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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1970

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Array General
meeting
initiates
action
on tenure
dispute.
see page 3
—maureen gans photo
Left to right: ex-external affairs officer Mike Doyle, grad student Jeff Marvin, ex-ombudsman Sean McHugh, ex-president Fraser Hodge.
Nose-count will
determine awards
B.C. government scholarships will again
be offered for 1970-71, bur Victoria has instituted a new system for awarding them.
New criteria for eligibility are in the
form of percentages rather than marks. The
highest ranking five per cent of students
are eligible to receive three-quarters of
their tuition paid.
The next highest ranking six per cent
will receive one-half of their tuition fees
and the following six per cent will receive
one-third of their tuitions.
Previously, the criteria were marks of
80 per cent or better, 75 per cent or better,
and 70 per cent or better for the three
classes of awards.
Applications are available in administration president Walter Gage's office,
Buchanan 207, and must be returned there.
V
Senate kills Belshaw report, page 2
The Alaska job racket, page 3
B.C. college fires 2 profs, page 6
Orgasm: his'n'hers, page 7
The Ubyssey will not publish on  Tuesday,  as staffers  make  their
last valiant efforts to salvage their years.
The paper's last issue will appear next Thursday,  the day before
Good Friday. Staff are reminded this means Wednesday is a press day.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. U, No. 42
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1970
,4S       228-2305
Gage asks review of Mayne, Powell firings
By SANDY KASS
Administration president Walter Gage has called for
a review of the decision to deny tenure to English profs
Brian Mayne and David Powell.
The two were, in effect, fired March 9 when acting
arts dean Doug Kenny upheld the recommendations of
the English department tenure committee.
The committee ruling that Mayne and Powell had
not met the existing publication standards and could not
be granted tenure has spairked protests from many
students and faculty members.
Because of the number of requests, Gage announced
Wednesday that the senior appointments committee
would begin reviewing the case early next week, taking
into consideration every issue raised by the two faculty
members, their colleagues and a number of students.
The standing presidential committee chaired by
pharmacy prof Bernard Riedel normally deals with
recommendations for appointment, reappointment, and
promotion for faculty members at the rank of associate
professor or above.
The 28 senior faculty members drawn from almost
all faculties and a wide range of academic disciplines are
individually chosen by Gage.
English department head Robert Jordan, French
department head L. L. Bongie, and home economics
director Melvin Lee, presently members of the
committee, have volunteered to relinquish their
membership for the current review. They have
previously been on committees judging the case.
If these positions are vacated and not filled by early
next week, the committee reviewing the case will only
have 25 members.
"I am not in a position to say when a
recommendation can be expected from the committee,"
said Gage. "However, I am asking them to deal with the
matter as expeditiously as possible. Any final decision
will be the result of a full and thorough investigation."
"I want to assure the entire university community
that we will move as rapidly as possible in examining all
the issues that have been raised," said Riedel.
The purpose of the first meeting will be to discuss
procedures to be followed by the committee in
conducting its review, he said.
"Three basic criteria will be examined in reviewing
this case-teaching, research and publication, and
community activities of the individuals concerned."
Riedel suggested that it may be necessary to call in
scholars from other universities to offer an impartial
view of the situation.
Other members of the committee were unavailable
for comment.
The committee operates all year long, and any
decision may not be formalized until after classes have
ceased.
"I guess we'll just have to wait and see what
happens," said Powell. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
Federated colleges scheme
shot down in flames . . .
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Ubyssey Senate Reporter
The UBC senate Wednesday night
voted to retain, with modifications,
the present structure of this university.
In so doing, they turned thumbs
down on anthropology and sociology
head Cyril Belshaw's federated colleges
scheme.
The scheme envisioned a university
made up of a large number of small
colleges each with an autonomous
program and budget. Changes in
university size were to be made by
adding or subtracting individual
colleges rather than by adding students
to existing faculties. This would have
made university growth more flexible,
proponents of the plan said.
According to Belshaw, the college
programs were to be highly variable.
Some were to be oriented towards the
traditional disciplines while others
would have a strong inter-disciplinary
approach. Still others were to be
oriented towards experiments in
college organization and teaching.
Opponents of the plan cited cost
factors and the possible administrative
unwieldiness as major reasons for
rejecting it.
The retention of the present
university structure was favoured by
the    senate    long    range    planning
committee by a majority of one,
however, and it was this
recommendation which was presented
to senate.
Academic planner Robert Clark, in
moving the recommendation, said: "It
is not a conflict between hard nosed
realists and an idealistic minority. If
we simply defeat the federated
colleges proposal, we will not have
faced up to the problems."
He stressed that acceptance of the
present university structure did not
necessarily mean that senate was
taking a conservative stance.
"There are major challenges facing
this university," Belshaw said in
support of his plan.
"The intense crisis facing higher
education on this continent has not
been solved by any university. We are
held in a strait-jacket by our present
mode of doing things."
He attacked the structure of the
university, saying: "The present form
of university structure is not flexible
enough to respond to change. If there
is a large movement of students from
the sciences to the humanities or vice
versa, there would be no way for us to
deal with it."
The federated colleges scheme
would provide a variety of approach to
subject matter and not merely a
variety of subject matter, he said.
"It (the federated colleges
proposal) is a challenge to turn this
university into a large university
institute of the sort which has never
been seen on this continent before."
Senate then voted by a 6-1 ratio to
support the present structure of the
university "with modifications."
Next on the agenda was
recommendation 18; a proposal that
an orientation college be created to
assist first and second year arts and
science students in choosing their
programs for their final two years.
"One of the major characteristics of
the student body at the present time is
movement (from one discipline to
another)," Belshaw said in support of
the college.
An orientation college would made
it possible for students to explore
different disciplines without
committing themselves, he said.
Classics head Malcolm McGregor
disagreed with the need for a college
of this type.
The present faculty advisory system
is already filling the need to help
students choose their discipline, he
said.
Clark disagreed.
"You can't find out about subjects
merely by getting good advice about
them," he said.
Senate finally moved that a joint
committee of the arts and science
faculties be set up to investigate the
feasibility of the college.
Other high/low points of
Wednesday's meeting include:
• the interruption- of an
outpouring of Clark's flowery poesie
with the crack by administration
president Walter Gage: "How would
you like a job as head of the
department of English."
• the fact that only half of the
senators bothered to come.
. . . . senate decides to
retain present structure
Abortion  trial draws  women's ire
Aboul 30 members of the Vancouver Women's
Caucus picketed in front of the Vancouver police
court Thursday to protest the trial of Dr. Robert
Mackaroff in progress inside the courthouse.
MackarolT has been charged with conspiring to
procure a miscarriage under Canada's current
abortion law.
The demonstraters, some with pillows stuffed
in the front of their dresses to simulate pregnancy,
carried signs declaring "Abortion is our right".
The women were not allowed to take their signs
into the courthouse.
During the demonstration the Caucus members
distributed an open letter to Mary-Lynne Hinston,
the policewoman involved in Mackaroff s arrest, to
passerby.
The letter expressed sympathy for Hinston's
"inhuman job" and added:
"We hope that one day you will have the
strength to resist, risk losing your job, to work with
other women as sisters to ease our common
oppression."
S.C.M. and Speakers' Committee
DR. THOMAS W. 0LGETREE
Professor Constructive Theology —
Chicago Theological  Seminary
NOON, FRIDAY, MARCH 20 - SUB AUDITORIUM
"Religion and the Radical Impulse"
8:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MARCH 20 - BUCHANAN 104
"Christian Marxist Dialogue"
EVENING STUDENTS - 50c OTHERS - $1.00
rIES
Dear Speak Easy:
This summer some of my friends from the
States are corning to visit me for two or three
weeks. 1 want to show them a good time but I
myself don't know much about Vancouver.
What are some good places to go at night? Also,
where can I take them during the days?
Money isn't the problem either. I just need
some good ideas.
Thank you.
SANDRA
Dear Sandra:
If it's a good summer, weather and
otherwise, the beaches will likely be worth
many hours. There's a dozen or so, each, to
some extent, with their own atmosphere. Try
Kits, Spanish Banks, University, and English
Bay, Boundary Bay, White Rock, etc. If you
have a day or two there is Qualicum or Long
Beach on Vancouver Island.
