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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1970

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Array Arts Week to concentrate on Canadian society
By DICK BETTS
Arts Undergrad Society President
"Social Movements in Canada" is the theme for Arts
Week '70. In it we concentrate on Canadian" society itself
and the problems besetting it today.
Much of the subject matter is historical because to
understand anything happening in Canada today it is
necessary to acquire a historical understanding of its.
social and political movements.
The problem most Canadians find in talking about
Canada or trying to understand what is happening in, for
example, Quebec, is that we are; trained to see things
through*U.S. eyes. We have a colonial mentality that
militates against an accurate interpretation of Canadian
history and contemporary Canada. While problems in
the tJ,S, become more and more acute and the social and
political struggle heightens there we find ourselves
reading U.S. news and patterning our thinking after what
is happening in U.S. The result seems to be that events in
Canada become unreal for us or loose their political
meaning.
Ft was felt that students should be exposed to an
historical and contemporary analysis of what is
happening in Canada, not to- isolate ourselves, but to
gain a fuller insight into contemporary Canadian politics.
Especially grass-roots, such as labor, politics must be
brought out because these are things none of us know
much about although they are there and have a history.
Things like the B.C. labor movement and the
separatist movement in Quebec remain confused and
mystified to us. Canada has a" rich labor history and B.C.
labor history provides us with some of its more exciting
events. Strikes and police repression coupled with
political maneuvrings of those in power, government
and corporations have been occurring since B.C. was
settled. Yet no one knows about the conditions under
which people worked, in early B.C. and how they fought
to better those conditions. As a result the real causes of
contemporary labor unrest remains mystified.
In Quebec, a radical separatist movement is growing.
How did it come about? Stanley Ryerson a noted
Canadian historian will speak on its origins Wednesday
noon in Buchanan 106. Michel Chartrand, one of the
leading spokesman of the labor movement in Quebec,
will speak about labor's role in the separatist movement.
Chartrand has been arrested for sedition and has recently
given up the presidency of the Montreal council of the
Confederation of National Trade Unions. To hear both
these men can only heighten one's understanding of
what is going on in Quebec today and how it can effect
the rest of Canada. Chartrand will speak Thursday noon
in the old auditorium.
The university we find also falls victim to a large
amount of Americanization. In the SUB ballroom at
noon today Robin Mattews and James Steele, two
Canadian university professors will speak on the
"Struggle for Canadian Universities". They will attempt
an analysis of what it means for Canadian universities to
have their faculties populated largely by Americans.
There is one word of warning to anyone attending
this program. It is designed to educate people to
relevancies.
Publisher 'will talk' in press lockout
By NATE SMITH
and BRIAN McWATTERS
The success of the Vancouver Express, the newspaper
published by locked out employees of Pacific Press, has
apparently had its effect on company management.
R. S. Malone, chairman of the board of FP
Publications Ltd., arrived in Vancouver Monday and told
reporters he was willing to meet with union spokesmen to
discuss any new contract proposals.
FP Publications, a national chain controlled by Max
Bell of Calgary, owns the Sun Publishing Co., which in
turn, owns 50 per cent of Pacific Press. The other 50 per
cent is owned by Southam Press Ltd., publishers of the
Province.
Malone's statement is the first the company has
issued expressing a willingness to return to the bargaining
table since direct talks broke off Dec. 1.
Bill McLeman, executive secretary of the
Vancouver-New Westminster Newspaper Guild, said
Monday he has sent Malone a telegram indicating the
Guild's willingness to meet him "anywhere, anytime."
McLeman said he was pleased with the success of the
first issue of the Express, published Saturday.
He said almost all of the 101,500 copies printed were
sold.
"The few returns we had were based on our inability
to distribute them properly," McLeman said, "but any
distribution problems have now been cleard up and we
expect a complete sellout for our next issue."
Although Saturday's 12-page Express had no ads,
McLeman said the guild has had to turn down several ads
for today's issue. All ad space for Thursday's and
Saturday's papers has also be been sold, he said.
The Express will published every Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday for the duration of the Pacific Press dispute.
It is being published by the locked out unions under
the name of Pugstem Publications Ltd. (for Pressmen's
Union, Guild, Stereotypers, Typographers, Engravers and
Mailers).
American Newspaper Guild international president
Charles Perlik Jr., also in Vancouver as a result of the
dispute said a bargaining table settlement is within close
reach.
The best way to persuade the company to solve the
labor dispute is to get the parties back to the bargaining
table. But the hardest thing will be finding a way that
both sides can come together and solve it, he said.
The joint Council of Newspaper Unions, representing
the five groups of employees affected by the lockout, has
not reached a settlement after six months of negotiating
with company representatives.
Perlik, head of the 32,000 member ANG pointed out
there is nothing unique about unions certified to represent
various groups of employees in the newspaper industry
Danding together and bargaing jointly.
What is unique, he said, is an employer in the middle
}f the 20th century deciding to close his doors.
Grad wallets hit
A grad fee increase of $ 150 will be proposed to the
UBC senate by a senate special committee on raising funds
for the university, a source close to the committee
disclosed Thursday.
t The increase will raise grad fees from the present
$300 per year to $450.
Reasons given for the increase are that UBC grad
students pay the lowest grad fees in Canada and that grad
students should pay the same fees as undergrads.
No further information was available at press time.
Perlik looked upon the relationship of the Guild
(representing editorial, advertising, circulation, clerical
and maintenance employees) with the mechanical unions
(representing the printers, pressmen, mailers, and
stereotypers) as a strengthened bargaining position.
"The management is no longer in a position to play
one union off against another and give one union lesser
conditions than another," he said.
Meanwhile, after closing down opereations Feb. 15
because increased production difficulties had "exhausted
their funds", Pacific Press has bought large amounts of
radio time and billboard space to state the company's
position.
THS U8YSSSY
Vol. LI, No. 35 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1970     «^^»48        228-2305
UNION PICKETS outside Sixth Ave. entrance of Pacific Press building.
—david bowerman photo Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24,  1970
Second slate elections fill AMS executive offices
By PHIL BARKWORTH
All positions on the Alma Mater Society
executive are filled as a result of the second
slate of elections Wednesday.
Christine Krawczyk, arts 2, polled 1,570
votes to win the position of AMS
vice-president. Her nearest rival was Kelvin
Beckett, arts 9, with 352 votes. George
Gibault, arts 3, had 314, and Dave Welsh,
arts 4, 291.
There were 144 spoiled ballots.
Sue Kennedy, home ec 2, the other
female contesting a position, swept the
polls for internal affairs officer with 1,368
votes. Dave Schmidt, arts 2, finished with
457 votes, Alex Murray, arts 2, 375, and
Til Nawatsky, -aw I, had 168.
There were 168 spoils.
Stuart Bruce, commerce 4, won the
office of treasurer by netting 1,858 votes
over Nawatsky's 627.
There were 192 spoiled ballots.
John Zaozirny, law I, polled 1,739 to
gain the office of external affairs. Clayton
Vogler, arts 2, drew 738 votes.
There were 201 spoils.
"The three things I want to do is involve
Now
whom shall I vote for?
—brett garrett photo
Last week's column was about debts, where
to try to get money, and what creditors can do.
Thanks to to the law student who gave us the
following happy information. Apparently
according to Section 25 of the Execution Act, a
debtor can keep $500 worth of possessions (his
choice). For example, you could exempt a car,
stereo, or TV. What was left would probably not
be worth the trouble to re-possess. For more
specific information check with Legal Aid, also
located in SUB.
More on welfare. Generally students are not
eligible. However, if you are broke and unable to
find work you are theoretically eligible and
should apply. If asked about student status, say
the truth: you are unable to return to school
unless you find work and hence you are not a
student. You should be able to get welfare.
There may however be problems. The
application procedure is frustrating and
demoralizing - especially the Vancouver City
office — and there are various hidden policies. It
varies between workers and offices, but generally
welfare does not like hippies, long hair,
communal houses, common law marriages, etc.
They generally do like "straight", reasonably
well dressed and groomed, "trying very hard to
find a job, but what's a guy to do when there is
no work", etc. type. Many of the people who
work for welfare are good, do care, and would
like to see improvements in the system. So, if
come May, you are broke, apply for welfare (less
than $75 cash per month for a single male). The
rates are very low, $75-$90 per month for a
single person, and they may try to put you in a
hostel instead of giving cash.
Speak Easy is a student run project, blah
blah, and operates on a shoestring. Coming
Thursday the Grad Class is giving away a small
fortune. If we by fluke or benefaction could get
a good portion of it, we could operate during the
summer. The pitch is this: we are worthy, useful,
etc, and quite broke. The grad money is
distributed by a vote of grad students coming
Thursday, February 26 at 12:30 in the SUB
auditorium. So if you are interested in Speak
Easy, please come out and vote for us.
Speak Easy is open Monday to Friday 12
p.m. to 9 p.m. Phone 228-3706, Room 218,
SUB.
Pulp  mills  serious polluters
By JAN O'BRIEN
Pulp mills have no right to complacency in the
fight against pollution even though domestic sewage
is the most serious water polluter, Terry Howard of
the B.C. Research Council said Wednesday noon.
The immediate surroundings of the Port Alice
and Prince Rupert mills have become a biological
desert since the mills went into operation, said
Howard.
"Mill managers are aware of the pollution
problems but they don't rank as their first area of
concern," Howard said.
Effluent from the bleaching and washing of
pulp accounts for 60 per cent of the pollution
caused by pulp mills, he said.
