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The Ubyssey Mar 3, 1970

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Array Festival seeks to create awareness of oppression
By GINNY GALT
The Festival of the Oppressed starts
Friday ut UBC.
The. festival which coincides with
Open House Week is being sponsored by
the Arts Undergrad Society, The Mother
Earth ^ribe and Industrial Workers of the
World.
IWW local 620 member Scott
Lawrence said the intent of the festival is
to create an awareness of the manifold
oppression that faces all of us and
particularly minority groups.
"The average white student in iinaw.ne
of the overt material oppression thai
faces most of the world's popuku ion. .md
this in itself is a manifestation •■>[ ili.u
oppression," said Lawrence.
The festival's sponsors are pii'senim}: it
during Open House to take advjm.it'c of
the large 'crowds coming to see ihv
university.
"We want to educate as large j [uit ot
the population as possible to the fact that
not only is the university doing iciy mile
to    alleviate    local,    national    .md
intemjiinnal nppiussion. but is an agent
tor imperialist and iacist foiCi?s."
LawrcMci' said.
LawiL'iu'e said the people participating
in the leNiual hope lo piovidc an
■ilu-rn.iuvc view (if ihe woild ami jn
alternative lift- style which is shown m
their poeiis , music and art.
Tin* program stjrts F-nday at 10 a.m.
(hi Sl'li pla/a with music, poetry, ,ind
speakers fmni the Scilile chaptei of rhe
Black Panthers. NjIiw Alliance tor Red
Power. Women's Caucus, anil California
(Iianc Workers.
On Saturday the speakers will include
i lie Unemployed CiiiamiN Council,
Aineiican descneis. and Newspapei Guild
representatives.
A nchcs ot movies and slide shows will
be shown in Sl'D 1251' beginning al 10
a.m.
"We pot inn name from Karl Marx
who said revolutions are the festivals of
the oppressed," Lavucnce said.
NEWSPAPER UNIONS DIG IN,
COMPANY RIGID
This weird drawing has probably got you wondering about the inadequacy of your own hallucinations
- only kinks imagine themselves being gobbled by pianos. Now if you are intrigued by this work of
art and would like to see more by the same artist, you are in luck. Morse Clary, a 30-year-old sculptor
and printmaker from Nebraska starts a one-man show of his work this week in conjunction with Open
House. Clary's sculptures, prints and drawings will be on display starting Friday in the Creative
Writing department in Brock Hall. His works have won many competitions and have been shown in
many galleries in the U.S. and his show of freaky things here will continue until April 1 in Brock.
Classes cancelled
All classes have been cancelled on Friday from 12:30 p.m. on, by order of
administration president Walter Gage.
Due to the cancellation, the arts faculty elections will be on Monday. An
all-candidates meet will be held Thursday noon. Location will be advertised on posters.
'Our only mistake was
not suspending operations
earlier/says Pacific Press head
By NATE SMITH
Talks between Pacific Press and its 1,100 locked-out
employees have broken down again.
After talks with company officials in Victoria Friday,
American Newspaper Guild International president Charles Perlik
said Sun and Province employees may have to "dig in for a long
fight."
Meanwhile, the Vancouver Express, the thrice weekly interim
newspaper published by the five Pacific Press unions, may go daily.
"There is certainly going to be discussion along these lines, but
there are no plans formulated at the moment," said Bill McLeman,
executive secretary of the Vancouver-New Westminster Newspaper
Guild.
Perlik disputed a statement by Province editor Paddy Sherman
that the Victoria talks included "a good thrashing out' of all the
issues."
Perlik said the talks centered around the company's financial
demand from the unions and barely mentioned matters that could
lead to a contract settlement. He said Sherman did riot even sit in on.
the meeting.
"Pacific Press had three Rs in mind — retaliation, retribution
and 'reparations' (Pacific Press general manager Ed Benson used that
word) from the unions," said Perlik.
According to Perlik, Benson said Pacific Press plans to bill the
unions for the $1.5 million it claims to have lost during the
production slowdowns between November and February. Benson
said the company would recover the money "by tapping the
international unions' funds or by billing each member."
Benson also said the company's board of directors, previously
divided, is now unified in its battle with the unions.
Perlik said Benson admitted the company made a profit in
November although it is claiming damages for a $150,000 loss in
that month.
Benson also said the company has strike insurance from a
co-operative fund among publishers which pays benefits up to
$30,000 a day for a maximum of 50 publishing days.
He said the company's only mistake was not suspending
operations earlier than it did.
FP Publications chairman R. S. Malone, who came to
Vancouver for a board of directors meeting last week, has returned
to Winnipeg.
The next board meeting is scheduled for April 10.
The company says it will talk to the unions again "in the
future" at an unspecified time and place.
Conspiracy seven
freed on bail
CHICAGO (CUPI) - The seven defendants in the conspiracy
trial here held an impromptu news conference in the street outside
the federal building Saturday after a United States court of appeal
ruled they were not "dangerous men to be at large,',' and freed them
on a total of $155,000 bail.
Bail was set at. $25,000 each for the five defendants—AJbbie
Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Rennie Davis, Dave Dellinger and Tom
Hayden—convicted of crossing state lines to incite a riot here in
August, 1968.
Bail of $15,000 each was set for John Froines and Lee
Weiner—acquitted of inciting to riot charges but, with the others,
convicted on contempt of court charges.
The five judge panel which freed the seven pending their
appeals of the sentences and convictions, also set bail at $15,000 for
defence attorneys William Kunstler and Leonard Weinglass-due to
be imprisoned March 4, also on contempt charges. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3,  1970
Building occupied
in Manchester
MANCHESTER ENGLAND (CUPI) - Nearly 3,000 students
occupied the main administration building at the University of
Manchester   here   Friday.
The occupation grew ovemight-from 1,000 students
Thursday-after the administration obtained an injunction barring
four members of the Socialist Society from taking part in student
union debates or activities.
The issue was first raised three weeks ago when students at
Warwick University, near Birmingham, found a letter to the school's
admission tutor from the headmaster of a private secondary school
describing an applicant to the university as a member of "a
schoolboy power" organization.
The Warwick administration vice-chancellor received the letter
and wrote on it: "Reject this man."
Word of this and similar letters sparked demonstrations at nine
of England's 44 campuses, including a three-day occupation of
administration buildings at Oxford.
"AND AS SOON as I walked
out of that barber shop I said
to myself 'Ron, this country
needs some consumer
protection laws,'" says Ron
Basford, minister of consumer
and corporate affairs, in a talk
to the marketing club Friday.
GSA president elect:
political role to play'
The new grad studies president and two Alma Mater Society
representatives were elected Friday.
The new president is David Mole, grad studies economics, who
returned 305 votes. His opponent Nick Collins, grad studies Spanish,
received 100 votes.
"We intend to fulfill the promises we made during the
campaign," Mole said after his election. "Graduate students should
be concerned with more than their jobs. We have a positive political
role to play in the university."
Evert Hoogers, grad studies English, with 168 votes, and Scott
Fast, grad studies political science, with 162 votes, were elected
graduate students' AMS representatives. Michael Wyeth, science 7,
received 140 votes.
"The basic point is that graduate students are members of the
university. We are affected by the same problems as all other
students, problems such as jobs and housing," Hoogers said.
Dear Speak Easy:
1 am renting a small one bedroom apartment in the
Kitsilano area and want to stay there mntil May 1. My
landlord, who has been making my life miserable for the
last three months, wants me to leave before then.
Yesterday, he sent me a note informing me that my rent
will increased $10 a month as of April 1: first, can he
legally do that, and second, if I don't pay the increase,
can he evict me?
I would leave tomorrow if I could but with all my
exams and papers due the first couple of weeks in April,
I just cannot begin looking for another place at this
time. Nor do I want any trouble as I'm under enough
pressure right now as it is.
UP AGAINST THE WALL.
DEAR UATW:
You speak not only for yourself but for thousands
of tenants who live and breathe at the discretion of their
landlords. Students, of course, generally tenants due to
their financial condition and temporary status, are too
often at the short end of the landlord's big stick. In your
case, however, it is possible to reverse the harassment.
According to the new Vancouver Rental
Accommodation Grievance Board by-law No. 4448
recently passed by city council, your landlord cannot
increase your rent or modify the rental agreement
(verbal or written) in any way without giving you three
months full notice.
Section 5 of the bylaw reads: "No landlord shall
alter the rent payable to a tenant with respect to any
premises or alter any other terms or conditions under
which the premises are occupied by the tenant, either by
amending or renewing an existing lease, or by
terminating an existing tenancy and creating a new one.
EXCEPT UPON THREE CLEAR MONTHS NOTICE IN
WRITING TO THE TENANT".
It is wise for every tenant to be familiar with the
clauses of the new bylaw and to be aware of the few
rights we do have. Copies this document are available
without cost at the office of the citv clerk at the citv
hall on 12th Avenue at Cambie. Infractions of the new
law on the part of the landlord can be presented to the
Grievance Board, and if found guilty, the landlord is
liable to fine and/or imprisonment.
However, there is a loophole, and that is that no
provision has been made to prevent a landlord from
giving you the mandatory month's notice and evicting
you if you make a stink. Hence, it is advisable to consult
with the B.C. Tenants Association, a lawyer, or Legal
Aid before taking action against the landlord.
Legal Aid panels are held at UBC, SUB rm.
237-237a Mon., Wed., and Fri. at noon, and in the
community at 7-9 p.m. Tuesday (2741 West 4th), Wed.
1144 Commercial Drive), and Thurs. evenings (5783
Victoria Drive). Two words remain to sum up the
situation: Tenants Unite!
Speak Easy is now open 10 a.m.—9 p.m., SUB rm.
218. We urge you as well to write to Speak Easy, SUB,
Box 215, or phone 228-3706.
Threats keep bomb mystery alive
UBC's mystery caller was hard at work Friday.
He began at 10:30 a.m. with a call to
administration information office director Arnie
Myers.
"There is a bomb in the math annex," the male
voice said, then hung up.
Physics prof talks
Prof. R. S. Cohen of Boston University's
physics department will speak on the "Sociological
Roots of Science" Thursday at 12:30 in Hebb
Theatre.
Cohen is currently serving with the National
Association for the Advancement of Colored
People.
At 12:30 p.m. there was a false fire alarm in
Buchanan. "Someone simply broke the glass on one
of the alarm boxes," said Myers.
