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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1970

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Array .,
'-jf** can read all about Wednesday's referendum on the future-of the AMS in today's
Ubyssey. Page 3 has a report of the open
meeting in the SUB ballroom Monday to
discuss the issue, and pages 6, 7, 8 and 9
have various opinion articles.
Oh, yes. There's an editorial on page 4.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 30 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1970
228-2305
First test in 50 years
FUTURE OF AMS AT STAKE
"No one may be compelled to
belong to an association." -
United Nations Charter: Universal
Declaration of Human Rights.
UBC's Alma Mater Society -
to which all students belong
whether they like it or not - faces
its first real test in 50 years
Wednesday.
Every student who holds a
little orange AMS card is eligible
to vote in the referendum which
asks: "Are you in favor of the
membership in and the paying of
fees to the Alma Mater Society
being made voluntary?"
This is the first time in the
history of the society that UBC
students have been asked whether
they want to belong to the society
that takes $24 of their money
each September.
And judging by the voter
turnout at Friday's advance poll,
we've all been waiting eagerly for
the chance to voice an opinion.
Some 330 students cast ballots
in the education building, the
largest turnout ever for an AMS
advance poll.
Other advance polls are being
held all day today on the main
floor   of   SUB   and   tonight   in
' residences.
The quote at the start of this
story was dredged up by the
instigators of the referendum, an
unholy alliance of politicos
including Conservative Club heavy
John Cherrington, who dreamed
the whole thing up in the first
place.
Cherrington managed to get
591 signatures on a petition
asking whether the students
wanted a referendum, well over
the number necessary to force it.
Soon after the referendum was
announced, former AMS
vice-president and current law
student president Carey Linde
threw in his lot with Cherrington,
claiming that his experience with
the AMS has been that it has very
little power to do anything and
misuses the power it has.
Other supporters of a
voluntary AMS include student
senators Peter Ladner and D. J.
O'Donnell and former senator
Stuart Rush.
This    space    is    devoted    to
outlining the issues students must
sand will take into consideration
when they vote.
The most important tiling
about the referendum, a fact
conceded by both sides, is that it
is only an opinion poll. It is not
legally worded because it contains
two questions: dealing with both
membership and fee-paying. It
would also not go into effect until
next September, although it
would be morally binding on AMS
councillors to accept the result of
the referendum and pave the way
for a transition to a voluntary
union.
administering of funds because
they chose to join.
Hodge and the AMS council,
which is with one or two
exceptions solidly behind the
existing structure, are basing their
advertising and publicity
campaign on a general appeal to
unity and strength, combined
with a justification of the
society's record in this and past
years.
They point to clubs and
activities,  The   Ubyssey, Winter
can now levy their own fees, and
already assume much of what the
AMS ' takes credit for such as
intramural sports, they would
pick up the slack even if no one
supported a voluntary union.
Cherrington, a former Social
Credit club president, is especially
incensed over the AMS' decision
to support law rep Dell Valair to
the tune of $6,500 as a candidate
in Rossland-Trail riding in the
August    provincial    election.
Final question is the issue of
daw twit photo
FRASER HODGE volunteers informertion about the glory of the AMS at Monday's ballroom debate, while brother Tony demonstrates
one of the organization's oldest traditions and passes the buck to Louis Romero, chief justice of the student court and the chairman.
The next thing is that the AMS
was originally set up as an
involuntary union by the
administration, not the students.
Proponents of a voluntary
union argue that this was done
deliberately to co-opt dissent and
general student opinion. They feel
a voluntary union would rid the
AMS of the necessity of
continually holding itself back for
fear of offending the "silent
majority" which doesn't
participate in elections or
activities but exists only insofar as
it pays its fees.
They also feel a voluntary
union would be stronger because
voluntary payment of fees would
imply an intensive commitment
on the part of members. They
would, the proponents argue, take
a far more active part in the
running of the society and have a
far    greater    say    in    the
Sports Centre, birth control
booklets, support for Cool-Aid,
day care and co-op housing as
concrete achievements of the
AMS that would go under if the
union became voluntary.
They argue that although
students want a strong student
union, they would not support it
if they were faced with the choice
of paying the fee.
They conclude that the union
would not be strong because few
people would support it. Hodge
and external affairs officer Mike
Doyle have also unleashed
personal attacks on Linde and
Cherrington (see pages 6 and 8)
and compared their tactics to the
Mao-inspired academic activities
committee.
Proponents of a voluntary
union counter with the argument
that the AMS has done little this
year and since undergrad societies
SUB. Hodge and the council argue
that students would! have to pay
the $15 SUB fee to the
administration anyway, and
administration control would be
worse than any student control
could possibly be.
But the voluntarists maintain
that the AMS is running the
building so badly it couldn't get
worse, and that administration
control is inevitable because the
AMS must sign the building over
to the administration in 50 years
anyway as part of the building
maintenance agreement between
the two.
Since this is the most
important AMS referendum in 50
years, the important thing is to
vote — either way.
Vote yes for a voluntary AMS
and no to retain the present
involuntary structure.
VOTE IN MAIN BUILDINGS UNTIL 4 P.M. WEDNESDAY Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
CANADIAN POET and leading man of letters, John Robert Colombo, will read at
8:30 p.m. Wednesday in Bu. 106. Columbo's poems, reviews, essays and criticism have
appeared in scores of North American journals and he is the author of four books of
his own poems. His forthcoming book, Neo Poems, will be published this year by the
Sono Mis Press in Vancouver. He is also the managing editor of The Tamarack Review,
one of Canada's top literary journals, radio dramatist and a free-lance broadcaster.
Admission to the creative writing department-sponsored reading is free.
—toronto telegram photo
Library's latest: a 15th century Bible digest
By ROBIN BURGESS
Examining the latest gift to
UBC's library - a 15th century
digest of the Bible - is all play for
head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs.
"I find it a particularly
fascinating project. Originally it
was thought that the author of
the book was St. Boniface," said
Stuart-Stubbs, "but I've
discovered that it was in fact
written by a French priest named
Nicolas of Hanapes."
Judging by the type of print,
the book was published
somewhere between 1477 and
1480, he explained - less than 30
years   after   Johannes  Gutenberg
AAenon, Niemoller talk
for Moratorium group
Two international peace fighters will be guest speakers at a
public meeting Friday at 8 p.m. in John Oliver Secondary School.
The Vancouver Moratorium Committee to End the War in
Vietnam will sponsor speakers Pastor Martin Niemoller and Krishna
Menon. Admission is $1 at the door.
Niemoller, who was sent to Dachau prison camp for opposing
Hitler's church policies, was elected in 1961 as one of six
co-presidents to the World Council of Churches and is chairman of
the Fellowship of Christian Churches in Germany.
He visited Hanoi in 1967.
Menon was the Indian delegate to the United Nations General
Assembly for more than 10 years, was a fighter for Indian
independence and was active in ending the Korean war.
invented moveable type.
He estimated that probably
about 200 to 500 copies were
made of the volume.
"Every letter of this book had
to be set by hand, printed on
sheets — eight pages per sheet,
dried and cut up and bound," he
said.
Called a poor people's Bible,
the book printed in Latin is a
digest of the Bible arranged in 134
brief chapters by topics.
"Interestingly enough I've
discovered that the book was
translated into English in the 16th
century," said Stuart-Stubbs. "We
have this translation on microfilm
in the library already."
The book in English translation
is called "Examples of Vice and
Virtue" and is a hand book of
moral instruction.
The original Latin volume was
given to the library by Canon
Thomas Bailey, registrar at UBC's
Anglican Theological College.
It will be  included in UBC's
Remember when "The Pill" used to be in
quotation marks? It was a matter of time before
"The Pill" was to become the pill and universally
understood as The Answer to Population
Explosion and Family Planning. All this in spite of
the fact that daily we consume massive quantities
of pills for headaches, pills for stomach aches, pills
for highs, pills for lows, vitamin pills, liver pills,
cold pills, ad infinitum.
You've probably guessed — this column is
devoted to the unmentionable but
cveryone's-talking-about-it-subject . . . birth
control. At Speak Easy, if we had to name the
most common concern with which we have been
faced, we'd have to admit it's been questions in
this area. Where can 1 get the pill? What about the
recent investigations and reports of its
implications? What other methods are available
for me that are relatively safe? "I don't want
lectures, I want protection."
In response to this obvious and crucial need
for information the McGill University Students'
Association has, in consultation with practicing
physicians and gynecologists, produced a most
informative and complete handbook directed at
the public. It goes a step beyond the pure
documentation of medical information about
contraceptives ... it grapples with long-maintained
myths and superstitions, cultural norms and hears
about sexual behavior and sexual response. Speak
Easy is distributing these handbooks at no charge
in SUB 218.
So you've read the booklet and you're at
Speak Easy asking for the next step. We feel it our
position to make clear to students the "policy" of
the    health    sciences    centre    at    this    point.
Dissemination of contraceptives to students is at
the discretion of each individual doctor at the
centre. If you have not procured either the
information or the contraceptives you desired
there, for other than medical reasons, the Family
Planning Clinic, located at 1530 West Eighth on
Tuesday nights (7:30-9:30 p.m.) and 2610
Victoria on Wednesday nights (same time) may
cater to your needs (tel. 681-8517 during the week
for appointments). Be advised, however, that at
the family planning clinic it is the student whose
responsibility it is to follow up the services given.
Remember to go for periodic check-ups if you're
on the pill. Discuss with the doctors there what
side-effects you might be likely to experience, if
any, and so on.
Of course, the ideal situation is a one-to-one
relationship with a good family doctor. He is able
to discuss with you your individual problems or
fears at whatever length appropriate. Speak Easy is
now attempting to compile a list of doctors, both
in the community and on campus, to whom
students can relate and speak freely. We would
appreciate any names, suggestions, or experience
you've had, to help us be as knowledgeable as
possible.
The above information is general, meant to
clarify some of the aspects around this crucial
issue. Birth control, of course, is purely personal,
and particular questions and concerns remain
unanswered. We urge you to drop by SUB 218,
write to Speak Easy, Box No. 115, SUB, or phone
us at 228-3706 for more specific information.
P.S.: If this column is now totally irrelevant
to you, out next column will look into several of
the alternatives for the woman who is pregnant!
special books collection of old
and rare volumes and manuscripts.
Less than ten other books in the
collection were printed before
1500.
"I feel the library has an
obligation to preserve things like
this," siad Stuart-Stubbs.
The special books collection
fulfills the role of a museum and
the volumes in it, therefore, are
treated   as   museum   relics.
Only students working on very
special projects are permitted
access to the collection.	