Particularly interesting parts of town are 4th
Avenue (at Yew, etc.), a sort of hippie
downtown; Gastown, (Powell and Carrall, etc.);
Chinatown, (Pender and Main), downtown in
general.
There is also the Art Gallery, Planetarium,
Stanley Park, Queen Elizabeth Park, Upper
Lynn Valley Park, the chairlifts, and outside of
the city, mindblowing delights in every
direction. Check with the Vancouver Tourist
Bureau for an exhaustive list.  So  much for
places.
As for things, there are the usual sports,
movies, nightclubs, etc. Of interest are the
River Queen on Burrard (usually folk music),
and the Bistro on 4th (usually rock groups).
The Aspidistra Room in Gastown might be
worth a try.
For what's happening in town, the Province
and Sun have listings in their weekend sections.
(Presumably they'll be printing by then.) The
Georgia Straight has other news about town
from a hipper point of view.
A little magazine called MacLean's Guide,
available in drug stores comes out monthly with
a day by day listing of official events, plus
notes on restaurants, etc.
If you like food, it would be worth the
money ($5) to join the Captain Vancouver Club
or the Vancouver Supper Club, which allow
you to eat two meals (i.e. yourself and a friend)
for the price of one at several restaurants.
Probably not included in the above, but worth
the trip are a couple of vegetarian restaurants,
the Naam and the Golden Lotus, both on 4th.
One restaurant we'd personally recommend
is the Little Budapest at 4th and Alma for some
glorious meat-eating.
Speak Easy is open Monday to Friday 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. Phone 228-3706, Room 218,
SUB.
This column is prepared by Speak Easy staff.
WIESEL: The Writer as Witness
THE   ADULT   EDUCATION   COMMITTEE   IS   PLEASED   TO   ANNOUNCE   —
E I i e    W i e s e I
Author of best sellers — Night,  Gates of the Forest, Beggar in Jerusalem
at the
BETH ISRAEL AUDITORIUM - TUES., MAR. 24
4350 Oak St. — Student Tickets, $1.00 — 8:30 p.m.
Limited   number  of   tickets   still   available   —   Phone   731-4161
An EPIC Occasion At WOLFE'S
PRICES ON NEW 1969 EPICS
REDUCED
EXAMPLES:-
DELUXE 4 DOOR SEDAN only   $1570
DELUXE 4 DOOR SEDAN-Whitewall tires,
70 h.p. engine only    $1690
DELUXE 2 DOOR SEDAN-84 h.p. engine     $1775
STATION WAGON—Automatic transmission
70 h.p.  engine  __-     $1975
Many More to Choose From — We Do Our Own Financing
WOLFE Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Ltd.
HASTINGS AT RENFREW PHONE 255-5151
"yancouver's Most Reliable Dealer" Friday, March 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
f No jobs in Alaska oilfields, says Manpower 1
By BRIAN McWATTERS
An advertisement placed in local papers has lured
hundreds of Canadians to Alaska with hopes of landing
high-paying jobs.
But in fact there are no jobs available.
The advertisements in several local newspapers,
placed by Job Research Services, of Whitehorse; and
Northern Job Information, Box 295, South Burnaby,
promise information about liigh-paying jobs in Alaska
oilfields. Some of the information offered concerns jobs
paying up to $2,900 a month.
"People apparently have been turning up in Alaska
after spending their last few dollars on transportation and
finding there are no jobs available," said Canada
Manpower information service adviser Murray Perry.
"We're extremely concerned about finding jobs for
students this year," said Perry, "and this sort of thing
doesn't really help us at all."
The student unemployment rate may be even higher
this summer than last, he said. It would be terrible for
these students to spend the last of their funds on
transportation to Whitehorse and be stuck there.
Perry said that accommodation in Whitehorse is so
hard to get that anyone going up there could quite
possibly freeze to death if they had no place to stay.
The information obtained through replying to the
advertisement is minimal, said Perry. It concerns labor
relations laws and working conditions in Alaska but does
not promise work in any way.
Printing union
seeks injunction
against lockout
By BRIAN McWATTERS
The Vancouver Typographical Union, local 226,
Tuesday launched Supreme Court action seeking an
injunction against Pacific Press.
The injunction charges Pacific Press with
contravening sections of the Labor Relations Act, the
Mediation Commission Act, and the Trade Unions Act for
closing down operations Feb. 15 leaving 1,100 employees
jobless.
The members of the VTU (approximately 80) are
seeking:
• a declaration that the lockout is illegal;
• an interim injunction restraining Pacific Press or its
agents from declaring or causing a lockout of the
members;
• a declaration that Pacific Press declared or caused a
lockout of the union Feb. 15 contrary to the Mediation
Commission Act;
• damages for breaches of the Trade Unions Act, the
Labor Relations Act, and the Mediation Commission Act;
• court costs and other relief monies.
Contempt proceedings by Pacific Press against the
Vancouver Printing Pressmen's Union, local 25, the
Vancouver ' Mailers' Union, and the ITU, local 226,
adjourned Tuesday pending an appeal by the unions
against an injunction order forbidding slowdowns in the
plant.
The proceedings were re-opened Thursday and are
continuing today.
The advertisement asks a fee of $2 for the
information.
Perry said the RCMP have been called in to
investigate the operation, and try to prevent the scheme
from continuing but have found no reason to suspend the
operation.
"I've been advised by our man in Whitehorse that the
territorial commissioner unearthed an ordnance passed
before World War I making it an offence to sell
information on jobs in the north when a similar situation
existed then," said Perry.
The territorial legal adviser is seeing if the ordinance
used then to stop ads can be put into effect now, he said.
"But the damage has already been done."
Alaska commissioner of labor Thomas Moore has
written to the Vancouver office of Canada Manpower to
warn people in this area that there is no work available in
Alaska unless it is pre-arranged with companies working in
that area.
Moore said the unemployment figure for Alaska only
two months ago was 8.5 per cent and since then it has
probably increased.
"I received word that 50 people came to inquire
about jobs in Whitehorse Thursday," said Perry, "For
Whitehorse 50 new faces is something."
UBC placement officer J. C. Craik said some students
have inquired about the advertisement (which appeared
twice in The Ubyssey) and expected that more would.
"At the time the students directed their inquiries to
us we simply told them they knew about as much of the
job possibilities as we did," he said.
Craik said when he sees the brochure sent out by the
firm that placed the advertisement, he will inform
students about the possibilities contained in it.
MEAGRE CROWD watches the show at the so-called AMS general meeting Thursday. Aside from
put on a pretty good show of their own from the platform, even if they were playing to an almost
—maureen gans photo
the band, AMS types
empty house.
The motions passed, but where was the quorum?
By JAN O'BRIEN
Even a band couldn't attract the 2,100 students
needed for a quorum at the Alma Mater Society general
meeting Thursday noon on the SUB Plaza.
This didn't stop the AMS though. Through a neat
political manoeuvre the crowd of 600 was declared a
quorum.
Past AMS president Fraser Hodge said the quorum
had been challenged. The chair then ruled there wasn't a
quorum.
AMS president Tony Hodge challenged the chair's
ruling and the challenge was upheld. Thus a quorum was
declared present.
A   motion   was   passed   recommending   that   four
students (two undergrad English majors or honors
students and two graduate students) be included on the
senior appointments committee and a two week time
limit be put on the decision regarding professors Brian
Mayne and David Powell.
Another motion involving the English tenure
situation recommending that junior faculty members
and departments not represented be included on the
senior appointment committee was also passed.
A third motion was passed authorizing the AMS to
proceed with development of a pub in SUB. The
development is subject to availability of financing, to a
total cost of not over $225,000. Complete costs are to
be repaid from proceeds of the activities.
"With 400 people at four beers a hour we can repay
a loan in no time," said Fraser Hodge.
A motion was passed to form a committee to
investigate food services.
Also passed was a motion that the AMS contribute
$6,000 toward the covering of Empire Pool provided
that the pool be used mainly for recreational purposes.
The AMS should give more financial assistance to
other worthwhile projects such as Speak Easy said Jeff
Marvin, arts 7.
Constitution revisions called "housekeeping" by
Hodge were passed with the exception of a revision that
would make a quorum unnecessary for any meeting of
the AMS. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
TH.U8YSSCY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH 20, 1970
Keep trying boys
Like final exams, the AMS general meeting is one
of those unpleasant inevitabilities that tend to ruin the
entire spring. As such things go, Thursday's circus was
something of a classic.