At 1:50 p.m. another call was made to Myers'
office. "There is a bomb in the bio-sciences
building," the threatener said. Click.
However no bombs exploded.
RCMP Sargent George Strathde said the UBC
detachment would not be investigating the threats
as, "there is nothing to investigate."
He added there is no apparent connection
between the threats and the false fire alarm.
The last explosion to occur on campus was in
the geography-geology building February 6.
Previous bombings occurred in Brock Hall
January 23, and in the Math building January 9.
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews for teaching positions in
the School District No. 36 (Surrey)
may be arranged for March 9th to
11th, inclusive, at the Student Placement Office. Please enter name on
Interview Forms.
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W 10th Ave.
224-0828
CALGARY
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS
invite applications for 1970-71
• GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS
• TEACHER  LIBRARIANS
• FINE ARTS
SALARY-YEARS TRAINING
4 5 6
Minimum $ 7,175        $ 7,675        $ 8,175
11 x 450 11 x 450 11 X 450
Maximum        $12,125        $12,625        $13,125
DR. J. A. EARLE
will be available for interviews
STUDENT SERVICES  -  UBC  - MARCH 9-10
BAYSHORE INN   -   MARCH 9-10 (evenings)
MOOSE VALLEY FARMS PRESENT
TEN   YEARS  AFTER
GARDENS
MARCH 8
TICKETS $3.50
the BAY
DOWNTOWN
TOTEM MUSIC
LOUGHEED & GUILDFORD
WEST SIDE MUSIC
WEST END Tuesday, March 3,  1970 T H E      U B Y S S E Y  Page
7 don't enjoy killing people but it might happen
_.,.„.   .    .     . . — ..,_ .,. . r:-j^M^^^^Bk   •■
Indians are afraid of cultural genocide but feel they ... ^^^H||||^^^H^^ ''.■■''•'&•■&$.■v?->:*4?&^^^^^^^^^^^^^Km^
don't have the power to prevent it. -.- ^H^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^.A^a^^^g-ShS-sSJ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BR,
By FRAN McGRATH
Indians are afraid of cultural genocide but feel they
don't have the power to prevent it
This was the theme of a panel discussion Monday in
SUB auditorium as part of the program for Indian week.
College counsellor, Ben Paul said, "I know who I am
and do not want to alienate myself from my Indian
identity. Just give Indians our chance in this majority
society!"
University of Victoria teaching assistant Ron
Hamilton said he is going around the country trying to
influence Canadians to accept Indians as Indians not as
brown white men.
"I have been doing this for a long time with little
results," he said.
"I feel the alternatives to violence are being whittled
down."
He said the Indian people don't have the economic,
political, social power to fight their battles.
"Indians started out trying to exercise power
through the means provided," said Hamilton.
The generation who wrote petitions are dying,
frustrated, he said.
"We have generations of Indian people working out
in the bush who got grade 12. The towns told them go
away we don't want you. I don't enjoy killing people
but it might have to come," he said.
Hamilton said the white power people came to hear
them but they don't make any changes.
He said Indians are not just encouraged to leave the
reservation but pushed into cities and into areas that will
certainly become ghettoes.
"I see it taking place all the time," he said.
As an example of the government's treatment of
Indians he cited Tofino on Vancouver Island. When a
Catholic run school on the reservation was closed, the
Indian Affairs Department put the children into
boarding homes in Tofino. The parents wanted a hostel
run by older generation Indians built in Tofino to keep
the children in touch with their background. But the
government refused on the grounds that money was
tight. Just recently the federal budget came out with a
surplus.
Hamilton said, "The government says come into
Tofino and go to school but on our terms. They want us
accultured."
He said the government wants to do away with the
Indians because they want their land.
"We have some of the last natural land around cities
with trees and streams in the country," said Hamilton.
"This is another example of a government that puts
money before people."
—david bowerman photo
BETTY WILSON (LEFT) and Jo-Anne Kelly show an Indian mask which will be on display, along with other
Indian art, in the anthropology museum this week. Exhibit is part of scheduled Indian Week events.
Education student Jean Albin offered segregated
Indian schools as a solution to maintaining Indian
culture.
"In order for two peoples to meet they first must
integrate within themselves," he said.
"In order for me to talk to you I must know who I
am."
She said she is starting an Indian school in her own
town next year.
"These schools will not be for those who succeed in
the public schools," she said, "they will be for the child
who fails year after year."
"The public schools have failed tremendously. John
and Janet readers with their middle class values are
totally irrelevant to Indian children," said Albin.
Indian children need readers that carry Indian values
to get them reading.
She said she is writing a primary reader herself.
"Indian children could not relate to the standard
curriculum and that "three R education" failed to meet
the social, psychological and cultural needs of Indian
students," she said.
Arts I program waiting for permanent ratification
New Arts 1 mav become a nermanent nroeram after a     a number of English 100 students is heino nserl as imp nf     r^n.v.,.
New Arts 1 may become a permanent program after a
three year trial.
"The administration looks favorably upon Arts 1 as
becoming a permanent program," said Dr. John Collins of
the committee to evaluate Arts 1.
The committee's report on Arts 1 will be given to
arts dean D. T. Kenny who will ultimately decide
whether the program remains.
A questionnaire issued to present Arts 1 students and
a number of English 100 students is being used as one of
the indexed of evaluation.
"The questionnaire is useful only if it is filled out
straight," said Collins.
"One student listed his three pastimes as 'healing the
sick, raising the dead and walking on water'," he said.
"Another criteria is cost. The total cost of Arts 1 per
student is $208, whereas the total cost for an ordinary
first year arts student is $104 on a 3 unit basis," said
Collins.
"We don't know if the additional benefits of Arts 1
are due to the program or the favorable faculty to student
ratio," he said.
It is proposed that Arts 1 be optioned as a three,six
and nine unit course. By doing this it will reach science
students who do not have room for a nine unit course but
need a good glimpse of what arts are, said Collins.
"Arts 1 is the kind of experience every student
should have, relating subjects to theme instead of facing
academic subjects that are strictly English literature or
strictly history," said Arts 1 prof Ian Ross.
Jonas   to read
The poems of George Jonas will make you remember
everything you want to forget.
Jonas, who will read at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in Bu.
106, has published in North America's leading literary
journals and his work has been widely anthologized and
broadcast.
Jonas' reading is the latest in the series sponsored by
the Creative Writing department. Previous readings have
included international figures such as Miller Williams,
Robert Sward and John Robert Colombo.
Coming up will be Irving Layton, Andreas Schroeder,
Michale ljullock and Richard Geller. Admission to all
readings is free.
—maureen gans photo
QUEBEC LABOR LEADER and separatist Michel Chartrand gives emphasis to his argument at Friday panel discussion
on American domination of Canada. Other panelists (left to right): historian Stanley Ryerson, former B.C. labor leader
Jack Scott, moderator Stuart Rush, Carleton University professor Robin Mathews and arts undergraduate society
president Dick Betts. See story page 12.
Double  apology
The Ubyssey wishes to apologize to Liberal MLA
Garde Gardom for linking him with the Social Credit
party in an article of Feb. 27.
The Ubyssey also wishes to apologize to the Social
Credit party for affiliating Garde Gardom with its
organization. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3,  1970
M UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH 3, 1970
Boycott buses!
We see that your benefactor and ours, B.C. Hydro,
has seen fit to raise bus fares to 25 cents and to insist
that travellers have the correct change ready.
We think it would be a good idea to tell the Socred
government's version of Monopoly to suck rocks.
BTC. already had an exorbitantly high hydro rate.
Compare it with Ontario's. For that matter, compare
B.C.'s education system, corrections facilities, mental
health and welfare systems with those of Ontario.
We're on the dirty end of the stick, so to speak.
Sure, we know all about the wonderful dams that
are making the hydro costs so high. And we know about
the high cost of setting up transmission lines in B.C. But
what does this have to do with bus fares?
If the government absolutely must increase its
revenue to pay for its dams and transmission lines — the
value of which is certainly questionable — then let them
get the money from the people these things benefit. Let
them increase hydro rates.
But lay off the goddam bus fares.
We propose a boycott of B.C. Hydro buses. Such a
boycott will come about partly through necessity
because too many people can't afford 25 cents a trip
and can't be bothered making sure they have the right
change all the time.
But we propose a conscious boycott, an absolute
refusal to ride B.C. Hydro buses under any
circumstances.
The answer lies in hitch-hiking, a practice which
continues to increase and is growing in acceptance.
Not only can hitch-hiking prove an economical,
convenient form of transportation, it is sociable,
friendly and offers a chance to meet people.
It also might be the answer to a number of
problems in the city — pollution, congestion, parking.
The advantages of hitch-hiking over riding
Bennett's buses and filling the government coffers are
virtually innumerable.
And the more people who hitch-hike, the more
acceptable the idea will become, the less stigma will be
attached to it, the less chance there will be of muggings
or assaults or whatever else causes the police to frown
upon the practice.
The government will be against anything that takes
potential money from its puppet corporations and the
police will be against anything that is out of its control.
That's just about enough justification right there.
But the hike in fares is the crowning touch —
hitting the student and the elderly, those poor enough
that they can't afford cars, ignoring the corporations
and the upper classes.
It doesn't have to work.
Boycott buses.
Editor: Michael Finlay
   Paul  Knox
City   Nate Smith
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Wire   Irene Wasilewski
Sports     Jim Maddin
Senior   John Twigg
Photo _____  Dave Enns
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City   John Andersen
Page Friday   Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
The Ubyssey office became a
political marketplace for commodities
Ginny Gait, Jan O'Brien, Bernie
Bischoff and Sandy Kass who ate
bagels as Smith eagerly looked on.
Fran McGrath complained about not
being in the masthead. Elaine Tarzwell
just complained. Brian McWatters and
Bev Gelfond did it tween classes as
Leslie Plommer did an essay. Jennifer
Jordan worked hard. Christine
Krawczyk didn't. The darkroom orgy
was led by Keith Dunbar, Dave Enns,
and David Bowerman as Brett Garret
ogled Maureen Gans. Jocks Tony
Gallagher, Scott McCloy and Dick
Button watched.
\Thc Ubt/sxi/j
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Push, bang
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
What have we got at this
university, man, the academic
community - PEACE? Don't we
study history and identify a
"military-industrial complex" and
point our fingers? Wouldn't we, as
a broad-thinking community want
to show the voraciously
truth-hungry public our better
side or is it meritable that this
military mentality is inherent in
all places?