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Groupie sources close to the
leaders here say the troubled
times call for a man of peace, love
and money. "Where is George?"
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE
Summer and Year Round JOBS ABROAD: Get paid, meet people, learn a language, travel, enjoy! Nine job categories in more
than fifteen countries. Foreign language not essential. Send $100
for membership and 34-page illustrated JOBS ABROAD magazine, complete with details and applications to International
Student Information Service, Box 152, Postal Station S, Toronto
20, Ont., Canada.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held
as follows:
SECOND SLATE:
Vice- President
Treasurer
Internal Affairs Officer
External Affairs Officer
Nominations open — Feb. 4
Nominations close — 12:00 noon, Feb. 12
Election — Feb. 18
Polls for AMS Elections
Advance polls for 1st slate:
1. Educations — 4:00 p.m.   7:00 p.m.
Friday,  Feb.   6.
2. Residences - Education — 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 10
3. S.U.B. — 11:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 10
Regular polls for 1st slate:
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Wed., Feb. 11
Chairman Required for AAC
The Academic Activities Committee is without a
Chairman. Anyone who is interested in this position
please apply in writing to the Secretary of the Alma
Mater Society second floor S.U.B., before Friday,
February 6. Tuesday, February 3, 1970
Page 3
UNIVERSITY
TRAFFIC 6 PATROL
OFFICE
IN CASE YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING for it, this is what the traffic office looks like
since its been banished to the bushland beyond the winter sports centre. At least one
student who went to pay a traffic fine hasn't been seen for three weeks.
-brace stout photo
Great referendum debate draws a pitiful crowd
By GINNY GALT
Who cares whether Alma Mater Society membership
is voluntary or not?
Apparently no one.
Only 75 students turned up Monday noon to hear the
great debate on this subject in SUB ballroom.
The debate centered on the referendum to be held on
Wednesday which asks students: "Are you in favor of the
membership in, and the paying of fees to the AMS being
made voluntary? Answer yes or no."
Carey Linde, law 3, and debating society president
John Cherrington, arts 2, took the affirmative stand while
AMS president Fraser Hodge and vice-president Tony
Hodge argued for the negative.
Linde began by challenging Fraser Hodge to deny
that the present referendum is merely opinion referendum
and does not legally bind the AMS to change now or in
the future.
Hodge agreed. "I phoned several lawyers to get
their opinions on the referendum. First of all, the wording
is contradictory. It contains a compound question which
is confusing. This in itself wipes out all binding legal
power.
"There 's also the concept of membership, and there
appears to be some root for legal argument there."
"If the motion passes, there will have to be a whole
series of motions to put it into effect. It would involve
just a lot of legal housekeeping," he said.
Hodge said the old adage of "united we stand, divided
we fall" is very applicable to this situation. "I don't see
how any projects are even conceivable without some form
of stability.
Cherrington proposed the principle of freedom of
association and called the AMS's statements regarding the
referendum a program of scare tactics.
"The council claims that if the referendum passes, the
administration will gain control of SUB.
"It has also been claimed that activities would come
to a halt, that clubs for instance would no longer function
- such assertions are totally absurd," said Cherrington.
"Today, free association as applied to the AMS is
especially  important  as  we  view  this body gradually
Decrease of men
to women ratio?
The proportion of women to men attending UBC will increase
if admission standards are raised, dean of women Helen McCrae says
in a report to administration president Walter Gage.
A study done during 1968-69 by student services director A.
F. Shirran shows that the mean high school average of women
entering first year at UBC continues to be significantly higher than
that of male students, said McCrae.
Therefore, if admission standards are raised, proportionately
..   more women will be allowed in than men.
As a reason for women having higher averages, Shirran said, "It
is part of our culture that men are expected to go to university,
therefore women are stronger students before entering university."
McCrae also said the age of women attending university is
changing, with greater numbers of mature students returning.
Enrolment figures at UBC for 1968-69, including credit
correspondence courses and the summer session, show that 41 per
cent of the students were women.
Women are marrying younger and then realizing the
opportunities education offers," she said.
"Changes in the socio-economic structure of our society are
bringing more women back," said McCrae.
In the 1968-69 winter session of 865 women ranging in age
from mid-twenties to mid-sixties attended UBC, 43 per cent had
children. There were 943 children with 241 children of pre-school
age.
Of the women with pre-school children, 21 per cent were
single parents. Two per cent widowed, eight per cent separated, five
per cent divorced and six per cent unmarried.
"These are significant figures and indicate the need for
couselling for these women and such- practical help as day-care
facilities and financial assistance," said McCrae.
Bombs threatened
» UBC's bomber took the weekend off but the threatener didn't.
Larry Slaughter, working at Sedgewick Library loan desk,
received a call from an anonymous male caller at 6:55 p.m., Friday.
"He was about 22," said Slaughter, "he just called and said
'we've planted a bomb in the library, ha, ha, ha,' and hung up."
"I called the police and they arrived in minutes."
The police evacuated the building and closed it until Saturday
morning. A search was conducted but no bomb was found.
A similar bomb threat was received on Saturday at the SUB
information desk. A woman called at 7:15 p.m. to say that a bomb
had been planted in the building and would go off by 7:30.
Once again the police were called. They evacuated the
building, and closed it until Sunday morning. A subsequent search of
the building turned up no trace of a bomb.
The campus RCMP refused to comment on the incidents.
Anyone with information on the bombings or the bomb
threats is asked to contact the campus RCMP.
-dave enns photo
"EXCUSE ME.  but I'd like to talk about your vote in the AMS
referendum Wednesday."
moving into student affairs, committing student funds to
political causes."
He referred to the $6,000 of student money being
spent on a candidate's campaign in the last provincial
election. "The AMS and council are such unnecessary
organizations. The AMS is not crucial to the majority of
students on campus."
Tony Hodge compared the tactics used by Linde to
those used by the Academic Activities Committee during
the recent dispute between council and the A AC.
"Also, I've never in my life known Carey Linde to
stand for the status quo. I thought he wanted change, and
we cannot have change unless we have a steady, solid
fund," said Hodge.
New grape  strategy
A meeting to decide new strategy in the United Farm
Workers' Safeway boycott over the California grape issue
will be held at 483 E. 49th at 7:30 tonight.
People interested in serving on commmittees are
invited to attend.
Candidates
join with
protesters
WATERLOO (CUP) - A
disqualified candidate and a
disillusioned semi-finalist in the
Miss Canadian University pageant
Friday joined 200 singing
demonstrators here in the first
major protest in the short history
of Canada's university beauty
contest.
The protest, which took place
during the final stages of the
queen contest, was sparked by the
efforts of Janiel Jolley, a
contestant sponsored by the
women's caucus and the student
society at Simon Fraser
University, who made the trek to
Waterloo Lutheran University to
raise the issue on female
oppression at the pageant.
Hastily barred from the
competition by the pageant
committee — despite assurances
that "any representative from any
university, protest or otherwise,
will be welcomed in the same
manner as in past years" — gained
the right to speak at each pageant
function.
Her efforts climaxed Friday
when Judy Darcy, candidate from
York University and semi-finalist
in the contest, left the platform
and joined Jolley and supporters
from at least four Ontario
universities in their low-key
protest against the pageant.
Grass, revolt
White Panther minister of
education Skip Taube will speak
on "Grass, Sex and the
Revolution" or "Create One,
Two, Many Faculty Clubs" or
something in Bu. 102 today at
noon. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a Weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 3,1970
Er, in answer to the question, you guys, yes.
If there is one thing that a voluntary union really
is, it's logical. That is, assuming the students at UBC
want a student union and that they want to be able to
have some voice in how it conducts itself.
You see, theoretically, if the students want a
union, they will support a voluntary union and enable it
to provide all the services which the Alma Mater Society
now provides. Perhaps more.
And as a bonus, a voluntary union would not
suffer that illegitimacy of existence that the AMS is
guilty of — being a society created, more or less, by the
administration and forced upon the unsuspecting
students.
Under the present set-up, the AMS appears
democratic because students have a vote as to who the
executives are going to be, and occasionally, on where
money is spent.
But the student pays his fees whether he votes or
not. He is a member whether he wants to be or not. He
suffers the consequences whether he wants to or not.
So, assuming that the students want a union, a
voluntary union will work. If they don't want a union, a
voluntary union will not work. And if this is the case,
then neither the AMS nor a voluntary union has any
right to exist, or indeed, any purpose to serve.
You see, there is no inherent goodness in a student
society. A student society must justify its existence
daily, not fall back on some idea that it is needed, that
students need a representational front, that we have to
stick together.
Which is what the AMS is doing now. It is saying
that the AMS must exist, good or bad, because there is
nothing else.
This is the old argument that some of the Canadian
Union of Students supporters used and that people like
Fraser Hodge dismissed. Hodge, you remember, said
things like CUS wasn't justifying its existence and that
we shouldn't support it simply because there wasn't
anything else.
So now we find the same argument coming from
the AMS: Is a voluntary union logical? Bullshit. Is the
AMS logical?
The answer to that is NO.
But the question must ultimately come back to the
students. Do the students want a student society? If so,
do they want one that will take political action? What
sort of structure should it have? Who should it serve?
These are the questions the AMS has answered for
the students for the past 50 years.
Now the students must answer them all by
themselves.
If you want a student union, an organization to
put on dances, to distribute birth control information,
to lobby against the government, to run candidates in
elections, to give money to political cause, or whatever,
then you must be prepared to support that union and
you should vote YES.
If you don't want a student union, then you
should vote YES to eliminate the AMS.
And if you don't care one way or the other, you've
got lots of company.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News  _._.,  _  pau|  Knox
City    _ Nate Smith
Managing        Bruce  Curtis
Wire      Irene  Wasilewski
Sports   Jim Maddin
Senior       John Twigg
Ass't News   Maurice Bridge
Ass't City    John Andersen
Page Friday   Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Brian McWatters was back at city
desk by popular demand. Smith, with
Elaine Tarzwell as guide, was sent to
the forests back of Seymour Mtn. with
Dave   Bowerman   and   Dave  Schmidt.
Jim Davies threatened Chuck
Krawczyk. Gin Gait told Jan O'Brien
of the WestVan wilderness as Sandy
Kass, Robin Burgess and Tony
Gallagher listened. Dick Button
laughed at John Kula. Dave Enns and
Maureen Gans went into the darkroom
to see what was developing.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Rah, rah
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Went to the big UBC basketball
game last Friday. Still shaking
with excitement. Not from the
score - Regina made sure it
wasn't close. But from the other.