"The brown pulp effluent reduces the oxygen
content of water. One volume of effluent uses 10
volumes of water, so about 400 million gallons of
water are used each day in a mill," said Howard.
The oxygen depletion results in fish dying,
disruption of species composition and a reduced
tolerance to toxic materials, he said.
"Only one coastal mill (Powell River)
neutralizes effluent, the others rely on the washing
away influence of the sea," he said.
"Biologists should be more informed and
actively involved in pollution control; theoretical
solutions are not adequate," Howard said.
He criticized the government's present type of
pollution control and said: "Standards for each type
of pollution should be set."
As part of the continuing Environmental Crisis
Operation program, ecology prof Julius Kane and
George Kalef of the Animal Research Centre will
speak on "What population problem?" Wednesday
noon in Bio-science 2000.
EAT IN .TAKEOUT. DELIVERY«
■3261 W. Broadway     736-7785:
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
TOMORROW
ALISTAIR COOKE,
FREDDY WOOD   THEATRE
 12:30 p.m.
one of the world's leading journalists, will be at UBC tomorrow to lecture under the auspices of the
Vancouver SUN. Born in England and educated at Cambridge, Mr. Cooke
forsook a theatrical career to become the chief American writer for the
Manchester GUARDIAN and a broadcaster for the B.B.C. who has interpreted America to Great Britain through a series of weekly commentaries
ent.rled "Letter from America." His topic tomorrow will be "How Does
the Rest of the World See America."
the AMS in the Community Educational
Research Centre, settle the beach road
issue in our favour, and look into the
tenure   issue,"   said   Krawczyk
Beckett, who placed second to
Krawczyk said "Great men of history have
always alienated a large percentage of their
constituency."
"This vote indicates this university is a
frigid campus," he said. "I may run for
editor of The Ubyssey now." *
Kennedy said her immediate aims were
to set up a communications committee and
start a better frosh orientation program.
"I don't want to reveal all my plans
because I don't know what will happen
between now and September," she said.
"The new executive has got to sit down
and start talking in terms of priorities,",
said Zaozirny. .
"It is essential that activities be
coordinated. We need teamwork and not
people working as individuals."
New AMS president Tony Hodge
commenting on the new executive said it
was a good bunch with some very keen
hard working people.
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
ENGLISH  LANGUAGE SUMMER SCHOOL
A   programme   in   communications   for   those   whose   native   tongue
is  not  English.
4  week programme — July 6 - July 3T,  1970
6 week programme — July 6 - August 14,  1970
ORAL FRENCH SUMMER SCHOOL-SAINT PIERRE
Improve   your    spoken    French    and    enjoy    a    holiday    in    a    native
French    setting.
Beginners,   Intermediate   and   Advanced   Levels
4 weeks - July or August, 1970
For information write:
Division   of   University   Extension
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
84   Queen's  Park,  Toronto   181,  Ontario (416)   928-2400
University Clubs Committee
IMPORTANT
GENERAL
MEETING
TODAY NOON, FEB. 24
Rm. 207 - 209
VOLVO OWNERS . . . NEED A TUNE-UP?
Come to the experts . . . (also Volkswagens and Mercedes)
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED" Tuesday, February 24,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—david bower man photo
CHAOTIC STATE of the Special Events office in SUB after it
was recently hit by unknown marauders, possibly enraged by the
thousands lost by Special Events this year.
Historic Chinese film
showing Wednesday
Paul Lin, a China expert and McGill asian studies prof, will
lecture and show "The China Story: One-Fourth of Humanity" in
the old auditorium Wednesday at 8 p.m.
The film is assembled largely from a private collection of
thousands of feet of film taken by sinologist Edgar Snow over three
decades.
Included in the documentary are the only pictures taken of
the Communist army's historic Long March and the first motion
pictures made of Mao Tse-tung, Chou En-lai, Lin Piao and others.
Snow accompanied the Red Chinese on the Long March and is
one of the few western journalists to have access to Mao Tse-tung
and other top communists.
Lin will also be giving a lecture on China; "Civilization in
Transition" in the Vancouver Public Library at noon the same day.
Tickets ($2.00 for each event) are available from the UBC
extension department.
Sign carriers
protest 'police
By ROBIN BURGESS
A Vancouver teacher and his wife who
object to Attorney General Lesley Peterson's
brand of justice are taking their case to the
students.
Garnet McKenzie picketed outside SUB
while his wife, L. J. McKenzie, distributed
pamphlets to students and faculty members on
campus Monday in an attempt to bring attention
to what McKenzie termed "Attorney General
Peterson's police state methods", something the
couple has had personal experience with.
"Students by and large are less inhibited and
more enlightened. We want to find out how
sincere their protestations of concern for the
truth really are," he said.
The couple was at Simon Fraser University
February 17.
The week before, Mrs. McKenzie carried a
placard in front of the Victoria legislative
buildings but received only scant attention from
MLA's.
Over a year ago, he and his wife were
involved in a dispute with another woman over
ownership of a duplex house. At the woman's
request, claims McKenzie, a group of policemen
illegally broke into the residence with a wrecking
bar.
To cover up what was obviously an
embarrassing error in judgment on the part of the
police, the McKenzies were arrested on false
charges of assaulting the woman involved in the
dispute, he said.
Under the Identification of Criminals Act
the McKenzies were fingerprinted and
photographed prior to any conviction on the
criminal charges.
Before the case could come to trial, the
Crown requested and obtained a stay of
proceeding suspending all action in the case for
an indefinite period.
In the meantime the criminal record against
the McKenzies' still stands.
"I am not the only innocent victim
stigmatized with a police record in B.C. by being
arbitrarily imprisoned on a false criminal charge
and corruptly denied a trial at the whim of the
politically powerful who control the courts of
this province," read the pamphlet distributed by
L. J. McKenzie.
"Anyone in B.C. can be dictatorily deprived
of elemental legal rights without public
knowledge because of Attorney General
Peterson's police state methods and news
suppression by this country's gagged press."
According to McKenzie, the local press has
the facts behind the case but is deliberately
suppressing them.
McKenzie  referred  to a bill sponsored by
outside SUB
state methods
Douglas Hogarth, (Liberal-New Westminster) that
passed first reading in the House of Commons
November 19.
The bill strikes at commonplace use by
crown authorities of stays of proceedings to
subvert the Identification of Criminals Act by
proposing to amend that Act to require
conviction of an indictable offence before
fingerprints and photographs are taken.
McKenzie, however, is not optimistic about
the bill's chances of possing.
"In the usual way of private bills by
members of the party in power, it is probably
just a trial balloon to see if any significant
number of politicians, public, or public opinion
molders even give a damn about assaultive
invasions of privacy under arbitrarily assumed
police authority," he said.
The Civil Liberties Association which
McKenzie called "an organ of ineffectuals" has
declined to take any action on the case.
"They actually told me at the Civil Liberties
office that 'we're only concerned about Indian
problems this year'. Ironically both those pieces
of legislation I'm protesting about affect Indians
probably more than anyone else," he pointed
out.
JUSTICE /■
PETERSONSTYL
,    JAIL.- THEN
ffiMl OF TRIALk
—david bowerman photo
GARNET McKENZIE
"imprisoned on false charges"
Controversial Belshaw discussion report drags on
By PETER LADNER
UBC student senator
At the rate we're going, it'll take 39 more three-hour
meetings like the last Saturday morning special to get
through all the 39 recommendations of the Belshaw
long-range objectives report.
To get on with it, the continuing debate on
enrolment restrictions—one of the more controversial
sections of the report—will again dominate the yattering
at Wednesday night's senate meeting, observers say.
Three of the recommendations that were on the
agenda at the special meeting Feb. 7 are back on for
tomorrow.
These call for:
• raising the entrance requirement for all first-year
students from B.C. to 65 per cent.
• setting a quota for enrolment in the first two years
of arts, agriculture, education, physical education and
recreation, and science, as well as for the first year of
commerce.
• a policy of limiting enrolment by academic ability
only, not on a student's geographical origin or previous
p*lace of education.
Sources close to the president predict some healthy
opposition to these proposals.
The 65 per cent entrance requirement is going to be
slammed by some who think marks are unfair assessments
of a student's ability.
Informed sources are worried because raising the
mark requirements could just mean that high school
teachers will give their kids good marks to make their
school look good.
It was this objection that caused senate to adopt a
limitation of 3400 students for next September, instead
of voting on a higher entrance mark. 3400 was the
estimated number of students who would have had an
average above 65 per cent.
The biggest objection to the second proposal-for
quotas in the different faculties-will come from the
half-filled agriculture faculty.
Why limit enrolment in agriculture when we've got
room for twice as many students as we now have, ask
Apology
We sincerely regret the omission in last
Tuesday's paper of candidates' statements for
internal affairs officer-elect Sue Kennedy and
candidates Til Nawatzki and David Schmidt.
The ommission was due to a printer's error and
did not imply any bias on the part of the editorial
board.
sources close to the dean.
The reason is to prevent from sneaking into the
science faculty through the back garden of agricultural
sciences.
If the official stuff isn't enough, two individual senate
members have motions up for discussion.
Commerce dean Philip White wants senate to decide
the criteria for enrolment size, now that we've decided to
freeze enrolment at 22,500 for the next five years.
And economics prof Gideon Rosenbluth wants the
senate to set up a committee to figure out what resources
per student are necessary to maintain a high quality of
education.
The only other item of general interest—and
particular interest to student senator Stan Persky—is a
course on criminology being proposed by the extension
department. Persky had promised to introduce a motion
for a "Cops on Campus" course.