We want to protest this "shoot
the space ship with torpedoes"
computer game which is supposed
to be the computing centre's
contribution to Open House (as
mentioned in UBC Reports). Once
again it is evident that the best of
some of our technology is being
used in the wrong fucking way.
RON CHARLES
RICK WHITING
Loss, gain
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Recently, the announcement
of the discontinuation of tenure
for several English profs was made
to the student body. True to
character the 20,000 concerned,
involved students of this
university took bold steps in order
to find out the cause of the
situation. In their unending quest
to better their education, students
prodded people into action:
questions were asked, information
was requested and finally, as the
ultimate resort, verbal banter was
employed. Having utilized all
other resources at hand the
students finally decided upon
decisive action to rectify a
mistake made by the (almost)
perfect administration.
Indignation was their main
weapon, they used it defty and
lethally in exposing the action
taken by the faculty members.
True, their scathing criticisms and
arguments never went further
than frustrated discussion among
themselves, but really, what more
could be expected?
Having had the pleasure of
studying under Brian Mayne and
David Powell - both stimulating
profs — and people, I know
what unfortunate future students
will be missing. Is it possible that
all 20,000 of us are so apathetic
and unconcerned about our
education that we're willing to let
some "God" at the head of the
English    department    make
incompetent and strongly biased
decisions on who's to stay and
who's to go? Does university
matter so little to us that we're
unwilling to voice opposition to a
move which is obviously injurious
to us, the students?
Apparently not all the faculty
members are opposed to the profs
in question. Ever since these profs
first stuck their necks out (along
with their jobs), numerous faculty
members have sidled up to
congratulate them on their
worthy stand, offering more than
enough moral support, but never
actually making any useful
commitment. Apparently they
would rather continue to kiss
asses than oppose a system that is
inherently static and not the
progressive system modern
education necessarily demands.
One has but to think of the
comfortable position our English
faculty heads occupy, in order to
see the control at their finger-tips.
The power to grant or refuse
tenure is substantial, but do the
students really want it to be
coupled with the biased and
selfish desires of a few faculty
members?
Another choice tid-bit for any
believers in the correctness of
faculty decision making. David
Powell was recently nominated
for the master teacher award.
From the 1500 possible nominees,
it seems rather ironic that Powell
should be one of the 28 best
profs, eligible for it. Nice going
UBC if all you care about is
getting your degree and not an
education. Apathy seems to truly
rule, if we're unable to lend
support to five men who have
taken enough interest in the
students, to acknowledge a battle
that we as students should be
fighting, (with nothing to lose,
but everything to gain) not they
as profs (with little to gain, and
everything to lose). Think about it
(for a change!)
ERIC PAAKSPUU
arts 2
Breakdown
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
"What we have here is a
failure to communicate." One can
sense that Cool Hand Luke in
taking his existential stand in the
world was articulating a position
very real and very frustrating; an
inability to relate to a*world
wherein "his, mind was not set
right."
I can only feel that this is the
problem in regard to the current
debacle in the English Department
and in particular to the tenure
cases of Brian Mayne and David
Powell. I feel that I am fortunate
to be in both of their classes,
fortunate in the sense that I am
constantly reinforced in my
opinion that I'm not just another
student to be programmed and
spoon fed with academic-literary
pablum. That there is a very real
desire on their parts to impart
their enthusiam and ideas to the
class, that they are receptive to
different perception on these
ideas, that they are "teachers" in
the best sense of the word
becomes more apparent as the
year progresses.
At best, a student of literature
often feels his position in relation
to the "realities" of life is a
tenuous one, a chosen stance
somehow divorced from the
money-security syndrome which
pervades our society. Any
professor who is willing to relate
this vacuous position to the
world, to make it more solid and
meaningful in our society, surely
deserves support and
commendation.
What I am talking about is
committment. In their choice,
that of teaching students rather
than tolerating them, these two
professors have relegated the
"game" to a secondary position.
The game? The publish-perish
game whereby the monkeys gather
to scratch each other's backs and
pick each other's fleas, that
academic dance where to "sit one
out" is tantamount to becoming a
literary wall-flower.
Well, enough of the tirade. I
suppose the academic mind-fuck
in the department will continue, I
suppose that the pablum will be
dished out in enormous
quantities, I suppose that sitting
around growing piles will still be
acepted as education.
It's too bad that "the man"
always gets the "Lukes." It's too
damn bad. JOHN DUNPHY,
arts 4
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for brevity,
grammar, legality and taste.
Letters should be typed, if
possible, and triple spaced.
Letters to the editor can be
sent to The Ubyssey office in SUB
by Campus mail or can be
delivered personally. Tuesday, March 3,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
PFage Tuesday
Murray Schafer
Symphony mingles
with electronics
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
The Vancouver Symphony
next weekend will finally break
away from its classical-dominated
programming when it world
premieres a new work by SFU
resident composer Murray Schafer
entitled The Divan i Shams i
Tabritz.
In an interview Monday,
Schafer explained the basis for the
piece. "The title comes from a
long mystical poem by the 13th
century  Persian  poet  Rumi,
"The piece tries to get
something of this spirit because
I've broken up the orchestra and
scattered it in fragments all
around the auditorium. The
sections start out quite
independently playing all by
themselves, oblivious to everyone
else. Then little by little they start
to coalesce and produce more and
, more homogeneity of sound until
they end hopefully in a long sort
of unison line on a long single
note.
Conductor Meredith Davies
will not be dispensed with for the
performance however. Schafer
commented: "There is a
conductor, and he assumes
importance little by little, drawing
a sort of unity, because by the
end of the piece all the players are
following him."
In addition to the orchestral
sounds, a four-track tape
accompaniment    will    also    be
MURRAY SCHAFER
.. . with noisemaker
deployed which mingles electronic
with vocal sounds.
When asked if he was
concerned with any reaction from
the audience, Schafer
commented: "I've never been
worried about reactions. You get
inured to that when you're very
young. You don't worry about
reactions — you write music and
you do as good a job as you
possibly can."
The concert featuring the new
work as well as works by
Beethoven, Brahms, and Dvorak
will take place next Sunday
afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and next
Monday evening at 8:30 p.m. in
theQueeniE.SoGOH!
MORE   LETTERS
Disgrace
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
At noon Thursday, the 1970
grad class held their annual
general meeting in the SUB
auditorium.
Any pretension to a just
distribution ot the money, and an
orderly procedure of carrying out
the meeting was quickly disgarded
in favor of a chaotic and
manipulated farce.
About ten projects were
selected from a larger group which
had been presented to the council
earlier in the week. Each was
presented separately, and a
question period followed.
The incredible method of vote
was weighted preferential ballot
by those present in the room.
There were only 100
graduating students present at the
meeting.
They decided to divvy up over
$12,000 of graduating students'
money.
To top it off, votes are not
counted until Tuesday.
Some of the groups
represented at the meeting
included the Cover the Pool Fund,
blind students' library, British
Columbia Union of Students,
NOW of the crisis centre, Acadia
day care centre, the UBC library,
and Speak Easy.
The largest grants were
requested by the Cover the Pool
Fund   ($6,000)   represented   by
former ombudsman Sean McHugh
and Speak Easy ($7,000)
represented by co-ordinator Joyce
Marvin.
All reps presented their briefs
amid the usual heckling and
cheering, which in most cases,
resumed a respectful silence.
In the true spirit of male
chauvinism Speak Easy
co-ordinator Joyce Marvin was
greeted with cries of "Give her ten
minutes" and assorted other
verbal graffiti.
The most awesome grant
requested, however, aside from
the Cover the Pool Fund, had to
be the grad class South America
Fund, where our loyal and
democratic representatives bid for
our money to send them on a trip
to South America.
That move made the Alma
Mater Society look like pillars of
virtue.
Thejre is no doubt that the
procedure by which the grad class
money is distributed has to be
completely overhauled, to enable '
all graduating students to voice
their opinion on how the money
should be allocated.
Perhaps a ballot sent to all
graduating students, with
appropriate information published
through The Ubyssey would
accomplish the task.
As it stands, the money is
allocated in a disgraceful cliquish
manner that must be exposed.
MARV JENNIFF
arts 7
BIRTH CONTROL?
DRUGS?
ABORTION?
PARENTS?
CURRICULUM?
LANDLORD?
SEX?
s
p
EASY
A
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WHATEVER'S
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SUB 218
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A NEW APPROACH TO AN OLD PROBLEM
WARRENDALE
One Showing Only —
TONIGHT-7.00 p.m.
— discussion afterwards
FREE    SUB AUDITORIUM    FREE
ff
The  University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
- Theatre Excitement -
AS YOU  LIKE  IT
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
?K
(SHAKESPEARE'S  CHARMINGEST COMEDY)
MARCH 6 -14 - 8:30 P.M.
DIRECTED  BY IRENE  PROTHROE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00
(available For all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
MONDAY, MARCH 9, 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, MARCH  12, 12:30 P.M. MATINEE
SUPPORT    YOUR    CAMPUS    THEATRE       I
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
? Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3, 1970
UBC SPORTS CAR
CLUB
ELECT YOUR
EXECUTIVE
FOR 1970-71
This Thursday 12:30
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With Tampax tampons
there's no need to change ever
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and pins. And there's no telltale bulge, so no one can ever
know.
It's fun being a girl. With
Tampax tampons you can be
all-girl every day of the month.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
NOW USED BY  MILLIONS OF  WOMEN
Gerard Chaliar.d, history teacher and specialist in underdeveloped countries, was born in Brussels in 1934. and now lives
in France. Formerly editor and assistant manager of the A Igerian
weekly Revolution Africaine (1963). Gerard Chaliand is the author of L'Algerie est-elle socialiste? (1964) and Lutte armee en
Afrique (1967)? Armed Struggle in Africa, (1969). In October-
November 1967, he went to live with the villagers of North Vietnam for a few months, the result of which is his most recent book
The Peasants of North Vietnam.
Interview by harry cowan
hidipo hamutenya
from the mcgill daily
Mobilizing for anti-
imperialist struggle
H.C. Lets not talk about liberation movements
of the Third World in isolation. Just what common
factors exist that they are reacting against in all
of these countries?