The reffing — the way they called
a foul every time down the floor,
and sometimes even made them
walk all the way back up the
court to take the shot. Stirring -
the way they take those foul
shots. And the cheerleaders — the
way they stand at attention
during the game, and mince
stiff-legged onto the court with
their fists dug rigidly into their
sides (natural-like), and then leave
the gym at intermission. Rousing.
And the way the band plays
magnificently at half-time, and
takes a break during the game.
Animating. And the way the
T-Bird first-stringers throw on
their    warm-Up   jackets,    fling
themselves at fever pitch onto
chairs and proceed, with
awe-inspiring aloofness and
heart-rending impartiality to sit
back silently on their duffs while
their subordinates run out the
clock for them. Admirable.
Especially when they are so far
ahead. Only one thing bothers me.
Would someone do something
about that wise-guy in the stands.
He actually had me enjoying
myself for a while.
JIM McFEELEY
Apathetic democracy (?)
The following is a collective statement of the
Campus Left Action Movement.
Democracy is based on the supposition that
man's dignity, indeed his growth and development
as a functioning and responsive individual in a free
society is dependent upon an opportunity to
participate in decisions that significantly affect him.
To look about us, here at the university or in
society generally, we can easily perceive that most
of us are apathetic. How is democracy and apathy
to be reconciled when the dominant conviction pays
lip-service to democracy? How can a vote which
occurs once every two, or four, or five years be
considered participation, especially when most
observe this act to be their maximum and significant
act of involvement? To what extent does this act
contribute to decisions made that directly affect us?
We witness campaigns strictly devoted to the
fabrication of the right image to secure votes —
look at Pierre Trudeau! We witness campaigns run
on non-issues, evocative slogans and nonsensical
muttering like "you don't have to understand Social
Credit to vote for it". Thus an incompetent voting
public is supposed to produce competent
government! We must observe that the student
government at UBC in order to maintain itself as a
legitimately constituted body must annually hold a
general meeting with a quorum. The only means
with which to gain a quorum is the attraction
provided by rock bands. The American government
legitimizes its war policies by invoking the support
of the silent majority. Indeed, apathy reigns.
Apathy is a word derived from the Greek
apathia, a - without, and pathos — emotion,
meaning lack of interest or a listless condition.
Without emotion and listless, we are dead. We
perceive that our present-day cultural condition
gives expression to the frantic pursuit of hedonistic
satisfactions and petty excitations ranging from
wife-swapping to tripping on acid. Desperately we
struggle to experience life by indulgence in extreme
sensations. Without avenues of meaningful pursuits
we try to escape and evade those oppressive forces
and conditions which control our lives and our
ability to experience it. The. extent to which we
relinquish our moral sensibilities and political
responsibilities is directly proportional to the degree
to which impotence and oppression have manifested
themselves in our so-called 'free' society. To relate
to the political dimensions of our life requires active
involvement in it for even our best self-interest. For
J. S. Mill has expressed quite clearly that not to
engage in the political affairs of one's country
would result in the stunting of man's intellectual
and moral capacities and in the narrowing and
dwarfing of his sentiments. He says further:
"Leaving  things  to  the government, like
leaving  them  to  Providence, is synonymous
with caring nothing about them, accepting their
results,   when   disagreeable   as   visitations  of
Nature. With the exceptions therefore, of a few
studious men who take intellectual interest in
speculation for its own sake, the intelligence
.  and sentiments of a whole people are given up
to the material interests, and when these are
provided    for,    to    the    amusement    and
ornamentation of private life."
Having provided for our material interest and
preoccupied with mediocre amusements (from the
golf club to the television set) we presume life to be
quite satisfactory.
We do not, however, presume that affluence is
restricted to a minority even in advanced industrial
society. We do not presume that our abundance has
been made possible at the expense of the many who
suffer poverty and starvation in the world in ways
inconceivable to our complacent imagination. We do
not presume that the nature of corporate capitalism
which characterized industrial society is geared to
the production of waste and obsolescent goods in
order to maintain excessive profits which in turn are
used to exploit us further. We do not presume that
the lack of governmental concern (or of the
university as well) about pollution, unemployment,
poverty etc. might be because governments are more
in tune with business interests than the public
interests. We are apathetic and therefore presume
very little. Mill's speculation about the stunting of
our moral and intellectual faculties was quite right.
Therefore as politically deferential morons we invite
the totalitarian control of our existence. This is
what apathy begets.
The alternative, Democracy, to which apathy
pays lip-service, requires apathy's death so that
people may begin to live. Democracy as an
instrument of involving people together publicly
becomes necessarily an end by which responsible
people can create a free society. Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
***v*%||^fc
Ummagumma by Pink Floyd
!l Rock Masterpiece
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Ummagumma by Pink Floyd (Capitol-Harvest
STBB-388) is quite simply, one of the best rock
albums ever made. To classify it under the term
"rock", however, is misleading, bacause like other
pop music masterpieces — for example, Van Dyke
Parks' Song Cycle — it precludes the term "rock"
both by its musical invention and its
progressiveness.
Ummagumma is a two-album set, one of which
was recorded live last summer in concert at the
Birmingham and Manchester College of Commerce,
while the other was made in the studio.
Three of the live album cuts are expended
versions on their earlier two albums. Astronomy
Domine, by the group's original lead guitarist Syd
Barrett, features more drum work than the version
on The Piper at the Gates of Doom. (Capitol ST
6242). Also organist Richard Wright does a long
solo which is more of an anti-solo. Not that it's
badly done, but it doesn't go anywhere and doesn't
build. Nevertheless, it holds one's attention.
Careful with that Axe, Eugene, a new work,
begins with a slow organ, quiet drums and a moody
vocal. However, it soon progresses into some abusive
screams and a total sound effect similar to that
produced by Led Zepplin with its full volume and
full feedback in the Agrodome last May.
The two pieces on the second side are based on
cuts from their second album, Pink Floyd (Capitol
ST 6279). Set the controls for the Heart of the Sun
is, like the earlier version, quiet, but enveloping.
Featured is another solo by Wright, which sounds
distinctly East Indian-influenced, especially when
accompanied by a tribal drum-like beat.
A Saucerful of Secrets, the outstanding long
track on the earlier album is here presented in an
almost completely different version with the
exception of some of the organ work. It begins
quietly and, similar to the previous version, then
builds up tension through the piling of layer upon
layer of sound. After this reaches a climax, a
constant drum beat takes over and lead guitarist
David Gilmour interjects some ricocheting guitar
outbursts combined with what I suspect is the use
of tapes.
In the live album, Pink Floyd is not concerned
so much with melody of lyrics to the extent that
they were on their earlier efforts. Instead they are
more interested in creating musical moods through a
kind of prolonged electronic jamming - all of the
cuts are over eight minutes long.
This alone would make a release of more than
routine interest. However, the superbly engineered
and produced studio album is what makes the
difference between an excellent album and a
masterful one. What is particularly remarkable
about this album is the incredible musical invention
shown by each of the group's four members in what
are basically four long cuts, each of which is written
by one of the group members and in which his work
predominates.
Organist Wright's contribution is called
Sysphus, which is divided into four parts. The first
starts out with a dull heavy droning bass pattern,
but cuts to a piano solo which sounds as if it is
written out, even though it's probably improvised.
The next section mixes jungle-like noises with John
Cage piano pluckings accompanied by drums and
occasional snatches of reversed tapes..
The third, quieter section consists of, in order,
sad strings, vibes, bird sounds, water noises and
gongs. And then POW!, an incredibly loud and
dissonant organ combined with drums, cymbals and
wordless vocals.
The second cut, actually made up of two, bass
guitarist Roger Waters, is the most lyrical and
relaxing one on the album, and a considerable relief
after the high-pressured sounds which have just gone
before. Across a panorama of birds chirping,
acoustic guitar and vocal combine in a fold song
very much like the Incredible String Band in both
sound and style.
Several Species of Small Furry Animals
Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a
Pict which closes the side is an incredible collage of
noises, most of them presumably generated
electronically. At its close is quasi-Gaelic voice
yelling in argument with jungle-like grumblings
coming from the other speaker.
On the fourth side, lead guitarist David
Gilmour's The Narrow Way builds with a sudden
rush of taped noise which suddenly cuts away to
acoustic guitars reminiscent of the beginning of
Chelsea Morning. Over this line grows a chorus and
interjections of Stockhausenish sound which passes
from one speaker to another.
The final cut, The Grand Vizier's Garden Party,
is by drummer Nick Mason, and consists entirely of
percussion solos except for flute phrases entitled
Entrance and Exit. Aside from a consistently
effective use of stereo here, there is an interesting
technique exploited. Mason takes a continuous
precussive sound, such as a roll on a drum, cymbal,
or gong, and then, by editing, makes that sound -
essentially many fast beats — into a separate pulse
of sound. He then incorporates this sound into his
solos, playing against it and with it as just another
percussive noise.
In practically every way, this studio album is a
brilliant achievement, as different from the
mainstream of pop music as the electronic
achievements of Karlheinz Stockhausen are from
the plethora of anti-electronic Moog-Muzak albums
currently flooding the record stores.
As a whole, the album opens new directions for
pop music, makes more effective use of the depth
and stereophony than any album since Song Cycle
and in short, is a fantastic total musical experience.
There seems to be little else to say except buy
it and hear it. Considering that the double album is
on sale in some local stores for as little as three
dollars you can't miss a bargain one way or the
other.
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DOLLINA  DISTRIB.
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Vane,  B.C.
CUSO Recruitment
Information Session   -   International House
Thursday, Feb. 5 - 8 p.m.
General and medical recruitment staff from Ottawa
will be present.
IF YOU ARE THINKING OF APPLYING,
COME TO THIS MEETING
Personal   discussions  with   Ottawa   recruitment  staff.
Sat., Feb. 7, 9 a.m. - 12 noon, CUSO office,
International House.
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate this spring are
requested to submit "Application for Graduaion" cards
(two) to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) immediately.
This includes students who are registered in a year not
normally considered to be a graduating year (e.g. one-
year teacher-training programme for graduates) but
who are expecting to complete a degree programme
this spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student
to make application for his degree. If the student
does not make application, his name will not be put
forward for approval by his Faculty and by Senate
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
MINING ENGINEERING
SCHOLARSHIPS
For GRADUATES in any branch of
ENGINEERING/APPLIED SCIENCE
$4500 - 9 months
PLUS Planned summer employment
For information contact: The Chairman,
Dept. of Mining Eng. & Applied Geophysics
McGill University, Montreal 110, P.O.
- CLOSING DATE: 20 FEBRUARY 1970 -
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Visiting 16 Different Countries
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For Full  Information  &  Dates.  Etc., Call
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5744 Cambie at 41 sf 327-1162 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
'Isolation is the real enemy within
Mike Doyle, AMS external affairs
officer: Students and faculty in Canadian
universities are inclined to be specialized and
parochial.
