gas  and   heat.    228-8759.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Tuesday,  March   10,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
SPOR TS
McKittrick moves on,
three star Birds chosen
Birds head east
St. Marys first
A 1 though the UBC
Thundeibiids did lose out in the
league this year, they have
managed to lose their manager,
Bill McKittrick.
This was the third year that
the Birds were forced to yield to
ithe mothering of McKittrick, and
the  dressing room will never be
" the   same   for   his   having   been
there.
McKittrick .. .
A good measure of the
successes of the team in the last
few years can be attributed
directly to Bill who was
responsible for the myriad of
details which crop up in running
any organization.
McKittrick   played hockey  in
his native Toronto until he was 15
-when he gave it up in favor of
football. He returned to the game
for a short time four years ago in
intramurals at UBC when he
played goal. His outstanding
achievement that year was
compiling the highest goals against
average of anyone playing in
intramurals, or anyone likely to in
the future. His main problem was
a preoccupation with watching
the red light behind the goal
which obviously left him in poor
position.
Bill will still be present on the
UBC hockey scene next year as he
will be the organizer behind the
Blueline Club, an alumni booster
club for hockey.
Present plans call for a
membership to give the holder a
season's ticket for reserved seats
to all Birds home games (a $10.00
value) and admission to social
functions to be held during the
year. Proceeds will go towards
buying equipment for the team.
Further information can be
obtained by contacting Bill
McKittrick through the athletic
office.
In other hockey news, the
WCIAA has announced this year's
all star teams. UBC placed three
players on the teams, Calgary two,
and most other schools placed
one.
Wayne Schaab was named
centre of the first team, while his
linemate for part of the season,
Barry Wilcox, and defenseman
and team captain Jack Moores
were named to the second team.
Schaab also won the WCIAA
scoring championship and Wilcox
ended up fourth.
Edmonton took two straight
from Calgary to win the league
playoffs and the right to represent
the west in the Canadian fianls at
Fredericton, New Brunswick.
The UBC Braves wrapped up
their season this weekend by
winning the Pacific Intercollegiate
League playoff, defeating Selkirk
College 5-4 in overtime. The
Braves were down 4-2 with less
than ten minutes left in the game.
Frank Lanzaratto came through
with two goals, the first to tie the
game and the second to win.
.. . splits
The Braves only lost one game
in league play this season and won
over half of their exhibition
games. The team may be entering
an intermediate league next year
in order to get more competition
than they did this season.
The UBC Thund birds
basketball club leaves on
Wednesday for the Canadian
Championships in Hamilton and
the team to beat must be the
McMaster Marauders.
The reasons for this particular
statement originates with the way
in which the draw is organized.
The Birds open on Thursday at 4
p.m. Vancouver time against St.
Mary's of the Maritime
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association and if they win, will
meet Laurentian of the Ontario
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association, who have drawn a
bye into the semi-finals.
McMaster, however, face
nothing like the grind in front of
the Birds. They, along with
Loyola of Montreal, meet in the
other half of the semi-final but
McMaster has the advantage of
home court.
If the Marauders defeat the
Montreal club as expected they
will have a clear shot at the Birds
if UBC manages to fight their way
through the jungle of the previous
two games.
McMaster also have other assets
which make them the prospective
favorites. A 6'5" forward name
Paul Mazza is their leader as
earlier in the season he was named
most valuable player in the
Carleton Invitational Tournament.
Performances of 26 points against
Waterloo Lutheran and 25 against
Geneseo of New York State
proved that he can score from any
place on the court as well as play
adequate defense.
Loyola are led by forward Earl
Lewis from Albany, New York
whose claim to fame is also a most
valuable player award, this time in
the Loyola Centennial
Tournament. He is backed up by
guards Tom Profenno and Jim'Ivy,
both considered outstanding
players in the Canadian context.
Mount Baker snowed under
by UBC Varsity ski team
- Varsity skiers came up with
another win in overall team
standings at Washington's Mount
Baker on Saturday.
This was the second time this
season that UBC has skied into
the top position at a collegiate
meet; the first at Bend, Oregon in
January.
This time, it was a relatively
easy win for both the Men's and
the   Women's   teams.   The   men
took   first   in   both   the   Giant
'Slalom and Cross-country events
to walk away with the overall
trophy. The Thunderettes
combined a first place in the
Giant Slalom and a second in the
Cross-country to capture the top
spot over runner-up, University of
Puget Sound.
Led by Alan Vittery with
second placing, the Birds put
three skiers in the top ten in Giant
Slalom. Gary Denton was fourth
and freshman George MacDonald
was eighth. Then Then UBC really
decided to dominate the races and
they placed one, two, and three in
the eight kilometer cross-country.
Veteran Jan Atlung beat out
team-mates Per Amlie and Truls
Omtvedt for the gold medal.
The first place for Individual
combined went to Gary Denton
who finished sixth in the
cross-country which combined
with his fourth in the GS.