CHAL. Well, on the whole they have all suffered
from imperialist domination. They have all been
colonies or semi-colonies-colonies in the case of
Africa and a good part of Asia and semi-colonies for
instance, as far as China is concerned. This is dependence, this is backwardness, this is misery,
and of course the humiliation which is a product of
all three, and they want to be rid of it. So they start
organizing themselves. It depends on the conditions,
but generally speaking, if they really want an independence which is real independence, they have to
go through a violent process of war or guerrilla
warfare as in the case of the Chinese or the Vietnamese, for instance, which are classical examples.
H.C. What common elements are there, if any.
in successful liberation movements throughout
the Third World?
CHAL. I think that in any successful experience,
you will find a leadership which clearly knows what
are the specific national conditions, knows about
the country, its history, its traditions, and is able
to organize as a party with a clear ideology. Frankly
by clear idolbgy, I don't mean African Socialism
or any kind of demagogic or folkloric socialism.
I mean scientific socialism, which is the ideology
of the Vietnamese and the Chinese, and is now the
ideology of the Cubans. I think that the capacity
for generating middJe cadres is extremely important, in order to have communication with your peasantry and your people. Hence, ideology, a party, the
ability of understanding the concrete conditions
and finally middle cadres seem to be some of the
very general things you find here and there in any
type of experience. One of the exceptions could be
the Cuban Revolution, which has been rather specific in its way.
FAILURE & SUCCESS IN GUERRILLA MOVEMENTS
H.C. On this aspect of guerrilla movements fail-
inr or succeeding. You have spoken about the factor
of machismo or virility in Latin America, suggesting that perhaps this was a reason why the leaders
were consecutively eliminated there. Exactly how
far are you prepared to use this species of cultural personality theory in explaining why guerrilla
movements fail or succeed?
CHAL. "Well, the causes of failure, of course
are complex and various. I think that many of the
failures in Latin America — Bolivia, Peru, Colombia and Guatemala for instance, or even Venezuela
in the Andean countries - were due to complete
underestimation of the Indian problem. Nobody
in the movement spoke Cuetchuan or Emara, which
constitute the languages of forty, fifty, and some
times sixty percent of the population. This was a
big fault.
Second, they had no knowledge of the peasantry's
specific conditions. And third, they didn't do any
political work in order to explain to the peasants
what was going on.
However, some of the reasons for the failure
can also be economic. You can't conduct guerrilla
warfare immediately after an agrarian reform, and
try to mobilize peasantry. For instance, with Peru's
present regime, guerrilla warfare in Peru would be
suicide. The problems of machismo are secondary,
of course. But one should not underestimate the
role of leadership in any guerrilla movement or in
any political movement.
SIGNIFICANT ROLE  FOR PERSONALITY
To take an example, I think that the Russian Revolution without Lenin wouldn't have been the same.
If we read carefully the notes of the Central Committee of the Soviet Union in 1917, we see that he
is the one who really decided, against the advice
of all the other,s, that they should try and take
power. The role of personality is significant for
instance, in Portuguese Guine. the fact that we have
a leader like Amicar Cabral is important. The
same is true for Castro who is a great leader. This
counts a lot, although a great leader alone cannot
do anything without organization, which is lacking
in many places. So machismo is secondary, but ifs
still part of a correct, concrete and complete
analysis. The excess of individual bravery, the
importance given to "le geste" is one of the weaknesses in Latin America, and if you compare this
with the collective cohesiveness of the Vietnamese
society, this makes a big difference.
H.C. Do your critiques of Che Guevara and De-
bray spring from this kind of observations?
CHAL. My critique of Debray and Guevara is
mainly their theory of foco, which means starting the fight without any support from the population. If you don't win the support of the population
quickly, you will be isolated and in fact completely
liquidated. You won't live like "fish in the water,"
but will die like those eagles in the mountains.
H.H. It seems that as both the left and liberal
intellectuals are now reassessing just what occurred
in Africa during the past decade, with the rapid
transformation towards nominal political independence, they are finding that instead of a revolution
taking place, there was a petty-bourgeoisie negotiating itself into power, and effecting no consequential
social or political change at all. From the beginning
liberal intellectuals, however, have tended to over-
romanticise the changes— Africa's great leaders, etc.
One could argue that probably those areas that
don't have their indep.
a chance of develop
based on guerrilla n
that unless we have
the population has |
it becomes impossibl
and social transforn
been won. Do you agr<
CHAL. I believe Ii
independence in Afric;
on a plate to the Afri
course, that any j
successful anywhere.
Africa for instance. Tc
the problem now is
would be a bit mechan;
Today's mission
comrade
is, dig the bash soil«
and make a strong p
with a P.M., a bazoo
In the long run, -tJ
to be prepared very
general guerrilla wa
of this and that cou
might bring a real ra
relationship Africa
whether it be Britisl
rilla warfare is best
organization really st
modernizing the peoj
war. This breaks a I.
which still remain and
H.H. In countries Ii
of guerrillas trained
to play their role in
as it is hard to imag
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 23 (Kelowna)
NEEDS TEACHERS
Representatives of Kelowna School District will be
in Vancouver to interview and appoint teachers for
the 1970-71 term, at UBC March 9 to 12 inclusive
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and evenings at the Georgia
Hotel, March 9 to 11 inclusive from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Applications  may  also  be  directed  to  the   Secretary  of
.he School District at 599 Harvey Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
UBYSSEY
OPEN HOUSE ISSUE
50,000 Copies To Be Distributed
March 6 and 7
CLOSES FOR ADS
TODAY
THERE WILL NOT BE A CLASSIFIED IN THIS SPECIAL ISSUE
J Tuesday, March 3,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
;e up to this point do have
real kind of revolution
jnts. Fanon has argued
zed the population, and
>ated in the revolution,
ake a genuine economic
once independence has
i that there is no real
aendence has been given
ates. We cannot say, of
a movement can be
s a difficult process in
»at the only way to solve
;anize guerrilla  warfare
alution
grow
12.7...
Marcelinos Dos Santos
»et from Mozambique
he right way, but it has
illy, watching not only
but specific conditions
area. And doing so, it
hange in Africa and the
ia.s with imperialism,
ch or American. Guer-
ideology is correct and
t is one of the ways of
ough a long process of
le traditional structures
y strong in Africa,
ola you have thousands
ps and actually waiting
ion struggle. Now, just
ictly when or how they
will eventually achieve their victory, it is equally
hard to see them disbanding themselves, .t seems
to me that when you have a stalemate where liberation movements are not making any headway, there
is a chance that leadership may well emerge out
of the cadres which are ready trained. Or do you see
a retrogression disbanding all the guerrilla mdve-
ments, and a capitulation to Portugal in the end.
CHAL We cannot say what will happen.  I was
saying that in the case of a Portuguese colony like
Mozambique and  Angola,  there  is  not a   lack  of
guerrillas. It's not a criticism against the theory of
guerrilla  warfare, but rather a  criticism about the
way you <jo it. If you indulge in guerrilla warfare,
you have to do it well -  like the Vietnamese and
the PAIGC  of Portuguese Guine.  In  Angola  there
was a lack of serious leadership. With more radical
and a better organised leadership, they could have
been much more successful. Still, I have been told
that in '68-'69 there were some important changes
in the leadership and in the cadres of the Movimento
de    Liberacion   de   Angola,    which    is   Aghostinho
Neto's  party.  This  might radicalize the  movement
and allow them to make a more serious attempt to
mobilize the people, and to hurt the Portuguese forces
more than in the past. So I think that they have still
a good future in Angola, but they have to work hard,
since nobody  else  is going to  do  it for them.  In
guerrilla warfare, apart from the arms supply, you
just rely on yourself as far as the fight is concerned. You  have to count  on your own forces when
public opinion can't do anything for you but provide
information. The pressure from the United Nation
was really nothing.
SMALL-SCALE OPERATIONS
HIPIDO. Internally, South Africa has got an
elaborate gestapo - extremely well financed, well
co-ordinated, and it's extremely sensitive to things
like public strikes. The Sharpeville incident has
demonstrated that very clearly, and probably it will
be very hard to persuade the population to go on
strike, because they know too well the consequences.
The leadership-thinks in terms,qf small scale guerrilla operations. Particularly with ANC, the hope is
that if you train four cadres very well and if you
get a chance of sending them inside to create bases
and organize cells within the country, then when
the appropriate time arrives you can strike here
and there on a small scale for the first time. Otherwise, you are up against odds. It is a very complicated situation.
STRIKES, MAYBE GENERAL STRIKES
H.C. How do you foresee events in South
Africa? It appears a particularly hard nut to crack.
CHAL. Frankly, this may be the most complex
situation in the world today - one of the most repressive societies and one of the impasses. It is
very hard to wait for any kind of help coming from
surrounding countries such as Angola and Mozambi-
que, which are under Portuguese rule or Rhodesia,
which has its own racists. So, logically, they can
count on  nothing.  They  have tried.  The ANC has
Sh ?h'ded t0 fight firSt With the Rh°desian ZAPU
hi!- k y/re d0mg' The 0ther ^native would
have been to try something from inside, but this is
nlf_fatfy' especial|y becaiJse ^e whites there are
perfectly convinced of their own rights. They won't
allow any kind of opposition within, and will receive
plenty of support from the U.S., France, Great
Britain, Germany and so on. There is a lot of political work to do among the South Africans, the
workers in particular, in order to create strikes,
and maybe general strikes. After all, if South
Africa is so rich, it's because there are a lot of
black workers. It's very difficult to deal with a
general strike, when it goes on for weeks. You might
lose, but this will disrupt a great deal and also catch
the world public opinion, which is not all racist.
THE PiT
Tues.' Wed. • Thurs.
free coffee 3:15      caps off 4:00
IN THE PARTY ROOM - 2nd Floor SUB
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
Operated  by   Young   People  for  Young   People
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS - SMALL GROUPS
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We   also   assist  with   Charter   Flights
For  Full   Information   &   Daltes,   Etc.,   Call
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j No  Admission to  Persons  Under 21 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3, 1970
BOYCOTTS
BY KIRSTEN EMMOTT
These ones are evil
What the concerned citizen needs these days is
a boycott list.
We all know we are supposed to boycott grapes
because the growers give their workers a bad deal,
big cars because they pollute the air, and Union Oil
because they drill offshore and slop oil.