The rock band playing in the SUB plaza had only
attracted about 600 students by the time AMS heavies
showed up and announced that a meeting was being
held. Through a questionable loophole in parliamentary
procedure, those 600 people were declared to constitute
a quorum of 2,000. Most of those present were
apparently still upset that the band had stopped, since
less than 50 bothered voting on the motion to declare a
quorum.
Among the motherhood and maple syrup issues
like food prices, the Pit and routine constitutional
revisions, the general meeting discussed (briefly) the
current tenure dispute in the English department, an
issue that has a direct bearing on the kind of education
we will receive at this place.
Earlier this year students voted on general
principles to keep the AMS in existence, but the small
turn-out for Thursday's meeting indicates they don't
really have much faith in its competence to deal with
such major questions. The AMS has for too long allowed
itself to be type-cast (justly) as the organization that
runs SUB, helps support clubs and treads softly for fear
of offending the administration.
The attempt to get token student representation
on the committee that will review the firing of Brian
Mayne and David Powell is a small, faltering, but long
overdue first step in an AMS search for relevence.
However, it looks like the AMS has a great deal of
work to do before any of us will begin to take its
efforts seriously. —N.S.
Say hello to Phil
At 1 p.m. today, members of the Unemployed
Citizen's Welfare Improvement Council and The Action
Committee of Unemployed Youth will stage a
demonstration in front of welfare minister Phil
Gaglardi's Vancouver office, 777 Hornby.
It is a demonstration against a government that
considers giving away our natural resources more
important than protecting the rights of the people.
It is a demonstration against a welfare minister
who describes the poor, people beaten down by an
unjust system over which they have no control, as
"deadbeats".
It is a demonstration against the Provincial Alliance
of Businessmen, a "job-finding" organization that, as far
as anyone can determine, has found work for no one
other than Gaglardi.
It is a demonstration by people fed up with the
frustration and degradation that accompanies what
passes for social legislation in this province.
It is a demonstration that deserves everyone's
assistance and support. —N.S.
Editor:  Michael  Finlay
News         Paul   Knox
City    Nate Smith
Managing     Bruce  Curtis
Wire    Irene   Wasilewski
Sports   Jim Maddin
Senior      John Twigg
Photo  —      Dave Enns
Ass't  Nuws    Maurice  Bridge
Ass't City ....  John Andersen
Page Friday  Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
What is so rare, indeed, as a day in
Spring? While winsome Ginny Gait, Jan
O'Brien. Judy Young, and Brian
McWatters played merry little games
twixt the Ubyssey desks, lithesome
Dave Schmidt and blorgsome Sandy
Kass applauded the happy quartet with
fervent vigor. "I say, chaps, let's
organize a marble game," called out
our favourite jock Tony Gallagher and
Dick Button and Bernie Bischoff and
Laura Patrick joined their playmate
with gusto. Meanwhile on news desk
toothsome Leslie Plommer and
eyesome Jennifer Jordan were
performing a gay spring jig
accompanied by Elaine Tarzwell,
Bernie Bischoff and Robin Burgess on
their     nose     zithers.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Gratitude
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I want to talk about Brian
Mayne and David Powell again. 1
was a student in Mayne's English
340 class in 1968-69. I've never
been in any of Powell's classes
but I've talked with some of his
students and I have heard
unanimous approval of him. But
because Mayne was a teacher
of mine I'm going to talk about
him.
I was confused about the
rumours of Mayne's unpublished
work so I thought I'd" ask
administration " president Walter
Gage what was happening. All I
could understand from the
interview (that is what we call an
unsatisfactory conversation these
days) was that he was not
responsible for any decisions until
some "scholar" (in the sky?) had
:arefully considered the contents
(read) Mayne's manuscripts. And
then he very nicely asked me what
my father did and what year I was
in and how was I getting along. It
was getting on toward ten o'clock.
He should have served tea.
I also had an appointment that
morning with English head Robert
Jordan because I wanted to see
why he thought he was cleaning
up the English department. What
is it that janitors are called these
days? Anyhow, he wasn't in and
his secretary told me to come
back that afternoon. Perhaps he
would be around then. That
afternoon he wasn't. I'm sorry, I
just can't figure anything out.
Maybe I haven't got the capacity.
But I will tell you a story.
Originally, the English 340
course was set up as the usual
three unit course: three one-hour
lectures a week. When I signed up
for the English novels course,
Mayne suggested that we have one
seminar and one lecture per week.
It was an experiment; most of the
students were ready for the
change. Mayne's seminar was held
at his home for about two hours
every Wednesday evening. He
mentioned that he bought a house
with a living-room large enough to
hold twenty or more people
because he'd planned to hold the
seminars in the atmosphere which
would be best for lively and
(hopefully) inspired conversation.
We were new at this sort of
thing and he gave us all the help
he could: we had a choice of two
beverages. We bought the beer,
the coffee was free, and most of
us brought our money. Because he
considered us adults (or, getting
there) we managed to behave
ourselves. That is, we did some
lively and inspired talking.
Surprise, learning is fun. Mayne
gave us the lecture once a week
for the historical background of
the novels. With Mayne, it was a
good course.
But I haven't finished the
story. That year, I had a series of
bad colds. The biggest one began
around the end of March and
ended about the middle of April.
Scholastically and otherwise, I
was in bad shape. Mayne believed
he could judge my knowledge of
the novel on which I'd planned to
write my essay by discussing it
with me. I knew the novel
practically by heart, but I was
nervous: my entire term depended
on. our one-hour conversation. I
walked into his horrible little
office in Arts 1, and he
immediately commented on his
horrible little office. I felt better,
and I passed.
I am grateful to have had such
a teacher. He understands that he
is teaching people. If you are
using your imagination and
ingenuity and if you are showing
concern for students who need
you, then it is bloody difficult to
get your manuscripts written as
well as you know you can, and off
to the publisher on time. As to
whether Mayne and Powell get
their tenure, let's just not think.
Let's abide by the rules.
Tell you what: let's all meet at
the SUB ballroom Saturday night
for an orgy. It seems the best we
can do under the circumstances.
Everyone welcome.
IRENE CHAMBERLAIN
Misinformation
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Robert Jordan, head of the
English department, addressed
AMS council Tuesday night,
March 10, regarding the present
tenure dispute. Despite his
"misgivings" about involving
students in "faculty personnel
matters", he expressed a desire to
clear up the "misinformation"
that has been floating around with
a '"clear, fair, accurate" account
of "the other side." (a term which
he    found    disagreeable).    He
stressed his hesitations to discuss
with students the "contractual
affairs and personal obligations of
faculty members" which he felt
would be "anti-intellectual" and
far too complex for students to
understand. According to Dr.
Jordan, it is "hard enough for
young faculty members" to
understand terms of hiring.
Using "his utmost descretion",
the English head enlightened us as
to the reasons for the firing of
Mayne and Powell.' In making this
"agonizing" decision, we were
told, all "ethical considerations"
were examined in order to
"safeguard the individual rights of
faculty members" and to save the
university from reproachments.
"Tenure, position for life, is a
privilege status not to be granted
lightly," he said. "We can't
gamble on the personality of the
individual, but we need to judge
all evidence to know what the
man will be doing thirty years
from now."
He said the first consideration
for tenure is "scholarship as
exemplified in teaching and
research", two equally important
criteria. The question was posed
to Dr. Jordan: "Do you think
grad students are able to judge the
competence of faculty members?"
His answer was "Yes".
There are no grad students on
the tenure committee, which
consists of eight full professors
and four associate professors.
When asked if Brian Mayne was
not qualified on the teaching side
in any way, Jordan was "not
prepared to discuss individual
details. But there was not
unanimity on the committee on
this side," he said.
A third year English student
asked if her suspicions that
Mayne's book manuscript had
been ignored were true. Jordan
replied, "I am afraid your
suspicions are not right". He said
the manuscript had been read in
its entirety, at least by himself.
Moreover, "Some committee
members had considered it agood
piece of work".