The microcosmic worlds within worlds
quality of being has become hidden and
merely implicit. This, it is noted, is simply
another way of describing estrangement or
alienation.
Considerations of this kind are almost
totally beyond the bounds of the
contemporary political mind. Ours is thus a
politics of secondary issues. An obvious
example, in the light of the current
"voluntary, union" controversy is the issue
central to the present politics of the student
society: the Tedistribution of material goods
(i.e. who should students give money to and
for which student services?). Some argue
that some students should run services for all
students while others say the administration,
voluntary groups, and "those who want to"
can do this equally well with no infringement
on the moral and political conscience of the
average student. "Do away with the AMS
and liberty, activity, fraternity and
(presumably) peace will bloom," would
characterize the statements of a large
number of those calling for a voluntary
union. On the other side, it sounds very
much like: "we distribute money and
services to everybody, and even if you don't
like us, come and ask us for money or
something you want done; we're very
friendly."
This kind of argument is secondary to
the simple lack of community which
troubles everyone in our university. There
are some 30,000 students, faculty, staff and
service people who are spending at least part
of their lives out here on Point Grey and the
thing we seem to share is our registration
number or perhaps, the parking lot sticker.
What does this referendum mean? For
me it indicates a lack of political imagination
and creativity. The segments who don't want
to be organized this way, want to give the
organization over to "something else". It
strikes me as a nihilistic action resulting
from the superficiality of present campus
life.
I trust that more than myself can see
the strikingly similar qualities of the Maoists
attacking the AMS and this other motley
crew of Cherrington, Linde, and O'Donnell
(politics of expedience makes strange
bedfellows...)
Simply then, this referendum has little
meaning for the things I've sketched as
basic: the academic and intellectual life and
direction of our university and our province.
I'm going to vote "NO" on this referendum
in order that the people who run for the
AMS executive and council declare
themselves on this primary issue. I'd prefer
to get some answers from these people
rather than from a simplistic "yes-no"
question on an important issue.
Davies   Ravies
First year gear tells all
By JIM DAVIES
In as much as this is engineering week,
boys and girls, we are going to talk about the
UBC engineers who are jokingly referred to
as the campus male version of Pussy Galore's
flying circus by those of us in the know.
I was looking around for an engineer to
interview when I suddenly heard a scraping
sound and I knew that an engineer was
approaching. You can always tell when an
engineer is coming because you can hear his
knuckles dragging on the ground.
Sure enough, it was one of the
foreheadless fubars, Leroy Hockey, a first
year gear.
"What the bloody hell do you want, ya
pimping hippie?" he chortled.
I told him that I would like to ask him a
few questions. He said he would answer
them if I would put his name in the paper,
so I agreed.
First, I asked Leroy about the gear
cheer.
"Well," he said, "First of all the cheer is
only good if there is a big mob of us guys. I
mean, can you imagine me walking around
saying I am, I am, I am an engineer.
Everybody would think I was a big stupid."
I then brought it to Leroy's attention
that the cheer said "We can, we can,
demolish forty beers" and that among over
1,000 gears that was only .04 of a beer
apiece.
DAVIES
"I know," he said, "but that way we
hardly ever barf. It's when we are allowed
to have a whole beer that we're in big
trouble."
I asked Leroy why all the gears wore red
jackets.
"Ya damn hippie," he said, "If you are
implying that we are commies, you are
gonna get your teeth knocked down your
damn hippie throat. The reason we all wear
red is because it's the symbol of violated
virginity. Did you know that some of us
actually get raped during our five years out
here? Why, I know a guy in third civils that
isn't a virgin - no lie, I wouldn't shit you."
"Oh yeah, another reason we all wear
the same clothes is so that we can recognize
each other. I mean we would look pretty
silly tanking each other, wouldn't we?"
I asked Leroy what he thought of the
trend towards long hair and sideburns.
"What's a sideburn?" he said. "Is that
something you get when you stand too close
to a stove?"
"Hey, you damn hippie Ubyssey
mother-obscenity," said Leroy, "I want you
to say that we are very clever guys. Why, a
guy in my Concrete and Stucco 239 lab can
even chew gum and walk at the same time.
I'm not shitting you!"
Suddenly a mob of the red-jacketed
neanderthals passed by with another victim
to bounce off the cement pond.
"I gotta go," said Leroy, "If the guys
saw me talking to you, they would kill me."
Now I understand the
engineer-neanderthal analogy — the last time
I saw anyone that looked like a gear,
Tarzan was feeding it bananas.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Referendum  comment
Page 7
H. D. Earle: The news that
"The universities act gives us the
right to levy fees, but nobody is
forced to join the AMS" is very
interesting. Combined with
aspects of the Belshaw report, and
recent antics of certain AMS
members, it does lead one to
certain logical conclusions. Should
a central AMS council continue to
exist at UBC, and are students
competent to manage the lives of
other students? Let the
proposition be examined from
financial aspects and human
considerations.
If erstwhile students
successfully claim repayment of
fees fraudulently levied (ignorance
of the law being no valid excuse)
by AMS of UBC, and condoned
by the administration in collecting
them, there might well be an
immediate drain on AMS funds to
repay fees, plus agreed interest,
plus nominal damages.
In the immediate future should
a majority of students 'opt out' of
AMS there will be a substantial
drop in the cash flow into the
central AMS funds. A further
consequence would be that AMS
would be unable to pay interest
on the funds used in part payment
of the Student Union Building at
UBC, and other activities and
'jaunts' would be drastically
curtailed. SUB could be run as a
central student resource area by
the university administration who
are financially involved. Perhaps
this would be better for all in the
long run.
Then the various faculty
communities, advocated as an
aspect of the Belshaw report,
could really come into their own.
With a kernal AMS 'trite
autocracy' succumbed, like the
Canadian Union of Students, to a
natural and un-mourned demise,
faculties could raise their own
funds for their own members for
known student needs. Such
de-centralization to a more
personal and humane level is long
overdue, and could indeed be
beneficial.
Involuntary AMS
is totally illogical'
Robert M. Hunter, science 3: If I may, I would like to answer
the question: "Is a voluntary AMS logical?"
The key argument of the AMS seems to be that if it were
voluntary, few students would join, even if everyone knew the AMS
to be beneficial. Hence, the students should be forced to join for
their own good. This is rather like justifying a fascist state with the
argument that the citizens are too stupid to have my freedom and
must be told what to think. (Note this dees not imply that I am
calling the AMS fascist.)
Suppose, however, very few students did join a voluntary AMS.
This would indicate that only a few students found the AMS worth
the $9 they are now forced to pay it.
It is to me clearly irrational to permit this minority of students
to force its views on the majority. Alternately, suppose that a
healthy majority joined the AMS. Firstly, the AMS would then be
funded adequately to carry out its programs at a level precisely
proportionate to the degree of its student support. Secondly, it
would remain irrational to force the remaining students to join. To
do this would amount to making a "package deal" of university
attendance: if one wishes to, and qualifies to, attend university, the
AMS comes with it and costs an extra $9.
Is it logical to expect the AMS to justify itself when it seeks
funds, or, at least, to expect them to ask for funds? I would say yes.
T/ it logical to expect a student, opposed to AMS policies and
activity, to financially support it? I would emphatically say no.
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Considering AMS staff it may
be noted that it was not they who
revealed the financial illegality,
the duress, of recent AMS
methods of obtaining fees. It was
an enlightened student. It was not
the AMS president, who is paid
more than $3,000 a year.
Incidentally, who was in the chair
when council voted and how did
your representative vote? Do you
know? This leads one to question
how many positions on council
have been filled 'by acclaim', and
how many students vacated their
positions during their term of
office, and in what circumstances.
Is 'election by acclaim'
satisfactory? As a Canadian
example of the will of a silent
majority one might find it less
than satisfactory.
One is led to question whether
students have either the maturity
or experience, during their
twenties, to arrange, to
manipulate the lives of other
students. Events indicate that
many do not possess these
qualities. When embryonic
politicians, businessmen, and
bureaucrats require experience it
is advocated they obtain it in the
world, where such experience is_
faster, and more cruel.
It is suggested that one positive
action be taken at once. Before
the registrar of UBC prints
1970-71 enrollment cards to
determine whether students wish
to be members of AMS, it is
strongly advocated that the AMS
hold a campus wide referendum,
to determine which present
students would remain members
of the AMS at UBC. It is implicit
that council will have to detail in
plain language the full advantages
of remaining 'within the fold', and
whether faculty undergraduate
societies could become
independent legal entities.
The referendum would only
indicate a trend, because it would
cover only those who bothered to
vote. However, this could be
useful. Were the voting card to list
all faculties, to give an option of
YES/NO for continued AMS
membership, and to include an
un-ambiguous question on
alternate society levies, it might
well be valuable. Extensive
advance publicity would be
essential.
Stop giving AMS
money to  play with
Jake van der Kamp, Arts l:In Friday's Ubyssey
there was an article by Dell Valair stating why a
voluntary student society would be disadvantageous.
I would like to offer some corrections to his
statements. He alleges that only a small number of
students would join a voluntary AMS. The people I
have talked to fear the same thing, yet strangely they
would all join. Valair says that such a union could not
effectively bargain with the administration.
Does the present AMS do so? The bargaining the
AMS does, which is none too effective or active, is
merely finishing what others have started. But the
most striking statement he makes is, "It doesn't take
too much imagination to see how easy it would be to
gain control of a small voluntary union, squeeze out
opposition, and then use the union to promote one
political line, in the name of the whole student
body." That is precisely what a compulsory AMS has
done! The AMS ;gave over money to Mr. Valair to
run against the Socreds in Rossland-Trail promoting
one political line in the name of the whole student
body.
It is to prevent this type of misuse of our money
that a voluntary union is needed. A voluntary AMS
would not deprive the whole student body of special
events, and entertainment, but would simply deprive
politicians such as Valair of money to fool around
with.
Why is a voluntary union needed? Primarily
because, by all principles of democracy, it is wrong to
force someone to become a member of a society. It is
needed secondarily as a check on misuse of student
money.
Some people say that if a person wishes to
withdraw from the AMS he may do so by leaving the
university. That would be like Premier Bennett telling
us that if we wished to leave B.C. we must also leave
Canada. There is also the argument that we cannot
live in an area without obeying the government of
that area. But the AMS is not the government of
UBC, the administration is. The AMS is a society or
club at UBC and being a student here does not have
to entail being a member of the AMS.