The Women's ski team hit
gold when Shirley Dylke bested'
her competitors in the Giant
Slalom. Bev Zetner backed her up
with an impressive third and
Kathy Sturgess held the team
down with a solid fifth placing.
Soccer team  shafted  for goalies
Are there any ' Soccer
goalkeepers on campus? If so,
UBC coach Joe Johnson would
certainly like to hear from them.
"We are presently employing
our tenth goalie of the year", said
a rather frustrated Johnson
yesterday afternoon. "The worst
part about it is that there are
already two or three goalies on
campus who are playing in the
PCL."
About the only consolation
that Johnson has this year is that
next year should be 100 per cent
better. None of the players on this
year's club will be lost and there is
a crop of young juniors waiting to
get a shot at next year's club,
presently Gary Thompson and
Tony Mair are carrying the
majority of the load.
If you feel so motivated come
out and stop some stiff shots.
The Birds' opponents are not
well known but St. Mary's did
beat out such clubs as Dalhousie,
Acadia and St. Francis Xavier in
the Maritime division. Laurentian
advanced to the tournament by
downing Brock University on
Saturday night and earlier in the
season beat such clubs as Western
and Waterloo Lutheran.
From all indications, however,
the Birds should be the strongest
club in the tourney despite the
fact that McMaster will
doubtlessly be the team to beat.
They are well balanced, talented,
and probably most imprtant,
ready.
Manitoba Coach Jack Lewis
said after his Bisons lost the
WCIAA finals to UBC, "I
certainly think that UBC will be
the toughest team to go down to
the tournament as we were down
earlier in the season and had no
trouble."
Lewis later went on to say "the
only conceivable difficulty for
UBC will come from the
Maritimes, probably Acadia or St.
Mary's". As it turnes out Lewis
may turn out to be a better
prophet than a coach as it is St.
Mary's which will provide the first
test for the Birds.
The final game of the
tournament will be telecast
nationally by the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation at 3
p.m. Eastern time Saturday
afternoon.
In terms of strategy the Birds
have the same advantage as the
eastern clubs in that they have not
been extensively scouted; hence
their full court man-to-man or
zone press will likely prove an
unpleasant surprise for the
opposition. Similarly, if they are
able to control the boards as they
did in their game against WCIAA
competition, it will make their
fast  break  particularly  effective.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 86
(Creston-Kaslo)
ATTENTION
EDUCATION
STUDENTS
Mr. Adam  Robertson, supervisor of elementary instruction     jj
and Mr. A. R. Fletcher, supervising principal, Prince Charles     t
i
Secondary School, will be available at the office of Student     i
Services, West Mall.
TODAY, WEDNESDAY, MaRCH 11,
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
to interview students interested in teaching appointments
in elementary and secondary schools  in  1970-71.
Applications may also be sent to Mr. F. T. Middleton,
Dist. Supt. of Schools, School Dist. No. 86, Box 1640,
Creston, B.C. Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   10,   1970
X-Kalay home, business
gro wing
By DAVID SCHMIDT
"X-Kalay is going to be as famous as Coca-Cola."
These words, spoken by a member, sum up the
feelings and directions of the X-Kalay Foundation, a
half-way house for ex-convicts. ,
Bill Brown, a habitual criminal on life parole, said, "I
was at the stage where no one wanted me. I was being
pushed into a corner. X-Kalay accepted me when no one
else would."
There, are 46 members at present, including seven
children.
"We said we would take anybody, anytime, but we've
had to send people away and tell them to come back in a
week," Margaret Caron said.
All of the members except Director David Berner are
ex-convicts. Berner is a salaried worker assigned to X-Kalay
by the Company of Young Canadians.
X-Kalay is presently trying to move into Seaton
Academy, 401 N. Esmond. It is an ideal setting, with
room for 100 people, a school and gymnasium, and acres
of lawn.
Their bid has been accepted and they are just waiting
for Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation funds.
The Vancouver Heights Homeowners Association
circulated a petition opposing X-Kalay's proposed move
into their area. It received over 4,000 signatures. A
counter-petition circulated by X-Kalay received almost as
many.
X-Kalay is completely self-supporting. Most of the
revenue comes from the X-Kalay Shell Service; the money
not used for operating expenses is used by the house.
X-Kalay members hold a car wash at the station every
Saturday.
"We've tripled the business since we took over,"
because we're committed to running the station," said Jim
Anatole.
Another source of revenue, the B.C. Pen Co., has
been in operation for a month and a half. The company
buys pens wholesale from Montreal, then mimeographs
advertisements for local businesses.
The rest of the money is obtained by the Hustling
Crew. These X-Kalay members go around the community
Maureen Shaw with two-week old Kalay, and
Margaret Caron at X-Kalay house.
talking to businesses and charity organizations about the
foundations and making requests for money and
donations.
"We're doing them a favor," Caron said, "For a
donation of $100 we can help a guy who's probably
stolen $100 a week from them."
Furthermore, most X-Kalay members are on welfare.