The extension department diploma course would be
open to anyone, regardless of educational standing, and
would offer courses in literature, sociology, psychology,
and political science. It's been worked out in
collaboration with the Vancouver Police Department, the
National Parole Board, and other police-type agencies.
Anonymous but knowledgeable informants say the
senate will probably recommend the proposal to its new
programs committee, which would report back to senate
for a vote on the course at a later meeting. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
THEWSStY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 24, 1970
Elitism
Today being Tuesday and Tuesday being our day
to be down on elitism, we thought we'd throw a hearty
boo in the direction of the eiitist Alma Mater Society
executive.
At this writing, said executive members are
enjoying, or at least consuming, a large selection of
various Chinese foods.
Keep reading. Coz guess who paid for the
aforementioned Chinese food.
Right. You see, the AMS executive members have
this notion that they do such a hard day's work and
then have to stay out here every Monday night until 10
or 11 p.m. for the council meeting and, my goodness '
things are so tough that they shouldn't have to pay for
their own meals.
So naturally they take our money and order
Chinese food for themselves. Which they eat.
We disapprove. It hardly seems likely that any
executive membersare so stone broke that they cannot
afford to buy their own meals Monday nights and it
hardly seems likely that the fact they have to stay on
campus until the late evening warrants their giving
themselves this luxury of eating out the students'
pockets.
Now Ubyssey staffers work all day producing  a
newspaper, a product which is becoming a collector's
item in this city, and they do not get free meals.
Two or three staffers will receive a meal from the
paper's advertising budget because they have to stay at
the printer's until two or three in the morning, working,
proof-reading,   correcting,  doing make-up and layout.
Two years ago the entire student council got meals
paid for by the students before each meeting. Then they
reduced it to just the cream of the cream, the superior
of the superior, the executive.
We think it would be a good gesture for next year's
executive, whose noble plans and ideas have been thrust
before us for the past several weeks, to end this practice.
Come down and eat with the plebes, you guys. We
won't hold it against you.
Karl, we love you
It has come to our attention that Karl Burau is
leaving UBC.
Karl never tired, until now, in attempts to set up
a kind of counter-university in opposition to what he
called the academic establishment. This usually took the
form of an Experimental College, which attracted pitiful
numbers of listeners. We laughed and labelled him a
raver.
Nobody listened to him—not former president
Hare, not the AMS, not even The Ubyssey—which
usually listens to anyone. Frankly, we often had a hard
time figuring out what he was preaching.
But it was clear he was challenging the status quo.
Now he's gone the way of all dissenters who take
root at this university. Frustrated, bitter, gone.
Karl, wherever you go, good luck. UBC stands
rebuked. —P.K.
Editor: Michael Finlay played reporter for the day. Said Smith
EHiior.  nucnaei  nniay a|SQ      became     grandi     njgh|     exalted
Newj         Paul   Knox oompah   of this here  rag and  sang a
rjfc,                                          N_ta c—ui. chorus  of "Bagels For Breakfast" to
ry —;     NaTe sm,,n celebrate.    John    Butler    did    double
Managing  .—    Bruce  Curtis coverage. Dave Schmidt returned from
Wire      Irene  Wasilewtki       the  wars while ElaineTarzwell showed
us  the  floor.  Jennifer  Jordan   was a
Sports  Jim Maddin       good   girl   as   were   Jan   O'Brien   and
c«_!., i-l„ T«ii.n       Sandy   Kass but  Ginny  Gait  declined
Senior    John Tw.gg      the endowment  ,ands   ,.Goot   goo, „
Photo       Dave Enns      said Robin Burgess. Phil Barkworth got
Ass't News Maurice Bridae       a   bvlme   as J'm Davies split. Photogs
ass-i News    maunce nriage       BreU Garrett_ Maureen Gans and Dave
Ass't City   John Andersen Bowerman     turned     in     their     usual
»__. r,jj_„                         tnA Cowmv collection       while      Keith       Dunbar
Pag. Fnday  ,,„ J£%„Z^ »hot°9ed     *»     «*»**■     With     him,
Noraert Kueosaat apparently, were Tony Gallagher, Scott
Nate   Smith   and   Brian   McWatters McCloy and Dick Button.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Choices
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The result of the Feb. 4
referendum is far from being
conclusive.
As the referendum was
described beforehand by some to
be legally inconsequential and
able to serve at the most as an
"opinion vote", it can be argued
that the motion is not settled,;
only student opinion expressed.
On the other hand, these
questions can" be asked regarding
the motion: Is a simple "yes" or
"no" in this issue descriptive to
any degree of what the student
really feels and wants to be done
about the AMS? Is removing
compulsory membership the
positive route to achieving what
the previous set-up failed to
achieve? Has he constructed or
visualised the image of the
succeeding structure before
starting to dismantle the existing
one?
The underlying dissatisfaction
which led to the referendum is
too complicated to be soothed by
the mere expression of an
agreement or rejection of the
motion in question. In fact it is a
distinct possibility that the basic
motives of a student voting "yes"
can be more distant from those of
another voting "yes" than from
one voting "no". It is like trying
to scratch an itch six inches out to
the right or to the left: the itch
remains. The value of the AMS'
being . compulsory is questioned-
beyond mere legality or logic or
the simple argument of the
student's individual right of
participation or withdrawal. If
only such points were considered,
there can be little doubt that the
motion would have been
overwhelmingly supported. The
fact that it has been voted down
reflects optimism for the future of
the AMS, not in a way that it can
again be financially secure in its
various political endeavours in the
name of and at the expense of the
student, but that the necessity of
the existence of such an
organization is recognized. Be it a
compulsory or a voluntary union,
there will be an AMS.
Despite its many commendable
undertakings, does it necessarily
mean that those voting in support
of a compulsory AMS are fully
satisifed with the AMS as it exists
now? The answer is doubtful. It
can mean among many things the
mere recognition of the fact that
there is a job to be done which
requires an organization of
considerable dimensions to it, or
the fear of the possibility of a
voluntary AMS becoming subject
to more intense political
manipulation due to only partial
representation (what is labelled
'apathy' of the 'silent majority'),
again in the name of the 'UBC
student'. However, should
political involvement be
standardized as a pivot upon
which apathy or commitment be
weighed in view of the diversities
of modern interests and
knowledge? The point here is: is
the 'silent majority' really silent?
Are those whose main interests lie
elsewhere or who cannot afford
time in spite of their interests
offered an easy channel for their
occasional utterances? Not while
student funds are donated in
support of the Sir George Williams
Defence Fund because the
EXECUTIVES support the
movement. Do they take for
granted that since their positions
are student voted their views will
be student supported?
As an alternative, can a
voluntary union provide the
expected democracy that is
presumably striven for, but
without success? Does it offer
open channels through which the
opinions and consents of members
can flow to eventually reach a
democratic decision? On those
previous occasions when student
money was used for
unrepresentative political
enterprises, evidently not—unless
it employs a different mechanism
from the existing AMS.
It becomes evident that it is
quite irrelevant whether the AMS
is compulsory or voluntary as far
as erasing the sore spot of the lack
of democracy is concerned. In
either case, a new system must be
devised to provide easy access to
the opinions of the general
student membership.
Herewith some proposals:
1. that current issues be open to
public consideration and
decisions through periodic or
ad hoc referenda. In either case
a special column could be
maintained in The Ubyssey for
prior public information. In
the case of the periodic
referenda system, each
referendum could contain
mulitipe issues as situations call
for.
2. that the AMS maintain a
periodic      report      to      the
membership      regarding      its
progress in various issues.
3. that  surplus  membership fees
be refunded at the end of each
academic year.
Finally, as for the extra
expense which these procedures
will entail, I am sure that the
student will then VOLUNTARILY provide for his share of
respect.
ANTHONY S. MA
science 4
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for brevity,
grammar, legality and taste.
Letters should be typed, if
possible, and triple spaced.
Letters to the editor can be
sent to The Ubyssey office in SUB
by Campus mail or can be
delivered personally.
Peace
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On behalf of the committee
which organized the World
Council of Peace Conference Feb.
7 and 8,1 would like to thank you
for the report which appeared in
the Feb. 3 edition of The
Ubyssey.
I wish to take this opportunity,
however, to point out an error of
fact which appeared in the course
of the story.
Your reporter states that
"although the conference claimed
to represent a cross-section of the
peace movement and concerned
committees, the only Vancouver
group to be invited was the
Communist Party". She then goes
on to say that certain political
groups did not even know about
the conference.
The fact of the matter—and a
phone call to the number given on
the press release would have,
confirmed this—is that there were
no representatives of any political
parties or groups at the
conference. Since the intent of
the conference was to discuss
concrete areas of agreement on
questions of world peace and not
ideologies, then it seemed logical
to confine the invitations to
non-political groups. Naturally, a
wide range of political opinion
was probably represented at the
Conference, but that is, you will
agree beside the point.
May I ask the courtesy of a
correction of this quite important
point?
ROSALEEN ROSS,
pro-tem chairman Tuesday, February 24, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
PFage Tuesday
Bela  Siki  plays  with  VSO
Bladders and boors
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
"Three Hungarians don't necessarily make a
good symphony concert."
That phrase might aptly describe the VSO
'performance last Sunday afternoon in a Queen
Elizabeth Theatre not exactly filled to capacity
because of the brilliantly sunny weather outside.
Guest artist for the afternoon was
Budapest-born pianist Bela Siki, subsituting on
slightly more than a week's notice for Russian cellist
Mstislav Rostropovich, who had been taken ill and
had returned to Russia.