Fraser Hodge recently called John Cherrington,
who collected the signatures for the petition, "a shit
disturber". That is rather interesting since shit, if left
alone, will harden and give off no smell as does the
AMS when left alone. It is therefore extremely
beneficial if someone occasionally disturbs the shit of
AMS affairs so that everyone can smell the stench. I
have therefore the honor to be, sir, another shit
disturber.
Like To Join These UBC
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FACULTY YEAR Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
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TRAINEE POSITIONS
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES INCLUDING ONE YEAR AT HEAD OFFICE AS AN ESTATE
PLANNER. CONTACT THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES REGARDING INTERVIEWS FEBRUARY 23 AND 24,
1970.
WANTED
A Tuum Est Editor
THE JOB: To work with various groups; to plan, control and co-ordinate
the  copy  and   lay-out  of  Tuum   Est  (student  handbook).
TO APPLY: Send a written application to Tony Hodge, AMS vice-president. He's found in the AMS executive offices. This application
should contain:
(1) name of applicant;
(2) applicant's  university experience; s
(3) applicant's   view  on  the   general  outline  that  Tuum  Est  should
take;
(4) View  on what  the  specific  purpose  of Tuum  Est  should  be.
WHY: A payment of honoraria upon completion of a satisfactory issue
of Tuum Est. This is an important position so please submit all
applications to  Tony  Hodge,  SUB 258  by  5:00  p.m.,  Feb. 3rd.
Views on a
THE GREAT
'There's a contradic
Carey Linde, law 3: Below, in bold face are ten
statements I put to Fraser and Tony Hodge at
Monday's non-attended debate.
Numbers one, two and three were agreed to be
true.
Number four was hedged around and never
answered. Fraser suggested that in fact what you are
paying is a fee levied by the Board of Governors under
the Universities Act, and not in fact a society fee. So
there obviously are a number of contradictions.
Number five was agreed to be true.
Number six was implied to be true.
Number seven was quickly agreed to be true.
Number eight was denied under some sort of
suggestion that it would mean too much work for the
AMS.
Number nine was very nicely avoided.
Number 10 was agreed on in parts, then in
whole, then disagreed on, and eventually totally
confused. So I'll just mention a few things involved in
number 10.
The AMS claims it pays the WHOLE shot for
intramurals. Well, if any of you are in the sports you
will know that you have to use a great deal of your
own money, and if you are in a active faculty that
your undergraduate society also has to spend large
sums of money to buy ice time, etc. Clearly
intramurals would be better handled through the
undergraduate levy, where the action is in that area,
and once and for all clear up the funding issue.
Special Events are already carried out at the
undergraduate level in many faculties, and this
process will continue.
The Cornerstone is a good example of a newspaper
growing on the basis of the support it receives.
Last year the Law Undergraduate Society
donated $1,000 to the Vancouver Inner City Service
Project, demonstrating that service agencies can do as
well if not better by undergraduate donations.
Finally, don't let the great red-baiters in the AMS
scare you into thinking that if you support these'
ideas you are becoming part of some large Maoist
plot. Like the late Senator Joe (Reds in the State
Hodge tells his 'truth' c
Fraser Hodge, AMS president: I am not one who
is given to low level mud slinging. However, everyone
has a certain tolerance level which can decrease
towards the end of one's term in office. If the shit
level rises correspondingly, the retaliation becomes
feasible, in fact, a likelihood.
My topic: Carey Linde and John Cherrington.
My motivation: I'm sick and fed up to the god
damned teeth with the lies and half-truths these two
would-be political figures have been spreading about
me, my executive, the AMS, and the university as a
whole over the months while I've been president.
Let's have a quick look at the surprisingly similar
backgrounds in this unique partnership of John and
Carey.  This  is the marriage of two diametrically
opposed political views.
The holders of these views have united in their
greatest undertaking ever — the destruction of the
one wholly legitimate student organization on this
campus.
Remember February 1968? Carey Linde
swept into office as AMS vice-president on the shirt
tail of Stan Persky's highly emotional "little ma%
against the establishment" (i.e. academic
requirements for eligibility) campaign.
Wow! There he was, vice-president of a
multi-million dollar organization with all kinds of
legitimacy at his disposal to make no end of wild,
shocking statements to rattle and shake the
university.
'Choice entails commitment'
Stuart Rush, law 3: Student unionism provides a
real alternative to student government. The AMS
apologists see only confusion and hell-holes beyond
their paper structures, but many others see genuine
possibilities in a voluntary union of students.
Rather than using the AMS as a scapegoat to
provide the reasons why student unionism is a
preferable form of structuring student energy, let me
simply outline the advantages which I believe exist in
student unionism.
First, it is voluntary. There is no compulsion to
join or to tacitly accept the policies and programs
which it offers. Membership is based on one's
acceptance of the program of that union and of the
participation which it demands. This emphasis on
consent has a two-fold design: on the one hand, it
necessitates a certain degree of commitment on the
part of the joiner and on the other hand it forces the
framers of the union to create policies and programs
which will respond to the status (of if you will, class)
demands of students.
The effect of this will of course be a proliferation
of unions. There will be competing ideas and
idealogies. There will be tension and conflict among
unions with opposing views of the good of the
student body. No one will have a monopoly on the
'student voice'. No one will be able to represent all
of the students nor receive representation on behalf
of all  of the  students. This dynamic will force a
clarification of the student role in the university and
in the society; it will also force a redefinition of the
university.
Second, a voluntary student union is
anti-authoritarian. Decision-making is democratic.
Participation is fostered through de-centralised
structures, eg. course unions would allow for the
greatest degree of participation within a wider
framework. A union is a creation of its members for
its members. Its interest is the maximization of its
members views and the greatest satisfaction of its
members' needs.
Third, a union of students is an action body. It's
main thrust is not the providing of services to its
members; although that can certainly be one of its
functions, but the altering of conditions to meet the
demands of its members. Policies and programs thus
become key in the activities of the union. Union *
membership entails commitment.
Student government plays a passive response
role. Student unionism can play an active innovative
role. If union members felt that student
unemployment were the single most important issu£~*
facing the union it could and would organise actions
which would focus on the root of the problem in an
effort to precipitate some measure of change on the
issue. Regardless of the issue, you make it, decide on
it or ignore it. Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
tary AMS
EFERENDUM
>n here somewhere'
rtment) McCarthy in the United States who
t have a brain in his head, and had to retain his
r, these people think that the best way out of
dilemma is to turn it into the old argument
t the Godless Socialist (which somebody else in
>rovince used in the recent past). Make up your
-nind in terms of your own ideals.
Che Alma Mater Society is a Society registered
inder the Societies Act of B.C. in Victoria.
4o person can be forced to pay membership fees
6 any society registered under the Act to which
le does not volunteer his membership.
Itudents are not given a choice and are
ompelled to pay membership fees to the Alma
dater Society.
rhere appears to be a contradiction somewhere.
'he present referendum is an opinion
eferendum, to merely indicate student
entiment, and does NOT legally bind the AMS
to change at all, automatically, either now or in
the future.
6) Any future change in student government styles
will have to be decided on AFTER the
referendum, and NOT BY the referendum, per
se.
7) The five dollar athletic fee is completely
unaffected by this referendum.
8) The Student's Council could draw up an
appropriate plan for keeping SUB in student
control, the undergraduate societies as they are,
and present this plan to the students at the
Spring General Meeting.
9) Under such a plan clubs would still be with us,
only minus the one percent of the budget SOME
get now.
10) The undergraduate societies, when they levy
their own fee, acting alone, in combinations, or
all as one, could provide their respective students
with such services as special events, news paper
or papers, intramural sports and grants to s
community services.
)ut Linde, Cherrington
/hat a gas! The child found he could get all the
ion he wanted by rattling the playpen and
ling his toys against the wall!
Ml, it didn't last long. The novelty wore off,
e stopped listening to the racket and soon
gh that burdensome monster called
risibility, or obligation to do something, reared
id.
o, Carey quit, offering some incredible excuse
rustration. I view this as evidence of his inability
fill the responsibilities of an elected office,
'rustration? Sure that's an occupational hazard
ated with everything you do, especially in the
of politics.
Jut anyone who is worth his salt tries to
ome that frustration and carry out his job in
of it. And since that fateful day, Carey's
:t"ive purge of those he couldn't overcome within
rganization he couldn't master, has led him from
ruitless attack to another. And eventually, to
ill-time height of his career: to destroy the
ization and the students along with it. \
vliat about the other half of the partnership?
*reat John Cherrington. This is the man who
ged to build around himself an artificial aura of
last   summer.   He   did  it   at   your   and   the
rsity's expense.
lis formula was simple: ' he told the
ntowners", (Rotary Clubs etc.) what they
:d to hear, not what it's really like on this
us.
t's common knowledge that a cheap way to be
ar downtown is to say the university's only
em is that the administration isn't tough
igh on those who hold other than moderate
cal views,
t's  also   cheap   to   claim   that   the   university
doesn't need more money, that facilities are entirely
adequate, and that the university is really trying to
build itself a marble and gold castle of luxury and
extravagance.
It's hard to believe that such statements would
come from any student on this campus. But that's
what Cherrington told the downtown community last
summer.
John Cherrington, self-appointed spokesman for
the students of UBC, went on to say that student
leaders, and me in particular, were only interested in
pubs on campus and undermining the morality of our
youth.
Cherrington further threatened that he would
have the president's job next year. What happened,
John?
710 votes and a poor eighth in a field of nine in
the senate elections isn't really a hell of a lot of
support.
Were you playing to the Socred ministers in
Victoria, or was it merely a plot to get your name in
The Vancouver Sun?
Are these the same motivations you're using in
pushing this referendum? I would be lying if I said
these thoughts had never crossed my mind.
Do you really think you can further insult the
intelligence of students on this campus by thinking
they will go for the vindictive antics of a couple of
children, negatively motivated by their personal
failures within the AMS?
You leave me wondering why some people can
only be negative. You leave me asking why you
haven't seriously tried to build up, not tear down.
We'll know for sure on Wednesday night what
the results of your efforts are. But I seriously doubt
that the students on this campus will endorse the
negative proposals of a couple of negative minds.
'It's a bureaucratic, leftist organization'
eoff Thomas, arts 3: The proposed referendum
VIS is the first sensible thing that has appeared
is campus in the three years that I have been in
dance at UBC. At long last we can have the
n of belonging to that bureaucratic, role-playing,
: organization that has given $400 of our money
e Sir George Williams defence fund. (You know
people, the ones who discredited "the student
reform movement", whatever that means by
destroying a $2 million computer.) They can do this
because of some ridiculous clause that says they are
allowed to use $9 of our money "for discretionary
use in social and political activities."
John Cherrington is to be commended on his
motion and I hope anyone who has any common
sense at all will vote "yes" on the referendum
pollution.--.