There indeed seems to be a
good deal of "misinformation"
going around, for Mayne told an
open meeting March 13 that only
he, John Hulcoop and one
member of the committee had
ever had a copy of the manuscript
to read. Strangely enough, no
To page 5 Friday, March 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
consideration whatsoever had
been given to Mayne's research
and yet it is on the basis of what
is termed inadequate research that
Mayne has been fired.
When asked the percentage of
English faculty with doctorates
Jordan replied, "between 90 and
95 percent." That is grossly
inconsistent with Volume 11, no.
2, Feb. 1970 edition of
"University Affairs" which states
"during the 11 year period from
1956-57 to 1967-68 the
percentage of PhD's among
teachers in the pure humanities
fell from 45 to 40%".
"Scholarship as exemplified in
teaching and research" still
echoing in our ears, we were then
told that "scholarship in the
classroom is evidence of good
teaching but not of the
scholarship under question". It
was explained to us that a "good
teacher must have good things to
say as well as being a good
communicator". The institution
of the successful Arts 1 program,
for which Jordan has "respect",
"cannot be considered equivalent
to the PhD doctorate". Being able
to institute ideas on a practical
basis is evidently much less a
measure of integrity than
producing mounds of published
words.
Speaking of integrity, Jordan
stressed his and the committee's
concern to maintain the good
name of our university. He
explained that "national standards
(regarding tenure) are not being
imposed capriciously in this
campus", . but that they are
consistent throughout the nation.
Being denied tenure at one
university puts no stigma on the
candidate regarding future jobs,
we were told. In fact, our
benevolent dept. has been trying
vain to attract to UBC a highly
qualified man who was refused
tenure at another university. For
someone who is trying to preserve
the "quality" of the institution,
someone seems to be making a big
mistake. Why bring to campus a
person judged elsewhere as having
"marginal" qualifications to
replace the person who has just
been fired on the same basis.
In summary, Jordan explained
that "not wanting to impair the
national reputation of the dept.,
and evaluating all relevant and
available material", Mayne and
Powell were judged "not up to
university academic standards". It
seems that teaching is of no
significance, that Arts 1 is no
indication of integrity, originality
and productivity. It seems
irrelevant to consider unpublished
work in the question of tenure; it
seems unimportant that numerous
letters praising Mayne's teaching
are being written; it seems
incongruous that both Powell and
Mayne are candidates for the
master teacher award; and it
seems strange the members of the
English department itself are
petitioning for a reversal of the
decision.
Jordan was grateful for the
"stimulating" evening.
S. MACDONALD
arts 3
Books  again
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We recently went to the
university book store and
purchased a book called
Astronomy by Fred Hale,
published by Crescent Books Ltd.
The book store's regular price
for the book is $16.50, although
it is now on sale for $9.50. We
later discovered that the same
book was available at the airport
bookstore for $5.95.
This is just an example of
many books that can be bought
for much less at off-campus book
stores, who already make a
substantial profit.
We also wonder why students
receive only a five per cent rebate
while faculty members get a 10
per cent discount.
We strongly suggest students
investigate off-campus prices
before buying.
BO CHANDRA
JULES LAJOIE
grad studies
Davies
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
About a week ago, I was
innocently sitting in the Pit when
I was accosted by a perfect
stranger, who I later found out
was your imperfect reporter, one
D. James Davies.
Mr. Davies waved several
pieces of paper in my face and
kept shouting "look at this, it's
great, you love it, and those fools
I have to work with won't print
it." After giving him several beers,
I calmed him down enough for
him to explain he was referring to
a Davies Ravies column your
editors had rejected.
After reading the column, I
would like to take this
opportunity to congratulate you
on your excellent taste.
GEORGE KERSCHBAUM
Rosie and Duane to cohabit?
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Rumors of the impending
cohabitation of Rosie, the green bourgeois blorg, and Duane, the red
lumpenproletarian socialist blorg, flew thick and fast in this island
capital Thursday. Millions of hairy grovelling brown blorgs
immolated themselves in protest, all to no avail.
HONG KONG
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Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
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VANCOUVER - LONDON RETURN
June 6 - Sept. 2 - $285
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August 15 - Sept. 6 - $350
INTERNATIONAL  STUDENT  IDENTITY  CARDS AVAILABLE  SOON
Order Your Eurailpasses, Brit-rail, Tours,
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Wait-list applications accepted for May 16 and September 14, '70 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
Former UBC activist fired
at Prince George regional college
PRINCE GEORGE (CUP) - Only six months after
its opening, the College of New Caledonia, one of B.C.'s
new community colleges, is already in the middle of its
first crisis over the firing of outspoken professors.
Charles Boylan and David Drake, fired along with
Nigel Kent-Barber and  registrar Abraham Enns, were
given  no reasons for their dismissals in February. All.
were on one-year contracts and CNC has no tenure.
Students at the college have circulated petitions
demanding an explanation for the dismissals. These were
sent to the college council with a request that an answer
be given by the end of this week.
Administration president Wolfgang Franke, wholly
in charge of hiring and firing at the college, told students
he didn't "think first year students can judge the
professors after knowing them only four months," and
refused to give reasons for his actions.
Franke resigned this week, again giving no reason.
This leaves all future action up to the college council
which doesn't meet until April 4.
English lecturer Boylan, a former Communist Party
member and student activist at UBC, charges that his
firing is "overt political discrimination."
Both he and anthropology and mathematics lecturer
Drake have been out-spoken radicals throughout the
year, and both have criticized the American pulp and
paper companies which control this northern B.C. town.
Boylan, backed up by student council, has charged
that Franke has ignored both student and faculty wishes
— a majority of students in his and Drake's courses have
already indicated in course critiques they would like to
have the profs next year — and says Franke is backing up
"local well-off merchants, political wheeler-dealers,
bureaucrats" and the pulp and paper companies in firing
the two trouble-makers.
ATTENTION:
ALL STUDENTS ENTERING LAW
The University of British Columbia Law Faculty, in
common with most other Law Schools in Canada, will
require all applicants for entrance in 1970 and succeeding years to take the Law School Admission Test. The
reason for this is that there are far more applicants than
there are available places, and these applicants come
with a great variety of pre-law qualifications. The score
on the L.S.A.T. will not be used as a single criterion,
but should improve the fairness of the process of selection. U.B.C. and U.Vic, are both test centres, and most
other large universities in Canada are as well.
Although there will be a test on April 11th, this may be
inconvenient to students writing regular exams. There
will, therefore, be another on May 16th, and all interested students are urged to make arrangements for
taking this test. Registration for the test should be made
at least a month in advance. For further information,
please see either the Registrar or the Faculty of Law,
U.B.C.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
dispelling some
repressive myths
Tiersias, who had been both man and
woman, was asked, as Ovid's legend goes,
to mediate in a dispute between Jove and
Juno as to which sex got more pleasure
from lovemaking. Tiresias unhesitatingly
answered that women did. Yet in the
intervening 2000 years between Ovid's
time and our own, a mythology has been
built up which not only holds the
opposite to be true, but has made this
belief an unswerving ideology dictating
the quality of relations between the
sexes. Women's sexuality, repressed and
channeled, denied and abused until
women themselves, thoroughly convinced
of their sexual inferiority to men, would
probably be dumbfounded to learn that
there is scientific proof that Tiresias was
indeed right.
Clitoris or vagina?
The myth was codified by Freud as
much as anyone else. In Three Essays on
the Theory of Sexuality, Freud
formulated his basic ideas concerning
feminine sexuality: for little girls, the
leading erogenous zone in their bodies is
the clitoris; in order for the transition to
womanhood to be successful, the clitoris
must abandon its sexual primacy to the
vagina.Women in whom this transition has
not been complete remain
clitorally-oriented or "sexually
anaesthetic," and "psychosexually
immature." In the context of Freud's
total psychoanalytic view of women —
that they are not whole human beings but
mutilated males who long all their lives
for a penis and must struggle to reconcile
themselves to its lack — the requirement
of a transfer of erotic sensation from
clitoris to vagina became a prima facie
case for their inevitable sexual inferiority.
In Freud's logic, those who struggle to
become what they are not must be
inferior to that to which they aspire.
Freud himself admitted near the end
of his life that his knowledge of women
was inadequate. "If you want to know
more about femininity, you must
interrogate your own experience, or turn
to the poets, or wait until science can give
you more profound and more coherent
information," he said; he also hoped the
female psychoanalysts who followed him
would be able to find out more. But the
post-Freudians adhered rigidly to the
doctrine of the master, and, as with most
of his work, what Freud hoped would be
taken as a thesis for future study became
instead a kind of canon law.