Siki was to have played the Ravel G Major
Piano Concerto, but unfortunately the only set of
orchestral parts in North America for the work had
Warblers wow
packed house
Once in a long while you hear an aggregation of
musical talent that is simply superb — one which
veritably blows your mind and is generally uptight,
all right and out of sight.
Such a pleasure was ours last Wednesday night
when, attracted by the strains of magnificent folk
music, we wandered into the Pit and heard Maurice
Bridge, Paul Knox and Rod MacDonald singing and
whomping their axes.
These boys will go a long, long way, we said to
ourselves. The singing and axe-whomping was
magnificent. Pick up on them next time they
appear.
-ELVIRA FINCH
Hot Poop
"THE EGRET AND THE HAWK", an evening
of theatre featuring Japanese No Drama and
adaptions by W. B. Yeats directed by Myra
Molholland which was to open last Tuesday in the
Dorothy Somerset Studio did not come off as
announced in last week's Page Tuesday. Illness;
probs. The plays will open instead tonight at 8:30
p.m. * * *
"A RECEIVER IN WHICH THE INCOMING
SIGNAL IS MIXED WITH A LOCALLY
GENERATED SIGNAL TO PRODUCE AN
INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY WHICH IS THEN
AMPLIFIED AND DETECTED A SECOND TIME
TO PRODUCE THE AUDIO FREQUENCY."-is,
the title of the next show at the UBC Fine Arts
Gallery — in conjunction with the Contemporary
Arts Festival — and it opens on Feb. 25. (All aspects
of this show have been arranged and organized by
the students of Fine Arts 438 - a course in Gallery
administration.)
Basically a "Sound Show", the exhibition will
endeavour to create pure sound, "sound as sound",
by isolating it from the original object which is its
source.
Dennis Vance, will be technical advisor for the
exhibition.
The show will feature several "special events",
of which the following occurs this week:
Wednesday, Feb. 25 - "ACCRETION PIECE", by
Gahtie Falk;in the Fine Arts Gallery.
(Events happening in following weeks will be
announced in this paper.)
been mistakenly shipped off to somewhere in New
York. Instead, Siki elected to play the E Flat
Concerto by fellow Hungarian Franz Liszt, one of
the major remnants of a virtuosic
piano-elephantiasis epidemic which swept Europe in
the mid-nineteenth century. Perhaps because of the
limited time he had to prepare the concerto, Siki's
interpretation was slightly less than
satisfactory—and throughout the piece mistakes in
the opening octave passages did little but instill
nervous apprehension in me that he wouldn't get
through the piece at all. Although the work was far
from a dead loss, the lack of flash and sheer
hell-bent-for-leather dynamism requisite for a
successful performance did little but convince me
what a trashy piece the Liszt really is.
Siki also played a Mozart Piano Concerto, K.
451, which was clear and well-articulated but had
little emotional, effect. On the whole, I would have
much preferred to sit through an all-orchestral
concert rather than suffer through the last-minute
efforts presented. How about a performance of
Beethoven's Sixth Symphony, for example, which
we haven't heard for quite a while?
POOR ACOUSTICS
Concluding work on the program was Music for
Strings, Percussion, and Celeste by Hungarian
Number 3, Bela Bartok. From my lower orchestra
seat I had a great deal of difficulty hearing this
masterwork. Perhaps this was because conductor
Meredith Davies had the large chamber orchestra
behind the stage's curtain line with a resulting loss
of sound projection.
Or maybe it was because Davies had the
orchestra tightly around him in a circle with the
percussion off to the left, considerably different
than Bartok's specified seating plan, which has the
percussion instruments—including piano, harp, and
celeste—between the two string choirs.
It was unfortunate that the result was such an
acoustic mess, because the transparent writing really
needs a clear, precise atmosphere in which to be
effective.
Aside from the program, the concert was
interesting for the incredibly boorish display put on
by a large percentage of the audience.
After the Liszt concerto there was an exodus of
old ladies and men who were not prepared to sit
through the Bartok, having been severely
traumatized by Daniel Barenboim's performance of
the same composer's ultra-dissonant First Piano
Concerto only two weeks before. People were also
seen leaving between movements of the Bartok.
OLD FOLKS AT HOME
And at the end, when the Bartok was finished,
the scene was repeated again. Their elderly bladders
obviously overflowing as a result of sitting for
almost two hours, the doddering dowagers and their
escorts fled for the exits at a snail's pace, tripping
on their crutches and the tails of their oversized
mink wraps.
One cool little old English lady who remained
seated remarked to me afterwards that the behavior
of the Vancouver audience was comparable to that
of "working class people."
I couldn't agree more. In fact, if Meredith
Davies had gone up to the front of the stage and
kicked one of the rude old farts hobbling in front of
the first row, I wouldn't have blamed him one bit.
film soc presents
50c
AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY 27, SATURDAY 28
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY, MARCH 1 - 7:00
BILLION
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BRAIN
—with Michael Caine
ANTI-UPTIGHT BAUBLES
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^
OF 1970
don't forget the
GENERAL MEETING
ON FEBRUARY 26 AT 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
On the agenda is the presentation and' ratification of the class budget, election of honorary class
president and vice president, class valedictorian,
poet, prophet, will writer and historian.
Class gift ideas must be submitted to the grad council.
Box 41, SUB by February 19 in order to be considered at
the general meeting. Final decision on the gift will be will
be reached at the meeting.
CALGARY
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS
invite applications for 1970-71
• GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS
• TEACHER LIBRARIANS
• FINE ARTS
SALARY-YEARS TRAINING
4 5 6
Minimum $ 7,175        $ 7,675        $ 8,175
11 X 450 11  X 450 11 X 450
Maximum        $12,125 $12,625        $13,125
DR. J. A. EARLE
will be available for interviews
STUDENT SERVICES  -  UBC  - MARCH 9-10
BAYSHORE INN   -   MARCH 9-10 (evenings)
VISIT OUR NEW VARSITY BRANCH - 4517 West 10th Ave.
(1 blk.from U.B.C. Gates)
Bftrbonks
Downtown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special U.B.C. Discount — Students and Faculty Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
There's still Time to get your name on
THE LUCKIEST LIST IN TOWN
HOME OIL
UBC STUDENTS
ONLY CONTEST
(See Page 12 for details)
February 20th Winners!
Trip for two to San Francisco
Paul Appleby
3526 West 1st
Vancouver 9, B.C. (1-Arch)
Dinner for two
at Hy's:
Dinner for two at
the Grouse Nest:
Evening for two at
the Daisy:
Eric Alexandre,
2725 Melfa Rd.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
(1-Arch)
624 Udy Rd.,
Richmond, B.C.
(3-AGSC)
Kenneth Cristall,
6950 Laurel St.,
Vancouver 14, B.C.
(4-Arts)
Evening for two at
Tickets for two to
Tickets for two at
Oil Can Harry's:
Canuck's Hockey Game:
Canuck's Hockey Game
Gordon A. Crawford,
720 West 53rd Ave.,
Vancouver 14, B.C.
(3-Science)
J. Grant Dunsmore,
2507 West 25th St.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
(2-Science)
Doug Hildebrand,
301, 1675 Comox St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
(7-Comm)
THE LIST GETS LONGER -
- WITH MORE WINNERS EVER Y WEEK
.   COULD BE YOU!
TRIP FOR TWO TO SAN FRANCISCO WINNERS . . .
January 30th:
February 6th:
February 13th:
Martyn Smith,
2803 West 14th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Nick Geerdink,
614—4th Ave.,
New Westminster, B.C.
Donald Allan Jones,
222—6695 McRay Ave.,
Burnaby 1, B.C.
January 30th:
John B. Edmond,
4493 West 12th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Randolph B- Zien,
1043 West 46th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
February 6th:
William G. Callaway,
1668 Kilkenny Rd.,
North Vancouver, B.C.
George R. Heinmiller,
8018 Cambie St.,
Vancouver 14, B.C.
February 13th:
George John Costello,
4010 Hillcrest Ave.,
North Vancouver, B.C.
Reynold G. Orchard,
5920 Crown St.,
Vancouver 13, B.C.
. . AND THE WEEKLY EXTRA PRIZE WINNERS
John S. Strugnell,
1240 Inglewood Cres.,
West Vancouver, B.C.
Ian D. Muir,
1395 West 14th Ave.,
Vancouver 9, B.C.
David A. Bunn,
207, 1972 York Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Peter Howatt,
4612 West 9th Ave.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Lawrence L. Hickman,
108, 1190 West 10th Ave.,
Vancouver 9, B.C.
Gary H. Barr,
2145 West 13th Ave.,
Vancouver 9, B.C.
Graham Mason,
5919 Clement Rd.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Glen A. Sambrooke,
8726 Montcalm,
Vancouver 14, B.C.
Larry Bryce Donaldson,
126 E. 35th,
Vancouver 5, B.C.
Joe D. English,
109—1928 West 2nd Ave.,
Vancouver 9, B.C.
Colin C. Love,
4832 Dunbar St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Robin L. Allen,
2954 West 14th Ave.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
There's still time to enter if you act now. See page 12 for details.
HOME    UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
HOME   OIL.   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400 ONE BENTALL CENTRE, 505 BURRARD STREET. VANCOUVER 1. B.C.
Learning
A UBC student, whose name is not used becam
repressive laws of that country after he heard
economics, had openings there, Below is an J
South Afri
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews for teaching positions in
the School District No. 36 (Surrey)
may be arranged for March 9th to
11th, inclusive, at the Student Placement Office. Please enter name on
Interview Forms. Tuesday, February 24,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
ig business
Brother's thumb
has friends and relatives in South Africa, wrote this article detailing the
AIESEC, a group which finds summer jobs for students in commerce and
iC poster.