INDUSTRIAL WASTE
FEB. 5
THURSDAY NOON
...at  U).
EAT IN .TAKE OUT • DELIVERY <
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GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Annual General Meeting
THE A.G.M. of the Graduate Student Association will
take place on Wednesday, February 25, at 12:30 p.m.
in the S.U.B. Auditorium.
Candidates in the forthcoming G.S.A. elections are
expected to be introduced at this meeting.
GIRLS!     GUYS!     EVERYONE!
Open  House '70 Needs  1,000 Students to be
Guides March 6 & 7
SIGN UP IN S.U.B.
RM. 230 ON BULLETIN BOARDS
MARTYN SMITH
Arts 4
2803 West 14th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
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See page 7 for a complete
winners list and contest details.
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SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS-
THE
POPPY
FAMILY
IN CONCERT !
SUB BALLROOM
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
- 8 P.M. -
Advance Tickets Now On Sale
at AMS Business Office
Students $7.75 — Non-Students $3.00
Tickets are going fast
Get Yours Today and Avoid Disappointment Page   10
Advertisement
THE      UBYSSEY
Advertisement
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
TOMORROW
AMS FE
FERENDUM
"ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF THE
MEMBERSHIP IN, AND THE
PAYING OF FEES TO THE ALMA
MATER SOCIETY BEING MADE
VOLUNTARY?"
TOMORROW Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
(UPI)—Thirty-one delegates from
the Asses and Mules Society held
a convention discussing the
relevence of the blorg society in
connection with the fertilization
of this inland paradise. 	
Cops end Ottawa occupation
OTTAWA (CUP) - An early morning raid by city police Monday ended a brief occupation of a suite
Jpf offices in the University of Ottawa administration building by a group of French-speaking social science
students demanding French-only instruction in their faculty.
The 18 students were charged with petty trespassing for their action, which began late Sunday.
Although the students were threatened with expulsion and suspension by U of O security staff during
the occupation, a spokesman for the administration vice-rector's office said Monday none of the 18 would
be dismissed or suspended by the university.
The students, released on their own recognizance, were to appear in provincial criminal court Monday
afternoon.
The occupation was the latest in a campaign by U of 0 social science students to gain all-French
instruction in the 350 member faculty, which is about 85 per cent Francophone,
Fascisme au Quebec: C est
rimposition de I'anglais
MONTREAL (CUP) - C'est dans la confusion la plus totale
que s'est terminee hier apres-midi (mercredi, le vingt-huit Janvier)
l'expose de Raymond Lemieux. devant quelques deux cents
etudiants reunis "au centre uruversitaire de McGill.
Ce n'est qu'apres une heure de discours relativement paisible
qu'eclata    une    melee    verbale.    Plusieurs    locteurs    improvises
s'emparerent a tour de rule du microphone. On remarquait parmi ces
derniers5 des activistes "Maoistes" d'apres Reggie Chartrand, de la
force constabulaire de Montreal.
Le discours de Lemieux (president du Ligue pour 1'integration
scolaire, une organization unilingue) e'tait bien pese" et allait droit au
$ut.
"Le fascisme au Quebec est l'imposition d'une langue par une
minorite* sur une majorite^" disait-il, "et comme les noirs aux
Etats-Unis s'identifient par la couleur de leur peau nous nous
reconnaissons par notre langue."
Lemieux poursuivait precisant les raisons de son optimisme
quant au succes eventuel d'une liberation nationale qu'il considere
gossible sur une periode a longue terms: "nos adversaires se battent
pour le passe, nous nous battons pour l'avenir car nous avons la
jeunesse de notre coW'
Selon Lemieux il n'y a pas de compromis possible avec
l'estalishment de la rue St-Jacques (rue des financiers anglophones de
Montreal): "je parle au nom d'un peuple qui vont diriger ses propres
affaires," declarait-il en denoncant les paroles recentes du H. Rocke
Robertson, principale de 1'universite'McGill.
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Announcement of Elections
Elections for G.S.A. Executive will be held on
Thursday, Feb. 26, and Friday, Feb, 27
Nominations Open Monday Feb. 2
Nominations Close 4:00 p.m., Friday, Feb. 13
The   following   positions   on   the   Executive   are   open   for
Nomination:
INTERNAL  AFFAIRS  COMMISSIONER
EXTERNAL   AFFAIRS   COMMISSIONER
PRESIDENT
ASSEMBLY  COORDINATOR
SECRETARY
Nominations should  be in  writing  and   should   bear the  signature  of  the
nominee   and   of  four   (4)  active   members   of  the   G.S.A.  They  should   be
addressed to the Secretary, c/o Graduate Student Centre.
for those who really want to know
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documenting how people, throughout the ages and
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New from UNESCO!
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International Publications,
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ADVANCED   LEARNING   PROGRAMS
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THURS., JAN. 5 - 8 p.m. - BAYSHORE INN
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STUDY SKILLS
NOTATION SKILLS
MEMORY SKILLS • USTENING SKILLS  • CONCENTRATION SKILLS Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
TUESDAY
SOUTHERN   AFRICAN   SUPPORT
COMMITTEE
General meeting in SUB 224 at noon
to   discuss   Wednesday  demonstration
at Portuguese consulate.
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Beethoven   piano   recital   at   noon  in
Recital Hall of Music Bldg.
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
Film   of   "Medical   Jurisprudence"   at
noon in Wesbrook 201.
THUNDERBIRD SKI TEAM
Ski film, "The Secret Race", today
and Thursday noon in old auditorium.
Admission 50  cents.
GREEK  CLUB
Greek   folk   dancing   in   International
House at 7:30 p.m.
E.C.O.
Volunteers  for  two  active  anti-pollution campaigns. Noon in Bio Sci 2321.
LEGAL   AID
Campus  legal  aid  panels  every  Mon-
div   Wednesday and  Friday noon in
SI H  2i'i
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT   WIVES   ASSOC.
Monthly   meet,   8   p.m.,   Cecil  Greene
Park.   Dr.   E.   Effort speaks  on  overpopulation.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meet,   noon,  SUB 211.
CLAM
Kap session on Democracy and Apathy
SUB   119.
COMMUNITY   INFORMATION
Meet,   noon,   SUB   council   chambers.
IliKh school visit schedule for Lower
Mainland  to  be  finalized.
EUS   ACADEMIC   SEMINARS
Dr.   Murray   speaks  on  air pollution.
noon, in Civil Eng. 201.
PRE-DENTAL   SOC
Meet, noon, SUB 213. Dr. Mike Wells
speaks on setting up a practice.
DEPT.   OF   MUSIC
Piano  recital  by  Kathryn Bailey and
Robert Rogers,  noon in Recital Hall,
Music  Bldg.
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
General  meeting and film in Bu.  104
at noon.
THURSDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Teach-in at noon in Kd. 202.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
lie-organizational meeting in International House  at noon.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Lecture   on   high   performance   flight
at noon in SUB 119.
NATIVE   INDIAN   CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 224.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Faculty violin recital by John Loban
at   noon   in   the   Recital   Hall,   Music
Bldg.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Poppy   Family   concert   in   SUB   ballroom  at 8  p.m.   Tickets   available  in
the AMS offices.
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Pollution series on "Industrial Waste"
at noon in l.H.
FRIDAY
CONTEMPORARY  ARTS   FESTIVAL
Al   Neil   free   concert,    noon,    Musical
Recital Hall.
FILM  SOC.
Marat  Sade,  Friday and Saturday at
7   and   9:30  p.m.,   Sunday,   7  p.m.   in
SUB  Theatre.   "The Life  and Ribald
Times   of  .   .   ."
SWING IN
PSYCHEDELIC    j
SOPHISTICATION
First Vancouver
Appearance
Sensational Recording       j
Artists \
Sugar and Spice
. Mon. to Fri., 8:30 to 2 a.m..
j   Sat. - 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.   j
I 5th Ave. at Fir - 736-43041
i THIS COUPON GOOD  FOR
i $1.00
| OFF REGULAR ADMISSION
j WITH STUDENT CARD
I MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
j No Admission to Persons Under 21
CAMPUS LAUDR0MAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   &   Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354 W.   10th 224-9809
a fervrJ
poefry |<
wed.feb.4
7:BOaf l.H.
. . . readings from
Africa, India,
Japan, West Indies
.. . admission free
w+m0^^m^**+^^m^^m^^0*m^^^^^a*m+^^^m^*^+
AMS REFERENDUM
POLLING STATIONS
Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. - -4:00 p.m.
Aud.   Cafe
Barn
Education
SUB
Main Library
Bus Stop
Civil  Engineering
Henry  Angus
Gym
Woodward
Ponderosa
Buchanan
Sedgewick
ADVANCE POLLS
Tues. — 11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. — SUB
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. — Residences
NOW - A NEW SERVICE^
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie   St.
Vancouver   15,  B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DINNER & DANCE ORGANIZED
by M-SSA. Sat., Feb. 14, 7:00 p.m.
International   House.    $2.00   each.
DANCE TO THE TRIALS OF
Jason Hoover. Friday, Feb 6
9:30-1:00 at Place Vanier. Res!
1.25.  Non-res.   $1.50.
Greetings
  12
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
the Poppy Family Thursday, Feb
5, 8 p.m. SUB Ballroom. Why not
drop in?
Wanted Information
13
RE: YELLOW VALIANT DOORS
creased Sunday, Empire Pool pay-
lot. Information wanted. Please
phone   321-901!)
Lost & Found
14
LOST IN EAST MALL ANNEX,
large red folder with photograph
inside. Personal, sentimental
value. Reward offered. Phone Allen   733-7019.
ATTENTION GREEN FIREBIRDS.
Anyone finding a 100 ft. yellow
extension cord in their car after
Mardi Gras at the Showmart
building. Please return to SUR
information   desk..
Rides & Car Pools 15
WEST VAN. CAR POOL. MON.-
Fri. for 8:30's. Phone Bob, 922-7955.
FROM No. 5 RD. & STEVESTON
Hwy. for 8:30 classes. Ph. 274-2360
after 6 p.m.  Ask for Tony.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott, 299-9422.
 — *	
LORD TWEEDSMUIR HOMECOM-
ing, Friday, Feb. 6, 7:30-???. All
ex-Tweedie-ite.s welcome. Come
and meet your old teachers,
friends, etc. Guided tour of the
new labs and facilities.	
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN YOUTH
HOSTEL OPENS
Special weekend packages available
for ONLY $8.00 — Includes two
nights accommodation and all
meals. Open 7 days a week, beautiful location on Alta Lake—skiing,
snow shoeing, ice skating, fishing,
etc.