While the neo-Freudians haggled over
the correct reading of the Freudian bible,
watered-down Freudianism was wending
its way into the cultural mythology via
Broadway plays, novels, popular
magazines, social scientists, marriage
counselors and experts of various kinds
who found it useful in projecting desired
images of woman. The superiority of the
vaginal over the clitoral orgasm was
particularly useful as a theory, since it
provided a convenient basis for
categorization: clitoral women were
deemed immature, neurotic, bitchy and
masculine; women who had vaginal
orgasms were maternal, feminine, mature
and normal. Though frigidity should
technically be defined as total inability to
achieve orgasm, the orthodox Freudians
(and pseudo-Freudians) preferred to
define it as inability to achieve vaginal
orgasm by which definition, in 1944,
Edmond Bergler adjudged between 70
and 80 per cent of all women frigid. The
clitoral vs. vaginal debate raged hot and
heavy among the sexologists - Kinsey's
writings stresses the importance of the
clitoris to female orgasm and
contradicted Bergler's statistics — but it
became clear that there was something
indispensable to society in the Freudian
view which allowed it to remain
unchallenged in the public consciousness.
In 1966, Dr. William H. Masters and
Mrs. Virginia E. Johnson published
Human Sexual Response, a massive
clinical study of the physiology of sex.
Briefly and simply, the Masters and
Johnson conclusions about the female
orgasm, based on observation of and
interviews with 487 women, were these:
1) That the dichotomy of vaginal and
clitoral orgasm is entirely false.
Anatomically, all orgasms are centred in
the clitoris, whether they result from
direct manual pressure applied to the
clitoris, indirect pressure resulting from
the thrusting of the penis during
intercourse, or generalized sexual
stimulation of other erogenous zones like
the breasts.
2) That women are naturally
multiorgasmic; that is, if a woman is
immediately stimulated following orgasm,
she is likely to experience several orgasms
in rapid succession. This is not an
exceptional occurrence, but one of which
most women are capable.
3) That while women's orgasms do not
vary in kind, they vary in intensity. The
most intense orgasms experienced by the
research subjects* were by masturbatory
manual stimulation, followed in intensity
by manual stimulation by the partner; the
least intense orgasms were experienced
during   intercourse.
4) that there is an "infinite variety in
female sexual response" as regards
intensity and duration of orgasms.
Revolutionary findings
To anyone acquainted with the body
of existing knowledge of feminine
sexuality, the Masters and Johnson
findings were truly revolutionary and
liberating in the extent to which they
demolished existing myths. Yet two years
after the study was published, it seems
hardly to have made any impact at all.
Certainly it is not for lack of information
that the myths persist; Human Sexual
Response, despite its weighty scientific
language, was an immediate best seller,
and popular paperbacks explicated it to
millions of people in simpler language and
at a cheaper price. The myths remain
because a male-dominated American
culture has a vested interest in their
continuance.
Before Masters and Johnson, men
defined feminine sexuality in a way as
favorable to themselves as possible. If
woman's pleasure was obtained through
the vagina, then she was totally
dependent on the man's erect penis to
achieve orgasm; she would receive her
satisfation only as a concomitant of
man's seeking his. With the clitoral
orgasm, woman's sexual pleasure was
independent of the male's, and she could
seek her satisfaction as aggressively as the
man sought his, a prospect which didn't
appeal to too many men. The definition
of feminine sexuality as normally vaginal,
in other words, was a part of keeping
women down, of making them sexually as
well as economically, socially and
politically subservient . . .
Adolescent boys growing up begging
for sexual crumbs from girls frightened
for their "reputations" - a situation that
remains unchanged to this day — hardly
constitutes the vanguard of a sexual
revolution. However, the marriage manual
craze that followed Kinsey assumed that
a lifetime of psychological destruction
could, with the aid of a little booklet, be
abandoned after marriage, and that
husband and wife should be able to make
sure that the wife was not robbed of her
sexual birthright to orgasm, just so long
as it was vaginal (though the marriage
manuals did rather reluctantly admit that
since the clitoris was the most sexually
sensitive organ in the female body, a little
clitoral stimulation was in order), and
their orgasms were simultaneous.
Restraint from the manuals
The effect of the marriage manuals of
course ran counter to their ostensible
purpose. Under the guise of frankness and
sexual liberation, they dictated prudery
and restraint. Sex was made so
mechanized, detached and intellectual
that it was robbed of its sensuality. Man
became a spectator of his own sexual
experience. And the marriage manuals
put new pressure on women to perform.
The marriage manual's endorsement of
the desirability of vaginal orgasm insure
that women would be asked not only,
"Did you come?" but also, "Did you
conform to Freud's conception of a
psychosexually mature woman, and
thereby validate my masculinity?"
Appearance notwithstanding, the
age-old taboos against conversation about
personal sexual experience haven't yet
been broken down. This reticence has
allowed the mind-manipulators of the
media to create myths of sexual
supermen and superwomen. So the bed
becomes a competitive arena, where men
and women measure themselves against
these mythical rivals, while
simultaneously trying to live up the
ecstasies promised them by the marriage
manuals and the fantasies of the media
("If the earth doesn't move for me, I
must be MISSING something"). Our
society has made sex a sport, with its
record-breakers, its judges, its rules and
its spectators.
As anthropologists have shown,
woman's sexual response is culturally
conditioned; historically, women defer to
whatever model of their sexuality is
offered them by men. So the sad thing
By Susan Lydon, Ramparts
for women is that they have participated
in the destruction of their own eroticism.
Women have helped make the vaginal
orgasm into a status symbol in a
male-dictated system of values. A woman
would now perceive her preference for
clitoral orgasm as a "secret shame."
ignominious in the eyes of other women
as well as those of men. This
internalization can be seen in literature:
Mary McCarthy's and Doris Lessings's
writings on orgasm do not differ
substantially from Ernest Hemingway's,
and Simone de Beauvoir, in The Second
Sex, refers to the vaginal orgasm as the
only "normal satisfaction."
Implications for liberation
One factor that has made this possible
is that female sexuality is subtle and
delicate, conditioned as much by the
emotions as by physiology and sociology.
Masters and Johnson proved that the
orgasm experienced during intercourse,
the misnamed vaginal organism, did not
differ anatomically from the clitoral
orgasm. But this should not be seen as
their most significant contribution to the
sexual emancipation of women. A
difference remains in the subjective
experience of orgasm during intercourse
and apart from intercourse. In the
complex of emotional factors affecting
feminine sexuality, there is a whole
panoply of pleasures: the pleasure of
being penetrated and filled by a man, the
pleasure of sexual communication, the
pleasure of affording a man his orgasm,
the erotic pleasure that exists even when
sex is not terminated by orgasmic release.
Masters and Johnson's real contribution
was to show this "infinite variety in
female sexual response;" that one
experience is not better than another, but
merely different.
There is no doubt that Masters and
Johnson were fully aware of the
implications of their study to the sexual
liberation of women. As they wrote,
"With orgasmic physiology established,
the human female now has an undeniable
opportunity to develop realistically her
own sexual response levels." Two years
later this statement seems naive and
entirely too optimistic. Certainly the
sexual problems of our society will never
be solved until there is real and unfeigned
equality between men and women. This
idea is usually misconstrued: sexual
liberation for women is wrongly
understood to mean that women will
adopt all the forms of masculine
sexuality. As in the whole issue of
women's liberations, that's really not the
point. Women don't aspire to imitate the
mistakes of men in sexual matters, to
view sexual experiences as conquest and
ego-enhancement, to use other people to
serve their own ends. But if the Masters
and Johnson material is allowed to filter
into the public consciousness, hopefully
to replace the enshrined Freudian myths,
then woman at long last will be allowed
to take the first step toward her
emancipation: to define and enjoy the
forms of her own sexuality. Page 8 THE      UBYSSEY Friday, March 20, 1970
Here's what the AMS 'did' for you this year
Alma Mater Society president Fraser and hence higher use of the building has discussed later in this meeting. the  student  body  at  UBC. What some
Hodge did not deliver this year-end report increased   maintenance requirements and         The death of the Canadian Union of people   will   call   an   irrelevant   lack   of
at the AMS general meeting Thursday, increased depreciation and normal wear Students last November was certainly no action by the AMS I will call a critical
like AMS presidents usually do. However, and tear. Thus, in the overall picture the surprise as I predicted it some six months «Pwtivitv in not beina nrone to flvin? off
Alma Mater Society president Fraser
Hodge did not deliver this year-end report
at the AMS general meeting Thursday,
like AMS presidents usually do. However,
he insists it contains the
"accomplishments " of the AMS this year.