/>|S
.v .■a*-rfj«Jii»H*v
Rf OUCCD AIR. f j
*    PAW'S - JIlHAWiMMW
To all those intending to visit the Republic of South Africa,
please take note of the following points:
1. Only Canadians of pure European descent are allowed into
South Africa without a visa. All other Canadian citizens must apply
to the South African government for a visa.
2. Under the 1950 Immorality Act, it is illegal for persons of
different races to have sexual intercourse, or (under the amendment
of 1957) to solicit for that purpose. Many visitors to South Africa
are convicted of this offence and receive prison terms of up to seven
years.
3. Under the 1949 Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act,
racially mixed marriages entered into outside the country are void in
South Africa.
4. Under the so-called 1950 Suppression of Communism Act,
communism is defined inter alia as any doctrine or scheme which
aims at bringing about any political, industrial, social or economic
change withing the Republic of South Africa.
5. Under the General Law Amendment Act (Act No. 37 of
1963) any commissioned officer may from time to time, without
warrant, arrest or cause to be arrested any person whom he suspects
upon reasonable grounds of having committed, or intending, or
having intended to commit any offence under the Suppression of
Communisim Act, 1950, or the offence of sabotage, or in his
opinion is in possession of any information relating to the
commission of any such offence.
Also, such a person may be held without trial, without access
to legal or medical aid, for any number of consecutive 90 day
periods (since increased to 180 days) at the discretion of the
ministers of "Justice".
If you were once a so-called "communist" but are not now,
you are still liable to imprisonment.
6. Under the General Law Amendment Act, 1962,the
definition of sabotage (penalties range from 5 years to death) is so
wide that it includes any wrongful or wilful act whereby the accused
damages or tampers with any property or any person, or the state.
Under sub-section (c), sabotage is also defined as common
trespass. The burden of proof is shifted to the accused. He is guilty
until he proves himself innocent.
7. Under the 1950 Group Areas Act and the Groups Areas
Act Amendment of 1957, certain areas are set aside for particular
races. Members of other races need special permits from the police
to enter these areas.
A white person would be risking his life to enter an African
"location" or town after dark, and an African town should not be
entered alone during the day.
8. Many books, pamphlets, and magazines (including Playboy,
and at one time "Black Beauty") are banned in South Africa.
Visitors accidentally bringing a banned publication into the country
are liable to confiscation of the literature and/or internment and/or
deportation.
9. The jury system is no longer used in South African courts.
10. If you are a Jew, you will be held under suspicion and
contempt.
11. As an English-speaking person you will be viewed with
hostility by the Afrikaans (Dutch-speaking) citizens. About 95 per
cent of police, civil servants and railway workers are
Afrikaans-speaking.
12. As a foreign visitor to South Africa you will be constantly
asked "what do you think of South Africa?" Be careful! The
questioner may be an informer for the security branch of the police.
These are some of the laws and policies you are most likely to
run afoul of as a visitor in South Africa. There are many, many more
like them.
You have been warned.
DIVERS, ARCHE0L0GISTS
everyone . . .
Dr. J. Cassels of the Penn.
State Archeological Expedition in the Aegean Sea
speaks in SUB 209
Tomorrow (Wed.) ot 7:30
- FREE -
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Annual General Meeting
THE A.G.M. of the Graduate Student Association will
take place on Wednesday, February 25, at 12:30 p.m.
in the S.U.B. Auditorium.
Candidates in  the forthcoming  G.S.A.  elections
expected to be introduced at this meeting.
are
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
Operated  by  Young   People  for  Young   People
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS - SMALL GROUPS
3 WEEKS-ENGLAND-SCOTLAND-WALES $99.00
5 WEEKS-N. AFRICA-SPAIN-PORTUGAL $179.00
5 WEEKS-SCANDINAVIA-RUSSIA $205.00
9 WEEKS-GRAND EUROPEAN TOUR $367.00
Visiting   16  Different  Countries
Food Kitty Keeps Food Costs to a Minimum
All Cooking Equipment Supplied
We   also   assist   with   Charter   Flights
For   Full   Information   &   Daltes,   Etc.,   Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie at 41 sf
327-1162
TVlttt&i Sfionte @e*ttne
ARENAS and CURLING RINK ice time re-
qests from UBC student groups for the 1970-71
season are required as soon as possible.
THESE REQUESTS ARE TO  BE
FORWARDED IN WRITING TO
MR. S.  FLOYD, Manager
Requests for Spring and/or
Summer Arenas ice time are
also presently being received.
For information call 228-3197 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
Action needed
on unemployment
By GINNY GALT
A general meeting for all students interested in taking some
action on student unemployment will be sponsored by The Action
Committee for Unemployed Youth in SUB 215B, on Thursday
noon.
TACUY member Stuart Rush, law 3, said the purpose of the
meeting is to discuss predictions for unemployment this summer, the
present unemployment rate in B.C. (7.1 per cent according to a
Manpower release), various government, policies regarding student
unemployment, and what action students can take.
"It's going to be a serious summer, and we'd like to talk about
some kind of action that can be taken by students to alleviate the
problem. TACUY, unlike other placement groups is an
action-oriented group," said Rush.
TACUY is considering demanding that unemployment
insurance be made available to all unemployed youth, he said.
"Also, we want to do a voluntary social action project in the
area of pollution or conservational control. We could present it to
the government and say here's an example of the type of work
students can do. We'd like to do this sort of thing and get paid for
it," he said.
TACUY can't act effectively until a Manpower report on the
B.C. student unemployment situation is released, he said.
"The survey which started last year was originally released on
January 29 but was called back on the grounds that it was not a
final draft. Now it won't be released until March 1."
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
.^VCATIOIMS      .
* ° N I |\| I V « *•
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
921-9621
(FOR FREE LESSON)
G.S.A. - A.G.M.
S.U.B. Auditorium
NOON
Tomorrow (Feb. 25)
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,  DARK  SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED  JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
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"A VERY, VERY GREAT MOVIE, ONE OF THE GREATEST"-Leo Lerman Mademoiselle
"A WORK OF ART"-Time Magazine ABSOLUTELY BREATHTAKING-Newsweek
Feature times: Evenings 7:30 and 9:30 Sunday 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30-Students 1.50-Adults 2.00 Tuesday, February 24, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Pago 9
U.S. culture penetrates here
through economic domination
By JENNIFER JORDAN
"Having control of a company
is more important than the
amount of shares that are
owned," Progressive Workers
Movement chairman Jack Scott
said Monday.
Scott, who describes himself as
a radical trade unionist, attacked
the various government reports
that often refuse to publicly
acknowledge the full extent of
American domination of
industries in Canada.
He cited Alcan as an example.
"Alcan, originally an
outgrowth of the American
Mellon empire, is thought of as a
totally Canadian enterprise," he
said. "The reason it came to
Canada was to evade United
States taxation, and even though a
U.S. commission rejected the
break that Alcan made with the
Mellon empire, they still consider
themselves Canadian, (while in
reality they are still American)."
He proceeded to make an
example of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, in which over 60 per
cent of the shares are owned by
Canadians.
"Although the shares are very
Quebec has some protection
against the penetration of
American culture," said Scott.
"To get the full impact of the
extremes to which this
domination is practiced, consider
the fact that there is more U.S.
control in Canada, with its 21
million population, than in all of
Latin America, with a total
population of over 210 million."
SCOTT
... no protection
widely distributed throughout
Canada, the owners have very
little control. The real control
comes from the near 40 per cent
of shares that are held in blocks
by large American and English
cartels," he said.
"The Americans also control
90 per cent of the mass media-
television     and     theatre.    Only
Nominations
open for arts
Nominations for the positions of president,
vice-president, secretary and treasurer on the
Arts Undergraduate Society executive open
today at noon.
Nominations close March 2 and the
elections will be held March 4.
Candidates' application forms are available
in the Alma Mater Society business office in
SUB.
WE MEET OR BEAT ALL PRICES
at
TYPEWRITER TOWN
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New & Reconditioned
Typewriters & Adders
OLYMPIA
All Office Equip.
SMITH-CORONA
Trades   Welcome
SPECIALISTS
REPAIRS
2151 West Fourth Ave.
731-0621
^
UBC STUDENTS
information and
advice offered on
ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES
— AND —
VOCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
FOR  BOTH  MEN AND WOMEN
Come tcr
THfrSUB BALLROOM
Jbi WOMEN ONLY-THURSDAY, FEB.26T-H
12.30   to 2.30 p.m.
Jot ALL 5TUDENTS - FRIDAY, FEB.27T-H
J   (MEN and WOMEN) 12 30  to  2 30 p.m.
Faculty, Graduates and Students
will be present for consultation.
The  University of  British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
- Theatre  Excitement -
AS YOU  LIKE  IT
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(SHAKESPEARE'S  CHARMINGEST COMEDY)
MARCH 6-14- 8:30 P.M.
DIRECTED BY IRENE PROTHROE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00
(available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
MONDAY, MARCH 9, 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 12:30 P.M. MATINEE
SUPPORT    YOUR    CAMPUS    THEATRE
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
?
Look fellas...like I told ya a million times. It was
just a gag. I hand the Campusbank teller the note.
She's supposed to laugh. Like ha ha.
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
Visit your Campusbank
a
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
Student Union Building Branch - T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch - G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch - J. W. Ferguson, mgr. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
TUESDAY
ucc
General meeting,  noon,  SUB 207.