Reservations and further information can be obtained at the Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406
West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
738-3128.
UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. SEE D.
Barrymore's "The Secret Race"
(color 55 min.). Today and Thursday, 5th at noon. Old auditorium.
Coverage of Portillo races in '66.
50 cents.	
SKI AT WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
4 weeks ski instruction with return
bus transportation only $22.00. For
further information contact: Canadian Youth Hostels Association.
Tel.   738-3128.	
SEE THE LIFE AND RIBALD
Times of Jean Paul Marat in
'Marat Sade' Fri. & Sat. 7:00, 9:30.
Sun.   7:00.   SUB  theatre.   Only  50c.
ATTENTION — POETRY LOVERS
— readings from Africa, India,
Japan, West Indies — Admission
free — Wednesday, Feb. 4 at 7:30.
Int.  House.
RESIDENCE DWELLERS! TRADE
four claustrophobic walls for the
larger environment of the Queen
B. theatre, Feb. 25 at 8. Only
$1.50. See the prize-winning film
of birth "The Rose" plus others.
Tickets,   Van.   Ticket  Centre,   683-
3255.
Travel  Opportunities
17
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON   A
BUDGET ?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian  Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver  9,   B.C. Tel.   738-3128
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobile For Sale
21
65 MUSTANG CONVERT 289 4-
spd excellent condition. Best of-
fer.   684-4007.	
1959 ZEPHYR CONVERTIBLE.
Good running condition. $150. Call
Rudi,   731-0348. ,
FANTASTIC 1953 CHEV. CANNOT
describe in short ad. Any test.
$300.00,   no  offers.   Phone  261-5840.
1958 AUSTIN — EXCELLENT
mileage. $125.00 or best offer.
Phone  299-7652. ^
MECHANICS' SPECIAL: 1954 PLY.
mouth, excellent body, real cheap.
Evenings  733-7358.	
1953 DODGE, IN EXCELLENT
condition. $135 or closest offer. Al,
732-9629.	
RETURN TO EUROPE, SELL 1969
VW-Bus, all glass, 13000m (long
distance), $2600 or best offer.
224-3082.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPEC-
ialists in graphs, maps, textbook
illustrations, complex formulae.
Scientific Displays. Advertisements.   Phone  733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
ARTWORK PHOTOGRAPHY Posters call me and see if I can't do
it.   John   Kula   224-4146.
VETENSKAPLIG GRAFIK =
Specialister 1 Grafik, Kartor, Text
Boksillustrationer, Invecklade
Formler. Vetenskapliga Visingar.
Annonser.   Tel.   733-4506.	
SEE 'THE PERSECUTION AND
Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat
as performed by the inmates of
the Asylum of Charenton under
the direction of the Marquis
De Sade'.  SUB theatre.
IS THE SUB SLOWLY COL-
lapsing? Protect yourself! Relax
in the sturdy concrete womb of.
the Queen E. theatre Feb. 25 at
8. $1.50. "The Rose" and other
prize-winning films. Tickets 683-
3255   (Van.   Ticket  Centre).
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
Sewing & Alterations 38
Type-writers & Repairs 39
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, these, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
THESES TYPED. EXPERIENCED
typist. IBM-machine. Call Jenifer
Tomlin, days 688-8572, eves. 682-
5380. __
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794 — 35c page, 5c
copy.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
Please  call 224-6129
Typing (Cont.)
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates; 738-6829
after  nine  a.m.   to  nine  p.m.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc.   Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone  321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
FEMALE HELP WANTED SIX TO
eight hours week, $1.75 hr. Keep
house   clean.   266-1611.	
COOK REQUIRED SATURDAYS,
10-7, $10 day. Call 224-9667 (Ernie
or  Dave).
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Language  Instruction
61A
Music
62
Tutoring
64
TUTORING  IN   MATH   -   PHYS.   -
Stat by  instructor  (Ph.D.)  ?5  per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Offic*
and Thunderbird Shop
LOVELY LAVENDAR GOWN —
full length formal with white bod-
dice and delicate  trim.  437-1808.
KOFLACK LACE SKI BOOTS;
size 11M, $35.00—1 season. 738-
7793.	
8-TRACK CAR STEREO PLUS 4
tapes, 2 speakers, $95.00, or best
offer.   Rm.   328.    224-9755	
MUST SELL ! 1968 PROOF COIN
sets (lc-$1.00) from the Mint.
Call   263-5975   after  seven.   	
SKIS 205 EPOXZ MASKS TOE-
pieces; Tyrol size 11-12 boots. All
good   condition.   Eves.   266-4338.
HEAD COMPETITION SKIS 215CM.
Great shape with Marker harness.
Must sell now. $50 or offer. Phone
Gary at  738-8435  eves.	
PORTABLE FLEETWOOD TV, 21-
inch, two years old, hardly used,
excellent condition. Call Rudi
731-0348.	
COMPLETE SET GRETSCH
drums, Avedis Zildian cymbals,
chrome snare. Excellent condition.
Terry  435-9380  aft.  6:00.	
SKIS, ROSSIGNOL ALLAIS MAJ-
ors, G.S., 215cm, 1 yr., good shape,
Nevada bindings. Dave Pugh 224-
1678.	
ESPANA CLASSICAL GUITAR,
also el. guitar, good fingerboard.
Sell cheap.  224-9660,  Jacques.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT ROOMS WITH REC.
room, T.V., record player, private
entrance,     bathroom,    near    UBC.
263-9609;	
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY^
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5760 Toronto
Rd.	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy,   224-9620.	
PL'HNISHED LIGHT HOUSE-
keeping and sleeping rooms. Close
to I'BC and trans. Students only.
Available immediately, $60 single,
S45 double.  Lloyd or Tom 738-1895.
MALES, SINGLE OR DOUBLS.
rooms; newly furnished; light
cooking; warm; TV room; near
UBC.   After   6   p.m.,   228-8040.
Room & Board
82
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.«T
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.
FREE ROOM BOARD EXCHANGE
for sitting and light duties faculty home. Transport to UBC. Ph.
RE 8-8205	
ROOil BOARD,        INCREDIBLY
friendly surroundings, food and
TV. P'hone 224-0723 or 224-9073.
Phi Delta Theta 2120 Wesbrook
Cres.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SHARE WITH GIRL. BASEMENT
suite, furnished, washer, dryeiy,
private entrance, bathroom, show—
er.   $55.   228-8238,   224-7338.	
2 BEDROOM BASMT. SUITE,
furn., wash. Kitchen, sep. ent.
Call 228-985'8 aft. 5:30 p.m. 3781
W.   20th Ave.	
MALE GRAD STUDENT NEEDS
person to share 2-bdrm. apt. Mar-
pole.   325-1367   or  Aud.   Annex  123.^
MADE ROOM-MATE TO SHARE
one bedrm. apt. in West End, $7ft
month.  Ph.  685-1581. '
Unf. Houses & Apis.
84
USE  YOUR
UBC
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   13
UBC team wins
debate on grass
The UBC debating team
defeated the University of
Victoria debating team Friday by
successfully arguing "that
marijuana be immediately
legalized for all persons over 19
years of age."
The UBC team of John
Cherrington and Charles Hulton
argued that present marijuana
laws in Canada violate a basic
premise in law-making and that a
person should be able to do
anything that is not harmful
directly to innocent third parties
or is liable to become a liability
on fellow citizens.
Cherrington said that
marijuana is similar in
intoxication to liquor and is being
further tested on.
The UVic team members, Jim
Hamilton and Geoffrey Corbett
argued that the word
"immediate" in the resolution was
the focal point of the debate.
Hamilton and Corbett
maintained  that  "the marijuana
Look,
M.L.Avery!
As required by the board
of    governors    of    our
university, would you please
publish the results of our
fee levy held Jan. 26, 1970.
The levy of $3 was passed
76-9.
M. L. AVERY
president NUS
user becomes more concerned
within himself and less concerned
with the world around him."
The new English Speaking
Union trophy now belongs to
UBC.
It's year
of the dog
The Year of the Dog, 4668, on
the Chinese lunar calendar begins
Friday.
To celebrate, the price of the
Chinese food combination in the
Auditorium cafeteria will be
reduced to 75 cents Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday. All orders
of Chinese food will receive
complimentary Chinese tea and a
fortune cookie.
This is the first year that
Chinese food has been offered in
the cafeteria.
"The food is as authentic as we
can make it for the western
palate," said dietician Shirley
Louie.
All the Chinese food is
prepared and served at the
cafeteria.
• At *"
EAT IN 'TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.ni.
FACTORY
TRAINED
, . . our mechanics that is
Specializing In Repairs To:
MERCEDES-BENZ - VOLVO
& VOLKSWAGEN
We have all the
Equipment to FIX
most of the REPAIRS
to your car . . . RIGHT
ON THE PREMISES
FULLY GUARANTEED
Very reasonably priced too!
8914 Oak St.     263-8121
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
ftrbcinks
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
ADULTERY
is
IT
LEGAL*
ENGINEERS' MODEL SHOW - TUES., WED., ALL DAY
SUB BALLROOM & PARTY ROOM (Free after 7 a.m.)
FREE FILMS - TUES., WED., 12:30 - 2:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
•NO
The Vancouver Vietnam Moratorium Committee
Presents
PASTOR
MARTIN NEIMOLLER
• Tried for High Treason for defying Hitler
* Spent 8 yrs. in Nazi Concentration Camps
* Served as co-president of World Council of Churches
• Visited Hanoi  in 1967
AND
KRISHNA MENON
*  Represented India at U.N. for ten years
FRIDAY, FEB. 6        JOHN OLIVER HIGH SCHOOL
8:00 p.m. 41st and Fraser
ADMISSION $1.00
THUNDERBIRD
BASKETBALL
Feb. 12 - Thursday - 12:30 Noon
University of Victoria "VIKINGS"
FREE   -   Admission for Students   -    FREE
3rd Annual Buchanan Trophy Classic
Feb. 14 - Saturday - 8 p.m.
PACIFIC  COLISEUM
SIMON FRASER
u
n
CLANSMEN
JV's play at 6 p.m.
Student Tickets: $1.00 for a $2.00 Res. Seat
ON SALE NOW AT MEMORIAL GYM
WCIAA Semi-Finals (Feb. 20-21) and
Finals (Feb. 28-29) at UBC's Memorial Gym
Under the jurisdiction of the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
STUDENTS PRICES WILL BE ANNOUNCED SHORTLY Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
SPOR TS
Ice hockey team drops game
in Brandons 'bush' arena
By DICK BUTTON
UBC's hockey teams ran into
some expected opposition this
weekend and came out on the
short end in their league play.