This being my last opportunity to
speak as President of the Alma Mater
Society I shall endeavour to summarize
the past year's events and my feelings
towards them.
The Student Union Building having
completed its first full year of operation
is showing a very slight excess of revenue
over administrative costs. Currently, the
AMS is slightly ahead of its repayments
schedule .for the SUB due to the fact that
enrollment has increased at a greater rate
than was projected at the time of
completing financial arrangements for
SUB.  However,  this greater enrollment
and hence higher use of the building has
increased maintenance requirements and
increased depreciation and normal wear
and tear. Thus, in the overall picture the
AMS is approximately breaking even in
the operation of 'SUB but I want to
caution that the current low level of
co-operation from Physical Plant with
regard to maintenance may result in
undue depreciation of equipment and
corresponding major increases in early
replacement costs for SUB.
With regard to the Pit operation with
the presentation to the B.C. Royal
Commission on Liquor Laws and the
subsequent recommendation by the
Commission to the Government that the
AMS be granted a licence to sell draft
beer it appears although it is not certain
that the way is clear for a real pub on this
campus.   A   proposal   for   this   will   be
discussed later in this meeting.
The death of the Canadian Union of
Students last November was certainly no
surprise as I predicted it some six months
beforehand and again in my half year
report to Students' Council on September
22, 1969. The only comment warranted
here is that a national union is to us as
students at this university at best a luxury
and certainly not a necessity and in the
case of this particular union no loss
whatsoever.
The Amchitka demonstration last
November was conclusive proof that the
students on this campus are concerned
enough to mobilize themselves on issues
which they can identify with as having
some legitimacy. This high level of
selectivity in choosing what issues this
student body will act on is what has
retained a fair degree of credibility for
the student body at UBC. What some
people will call an irrelevant lack of
action by the AMS I will call a critical
selectivity in not being prone to flying off
the handle at the first pretense of an issue
and a lot of publicity. There are many
other areas that the AMS has acted in
over the past 12 months such as the birth
control handbooks, operation of the
Winter Sports Centre and the expansion,
and in fact there is a list too long to
bother with here.
Finally, what I want to say to you is
that although you may not believe it right
now you have a student government on
this campus that does get things done in
spite of The Ubyssey's attitude towards it
and in spite of the image some have tried
to create. No other student union in
Canada   has   such    a   fine   record   of
To page 26: see HODGE
Arts to seek new dean
The UBC board of governors has accepted John H. Young's
resignation as dean of arts effective June 30.
Young, an economics prof, took a temporary leave of absence
last year to serve as chairman of the federal government's prices and
incomes committee and establish a committee to investigate causes,
processes, and consequences of inflation.
Acting dean of arts D. T. Kenny, a psychology prof, will
continue in his present position until a special search committee
decides on a new dean.
•   •   •
FREE
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5 One Act Plays
12:30 P.M.
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|     6143 FRASER at 46th
HERE ARE THE LUCKY WINNERS
IN HOME'S UBC STUDENT ONLY SAN FRANCISCO CONTEST
1
r
r
Weekends for two
in San Francisco:
Martyn Smith
Arts   IV
Nick Geerdink
Com.   Ill
Donald Allan Jones
Educ.   Ill
Paul Appleby
Arch.   I
Douglas Bryson
Eng.   I
Robert Gilbert
Eng.   Ill
Dinner for two
at Hy's:
John Edmond
Grad.   Studies
George Heinmiller
Com.    Ill
George John Costello
Educ.   IV
Eric Alexandre
Arch.    I
Andrew J. Rathgeber
Com.   I
Dinner for two at
the Grouse Nest:
Glen Sambrooke
Com.   IV
Bill Callaway
Grad.   Studies
Lawrence Hickman
Educ.   V
Geoffrey Barr
AgSc.   Ill
Michael T. van Biers
Com.   I
Peter B. Malcolm
Ph.   Ed.   I
Evening for two
at The Daisy:
Ian Muir
Com.   IV
Dave Bunn
Educ.   IV
Colin Love
Educ.   IV
Kenneth Cristall
Arts   IV
Samuel Vesely
Eng.   I
Christine Melnechuk
Ph.   Ed.   IV
Evening for two at
Oil Can Harry's:
John Strugnell
Educ.   Ill
Peter Howatt
Grad.   Studies
Reynold   G.   Orchtrd
Sc.  VI
Gordon A. Crawford
Sc.   Ill
Donald J. MacDonald
Arts   II
Mark T. Churchland
Sc.  VIII
Evening for two at a Canuck
Hockey Game:
Graham Mason
Grad  Studies
Randy Zien
Com.   II
Larry Donaldson
Com.   Ill
Joe English
Sc.   IV
Gary  Barr
Arch.   I
Robin Allen
Sc.   VII
Grant Dunsmore
Sc.   II
Doug Hildebrand
Grad   Studies
Barry Hinder
Grad.   Studies   III
Stephen Wong
Gracf.   Studies   III
William O. Karvinen
Sc.   VII
James C. L. Chen
Com.   VII
...AND FOR THE LOSERS "THANKS" FOR
ENTERING - MAYBE NEXT TIME?
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400 ONE BENTALL CENTRE, 505 BURRARD STREET. VANCOUVER 1. B.C.
j  j <?tensed L{
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INCLUDING SUNDAYS '
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FINE DIAMONDS 275.00
The   sparkle   of   diamonds . . .   add   their   own
particular beauty to the exciting textures of gold.
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REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS & FACULTY
THE
BOOK STORE
will be
CLOSED
ALL DAY
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st and
THURSDAY, APRIL 2nd
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FOR ANNUAL STOCK TAKING
The store will be open Tuesday, March 31st
and Friday, April 3rd
vma
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. S>. Sat. 3 a.m.
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RUSSIA TODAY
(IN   COLOR)
Moscow    -    Siberia    to    Tashkent
and    Samarkand
TUESDAY, APRIL 7
PLAYHOUSE   THEATRE
2 Showings —
6 p.m. and 8:35 p.m.
—  Reservations   --
Vancouver Ticket Centre
Phone 683-3255
A   Snider   Travel    Presentation
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY - 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
10062  King  George  Hwy.  — 58B-2727
2052 Kingsway — 874-3622
Teachers
Wanted
School District No. 65
(Cowichan)
Representatives of Cowichan
School District will be on Campus,
University of British Columbia, for
the purpose of interviewing both
Elementary and Secondary teacher
applicants on Tuesday, 24th March
and  Wednesday,  25th  March.
Appointments for interview may
be made through the Placement
Officer,   Office   of   Student   Services.
tSHELM
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W  10th Ave.
224-0828
Sinclair-Dickin
Report
on Sinclair-Dickin
SINCLAIR: What we need is an idea.
DICKIN: True.
SINCLAIR: Maybe we can do one on this Nixon thing.
DICKIN: That was my idea, Sinclair.
SINCLAIR: When will you realize, Dickin, that you are only a
fragment of my inebriation?
DICKIN:    (Philosophizing.)   The    world   is   coming   to    a
beginning.
SINCLAIR: The end is in sight.
DICKIN: Short world, isn't it?
SINCLAIR: Did you notice how Nixon phoned the astronauts
on the aircraft carrier, rather than on the moon?
DICKIN: Yeah. It's all part of the government cutback in
spending. The moon is long distance. But aircraft carriers are
regular rates, and cheaper after six p.m. and all day Sunday
too!
SINCLAIR: Don't ever say I didn't set you up. But don't
expect me to go through life being your straight man.
DICKIN: As far as I'm concerned, you don't even have to go
through life at all.
SINCLAIR: May the palsied hand of Sigmund Freud grab you
by...
DICKIN: (interrupting.) Do you remember when you actually
stood up and made that ridiculous speech at Shoreline? There
was something about a camel in it.