STUDENT    LIBERAL    CLUB
General  meeting,  noon.  SUB  212.
PRE-DENTAL   SOCIETY
Meeting,   noon,  SUB  113.
WILLMOTT'S LECTURES
Discussion, noon,  SUB  117.
GERMAN CLUB
Slides,  noon,  I.H.
UBC  SOCREDS
Caucus     and     membership     meeting,
noon, Bu. 224.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Sign-up   for  Strong   tour,   noon,   SUB
119.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
General meeting, noon, Ang. 24.
PRE-DENTAL   SOCIETY
General  meeting,  noon,  SUB   115.
MUSIC   DEPT.
Original    student    compositions,    4:30
p.m.,   Music    Building    Recital    Hall.
Psychedelic!!!
pa™
EAT IN .TAKEOUT. DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.ni.
SWING IN
PSYCHEDELIC
SOPHISTICATION
i
i
Featuring The Vibrant      |
Sounds of
KENTISH STEELE
and the new
CHANTELLES
Mon. to Fri., 8:30 to 2 a.m.
Sat. - 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
5th Ave. at Fir - 736-4304
THIS COUPON  GOOD  FOR i
TWO ADMISSIONS j
FOR THE PRICE OF ONE    j
MONDAY THRU  THURSDAYj
No Admission  to  Persons  Under  21 I
GO NORTH!
Looking for a SUMMER JOB ?
It's your choice: make $300
monthly in the city or up to
$1700 a month working up  NORTH.
$ MONEY $
We can supply you with complete
information on where to go, what
to do, who to see to get those
high paying jobs on pipelines,
construction, oil rigs, or in mines,
forestry, transportation
The YUKON N.W.T., and other
northern areas need labourers,
equipment operators, technicians,
skilled labour and women in
offices, labs, lodges
Conditions are generally good,
room and board free or nominal,
and transportation to job is often
financed. Turnover is high everywhere with on the job training
in  certain  areas.
For your copy of our comprehensive 38 page booklet forward
$2.00 (cash, cheque, or money
order)   to:
NORTHERN JOB
INFORMATION
BOX 295, SO. BURNABY
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SCIENCE   FICTION   CLUB
Meeting, noon,   SUB 105A.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting,   noon,  SUB  130.
SPEAKERS   COMM.
China,    10:30-12:30    p.m.,    Old    Auditorium.
LECTURES  COMMITTEE
A. Cooke speaks, noon, Frederic Wood
Theatre.
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
Mind   Audio   Frequencies,   Hock • and
light show with DJANGO, noon, SUB
Ballroom.
'tween
classes
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   MOVEMENT
Women   on   the   march,   noon,    SUB
207-209.
THURSDAY
MUSIC   DEPARTMENT
Voice   recital,   noon,   Music   Building
Recital Hall.
SPEAKERS   COMM.
Dr. Paul speaks, noon,  Ang.   104.
CLASSICS  CLUB
Meeting, 8 p.m., at home of Prof, and
Mrs.   Bongie  at 3746 W.   13th.
VARSITY  ROD AND GUN
Meting, noon,  SUB 105A.
FRIDAY
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Open  House   70,   SUB   117.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Dr.  James speaks,  noon,  SUB.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
"Coming to Life", noon,  Bu.  234.
SATURDAY
COSA
China  Night,  8  p.m.,   SUB Ballroom.
MONDAY
VARSITY   DEMOLAY
Regular meeting, noon, SUB 213.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students,  Faculty  & Club—3   lines,   1   day  750,   3  days   $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.  the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
THE FILM EVENT HAPPENS
tomorrow night. Queen E. Theatre
at 8, $1.50. Real cheap. 	
FOLK ARTISTS PAYNE AND WIL-
son. In the flesh tomorrow night.
8 p.m.  at  the  Queen  E.,   $1.50.
DROP THOSE STUDIES TOMOR-
row night. Good flicks arrive at
the Queen E. at 8. Low price,
$1.50!
Lost & Found
14
LOST, ONE GITANE TEN-SPEED
racing bike. Phone 922-6713 with
any   information.
LOST, PAIR SANDALS IN BROWN
bat?.   Call  Ron, 731-0985
LOST, NEMO STANDARD (Large)
black poodle. Owner desolate. $50
reward.  Phone  731-3483
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices
16
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN YOUTH
HOSTEL OPENS
Special weekend packages available
for ONLY $8.00 — Includes two
nights accommodation and all
meals. Open 7 days a week, beautiful location on Alta Lake — skiing, snow shoeing, ice skating, fishing,   etc.
Reservations and further information can be obtained at the Canadian Youth Hostels Association,
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9,
728-2128
SKI AT WHTSTLER MOUNTAIN
4 weeks ski instruction with return
bus transportation only $22.00. For
further information contact: Canadian Youth Hostels Association. Ph.
738-3128
IN ACCORD ANCP3 WITH THE
UBC Liberal Club constitution,
due notice is hereby given for the
election of the 70-71 executive.
Elections to be held March 12/70
in   Rm.   212   of  SUB  at   12:30   p.m.
SOFTBALL PITCHER NEEDED
for a Commercial C League team.
Phone Ken MaeLachlan, 327-2737,
6-7  p.m.   any  evening.
PAYNE AND WILSON do it on
stage tomorrow night! Right before   your   eyes.   Queen   E.   at   8.
SEAN GROWS Iir IN HAIGHT-
Ashbury. See him on film tomorrow   night.   Queen   E.   at   8.   $1.50.
IT'S A TAKEOVER! FILMS AND
other visual goodies take over the
usually conservative Queen E. tomorrow.
PRIZE WINNING FILMS ASSAULT
your eyeballs tomorrow night.
Just $1.50 for this visual flagellation!   Queen   E.
COME AS YOU ARE TO THE
visual goodies at the QUEEN E.
theatre   tomorrow   nite.   S   p.m.
GOLDEN GLOVES BOXING, MAR.
6 & 7, 8:00 p.m., $2 & $3, P.N.E.
Garden   Auditorium.
INVITATION, THE STUDENT
Discount Book, is now selling for
under half price in the Bookstore
and at SUB Information. Two for
the price of one at Odeon, Concerts, Plays, Nightclubs, Restaurants, etc. All this for only 75c.
Don't   Miss  It!
VICK'S   T.V.   &   RADIO   CO.
513 West Pender — 685-8622
Guaranteed   Repairs   TVs.   radios,
tape  recorders — 10<7r   discount  to
students.
100% BIODEGRADABLE DETER -
gent does the best job for less
$$. See Richard Hollins, 351 Sal-
ish.   224-9755.
Travel Opportunities
17
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS    ON    A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406   West  Broadway
Vancouver   9,   B.C. Tel.   738-3128
EUROPE   FOR   SWINGING
'     SINGLES   AGE   17-30.
meals,    accommodation,    tours    &
transportation.
3  -weeks   $225.00
6  weeks  $330.00
DINERS   FUGAZY   TRAVEL  —
688-2545.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
68 DATSUN 2000—135 HP, 5 SPD.,
etc. with or without hardtop. Best
offer.   261-2439.	
FOR     SALE     1965     VOLVO     $800.
Phone 922-1053  after  6  p.m.	
FOR    SALE:    1968    TRIUMPH    250.
Best   offer   accepted.   Phone   Bob,
263-6484   after   6   p.m.	
1967 DODGE DART, 6 CYL. STAND-
ard,     excellent     condition,     $1295.
Offers?   263-8366	
'67   V.W.   1500   IN  GOOD   SHAPE.   4
eitr    weinstr       ./OHWi   RGE        A
winter   tires,   radio.   $1250.   Phone
738-0104.   Must   sell.	
1962      CHEVY      II,      AUTOMATIC,
radio,  four new  tires,  good  shape.
Best    offer,    Irene,    874-3814   eves.
'69     VW     DELUXE     BUG,     FULL
equipment.   Victor,   FA   7-7282
'59      MATCHLESS      500      SINGLE,
good condition,  $350.00:   '60 Falcon
2   dr.   std.,   as   is,   $150.00.   263-4803
1966 ENVOY EPIC EXCELLENT
condition. Two new tires: asking
$795.   Phone   224-3385   after   7  p.m.
'65 MUSTANG CONVERT. V-8
auto. Must sell; best cash offer.
254-2818; '56 Chev. sed. del., floor
shift, new plates, $175 firm. Ph.
254-2818.	
1960 ENVOY SPECIAL, 43,000 MI.
Needs some brake work, $100. Ph.
879-8396	
'54 AUSTIN. MCH. SP. OR GOOD
for parts. Needs clutch, $25, or
best.  Keith.  261-0893	
'54 METEOR, $50; '59 FORD, $225.
Barrett,   224-1581	
'57 FORD, GOOD SHAPE, 2 DR.
hrd. top. Low mileage. "C" Lot
permit:   radio,   $100.    224-9460
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—P arts
23
SIDE CURTAINS FOR TR - 3,
aluminum apron. Phone Bruce
Ferguson,    228-2916   after   7:00.
Motorcycles
25
'67 250 HUSTLER, 7000 MILES,
new transmission, excellent condi-
tion.   Ph.   733-6203.	
650 CC B.S.A. CUSTOM (1967) . . .
must be seen. Ph. 224-9665, Gord,
Rm.   20	
DON'T LET THIS BEAUTIFUL
weather pass without having a
bike. Yamaha 80, as new', Paul
926-1069 .	