However, the list of moral imperatives grows all
the time, so to keep you up to date, here's a list of
What the Well-Dressed Radical Will Boycott:
General Electric - because they have a long
history of contempt for the consumer. Lousy
appliances, archaic, oppressive union practices and
proven price-fixing.
Detroit automobile companies, ditto. Also
pollute.
Honeywell. Make anti-personnel fragmentation
bombs - a leading cause of death among
Vietnamese.
Coca-Cola. Non-union. Notorious for anti-labor
practices.
Seagram's booze. Being sued by Consumer
Reports for using its report in their ads.
Walt Disney's apparatus. Supports John Birch
Society with large fund.
People who mail out unwanted credit cards and
junk mail.
Workshop instruction
in glazing, kiln use
A series of workshop
instruction is being initiated in the
SUB crafts room (room 251).
Today   at  7 p.m.:   free  form
hand  building; Wednesday at 8
NDP lecture
Detergents. Contain phosphates.
Elvis Presley. Sings "In the Ghetto" but
contributes to George Wallace's campaign.
Columbia records. Pulled its ads out of the
underground press in an attempt to ruin the papers.
Trans-World Airlines. Abandoned me in Los
Angeles at midnight when I was 16 because of late
planes and missed connections.
And now, the bright side.
There are a few people who are really trying.
They should get your money. Here are some:
Royal Bank. Puts out cogent anti-pollution
newsletters.
Volkswagen. Makes a sensible car with a small
engine.
Uncle Ben Ginter's beer. Defies B.C. attempts
to inflate the price of beer.
Alka Seltzer and all other makers of funny or
intelligent commercials.
Ivory Snow and all bio-degradable detergents.
United Airlines. Rescued me from Los Angles
at midnight when I was 16, earning my undying
gratitude.
You'll notice I've thrown in a little prejudice of
my own. You may have your own. For instance, if
you're Zionist, you buy Kraft foods, because they
are kosher.
EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
GENERAL MEETING
for All Education students
WEDNESDAY  12:30  p.m.
EDUCATION LOUNGE
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
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225 E. 2nd Ave.
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p.m.: glazing; Thursday at 7 p.m.:
use of the kiln.
More workshops are being
scheduled in ' weaving, batik,
leather and pottery. Instruction if
given by education students with
advanced experience in these
fields.
tonight
The first lecture.discussion of
the New Democratic Party Youth
70 program will be held tonight at
the Rio Hall. 3325 Kingsway.
Guest panelists will be social
worker Norman Levi, lawyer Mike
Harcourl, and psychiatrist Dr.
Ray Parkinson.
PIZZA
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EAT IN 'TAKEOUT. DELIVERY'
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. ?•: Sat. 3 a.m.
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Trades   Welcome
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young uck kim, violin!
Stephen kates, cello|V w,m
perform brahms' violin and cello concerto
the divan i shams i tabriz composed by
murray schafer
f
V
an instrumental-vocal-electronic composition
inspired by the mystic poetry of sufi jalaludin rumi
"a face like fire...the soul was wailing,
beethoven •. consecration of the house
dvorak: scherzo capriccioso
meredith davies conducts ||||
NEXT SUNDAY, MARCH ft
NEXT MONDAY, MARCH 9
queen elizabeth theatre      L —°
tickets NOW at the Vancouver ticket centre or
charge at any eaton's store
reservations: 683-3255.
$2, $2.75, $3.50,$4.25 & $5.
PRINCE GEORGE
IS A GOOD PLACE TO TEACH
Meet district representatives at the Georgia
Hotel. Thursday noon Friday, Saturday a.m.
March 5, 6, 7.
TELEPHONE FOR APPOINTMENTS
AFTER 12 NOON THURSDAY
WRITING APPLICANTS APPLY TO:
D. P. Todd, District Superintendent
1891  W. 6th Ave., Prince George Tuesday, March 3,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
DAVIES' RAVIES
UBC Putney fades out
By JIM DAVIES
The film Putney Swope heralded a new
tradition of creative advertising. Now there exists a
bolder, more truthful, more soulful version of
creativity. Ladies and Gentlemen, Presenting
Putney Davies.
Advertisement No. 1
The camera reveals nothing but white.
However, as it retreats, it is clear that it has been
focusing on the tusk of a magnificent young
elephant. Suddenly, 90 old men pound out of the
bush brandishing machine guns and screaming
profundities from Roberts' Rules of Order.
They spray the beast with bullets, reducing it to
the equivalent of a pound of raw bully beef. Then
they drag the tusks to a large clearing where the
camera pans over a huge tower composed entirely of
such tusks. Screaming virgins are being flung from
the top of the tower.
Camera focuses on a bikinied goddess gushing,
"Support UBC's Senate".
Fade out.
Advertisement No. 2
Camera focuses on a large baby crib. There are
thirty babies all screaming and wailing. A small
group of babies are clustered together in a tight ring.
Camera pans on the diapers of these babies. They
are virtually overflowing with poop.
Focus on the biggest baby of them all. A large
globule of drool forms on the baby's chin. In slow
motion we watch it cascade to the floor. As the
drool hits the floor, a full color shot of an atom
bomb exploding appears on the screen.
Focus on twenty thousand babies chanting
"who cares!"
Camera flashes on billboard saying simply,
"AMS Council':.
Fade out.
Advertisement No. 3
Focus on Ubyssey editor, Mike Finlay hanging
from a tree.
Focus on AMS president Fraser Hodge hanging
from a tree.
Focus on Ubyssey columnist Jim Davies
hanging from a tree.
Focus on eleventy-eight zillion people hanging
from assorted trees.
Camera pans on the Academic Acitivities
Committee. They do a clever imitation of a
bureaucratic lackey.
Fade out.
Advertisement No. 4
Camera pans on a beautifully paved highway.
Camera moves along highway and finishes up on top
of gigantic dam.
Student bleeding from ears, nose, mouth, and
other assorted bodily orifices is thrust from top of
dam to highway below.
Fade out.
Advertisement No. 5
Focus on woman. She is wearing spike heels,
black G-string, mask, and saddle. A cat of nine tails
is in her hand.
Camera pans to her feet. She is standing on a
hump-backed chimney sweep.
Camera pans on a Russion woman shot-putter
carrying placard. Placard reads, "Liberate Women".
Focus back. Incident has been on a TV screen.
Pan on woman in pajamas watching TV while eating
a TV dinner, awaiting her husband who is at the salt
mines.
Fade out.
Focus on me being called a "jive nigger".
Fade out.
Tent thieves hinder festival events
Does anyone know what happened to the
40-foot plastic tent that was on the lawn in front of
the library? The octagonal tent was taken from the
lawn over the midterm break. Ernie Vanstralen, the
tent's designer is anxious to have it back—and so are
the producers of this ,years Contemporary Arts
Festival.
Whoever took the tent can feel quite satisfied
that they have denied the students of this university
the many interesting Contemporary Arts events that
were to take place under it. These events, including
dancing, poetry readings, theatre, and a pollution
display will have to be performed inside one of the
buildings on campus; if there is space to perform
them at all.
Some $100 of the festivals money has been
spent on this tent, and the loss of this money means
there will be fewer festival events this year and next.
If you saw anyone removing the tent, or have
any idea of where it might be located, please
contact Ernie Vanstralen at the architecture
department in the Lasserre building.
NOW - A NEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie  St.
Vancouver  15, B.C.
Phone:  327-1162
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry Brown lee, Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
SIMS & SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS:
L
TO TRANSCEND?
To Transend means to go beyond. Transcendental Meditation involves taking the AWARENESS beyond thought to
PURE CONSIOUSNESS, the source of all ENERGY, CREATIVE
INTELLIGENCE and HAPPINESS.
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION
Paul Horn who accompanied Donovan on a tow
of North America, will speak on the Technique
of TRANSENDENTAL  MEDITATION.
THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 12:30
SUB BALLROOM - Admission Free
1970 Graduates
B.Sc. (with interest in Data Processing)
B.A. (Economics Major)
B.C. TELEPHONE CO.
Will be Interviewing on Campus
March 5 and 6
Please Make Appointment Now at the
U.B.C.   PLACEMENT OFFICE
Takla Logging Company Limited
requires
ROAD CONSTRUCTION ENGINEER
DUTIES: Supervision of construction assignments. Layout and design of
main roads, camps, rail sidings, bridges and other facilities. Preparation
of contracts and specifications for construction projects.
QUALIFICATIONS: Graduate Engineer (Civil or Forestry). At least 2 years
practical experience. Familiarization with government reculatioms.
LOGGING ENGINEER
DUTIES: Supervision of field engineering crews on layout work for roads.
landings and clear cuts. To conduct feasibility studies for future projects. Conduct cost and efficiency studies on elements of log production costs.
QUALIFICATIONS: Forestry Graduate. At least 2 years practical experience.
Both of these positions are for our operations in the North
Central Interior of B.C. The successful candidates will work
out of our Prince George head office. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Medical, Group Insurance and
Relocation Assistance are available to the successful candidates.   All replies will be held in confidence.
Reply to:   Industrial Relation* Department,
Takla Logging Company Limited,
Unit No. 5, 1?»»—1st Avenue,
Prince George, B.C.
THE BEATLES LATEST LP.!.!
"HEY JUDE"
ON SALE
Wed.. Thurs.. Fri.
ONLY
Reg.  Price $5.59
SALE *389
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
SUB. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3, 1970
TUESDAY
UBC  FLYING  CLUB
Lecture—tactical flight, noon, SUB
105A.
THUNDERBIRD    FOOTBALL   TEAM
Meeting,   noon.
VIETNAM    COMMITTEE
Carol  Oleniuk  speaks, noon.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP   SOCIETY
Tour    of   microfilm    division,    noon.
Meet at card catalogue.
PANHELLENIC  COUNCIL
Potluck   dinner,   6   p.m..   Panhellenic
House,  behind I.H.,  all girls interested in sororities are asked to attend.
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Collegium   Musician   Ensemble,   11:30
a.m.. Recital Hall of Music Building.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Beethoven   Piano   Recital,   noon,   Recital Hall of Music Building.
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Contemporary Percussion Music, 4:30
p.m., Recital Hall of Music Building.
GERMAN  CLUB
Hike,   noon, Bu.  Plaza.
UBC FLYING CLUB
Insurance    seminar,    7:30   p.m.,   SUB
215.
H.A.T.E.