SINCLAIR: No.
DICKIN: Oh.
SINCLAIR: But I do remember my last seven incarnations. I
was a sacred cow in all seven. I don't think things have really
changed much in the eighth. Would you like to see me give
milk? (A long silence. Sinclair and Dickin stare glumly at the
wall.)
DICKIN: (Suddenly.) As you go through life, there are just
two things you should remember, and I've forgotten both of
them.
SINCLAIR: It should be "but I've forgotten both of them",
not "and I've forgotten both of them."
DICKIN: No, no, "and".
SINCLAIR: "And" doesn't make any sense.
DICKIN: But I've always said it that way.
SINCLAIR: It's going to be "but". (Dickin's next remark is
deleted   by   Sinclair,  who  felt  it  seemed  to   dim  his  own
extremely brilliant rejoinder.)
SINCLAIR: Oh. (Sinclair scores another point!)
DICKIN: Why don't we call it the Dickin-Sinclair Report?
SINCLAIR: Because I'm the real brains of the outfit. Besides.
it's euphonous.
DICKIN: What's a euphonous?
SINCLAIR: (Incredulous.) And you take Creative Writing?
DICKIN: What does incredulous mean?
SINCLAIR: Look it up.
DICKIN: How do you spell it?
SINCLAIR: "i" something.
DICKIN: You what?
SINCLAIR: (At top of voice.) "i" something!
DICKIN: You something?
(Sinclair murders Dickin, retitles report the Sinclair Report.)
DICKIN: Wait a minute! Dickin should murder Sinclair.
SINCLAIR: We'll compromise. I'll murder you but still title
the report the Sinclair-Dickin Report.
DICKIN: That's a fair deal if you'll throw in Boardwalk and
Park Place.
SINCLAIR: Whaddya mean? I got six hotels on Boardwalk.
I'm getting thirty thousand dollars out of you every time you
land on it.
DICKIN: Oh.
SINCLAIR: Well, we still have this stupid report.
DICKIN: If you think the report is stupid, you should see the
people who read it.
SINCLAIR: I don't think anybody reads it.
DICKIN: I read it.
SINCLAIR: So do I!
DICKIN: They never did publish our letter to the editor, did
they?
SINCLAIR: You'll have to change that line, Dickin. It was
published after this report was written. This report sure was
written a long time ago.
DICKIN: Well, we need an idea.
SINCLAIR: Why don't we do one on the creation of the
Sinclair-Dickin  report.  We  could put  it  in   the  form of a
dialogue.
DICKIN: You come up with some useless ideas, don't you?
SINCLAIR: Do you have a better idea?
DICKIN: No.
SINCLAIR: This pen of yours skips.
DICKIN: (Incredulous. He has looked it up.) Are you writing
this down?
SINCLAIR: No.
ipS 2WO
Friday, March 20, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY BULL DURHAM
a play by
Jeremy   Newson
Much of the "theatre" which is placed
before us these days in the name of
"experiment" often turns out to be of interest
only to those involved or those well versed in
the intricacies of the medium. Too often the
essential element of "entertainment" for the
audience is overlooked in the search for new
forms of expression. Last Wednesday at noon
in the Old Auditorium, an experiment was
conducted, not in form or artistic expression
or any of the other cliches but an experiment
in entertainment.
Bull Durham, the western face which
appeared previously this year in the F.W.
Theatre, played to a full house of noon-time
trip-seekers. They were taken away by the
liveliest piece of entertainment to hit this or
any other local stage in many a sunset.
Written by campus playwright Jeremy
Newson and directed by John Gray, the play
is a series of ten essentially opposed scenes
tied together by songs that must have
floated to Mr. Newson by way of a polluted
river somewhere in the Ozarks and a plot line
scraped out of hooka-resin. Studded by a cast
that included David Peterson, as the brilliantly
grotty town drunk, .lace VanderVeen as the
power hungry garbage collector, Wayne
Robson as Karl, shades of Marx, mad German
scientist, Mark Perry as the power mad mayor
(typical?) and backed up by a group of
cowboys that make the "wild bunch" look
like human beings in comparison, the play
carried its audience on gales of laughter.
Each scene in the play carries with it a
different "message"; power, pollution,
political repression, social revolution, cultural
revolution, personal development, each and
every "message" that has been pounded into
our heads through films, plays, records, for
the last twenty years, is brought up and
subsequently put down. A parody on
"message plays"? Perhaps! And perhaps a
statement that everyone is fed up with
statement. It doesen't really matter because
the play accomplishes what it sets out to do,
entertain the audience.
It was obvious that the audience enjoyed
the performance at noon yesterday but also it
was obvious that the cast was having a good
time while performing and this generated a
great deal of energy for both groups. At the
end of the final scene, the audience began to
clap and sing along with the chorus of the
final song, as absolute chaos broke loose on
the stage. Everyone was having a good time,
enjoying themselves and that is what Bull
Durham is all about.
pf shree
DAL GRAUER LECTURES
PROFESSOR HARRY G. JOHNSON, who holds appointments in economics
at both the University of Chicago and the London School of Economics,
will give two Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures at UBC on MONDAY, MARCH
23 and 24. He speaks in Angus 104 at 12:30 p.m. on Monday on the
topic "FOREIGN CONTROL: THE MULTI-NATIONAL CORPORATION AND
THE NATIONAL STATE." His second lecture will be given in the Totem
residences at 8:15 p.m., Tuesday on the topic, "THE PEARSON REPORT:
PARTNERS IN DEVELOPMENT." Prof. Johnson is noted for his work in
the field of the economics of education, trade unions and the brain drain.
He is generally regarded as the most outstanding economist yet produced
by Canada.
WE MEET OR BEAT ALL PRICES AT
TYPEWRITER TOWN
Sales - Repairs - Rentals
New & Reconditioned
Typewriters & Addersf^l5
All Office Equip.
Trades   Welcome
Specializing in
Smith - Corona
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Electrics
2151 West Fourth Ave. 731-0621
CLEARANCE SALE of
JECO TAPE RECORDERS
FEATURING 80 MINUTES RECORDING
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Study
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TAPE RECORDERS and  RADIOS ARE BOTH
FEATURED  AT TREMENDOUS  SAVINGS
See   our   complete   stock   of   Jewellery   —   Watches   —   Chinese   Art   	
Souvenirs —  Gift  Items,  Etc.
BUDSON  CO.
3235 W. Broadway ASIA CENTRE 738-1854
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20,  1970 EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
Operated   by   Young   People   for   Young   People
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS - SMALL GROUPS
3 WEEKS-ENGLAND-SCOTLAND-WALES $99.00
5 WEEKS-N. AFRICA-SPAIN-PORTUGAL $179.00
5 WEEKS-SCANDINAVIA-RUSSIA $205.00
9 WEEKS-GRAND EUROPEAN TOUR $367.00
Visiting   16  Different  Countries
Food Kitty Keeps Food Costs to a Minimum
All Cooking Equipment Supplied
We   also   assist  with   Charter   Flights
For   Full   Information   &   Daltes,   Etc.,   Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744   Cambie  al  41st 327-1162
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry   Brownlee,   Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE  ON THE CAMPUS
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Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
FILM  SOCIETY:
presents:
Casino Royale
PETER SELLERS DAVID NIVEN
URSULA ANDRESS WOODY ALLEN
DIRECTED BY JOHN  HUSTON
FRIDAY & SATURDAY - 7:00, 9:30
SUNDAY - 7:00
SUB Auditorium - 50c
m*™:
*»
It's the real
wOKGa
Trade Mark Reg.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trad* marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Md
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO   (B.C.)    LIMITED
The Fairport Convention is one of Britain's more
intriguing folk-rock groups. Their latest album,
Unhalfbricking (Polydor 543.098), showcases their feeling
for that religious sense of the supernatural which pervades
British tradition. There is an air of ritual, an incantational
quality about the slow songs, and the fast ones are
unmistakenly witches' reels. Listening to the Convention
when in the right mood is like sitting in on a sacrifice at
Stonehenge. The only problem with soft rock is that it
tends to become monotonous. The creation of an original
sound with violins and mandolins and the compelling
mysticism largely overcame the repetition on this album.