~66 ZUNDAPP " SCRAMBLER ",
excellent buy.   Barrett,  224-1581
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS. SPE-
cialist in . Graphs, Maps, Text
Book Illustrations, Complex Formulates. Scientific Displays, Advertising.   Phone   733-4506	
Duplicating & Copying
32
WETENSCHAPPELYKE IDLUS-
traties —■ Specialisten in Grafiek-
en, Kaarten, Boek - Illustraties,
Complex Formules, Wetenscharp-
pelyke Tentoonstellingen, advert-
enties.  Tel.  733-4506
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
FOR SALE — DURST 5-35 EN-
larger with 50mm f/4 Componon
lens, set of trays and easel, all
for $80 or best offer. Telephone
228-8380 after 7 P.m.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
CRAIG, THANKS AGAIN. TRIED
contacting you at the house.
Please call me. Cynthia	
WILSON IS RUGGEDLY MASCU-
line. Payne is seductively feminine. Anything can happen when
they get together tomorrow nite
at the Queen E.	
THE MOST UNIQUE CHILD-
birth film ever made unreels tomorrow nite at the Queen E.
"The  Rose".
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates; 738-6829
after  nine  a.m.   to  nine  p.m.	
QUALITY TYPING SERVICE.
(Private).   681-1805  after  6:00 p.m.
ESSAY   TYPING.
3589 West 19th Ave.
733-5922
ESSAY TYPING FOR FACULTY
of Arts. Phone 732-6739 evenings.
IBM   Selective   typewriter.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
theses, essays, term papers, documents.   Reasonable   rates.   266-4264
"ACCURATE ESSAY TYPING" —
Mrs.   Pasqualotto,   434-1402	
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST, ES-
says. theses, etc. 50c per page.
Mrs.   Duncan   228-9597.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY*
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (DOCU-
ments, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.	
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING
My    home.    Essays,    Thesis,     etc.
. Neat   accurate   work.   Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver home.  988-7228.	
EXPERIENCED FRENCH — ENG-
lish typist. Thesis-Essays-Translations-Publications, any other
work. Contact: Miss Danielle Cou-
nord, office hours: 682-1878; even.
hours:   879-3568. 	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing — essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone   321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
ATTRACTIVE VERSATILE FE-
male vocalist for steady weekend
work.   Call   526-9356  or  987-7214
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broad -
wav location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time  summer work.
Help Wanted—Male
52
WE REQUIRE PART - TIME
salesmen to handle a fast moving product at top commission.
Phone 684-5010 for an appointment.
Male or Female
53
MARRIED COUPLE ATTENDANTS
for campsite on Hornby Island.
Graduate student preferred. Trailer provided; leisure time: available June 19 - September 8. Applicants phone Saunders, 224-7355
between 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   Wednesday,   Thursday.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction  Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
PIANO   VOICE   THEORY   COACH-
ing   by   qualified   teacher.   Colling-
wood  and   Fourth.   731-5459
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats, by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00 per hr. Phone 733-6037 evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
MATTRESSES FOR SALE, TWO
double $15 each, one single $7,
hardly   used.   732-9897.	
ONE PAIR HEAD 360's WITH
harness, poles, canvas covers; 210
centimeters. Phone 261-0394 after
6:00  p.m.	
NYLON FIBER SHORT'N CURLY
wig. Light blonde, pre-cut and
styled. Head included. $30.00.
Chris  224-3380.
Miscellaneous For Sale
(Cont.)
71
LISST UPRIGHT PIANO WITH
bench, one year old. $500.00 or
near offer. Financing possible.
263-5975   after   seven.
STEREO RECORD PLAYER, POR-
table, Electrohome, cost $160. Like
new,   $69.   Offers?   263-8366	
DUNCAN FYFE DINING ROOM
set, four days, best offer. Phone
732-5858   after   5  p.m.	
BEDROOM FURNITURE SET.
Bright orange, $70, or best offer.
732-5858   after  5   p.m.	
HEAD STD's 210's STEP - INS,
one year old. Muntz four track
tape, deck 18 tapes, speakers, $70.
266-4656,   ask  for  Terry.
SANSUI 5000 STEREO RECEIVER,
180 watt, reg. $659.95, spec. $399.00.
Stereo amplifier, 65 watt, solid
state, reg. $139.95, spec. $95.00.
Sansui receiver, AM-FM S.W.,
$68.00. Fisher stereo ampl., 60w,
reg. $299.85, spec. $188.00. Scott
radio tuner, best buy, $138.00.
House of Stein Electronics Ltd.,
901 Granville,  685-5611	
PHILLIPS MONO. 2-SPEED 4-
track   tape   recorder,   $60.   980-2280
MOVING EAST, MUST SELL FUR-
niture and household goods of
interest.   Call 738-4030  daytime.
205 CM FIBREGLASS SKIS —
used   only  twice.  Phone  228-8427
SMITH & CORONA TYPEWRITER,
older model in excellent condi-
tion,   $50.    Phone   738-9108	
'69 HEAD SLALOM SKIES, 210
cms, Barker bindings. Demanding
and high-spirited skis for the
competent   skier.   Mike,   224-0500
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STIU AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS  Publication!  Office
and Thunderbird Shop
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT BED SITTING
room, fully furnished; fridge, hotplate, S70 mnth. 3035 Hemlock,
male student. Tel.  738-4090 after 6.
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY !
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5670 Toronto
Rd.	
GIRL TO SHARE FLAT WITH
same; fridge, hotplate, $42.50. Ph.
224-9303	
FURNISHED LIGHT HOUSE-
keeping and sleeping rooms. Close
to UBC and trans. Students only.
Available immediately. $60 single,
$45 double. Lloyd or Tom,
738-1895	
ROOM FOR MALE, NEAR UBC
gates. Kitchen and laundry facili-
ties,   S35.   Ph.   224-1678	
TWO SINGLE ROOMS FOR MALE
students in new house, Point Grey
area. Separate entrance and bathroom. Available March 1st. Phone
224-9319.
Room & Board
82
FREE -BOARD AND QUIET ROOM
offered student or working girl for
help  during weekends.  733-3018
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
COUPLE WITH CHILD NEEDS
accommodation from 1st of March
till 20th March, near UBC, Phone
224-3865	
BASE. STE., FURN.; PRIV. ENT.;
2 girls, bd. rm., sitting rm., kitchen, all found own showers,
toilet, auto, wash, and dryer,
$110.   Ph.   228-8238,   avail.   Mar.   1.
KITSILANO — CLEAN     2     ROOM
furn.   suite   in   quiet   house,   grad.
female   student,   2525  W.   7th  Ave.
731-9841	
GIRL  WANTED   TO   SHARE   TWO
bdrm.  apt.,  10th  Ave.  near gates.
furnished,  $55.  Ph.  224-7035	
MATURE       FEMALE       STUDENT
wishes   to   locate   another   female
to   share   apartment.   Phone   228-
8567  or  228-9849
Unf. Houses & Apts.
84 Tuesday, February 24,  1970
T H
UBYSSEY
Page  11
Birds surprise
'■if
—dick button photo
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA VIKING'S Tom Hatcher (42)
found the going a little rougher than expected as he put up an
easy shot in Saturday's WCIAA semi-final game. That's Terry
MacKay of the Birds knocking the ball out of harm's way. UBC
handily won both games to advance to the finals against the
University of Manitoba here at UBC next weekend.
Covering the pool
The next step in the continuing story of the University
Recreation Committee's attempt to cover Empire pool is the initial
costing of the trouble.
"First prices indicate that it will cost us about $3.60 to $3.80
a square foot," said committee chairman Sean McHugh.
The committee expects to put up about half of the total
capital expenditure of $70,000 and get the rest matched by a grant
for the board of governors to buy and erect the $70,000 structure.
"For putting up half the money," McHugh explained, "we feel
our demand for half of the .pool time for recreation is not at all out
of line."
They will also ask the  board to put up extra capital for
expansion of dressing and shower room facilities.
The Grad class donation is the most important step in the near
future though, according to McHugh.
The committee feels the Grad class should be concerned with
what sort of gift they can leave campus with.
Puck Birds
finished
It's all over for this season,
according to UBC hockey coach
Bob Hindmarch.
Also according to the Western
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association. They have
proclaimed that UBC has been
eliminated from the WCIAA
playoffs by virtue of two losses to
the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs in Calgary this
weekend.
The Birds had their third close
game against the Dinos on Friday
night, in fact the closest of the
season as they forced the game
into overtime, then lost it 7-6.
Saturday night, they bowed to
superior play by Calgary, 8-1.
The Birdsgot behind early in
the game Friday, as they gave up
three goals in the first ten
minutes. UBC came back with
goals by Jack Moores and Tom
Williamson to end the period at
3-2.
The Birds outscored Calgary
2-1 in the second period as Wayne
Schaab picked up another goal
and Doug Buchanan finally broke
a long scoring slump.
The Birds started fast in the
third period and went ahead 6-4
on goals by Larry Watts and Jeff
Wilson in the first six minutes.
Unfortunately, the defense lapsed
slightly and Calgary tied it up at
6-6 by the end of regulation time.
Calgary then scored at 2:01 of the
overtime and the game was over.
That goal pretty well decided
Saturday night too as Calgary
came out flying and the Birds
were both tired and disappointed.
Tom Williamson picked up their
lone goal in a losing cause.
Hindmarch feels that the
Calgary team that the Birds
played Saturday night is the best
team ever to play in the WCIAA,
and predicts that they will go on
to win the Canadian collegiate
championships in Fredericton
next month.