The Thunderbirds flew into
Brandon Friday afternoon
unprepared for the tough Brandon
University and their ridiculously
inadequate rink, and were stopped
6-4.
The same night, the Braves, at
home against Simon Fraser, lost
their   first   league  game  of the
season by a score of 3-0. The
Braves were without the services
of Rich Longpre, Bruce Ratcliffe,
and Ken Lemmen, the last two
having made the trip to the
prairies with the Birds.
Saturday night, the Birds fared
a little better as they drubbed the
University of Saskatchewan,
Saskatoon campus, 7-1.
Not only did the Birds lose
the game Friday, they also lost the
services of Wayne Schaab for an
Wrestlers face
very tough gang
Today at 2 p.m. the UBC wrestling team meets one of the
strongest wrestling schools in the US when they host California
Polytechnical.
Immediately afterwards the Birds will wrestle Skagit Valley
College in the wrestling room at Thunderbird Stadium, and coach
Paul Nemeth invites all interested people to come out to watch.
Nemeth's wrestling Birds had a tough day Saturday when
they wrestled Western Washington State College, winning 20-13
but then dropping a 31-10 decision to the University of Puget
Sound immediately afterwards.
"Its hard wotk for the boys to wrestle matches back-to-back
like that, " said Nemeth, "but they must get used to it because in
the Western Championships they must wrestle up to three times
in one day."
Les Burgener, Bob Grafton, Bruce Grist and Bill Duncan all
won events for the Birds in the Western meet while only Burgener
and Grafton beat their UPS opponents.
T'Bird  skiers  beat
Canucks  at  Banff
The UBC men's ski team
placed fifth in the 24th
Intercollegiate Ski Meet at Banff
and Lake Louise over the
weekend.
The Birds finished behind four
American schools, led by the
University of Denver, the top
ranking American national
university in skiing.
The top five places were
University of Denver, 396.9 (out
of a possible 400), US Air Force
Academy, 369.0, University of
Montana, 338.9, University of
Washington, 336.0 and UBC with
330.8 points.
The next meet for the men's
team   is   in   Reno,
In women's competitions, UBC
is doing well also. Joy Ward of the
Thunderbird Ski Club won the B
class girls event at the Vancouver
Coaches    Association    Downhill
training    camp    at    Whistler
Mountain over the weekend.
indefinite time due to a knee
injury. He was skating into the
corner and caught his skate in a
hole in the ice and was hit from
behind.
Norm Parks was flown out
Saturday morning to replace him
for the game against Saskatoon.
The Birds fell behind quickly
Friday, and were down 4-1 at the
end of the first period. They were
outshot 18-3. They came back in
the second and narrowed the
margin to 4-3, but all in a losing
cause.
Goal scorers for UBC were
Wayne Schaab with two before his
injury, Jeff Wilson and Dwayne
Biagoni. Ray Brownlee picked up
four goals for Brandon.
Saturday the Birds got on top
early and stayed there. Roy
Sakaki scored up two goals, and
Barry Wilcox. Larry Watts and
Jeff Wilson got one each.
Top point man for the Birds
was Doug Buchanan, with two
assists against Brandon and three
more against Saskatoon.
The Birds get a chance to even
the score against Brandon here
next Friday.
Coach Bob Hindmarch said
after the game that the Brandon
"bandbox rink" was the most
ridiculous arena he had ever seen.
The neutral zone, blue line to blue
line, was half the regulation size.
Brandon is used to this of
course and plays a style which
takes advantage of the small rink.
On the other hand, they have
not been winning too well away
from home this year, which
maybe serves a basis for
predictions for next weeks game.
UBC must beat Brandon to get
into the WCIAA playoffs.
Intramurals
ARTS 20 RELAY ROAD RACE
The Intramural program is sponsoring a relay road race known
as the 'Arts 20 Relay Road Race".
In the spring of 1920, the senior Arts class challenged all other
classes to a relay road race. A course was mapped and the race was
run from what was the undeveloped site of the present university to
the temporary buildings in Fairview.
February 19, 1920, the first "Arts 20 Relay Road Race" was
run. It had five eight-man.teams running from Point Grey to UBC, a
distance of seven and a half miles.
The course went from: Marine Drive to Fourth Ave.; Yew St.
to Broadway; to Granville to Twelfth Ave.; to UBC and finished in
front of the Arts Building at Fairview.
Because of the war, the last "Arts 20" race was held in 194U.
Intramurals is now looking for teams to enter in this relay road so if
any faculty or group is interested, please come over to the
Intramural office and let us know. Room 308 Gym..,
pollution...-
INDUSTRIAL WASTE
FEB. 5
THURSDAY NOON
...at   U).
a
a
THE SECRET RACE
55   minute   color
documentary on the
'66 WORLD SKI
CHAMPIONSHIPS
"best film on skiing
to date"—Ski Mag.
Today and Thurs., 12:30
OLD AUDITORIUM  -  50*
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS, DARK SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
—keith dunfaar photo
FLYING   RON  THORSEN   was  seldom  this  near  the ground
Saturday night as he makes an offering on the way to his record    »
breaking 48 point outpouring against University of Saskatchewan,
Saskatoon. Paul Jacoby (11) and Bob Vander Velden (31) look
on aghast.
Thorsen leads
Birds to top
Were it not for the majestic performance of Ron Thorsen, this
weekend's basketball victories would have been sufficient to put
most fans to sleep.
The Birds continued their relentless march to an undefeated
season in conference play as they dumped their University of
Saskatchewan opponents Regina and Saskatoon with boring ease.
The scores, while entirely academic, were 94-54 over the-
Cougars and 109-70 over the hapless Huskies from Saskatoon. But
the real story was a 6' 1" guard named Ron Thorsen. <
He had a weekend which to most college players is an
excellent season. As he came up with a total of 73 points, 13 assists
and committed only eight turnovers in the two games.
Friday night he played approximately half the game in scoring
his 25 points, chiefly on drives into the middle where he was able to
utilize his many talents against the porous Regina defense.
Other Birds to come up with good performances were the
league's leading rebounder Derek Sankey, who added 31 rebounds to '
his total and Bob Molinski's Friday night effort of 17 points.
On Saturday evening Thorsen played three-quarters of the
contest and his totals' went up like geometric progressions. He came
up with a 48 point night which broke Bob Barazzuol's old record of
44 points in one game set four years ago against Alaska Methodist -
University.
Coach Peter Mullins' comments, apart from his descriptions of ■*
Thorsen's play were instant replays from the previous evening.
"We played extremely well defensively and also broke very
well," commented the cool Aussie, "we just ran them off the court."
Last night the Birds picked up their 14th victory without a
defeat as they downed the University of Victoria Vikings 76-69 on
the island.
The next home action for the Birds will be on Saturday night
when the University of Lethbridge will be in town. UBC coirjptete its^
WCIAA schedule on Thursday Feb. 12 with an afternoon game"
against the UVic Vikings.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT  REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
LISA'S FLORIST
6570 VICTORIA DRIVE
Flowers For
All Occasions
FREE DELIVERY
Bus. 321-1411
Res. 434-1423 Tuesday, February 3, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
SKIS!
BOOTS!
SKI WEAR!
THIS IS A 3 BAY SALE
THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY - FEB. 5 - 6 - 7th
THE GREATEST SELECTION OF SKI EQUIPMENT    EVER OFFERED AT THESE REDUCED PRICES
fr.Kw?pHm&®
SKI BOOTS
Koflach Swing Star - reg. ss.oo Now 65.00
Arlberg Buckle Boots - reg. 60.00 Now 39.99
Yal d'Or Buckles - reg. ss.oo Now- 65.00
Tyrol Double Lace - reg. 50.00 Now 33.99
Koflach Expo Masters reg. 135.00 Now 99.95
SKI FASHIONS
Tyrol Jackets - 25% Off
Mossont Jackets - 25% Off
Montant Sweaters - 25% Off
Medico Turtle Necks — reg. 7.00 Now 5.88
Dufold Underwear    •
and Dufold Turtle Necks - 25% Off
Pants - All Kinds & Sizes - 25% Off
Fur Hats - 25% Off
Nany Greene & Other Well Known
Brand Names 25% Off
After Ski Boots - 25% Off
• Well Known Brand Name Skis 15% Off *
POLES - I year guarantee - Reg. 16.95 - Now 12.95
THESE   SAVINGS   AVAILABLE   ONLY  AT
IVOR WILLIAMS
SPORTING GOODS LTD.
2120 - West 41 st Ave.        261 -6011
DAILY 9-6 P.M.
FRIDAY 9-9
•'%
REMEMBER SALE LASTS ONLY THURS. ■ FRI. ■ SATURDAY Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1970
Graduating from University
p ■ -*•*
?
this Spring?
Looking for a good job?
Try American Empire.
Like this young man.
When Pierre graduated with his B.A. from Jean de Brebeuf
College in 1940, he was a confused young man like most of
you. He had great ambitions. American Empire persuaded him
to further his education. He received his law degree at Univer-
site de Montreal and was called to the bar in 1943. But Pierre,
like most young men had an interest in why things are the way
they are, so we obliged him. He came down to Harvard where
he received his M.A. in political economy in 1945. But he was
on to even better things: Ecole de Sciences Politiques in Paris
and London School of Economics. We could see he was a
young man with promise.
He was a young man out to change things, clear away the
musty cobwebs. When he joined the Privy Council in 1949 as
an economist and political advisor, we knew we had a real
mover on our hands. When he challenged the conservative and
crusty regime of Maurice Duplessis in Cite Libre, we knew he
was our man.
We like our clients to be happy. Our young men are working
hard at changing conditions. Pierre showed*he had the drive,
the intelligence and the charm to do the job so we made him
our chief agent in Canada, the position he now holds.
You want an interesting job, right. A job that will help you plug in your own house. If you want to swing, but want security, try
into the mainstream of North American life and yet be a master us. Well be recruiting on the UBC campus soon.
THE
American
Empire©
CANADA LTD.
THE COMPANY
THAT LETS YOU
DO THINGS
aiS-i-1*-
Washington. Ottawa. Undon. lisbon. Madrid. Rom*. Bonn. Born. The Hague. Copenhagen. Brussels. Vienna. Oslo. Dublin. Canberra. Saigon. Manilla. Bangkok. Seoul. Rangoon. Kuala Lumpur. Taipei. New Delhi. Tel Aviv. Karachi. Johanessburg. Lagos. Salisbury. Brazilia. Buenos Aires. Quito.
Panama Gty. Lima. Bogota. Santiago. Mexico Gty. Tegucigalpa. San Juan. Guantanamo. Paris. Vientiane. Caracas, and many, many more to serve
y<you.

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