Their welfare checks are given to X-Kalay, the individual
members do not own anything. Everything from food to
cigarettes is supplied by the foundation.
X-Kalay has also moved into the Matsqui Institution.
There is an X-Kalay tier in the Woman's Dorms where the
women live in a community similar to X-Kalay.
X-Kaly members go to the prison every Thursday to
conduct a "game" session with male volunteers. The
"game" session, or group encounter attack therapy,
involves "getting out your gut feelings." People are forced
to see their problems so they can be corrected.
"It's been going fairly well. It's strictly a voluntary
affair," said Warden Maloney of the Matsqui Institution.
"We've had our problems though. They're a pretty
dogmatic and self-righteous group," he said.
"Game" sessions are held at the X-Kalay house, 2025
W. 16th Avenue, three times a week. Besides involving the
members, people from the outside community can also
attend, providing they agree to attend for at least once a
week for three months.
In order to publicize the foundation, X-Kalay is
starting its own bi-monthly newpaper, "Out Front".
Editor Carol Walker said it will distributed free to friends
of the foundation and will feature articles about X-Kalay
and X-Kalay events.
"Anything that we do, we must do better than
anybody else," Browne said.
X-Kalay open houses are held every Saturday evening
at the Alexander Neighbourhood House, 1726 W. 7th.
—david bowerman photo
Black Panthers talk to students:
By STEVE McFIELD
Steve McField, a black student at UBC is deeply concerned by what he calls the
"black salesmanship".
The black people who make up these groups are leading their people into oblivion
he told The Ubyssey.
Black people like those that I heard on Friday do not love black people at all.
They do not even love themselves," he said.
The following is not objective; it's McField's own opinion, as a black man.
Arts and politics made their entre at UBC Friday.
Revolutionaries, local and imported, gathered in SUB ballroom to groove on
music, poetry and revolutionary rhetoric.
The meeting was unofficially called to order by reading the poems "Red Army"
and "We Shall Have Victory".
After this call to victory was over, the microphone was handed over to Darril
Osbrooke, of V-Bag, a black action group based in Vancouver.
Osbrooke gave a brief run down of his group, and said it was comprised of black
people who came from the U.S. and the West Indies. He said that V-Bag has been
organized for political reasons. The main reason, he said, was racism and discrimination
in Canada.
Osbrooke said that V-Bag's manifesto, which he read, was based on opposition to
imperialism and racism, and to eliminate the 50 point system of selecting immigrants to
Canada.
This 50 point system, he said, was biased against black applicants to Canada. The
manifesto would seek to put an end to Canada's racist immigration policy and the end
to police brutality.
"Black people," he said, "are being harrassed by the pigs on Hastings and other
downtown streets."
The manifesto would seek to bring about participation of people in the
determination of trial by their peers, he said.
Osbrooke called for "the overthrow of the capitalist system all over the world."
"The Black Panthers are the saviours of mankind," he said.
The next speaker was V-Bag chairman Greg Johnson who spoke about repression.
"White radicals have to define their role with other radicals of the third world,"
he said. "The objective conditions that white radicals face are different from those of
black radicals."
He said that the campus radicals in North America cannot relate their objective to
survival.
"Canada was repressive towards Indians and blacks," he said. "We are colonizing
the nation of Quebec. Canada is not a nation. It is a colony of the USA."
Johnson said it is time white radicals throw themselves behind the revolutionary
struggle in Canada and the U.S.
"No more time, no more statistics to make you ready. It was time to put your
bodies behind the black struggle and get off your Ivory Tower going to school on the
backs of the people of the third world."
Revolution is inevitable, he said, and your part in revolution is inevitable.
"You are up against the wall — it's time to get out," he said.
A member of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party greeted the capacity
crowd with the revolutionary slogan, "All power to the people", but the response was
faint.
He then apologized for not having any literature to distribute.
"The Canadian government will not permit you to be educated," he said.
"Coming into north Babylon, I had to leave all the literature behind."
His very poor and incoherent speech retold again and again the history and
brutality of the Black Panther Party.
"Since October of 1966, 28 panthers have been slain by the pigs," he said.
"Blacks wanted decent jobs, no jive aid."
He called for U.N. intervention into the atrocities against black people in the U.S.
Other black groups are not rivals of the Panthers, he said. These are only lies of the pigs
to keep blacks apart.
"Some blacks are opportunists and bootlickers," he said. "The Caribbean blacks
who love white women and wear African clothing are agents of the pigs."
Pigs are cowards who run around with clubs and guns, he said.
In all, the meeting was a psychological success. Whites who obviously came to
have their consciences whipped did so. Blacks unleashed long pent up racism and
violence.
As a black man and a student, I wonder where blacks will end up. If a revolution
does happen, blacks would have to be sure of victory. Blacks will lose if they continue
to follow the present black salesmanship. Black people, like those that I heard on Friday
do not love black people at all. They do not even love themselves.
The thing that frightened me was the speakers' directions in leadership.
They are obviously leading blind, poor black people down into oblivion.
unleash feelings

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