General  meeting,   noon,   SUB  125.
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
Gallery tour by Ken McCarthy, noon.
Fine   Arts   Gallery,   basement,   Main
Library.
cvc
The CVC office has been temporarily
moved to the Women's Gym during
the week of March 2-6 for Open
House.
'tween
classes
y*W   *tr + ,. V'WV_V
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS   DEPARTMENT
Prof. G.   M.   A.  Grube speaks, noon,
Bu.   100.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Seminar,  noon, SUB 12S.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
General  meeting,   noon,  Ang.   24.
CAMPUS   LEGAL   AID   PANELS
Legal    aid    given,   Mon.,   Wed.    and
Fri.,   noon,   SUB   237-237A.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Violin   and   organ   recital,   noon,   Recital   Hall   of  Music   Building
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Contemporary    music,    3:30,    Recital
Hall   of  Music  Building.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting,   noon.  SUB  105A.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE   ORGANIZATION
Mfeetine.   noon.   Bu.   3201.
PRE SOCIAL   WORK  CLUB
Jill   Madden   from   Youth   Resources
speaks,   non.   SUB   117.
CWLF AND FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Band   concert.  March  4.   5,   6,   noon,
SUB Plaza.
FINE  ARTS  GALLERY
Hare track  gallery staff band,  noon.
Rain—Fine    Arts   Gallery;   Sun—Outside   Fine   Arts   Gallery-
THURSDAY
VIETNAM   COMMITTEE
General  meeting,  noon,  Bu.   2230.
UBC   THUNDERBIRD   FOOTBALL
Meeting,   noon.   Armouries,
CANOE CLUB
Meeting,  noon.  Ang.  110.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Student     Composition     recital,     4:30
p m ,  Recital Hall of Music Building.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
String  Quartet  recital,   noon,  Recital
Hall of Music Building.
UBC   SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
General  meeting,  Chem. 250.
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
Simpson   speaks,   noon,   SUB  Aud.
AMERICAN   SOCIETY   OF
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERS
P.   Bowers  speaks,  noon,  Eng.   201.
WORLD   UNIVERSITY   SERVICE
Elkins   and   Chamberlain,   noon,   Bu.
205.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
No  meeting  this Thursday,  elections
next Thurs. in SUB 124.
SIMS
Special  introductory  lecture  by Paul
Horn,   noon    SUB   Ballroom.
PHYSICS   DEPT.
Prof.   Robert   S.   Cohen   speaks,   noon,
Hebb Theatre.
«IDAY
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Student     Composition     recital,     1:30
p.m., Recital Hall of Music Building.
THURSDAY
DEPARTMENT   OF   GERMAN
Dr.  G.  Helgadortlr speaks, noon,  Bu.
102.
Bowsey burned
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -•
Some 2,000 student blorgs rioted
today in the capital of this island
fiefdom when the local boiled
beet pushing team lost the world
championship match. Team coach
D. D. Bowsey was burned in
Effigy, a small town north of
here.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
.00.
SONGFEST is coming
March 12th-QE
CAMPUS LAUDROMAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   &   Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354  W.   10th 224-9809
•EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a-m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used   University  Text's
Bought and  Sold
146 W.   HASTINGS
Opposite  Woodwards
681-4931
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines,  1  day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25£; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
PLACE   VANIER   RESIDENCES   UBC
ART SHOW
MARCH 7, 8
Painting, Student Art Work
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST: FEB. 24, GOLD CUFFLINK
with naval crest, Brock Hall or
parking lot. 266-6070	
LOST: GREEN LEATHER COAT
from AMS Travel office. Please
return,   it's  cold.   Linda,  327-4069.
LOST: BLACK TWIN HANDLED
briefcase. Taken from main library. Contains imp. notes. Phone
after 6,  327-3988.
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices      16
PLACE VANIER RESIDENCES
U.B.C. Art Show. March 7 & 8,
1970   painting   student  art   work.
UBC PLYING CLUB. MARCH 3,
noon. SUB 105A. CF-104 lecture.
Tactical flying 7:30 p.m. SUB 215
Navigation Course. Bring your
computer.	
GOLDEN GLOVES BOXING, MAR.
6 & 7, 8:00 p.m., |2 & $3, P.N.E.
Garden  Auditorium.	
INVITATION, THE STUDENT
Discount Book, is now selling for
under half price in the Bookstore
and at SUB Information. Two for
the price of one at Odeon, Concerts, Plays, Nightclubs, Restaurants,   etc.   All   this   for   only   75c.
Don't  Miss It!	
VICK'S    T.V.    A    RADIO   CO.
513 West Pender — 685-8622
Guaranteed   Repairs   TVs.   radios,
tape   recorders — 10%   discount   to
students.    	
LIGHTWEIGHT AIRCRAFT DEN
sign. Peter Bowers speaks, "Experimental Aircraft," noon Thursday, March 5, Eng.  201.	
OPEN HOUSE GUIDES MEETING
tomorrow, Wed., 12:30. S.U.B. Ballroom. For all open house guides
orientation meeting, briefing ses-
sion.	
NO FILES, NO LECTURES, SPEAK
easy. S.U.B. 218, 228-3706, 10 a.m.-
9 p.m.   Mon.-Fri
LOLA'S  DATING CLUB
New modern fun way to meet
UNATTACHED LADIES
AND  GENTLEMEN
Ages 18-70 Welcome
Open   9  a.m. • 9   p.m.   314   West
Hastings,  JlW   or  call   688-0396
Travel Opportunities
17
FOR SALE: ONE-WAY TICKET
N.Y. - Luxemburg. Good 'til May
15.   $98.00   Can.   Phone   874-6068.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: WOMEN'S THREE
speed bicycle. Phone 731-2872
evenings.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 SUZU BELLETT DELUXE
Excellent condition $875.00. Radio.
Call   Sasha,    266-8035   after   6.
57 PLYMOUTH 2 DR. H.T. with
'62 Chry. 383, 3 spd. auto., Dual
exh.,    H.P.    Susp.    $350.    526-6073.
1958 CHEVY. AUTOMATIC WITH
radio, heater. Excellent condition.
Phone    224-3865. ___
1954 CHEV. WELL MAINTAINED.
Above average condition, can
demonstrate.    929-4129   nites.
f961 FORD FAIRLANE. AUTO.
4-dr., 6-cyl., radio, snow tires.
228-8562.	
1966 SUNBEAM IMP. $600. PHONE
l)87-66.'i4,  after 6:00 p.m.	
'66 BEAUMONT 2-DR. H.T. 300 H.P.
327, mags, Hurst, 39,000 mi., H.D.
everything. Immaculate cond. Must
be seen.  $1950 or offers.  738-2544.
1961 VAUXHALL. BODY AND
motor in good condition. Price,
$175. Phone 228-9398 evenings.
FOR SALE: 1961 TRIUMPH HER-
ald. $75. O.N.O. 224-0236 after 5
p.m.	
1962 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE. AUTO-
matic, excellent condition. Anyone
interested please call Pam or Barbara at 684-4679.
Autos For Sale (Cont.)
21
1961 SUNBEAM RAPIER. VERY
economical transportation for $2130.
Jim, 228-3898,  lab.: 228-9609, home.
$50 TRANSPORTATION $50
1958 Studebaker. Call Dave Norton, 688-3411 (day*) or 263-5079
(nights).	
1954 CHEV. 2-DOOR HARDTOP
for   sale.   224-6350.	
68 DATSUN 2000—135 HP, 5 SPD.,
etc. with or without hardtop. Best
offer.   261-2439.	
FOR SALE: 1968 TRIUMPH 250.
Best offer accepted. Phone Bob,
263-6484   after   6   p.m.
ALL NEW FIATS
Special   Student   Terms
Fiat 850: $59 deposit $59 per month
Trades Welcomed
Call JIM MaoDONALD  985-9344
(Eves.) 684-4685
FOR SALE. 1965 ECONOLINE
camping truck. $850. 224-4185
after   8   p.m.	
1967 DODGE DART, 6 CYL. STAND-
ard, excellent condition, $1295.
Offers?  263-8366	
'67 V.W. 1500 IN GOOD SHAPE. 4
winter tires, radio. $1250. Phone
738-0104.   Must   sell. j
1962 CHEVY II, AUTOMATIC, i
radio, four new tires, good shape. ;
Best   offer,   Irene,    874-3814   eves.
'59      MATCHLESS      500      SINGLE, '
good condition,  $350.00:  '60 Falcon
2   dr.   std.,  as   is,   $150.00.   263-4803
'57 FORD, GOOD SHAPE, 2 DR. '
hrd. top. Low mileage. "C" Lot ;
permit;   radio,   $100.    224-9460
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
'67 180 YAMAHA. 7,000 MILES
Electric start. $285. '70 plates
526-6073.	
FACTORY YAMAHA DIAL
gauge (for ign., timing) $25. 435-
2970.	
DON'T LET THIS BEAUTIFUL
weather pass without having a
bike. Yamaha 80, as new, Paul
926-1069	
LARGEST SELECTION OF 10
speed bicycles, French and Japanese. As low as $69.00.
THE  CYCLE  SHOP
5895 Fraser St. (43rd & Fraser)
 327-4229	
FOR SALE: SUZUKI 250 "HUSTL-
er." 1966, 11,000 miles. $425 or
trade for Triumph 500. 224-3873,
Barb.	
STUDENT SITPER 4 - SPEED
machine — 1965 Honda 90 — runs
fantastically — $115. Justin, 738-
5391.	
WANTED: VEZPA MOTOR SCOOT-
er.   Phone 731-2872  evengins.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPECI-
alists in graphs, maps, textbook
illustrations, complex formulae,
scientific advertising. Phone 733-
4506.
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
GRAPHICOS SCIENTTFICOS — ES-
pecialistos en diagramas, mapas,
ilustraciones por libros de textos y
formulas oompletas. Exhibiciones
Scientificos. Propaganda. Tel. 733-
4506.
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
MORROW FOR A.U.S. PRES?
OF COURSE!
Vote  March  5.
VOC       BANQUET.        MARCH       13.
Tickets   available   from   executive.
Contact  Jim,   224-9655.
Sewing  &  Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my hoi-.ie. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317.
Typing (Cont.)
40
ON-CAMPUS ACCURATE EXP.
typing. 40c per page, IBM selec-
tric.   Phone   224-9183   after   5   p.m.