EAT IN* TAKE OUT. DELIVERY
3261 W.' Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.i
NOW - A HEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie  St.
Vancouver   15,   B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
THE EGRET & THE HAWK
A Programme of No & Yeats
Directed by MOYRA MULHOLLAND
FEBRUARY 24-28 — 8:30 P.M.
in the new SOMERSET STUDIO
Tickets: Room 207-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
STUDENTS: $1.00 ADULTS: $1.50
win semi-finals
Surprise, surprise. Yes the
University of B.C. basketball
Thunderbirds won the WCIAA
semi-finals in straight games on
the weekend as they twice
bombed the University of Victoria
Vikings, 96-74 and 97-56.
Surprise? Well, it probably is
overstating the results somewhat.
The fact of the farce is that the
Vikings were out of contention
the moment they stepped off the
plane. As a case study of the
devastation, Friday evening's
game will be examined as it most
flatters the Victoria pundits.
Before 650 paying partisans,
the Birds came out and applied
their traditional methods of which
the most effective was the fast
break. The full court press also
forced numerous Viking turnovers
and allowed the Birds to open a
slim 41-28 half time lead.
Pace setter for the contest was
the consistently brilliant guard
Ron Thorsen who was 13 for 22
from the outside and finished
early with 30 points.
Bob Molinski, equally
consistent, had 21 points while
Terry MacKay had one of his best
scoring evenings with 17.
The Vikings, while clearly
outclassed did come up with a
great performance. Using a non
recognizable offense the Viks
were able to hold the Birds to a
mere 13 point half time edge and
come up with 74 points, 16 of
them by guard Mike Taafe.
Saturday night was very much
the same as the Birds forced 23
Victoria turnovers, harassed the
Vikings into shooting 22 per cent
from the field and won by 41
points. The scoring leaders list
reads the same as usual and the
rebounding was taken care of by
Terry MacKay with 14 and the
conference leader Derek Sankey
with 15.
This weekend the Birds host
the University of Manitoba Bisons
in the conference finals as the
Bisons easily took care of Alberta
in the other semi-final.
HOOP STATISTICS
University   of   Victoria   (74)
Jossul 4, Brumwell 11, Cronck 8,
Burch 11, Piper 4, McKeachie 2,
Glover 11, Hatcher 7, Taafe 16.
University of B.C. (96)
Brayden 7, Molinski 21,
Matheson, Kainer, Hawkins 2,
Sankey 15, Hoy 2, Thorsen 30,'
MacKay 17, Mills 2.
University of Victoria (56)
Jossul 13, Brumwell 6, Child 7,
Cronck 11, Burch 2, Piper 2,
McKeachie 5, Glover, 2, Hatcher
8, Taafe.
University of B.C. (97)
Brayden 14, Molinski 23,
Matheson 2, Kainer 4, Hawkins 6,
Sankey 9, Hoy 4, Thorsen 21,
MacKay 12, Mills 2.
Swimmers
go east
Five members of the UBC
Thunderbirds swimming team
qualified to make a trip to the
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Union championships to be held
at McGill University next
weekend.
Veterans Phil Dockerill, Phil
Winch, Terry Lyons and Jim
Maddin as well as newcomer Andy
Keir are the UBC members of the
Western Conference team.
Dockerill was UBC's only
winner, taking the 100 meter
breaststroke while Winch came
second.
Maddin picked up a second
place in the 100 meter backstroke
while Lyons took second in the
50 meter freestyle.
Keir qualified by bettering a
standard time in the 400 meter
freestyle event.
The team's second place finish
was matched by the Thunderettes
who finished second in their
competition, both UBC teams
being defeated by teams from the
University of Alberta.
CAMPUS LAUDROMAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   &    Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354 W.   10th 224-9809
WORRY  BEADS!
Got Yours Yet?
Application  Page  12
OPENS SATURDAY
for 7 days only
"BABY THE RAIN MUST FALL"
"IT'S GONNA BE FINE"
Plus many more great
hits of	
GLENN
YARBROUGH
Plus . .. Comedy of .. . GABE KAPLAN
| Tonight & Wed. - RICH LITTLE  |
<si
682-3677 Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1970
GSA posts
contested
this week
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Elections will be held Thursday
and Friday for the positions of
president and Alma Mater Society
reps of the Graduate Students
Association.
Contesting the position of
president are Nick Collins, arts 7,
and David Mole, arts 7.
Collins is running on a
platform of opposition to the
proposed grad fee increase of
$ 150 (see story p. 1) and federal
finance minister Edgar Benson's
white paper on taxation which
proposes to tax all sources of
income of grad students, including
scholarships and bursaries.
"We should be more concerned
with developing a sense of
community," Mole said. "We have
a responsibility to the university
as    an    important    part    of   it.
The candidates for AMS reps
are Scott Fast, Evert Hadgers, and
Michael Wyeth. There are two
positions available.
Elected by acclamation were:
Gallen Teel, External Affairs
Officer; Marylee Stephenson,
Internal Affairs Officer; and Susan
Clarke, Secretary.
Since no nominations were
received, the position of Assembly
Co-ordinator will be appointed by
the incoming executive.
Widespread demonstrations
protest conspiracy sentencing
—dave enns photo
WITH HOUSING such a problem
in Vancouver, the easiest way to
beat the mania of trying to find
an apartment is to make do with
what you've got. This guy
obviously didn't have much, as he
spread out his 'sleeping gear' over
the railing on SUB steps, stretched
out and took advantage of the
sunny weather.
CHICAGO (CUPJ) - Judge Julius J. Hoffman
handed down maximum sentences to five members
of the "Conspiracy 8" Friday while demonstrators
in Toronto and across the U.S. continued their
protests against the trial verdict and American
justice in general.
Forty-eight hours after a jury found David
Dellinger, Rennie Davis, Tom Hayden and Jerry
Rubin guilty of crossing state lines to incite rioting
during the Democratic Party national convention
Hoffman sentenced the men to five years'
imprisonment and fined each of them $5,000.
In addition to the fine, Hoffman directed that
the five men also pay for the costs of the
prosecution in the four and a half month trial —
estimated to be at least $55,000.
The sentences were added to lengthy and
possibly illegal contempt of court citations handed
out to the defendants and their lawyers at the end
of the trial.
Meanwhile, the series of spontaneous protests
which sprang up across the U.S. continued over the
weekend, spreading across the border into Canada.
Approximately 250 demonstrators splattered
eggs filled with red paint.across the front door and
official seal of the U.S. consulate in Toronto
Saturday in protest against the convictions and
sentences.
Demonstrators are currently organizing a
telephone harassment campaign against the
consulate, asking sympathizers to bombard
telephone lines with questions concerning the
justice of the Chicago trial, police involvement in
the original 1968 "riots", and U.S. government
repression against the Black Panther Party.
More than 7,000 demonstrators gathered
outside the Chicago Federal Building Saturday to
protest the sentences, filling the plaza outside the
building in a peaceful protest.
The crowd later moved to the Cook county jail,
where the convicted defendants are being held.
The crowd was told by Jesse Jackson, a leader
of the Southern Christian Leadership conference,
that the "next conspiracy demonstration must be in
Washington with a million people to say "no more
Fascism, no more Imperialism, no more
Capitalism.' "
In Washington, approximately 1,000
demonstrators gathered across the street from the
justice department to hear William Kunstler, chief
attorney, for the Chicago defendants, protest the
conviction of five of his clients.
"I guess the answer is that government responds
only to the power of the people," — adding that
people must "put their bodies and minds where the
government will be afraid."
Concerned
about future?
Students concerned about their job futures will
have a chance this week get information and advice
from professors representing all faculties.
Called Quo Vadis, the program was initiated
last year by the dean of women to help UBC
students assess academic and vocational possibilities.
Quo Vadis takes place for women only on
Thursday in SUB ballroom from 12:30 to 2:30 pm
and for both men and women on Friday at the same
time and place.
There's still time to enter if you act now!
^ •
Win a Week-End
for two in
San Francisco
6 trips for two will be won by UBC students
between January 30th and March 13th.
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for 2 days for winner
and friend.
PLUS EXCITING EXTRA PRIZES
EVERY WEEK: Dinner for two at
Hy's Steak House — Canucks Hockey tickets
for two — Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
Evening for two at the Daisy — Dinner for two
at the Grouse Nest.
Easy to enter! Fill in coupon and get your special Home /. Credit Card
We'll mail your special Credit Card to you as soon
as we get the coupon. Every time you use your
Home Credit Card at any of the 298 Home Stations
you are automatically entered in the contest. The
more often you use it the more often you enter.
And the better your chances to win
GET YOUR   FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
We'll mail you your Worry Beads as soon as we
get your coupon, along with full contest details,
your special Home Credit Card and fascinating
Worry  Bead  story.
,£ If yog now have a  regular Home  Credit Card  phone our  Credit Dept., 685-9131   — we will  make
arrangements to make it eligible.
WORRY BEADS ARE BIG ON CAMPUS.
Fourteen wooden beads on a
leather thong  .  .   .  anti-uptight
baubles to get you  through daily
disasters. And they're yours free
in the mail when you apply for
your special UBC Home Credit Card.
TO: Home Oil Distributors Ltd., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Complete this application form  (please print) and  mail  it to  Home Oil. We'll  rush your special
Credit Card to you, plus your FREE Worry Beads!
SURNAME
Christian Names
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS, if different from above. (Street No., Town, etc.]
REGISTRATION No.
Faculty Year
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400   ONE  BENTALL CENTRE,   505   BURRARD  STREET.  VANCOUVER  1.   B.C.

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