FAST, EXPERT TYPING DONE
at a reasonable price. Will pick
up   and   deliver.   Phone   988-9781.
ACCURATE TYPING — GERMAN,
Dutch, French, English. At home.
Reasonable   rates.   Phone   261-3751.
"FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST —
will do typing in my home. Please
call   263-0196.	
ELECTRIC TYPING; UBC GRAD;
English   major;   35c   a   page;   736-
9874.	
QUALITY TYPING SERVICE.
(Private).   681-1805  after 6:00 p.m.
ESSAY   TYPING.
3589 West 19th Ave.
733-5922	
ESSAY TYPING FOR FACULTY
of Arts. Phone 732-6739 evenings.
IBM  Selective   typewriter.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
theses, essays, term papers, docu-
ments.   Reasonable   rates.   266-4264
"ACCURATE ESSAY TYPING" —
Mrs.   Pasqualotto,   434-1402	
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST, ES-
says. theses, etc. 50c per page.
Mrs.   Duncan   228-9597.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver home.  988-7228.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing — essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate "work, reasonable rates.
Phone   321-2102.	
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates. 738-6829
after nine a.m. to nine p.m.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
page. Essays 30c page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Ph.
325-0545.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Opportunity for 'women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work.
Help Wanted—Male
52
WE REQUIRE PART - TIME
salesmen to handle a fast moving product at top commission.
Phone 684-5010 for an appointment.
Male or Female
53
MARRIED COUPLE ATTENDANTS
for campsite on Hornby Island.
Graduate student preferred. Trailer provided; leisure time: available June 19 - September 8. Applicants phone Saunders, 224-7355
between 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday,   Wednesday,   Thursday.
Work Wanted 54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
PREMIER DRUMS. L U D W I G
Snare. Ziljian Cymbals. Hard shell
cases. Excellent condition. $350.00
Phone 266-5025 eves.	
PIANO VOICE THEORY COACH-
ing by qualified teacher. Colling-
wood and  Fourth.  731-5459
Tutoring
64
FEMALE MATH TUTOR, THREE
mornings a week for grade ten
night school student living on
campus. Must be grad student
or have teaching certificate.
Reply Norm Brown, Childrens
Aid   Society,   879-8821.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
WANTED  —  A  GOOD   QUALITY
portable stereo tape recorder.  Cash.
733-4013.	
LISST UPRIGHT PIANO WITH
bench, one year old. $500.00 or
near     offer.     Financing    possible.
263-5975   after   seven.	
STEREO RECORD PLAYER, POR-
table, Electrohome, cost $160. Like
new,   $69.   Offers?   263-8366	
"TERINlT" TRACK SUITS — IM-
ported from FINLAND. Assorted
colors and sizes. Also brand name
camping and outdoor equipment at
207c savings. See Hank, room 305,
Memorial Gym, Mondays and Wed-
nesdays   (12:30-2:00).     	
TOP     QUALITY    TERM     PAPERS
available in most areas of the following disciplines:
History, English, Political Science,
Psychology,    Asian   Studies,   Geography,    Classics,    Sociology,    Art
History,  etc.,   etc.,   etc.
Essays  also   available  in   most   of
above areas.
Phone  733-8734  or come  to —
1060 W. 8th Avenue
Saturday &  Sunday,  March 7 & 8
'69 HEAD SLALOM SKIES, 210
cms, Barker bindings. Demanding
and high-spirited skis for the
competent   skier.   Mike,   224-0500
SANSUI 500
STEREO RECEIVER
180 watt, reg. $659.95, spec. $399.
Stereo amplifier, 65 watt, solid
state, reg. $139.95, spec. $95.00.
Sansui received, AM-FM S.W.,
$68.00. Fisher stereo ampl., 60w,
reg. $299.85, spec. $188.00. Scott
radio    tuner,    best    buy,    $138.00,
HOUSE Of STEM
ELECTRONICS   LTD.
901   Granville 685-5611
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al  the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GRAD. STUDENT & WIFE NEED
room with kitchen facilities. Phone
224-9774 after 7  p.m.  Ask for Chua,
room   316/leave   message.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY !
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327   or   come  to   5670   Toronto
Rd.	
LARGE DOUBLE SLEEPING
room, suitable for two people.
Ideally located. Phone 731-1660.
NEWLY FURNISHED & CARPET -
ed room; kitchen facilities; TV
room; males; 1 or 2; quiet. Near
U.B.C.  228-8040.
Room  &  Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student. $80 per month. Fraser &
22nd Ave.  Phone 879-7061.
Furn. Houses &  Apts.
83
MARCH 1st 3 BEDROOM UPPER
duplex, furnished, 5th & McDonald.
874-8531.    Newly    remodelled.	
MATURE FEMALE STUDENT
wishes to locate another female
to share apartment. Phone 228-
8567  or  228-9849	
ONE PERSON WANTED TO
share house with four others. Modern, own bedroom, completely
furnished. 2241 Dunbar. Phone 732-
7774.	
WANTED IMED.: THIRD PERSON
($67 P.M.) or couple ($80 P.M.) to
share large suite. Phone Ann, 266-
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Ufcf. Houses a Apts.
84 Tuesday, March 3,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
—keith dunbar photo
HIGH SCORING Bob Molinski (13) puts up two more points in
the last home game of his four year college career. Failing in his
attempt to halt "the Duke" is Ross Wedlake (24) and the ever
popular "Ralph" Schoenfeld (33).
Rugby consistent
The Thunderbird rugby team
showed no signs of their beating
the week before as they lasted out
Western Washington for a 12-12
tie Saturday.
The wind factor hurt the Birds
chances again with a whipping
breeze across the field. If the ball
was passed any farther than five
yards it went astray.
The tie unfortunately leaves
the team in the same position
they were in last week, so the
outcome of Saturday's game will
decide their overall place in the
league hierarchy.
UBC's opposition will be the
University of Victoria who earlier
in the season beat the Birds
convincingly. Coach Spence's lads
may be further hampered by the
possible loss of first-string backs
Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10% UBC Discount
Doug Shick and Dave Austin. The
coach has yet to find out whether
they will be available as he has not
received word from the B.C. Reps
coach. The boys leave on tour to
Japan on March 11 so he doesn't
want any last minute injuries.
If the Birds beat the Vikings it
will put them solidly on top of
the Northwest Conference.
Victoria took them last season in
the final deciding game so the
team does not desire a repeat
performance.
Coach Spence is looking for
good crowd support as it will be a
real lift for the boys. Victoria had
excellent support and it gave them
the lift that made the difference
in their game.
Game time will be 2:30
Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
Qmzm
PATIO
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY-
3S61 W/Broadway     736-7788,
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Birds head East
as Bob rams Bisons
By TONY GALLAGHER
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds embark on the last leg of
their quest of the Canadian Championship on Wednesday March 11
when their plane heads for Hamilton.
The Birds made their reservations by winning the WCIAA
finals in straight games over the University of Manitoba Bisons 82-74
in overtime Friday, and 91-68 Saturday before a total of 2400 fans.
Their wins represented the 19th and 20th consecutive for the
number 1 ranked team in the nation and stretched their overall
record to a more than impressive 24-4 mark.
On Friday night the Birds escaped with maximum luck and a
little help from the officials. Shooting only 39 percent from the field
they were unable to get on track early and trailed the Bisons 36-32
at the half.
The fact that the Birds were behind however was through no
fault of the officials as they called Manitoba for 14 first half fouls as
compared to only 3 on the Birds and in general-homored them out
of the gym. In the second half UBC regained their senses, managed
to battle Manitoba to a 70-70 regulation deadlock, and walked away
in the overtime.
The revealing statistical explanation for the Bisons loss was
their 28 fouls to only 14 by the Birds, and coughing up 18 turnovers
to only 7 for the winners. The four most prominent individuals on
the court were indeed superb. Bob Molinski had 27 points, 13 of
which came on free throws and Ron Thorsen had 23 points and 8
rebounds for the Birds. The Manitoba duo of Terry Ball and Cliff
Cornelius were the outstanding performers as expected as the
former delivered 22 points while the latter added 20 points and 12
rebounds.
Saturday evening was a significant reversal in form for the
Birds and the Bisons were at pains to remain in the contest. UBC, as
is becoming customary, unleashed their full court press forcing 28
oppostion turnovers, shot 50 percent from the field, and had 21
assists including a baseline to baseline bomb by Terry MacKay.
The Birds opened a 40-30 lead at the half and upped the lead
by 10 with 11 minutes remaining and coasted to the duration.
Although the whole club played brilliantly, the night belonged
to the veteran Bob Molinski. Playing in the final home game of his
four year career as a Bird, Molinski again saw fit to perform miracles.
He hit 9 of 13 from the field, had six free throws, through in the
same number of assists and retired to a thunderous standing ovation.
"I must admit I was somewhat touched out there," said
Molinski after the victory, "It will be nice if we can just keep
winning and go on all the way."
Coach Peter Mullins, on the refreshing end of a tall cool one in
the dressing room mused, "everybody did a job out there tonight
and some of our scoring spurts were the best we've had all season."
Of interest was Ron Thorsen's 20 points which broke by 1 the
UBC single season scoring mark of 586 points by Bob Barazzuol.
Athletic election notices
The Women's Athletic
Association Will hold its annual
general meeting in the Women's
Gymnasium at 12:30 on
Thursday, March 5.
Elections will be held from
1:00 to 4:30 pm.
Positions open for nominations
are: president, vice-president,
secretary, and member at large.
The positions of sports
managers, equipment manager,
WCIAA co-ordinator, PRO, and
intramural co-ordinator must be
applied for by letter to the
secretary before March 9.
Applications   are   now  being
accepted for the following
positions in the men's intramural
program:
Director
Assistant Director
Referee-in-chief
Assistant referee-in-chief
publicity director
Co-recreation director
Apply    in    writing    stating
personal    qualifications    and
experience by Wednesday, March
11,to:
Mr. N. Korchinsky,
Faculty Advisor
Men's Intramural Programrc
War Memorial Gym
UBC
Dr. Mullins likes the Cup.
Soccer chaps
win another
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team won another game Saturday
afternoon to embark on another
winning streak.
The most notable thing about
the win was that the team looked
very good in winning, making a
number of good plays both
offensively and defensively.
The final score was UBC 3,
Victoria O'Keefes 0.
Gary Thompson scored two of
UBC's goals, one on a breakaway,
and hit the crossbar on another
occasion. He also set up Rick
Gunn for the other Birds goal.
The Birds were fortunate on
defense a few times, once when
they stopped a penalty shot, and
on two Victoria shots which went
wide of an open net.
Coach Joe Johnson was well
pleased with his team's
performance, and feels that they
may finally be on the winning
trail.
Girls basketball
win BC trophy
The UBC women's basketball
team defeated the University of
Victoria 37-25 on Friday night to
win the second game of a best of
three tourney. This now gives
UBC the B.C. championship, and
they will journey to Halifax for
the Canadian championships
March 13, 14.
After a discouraging beginning
with UBC constantly fumbling
and Victoria scoring, the
Thunderettes gradually gained
momentum due to the use of a
full court press. With a half-time
score of 16-11 for UBC, coach
Ken Shields gave an impromptu
coaching lesson to his girls. The
second half belonged to the
Thunderettes as Victoria hit a
cold streak, and simply could not
put the ball in the basket. Two
high scorers for the game were
Wendy Grant with 11 points and
Terry McGovern with 9 both from
the UBC team.
TUXEDO
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JIM   AKtNETHY    MANAOER
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THE SOCIOLOGICAL
ROOTS OF SCIENCE
Prof. Robert S. Cohen, of the Physics Department at Boston University,
will visit UBC on Thursday to lecture on "THE SOCIOLOGICAL ROOTS
OF SCIENCE" in the Hebb Lecture Theatre at 12:30 P.m. Dr. Cohen is
noted for his scientific writing and for a number of papers on general
education in science and science and the social order. He is a Koerner
lecturer under a grant from the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation.
THURSDAY-12:30 p.m.-Hebb Theatre
Master of Public Administration
AN  INTER - DISCIPLINARY  SEARCH  FOR  SOLUTIONS
TO CANADIAN PUBLIC PROBLEMS
Direct entry to better - than - average graduates
from an Honours course in a Social Science or
History, a course in Law, or a four-year course
in Business Administration.
QUEEN'S
Write:
Director, UNIVERSITY
School of Public Administration, ■	
Queen's University, fl{ fanflSfoH OtttaYW
Kingston, Ontario  ~	 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 3, 1970
A tight tor a
new society .
By Bernard Bischoff
"The fight for Canadian independence is the fight
for a new society."
"Imperialism is a manifestation of a social system
based on the exploitation of man by man, and
consequently the only way to destroy imperialism is to
change the basic nature of society."
These remarks were made by panelist Jack Scott,
leader of the Progressive Workers Movement, who spoke
Friday in Buchanan 106 on American domination of
Canada.
The other panelists were Robin Mathews, Stanley
Ryerson and Michel Chartrand, all of whom had also
spoken at UBC earlier in the week.
Scott's premise, which had also been insisted on by
the other speakers during the week, is that our economy
is wholly controlled from the U.S. There is more
American investment in Canada than in any other
country in the world — more than in Latin America and
Europe combined. In fact, in everything but name,
Canada has been reduced to the status of a neo-colony.
As an example of American robbery of Canadian
people, Scott cited that hydro dams being built in B.C.
for the benefit of American industry below the border
are being paid for by high-interest loans from American
financiers.
This explains in part, the higher hydro rates
imposed by the government, Scott said.
Scott also claimed the idea that Canada needs
American investment is a myth.
"There is more money going out of Canada than
coming in," Scott explained.
He declared that when countries such as Peru fully
succeed in throwing off the yoke of foreign domination,
the so-called "Canadian" holdings in Latin America, will
be exposed as actually being in American hands.
"In order to free ourselves of American domination,
we have to convert Canada into a truly socialist society,"
Scott continued.
"This means confiscation without compensation of
all property owned by the Americans in Canada and the
confiscation of property owned by Canadians who are
working for the Americans."
Scott declared that his movement is prepared to
fight together with others if they agree that American
control is a very basic and serious problem.
The other panel members basically agreed with
Scott but were not quite as explicit in their statements.
Stanley Ryerson, Canadian historian and author of
"Unequal Union" said the crisis in contemporary Canada
which started in the storm centre of Quebec, has caused
•        •
many English-Canadians to question their basic
concepts.
Ryerson felt there is progress being made in Canada
"The comfortable ambiguity of the British North
America Act has been ruptured forever," he stated.
Ryerson also made a distinction between genuine
internationalism which regards all men as brothers
regardless of the particular nation-state to which they
belong, and phony internationalism which means
"removing the psychological and political barriers to the
flow of international capital" (which in this case of
course means American capital).
Michel Chartrand, president of the Confederation
Syndicates Nationaux and a well-known Quebec
nationalist, agreed with Scott and Ryerson.
"The basic problem is to get rid of capitalism and
live in a democracy which is a democracy in fact and not
in name only and where the people directly participate
in decision-making," he said. "The way to help the
people in Latin America is to get rid of capitalism in
North American."
Robin Mathews, co-author of "The Struggle for
Canadian Universities", concentrated on the specific
problem within Canadian universities.
He said  the  so-called liberal  education presently
control in the sense that students in the university are
subjected to a subtle brainwashing process.
Betts also criticized the fragmentation of knowledge
into departments which prevented free discussion of all
issues and frustrated the student.
"We have to break down the myth of students
automatically having jobs when they get out of this
place," said Betts.
"Either open this university up or shut it down,"
Betts concluded.
"What is the difference between English Canadian
and American culture a member of the audience asked in
the question period that followed.
Mathews said that the difference is basically
institutional, social, and customary.
He said that Canadians implicitly reject the
robber-baron mentality of the Americans.
"The real history of the Canadian people is often to
be found in their literature not in their history books,"
he added.
One student raised the question that often
university racials "import" political issues from the U.S.
instead of developing their own analysis of Canadian
problems and asked whether this too was a form .of
imperialism.
"We will not be free until the Canadian people
themselves determine to be free," Jack Scott said in
response. "You can't impose freedom on a people from
outside."
"We are a Canadian people because we are conscious
of that fact," Scott added. "But we are not a nation; we
are still struggling to build a nation."
In response to another question, Ryerson criticized
the   practice   of  certain  "radicajs"  who  specialize in
Arts Week panelists blast
Canadian complacency in the
face of American domination
being studied in our universities is a blatant fraud.
"There are great areas o'f Canadian history,
specifically struggles of the Canadian working class,
which are suppressed," he said.
The solution to this problem means that students
must form course unions and insist on the history of
labor movements being taught in the universities, he
said.
UBC arts undergraduate society president Dick
Betts said there are two kinds of control imposed on
university students. From above there is overt control in
the sense that financial barriers are erected so that only
certain students can enter university and there is covert
revolutionary jargon and accused them of suffering from
"baby sickness".
"Jargon is not jargon until it is used beyond the
point of rigor mortis," he said. "If it is used to club
people over the head then words like 'bourgeois',
'proletariat', and 'dialectic' cease to have meaning and in
fact help to perpetuate corporate capitalism."
Mathews concluded by insisting again that the
problem within Canadian universities is of special
importance.
"If the drive for nationalization and freedom
continues in Canadian universities, it will spread to
Canadian economy and politics," he said.
GRAD MEETING CONDUCT DEPLORED
3y GINNY GALT
A group of graduating students is contemplating legal
action against the 1970 grad class executive.
Group spokesman Stuart Rush, law 3, said there are
several complaints about the way Thursday's meeting for
graduating students was conducted.
One of the purposes of the meeting was to decide
.how to spend the grad class gift of $12,000 to the
university.
"The most obvious criticism is that the grad class has
its money collected by the board of governors on a
non-consensual basis. The grad students have no say as to
whether or not they want to pay their $7 on photos,
banquets or any of the other planned events," said Rush.
Rush called the $12,000 "an involuntary gift on the
part of all grad students to the group of so-called grad
executives to spend almost as they wish."
"A lot of people are pissed off because only 200
people out of 3,000 turned up to decide how the money
should be spent," Rush said.
Rush complained that several of the graduating
students didn't know about the meeting and said a lot of
:he grads had trouble getting ballots.
"The ballot boxes were open, not locked which made
(hem susceptible to stuffing," Rush said.
Another complaint was the fact the ballots were not
counted at the time of the meeting, but put off five days
because "five of the six executives are engineers and they
had labs to do on the weekend." (The ballots will be
counted tonight.)
The group also objected to the ballots themselves.
They listed several gift suggestions and the students had to
vote by numbering the suggestions according to their
preferences.
Rush called this a "stupid preferential voting system
which was prejudiced against the students who wanted to
cast all of their votes behind one particular gift."
"One of the gifts was called the Grad Executive
South American Fund. This was to be a trip to South
America for the executives," Rush said.
"The   wording   of   this  gift  was  deliberately  left
ambiguous. Some people thought it was some sort of
charity fund."
Rush would like the ballots to be changed from
weighted voting ballots and would like the executive to
give an account of how they will spend the $2,000 put
aside for summer activities.
"The class gift, if there's going to be one, should be
decided on in a fair way — perhaps by mail ballot," he
said.
Blackmail charges denied at Queen's
KINGSTON (CUP) - Four-fifths of a special
Queen's University investigation committee agreed
Thursday that chemical engineering prof Henry Becker
rVvas "utterly innocent" of charges of political blackmail
levelled at him by one of his graduate students.
The other one fifth, student Terry O'Hara, was
bodily ejected from a meeting of the Queen's senate
after a five-minute shoving match.
O'Hara had insisted that PhD candidate Charles
Edwards—who accused Becker of the blackmail—be
allowed in the senate chambers to hear the committee's
verdict.
Eight student society constables shoved O'Hara
through the chamber's doorway, which was blocked on
the outside by members of the Queen's Free Socialist
Movement.
The report, finally read "to the appropriate
committees", did give a mild slap on the wrist to
chemical engineering department chairman Reginald
Clark in reference to a visit to the campus by an RCMP
officer last October.
Edwards told the committee that Clark's attitude
toward him changed for the worse after the policeman's
visit.
"With hindsight," the report said," Clark ought to
have asked the policeman why he wanted to talk about
Mr. Edwards."
The report said there was a "danger that Mr.
Edwards was being subjected to surveillance respecting
his lawful political beliefs or activities," and said the
matter should be brought up in parliament.

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