Repetition may, in fact, be part of the ritual, as on "A
Sailor's Life", on which the music takes off and rises to an
almost sexual climax. And of course, there is always Sandy
Denny, whom Judy Collins calls "England's finest folk
singer". She has an eerie voice, wild and free and full of life,
and against the weirdly hypnotic background, she sounds
like the high priestess of some dark cult.
BILL STOREY
*   *   *
Selections from "The Female Prisoner". (Columbia OS
3320)
This soundtrack album is from a film by Henri-Georges
Clouzot which hasn't played Vancouver and shows little
hope of doing that. Even so, the album, containing pieces
used as background music in the film, is an interesting
display of three different musical styles.
Luciano Berio's Visage is a tour de force for singer
Cathy Berberian, which also employs electronic effects.
Aside from the word "parole", the spoken material
consists of every imaginable nuance in a fantastic
"metaphor of vocal behavior" consisting of sounds ranging
from grunts to screams, from a soft sexual purr to a
bemused hum.
Also included are the third movement of Mahler's
bittersweet late romantic Fourth Symphony as performed
by the New York Phils, under Leonard Bernstein and Five
Pieces by Anton Webern done by the London Symphony
under Pierre Boulez.
The latter is a beautiful crystal clear example of
musical pointillism and the "disintegration of music as it
was once conceived." However, considering the extreme use
of pianissimos and silence in these mini-masterpieces, the
amount of clicks, scratches, bumps, and general surface
noise in the Webern cut on my copy was almost obscene.
* *   *     -MICHAEL QUIGLEY
The rock and roll of the Fifties had a feeling which
went beyond the technicalities of the music and became
part of that decade. It was a unique feeling, and definitely
different to the contemporary musical atmosphere.
Consequently, revamped rock and roll is a difficult
proposition at best, and often gets only as far as the
technical styles of rock.
Case in point is Johnny Winter's Second Winter
(Columbia KCS 9947), a good album marred by attempts at
recreating rock. The most flagrant example is Johnny B.
Goode, which still sounds great on the old Chuck Berry
record,but loses here. The sound is good, and very similar to
the original, but the spontaneity is missing. Winter sounds
as though he feels an obligation to do the song, so that he
can get on to something he digs.
The rest of the album is more like it, and Winter really
gets it on. Vaguely Delta-grounded blues, and Winter's own
compositions make up the package, which is a good step
ahead from his first album.
His three-man back-up is tight, and Winter's
omnipresent guitar fits in well without dominating. He is
amazingly fast at times, and almost never stops, similar to
Alvin Lee's work with Ten Years After. His replacement of
guitar with electronic mandolin on one track is worth
hearing.
This sold as a three-sided record, but the fourth side is
good in its own right. Sound reproduction is excellent, and
your stylus will do things you won't believe. Try it.
-MAURICE BRIDGE
* *   *
THE GUESS WHO: American Woman (RCA Victor
LSP 4266)
I've finally figured out what the Guess Who's
"Wheatfield Soul" is all about. I mean, what better example
of Canadian indifference and fear of taking a stand on an
issue could you find than in this group's music which is an
ambivalent blend of teeny-bopper grunts and groans with
good solid rock. This isn't a bad album, yet it's not a good
one either. Ho hum. One good aspect of the album,
however, is its sound which, for RCA Victor, is
outstandingly clear. (Consider the Airplane's Volunteers,
for example, which was a real sonic dog's breakfast.)
-MARK JACQUES
pfi 4our
Friday, March 20,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY A Composition...
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VISIT OUR NEW VARSITY BRANCH - 4517 West 10th Ave-.
(1 blk.from U.B.C. Gates)
.Downtown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special U.B.C. Discount - Students and Faculty
KIT I MAT
Representatives ot School District No. 80 will
be on Campus Tuesday to Thursday,
MARCH 24-26
for interviewing with respect to teaching possibilities in Kitimat.
Persons interested in teaching positions are invited to make an appointment for an interview
through the Office of Student Services (Placement).
Interviewing will be carried on 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.,
Tues., Wed. & Thurs., March 24, 25 and 26.
Fresh as a
Floiuer...
in Just 1 hour
BRING IN THIS COUPON FOR
$1.49 DRY CLEANING SPECIAL
GOOD   FOR  MONTH  OF  MARCH
2 PIECE SUITS - OVERCOATS - DRESSES - PLAIN
Any Combination of the Following:
2 TROUSERS - SLACKS - SWEATERS - SKIRTS -
pleats extra
UNIVERSITY
One hour
"mmimiine"
THE   MOST   IN  DRV  CLEANING
SHIRTS - LAUNDRY - ALTERATIONS
2146 Western  Parkway — University Square
(Nr. the Chevron Station)
228-9414
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970 Scul|
at
Print
An   exhibition  of artist  Mor:
Drawings is at the Creative Writing Di
The art of Morse Clary is'p
through this work for the Sono Nis
He designed the covers for The Ozoi
and The Suicide at the Piano by
working on the illustrations for The
Michael Yates.
Mr. Clary was born in 1940.
College, Wayne State College, and th
currently a candidate in the MFA pr
Scott College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska
from the Association of Nebraska Ar
Exhibition, and the Nebraska West E;
The first thing that strikes the
Morse Clary's sculpture, is MONUME
By monumentality, I mean th
from a sculpture when certain as
instance, Walnuto, in the collection c
swollen elbows and forearms seems ;
with just one of its arms. Clary has ol
Moore. Anyone who has seen one
Moore can easily see the connect:
emanating from Walnuto, and the
seeing the colossal open legs of one ol
Although Clary has borrowed i
from Moore, he uses it in a complet
Moore. Walnuto, unlike Moore's recli
and the hills that they echo, is intr
turn their pressure in opon the brain (
The wooden forms are beautil
glossy that they detract from the
themselves, instead, the finish of the
movement within the grain of the wo
(Passage of Sono N
pf 6ix
Friday, March 20, 1970
THE       U BYSSEY Clary
ture
d
Show
Clary's  Sculpture, Prints,  and
artment, UBC, until April 1.
bable best known to Canadian
ess, as a designer and illustrator.
Minotaur by Andreas Schroeder
lairier Schulte. He is currently
reat Bear Lake Meditations by J.
e has studied at Chadron State
University of Idaho, where he is
>ramme, and has taught at Hiram
id elsewhere. He has won awards
]lubs, at the Nebraska Five State
ibition.
•*
'iewer upon seeing and touching
TALITY.
feeling of power that emanates
cts of it are emphasized. For
J. Michael Yates, with its muscle
though it could level a building
iously been influenced by Henry
f the many reclining figures of
i between  the  monumentality
onumentality that one feels on
loore's figures.
least some of his monumentality
/ different context than that of
ng figures, that open to the sky
pective, the huge crushing arms
the figure.
ly finished, but they are not so
>owerful impact  of the  forms
;ulpture brings out the powerful
-TIM WILSON
i ijSittiiikt.'' x_
(Jonah and the Whale- Thermograph)
-Collograph)
(Walnuto-Walnut)
pi 7even
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970 Zabriskie Point
Michelangelo Antonioni's first film since
Blow-up is Zabriskie Point, and what it amounts to
is a rather precise dissection of that wormy corpse
of democratic idealism, American society. This is
not to say that democratic idealism is worth
anything anyway, because it probably isn't, but
that's the concept the country was supposedly
founded on, and Antonioni uses it rather bemusedly
as a guideline for his cinematic scalpel.
The explosive political situation in the United
States is a worried point of contention at this
geographical point in time, and for this reason, it is
a welcome change to find someone deal with it from
a relatively unpolarized point of view. Antonioni
does not tip the balance in any one direction, but
shows both sides (or all sides) as would an
uninformed onlooker, which perhaps he is. What he
lias done, however, is bubble to the surface all the
decadence, perversity and absurdism of U.S. society;
even in those things which we still regard as good,
such as love, or, if you insist, freedom.
The story is a sort of love story about a young
man and young lady who have a fleeting, albeit
erotic, encounter in the desert of Death Valley. The
relationship between the two is counter pointed by
the scene around them. Their lush young bodies
rolling naked in the dry sand are contrasted with the
bleeding young bodies crawling on the pavement of
campus riots, just as the barrenness of the desert
hills coincides with the mechanical landscape of Los
Angeles. In some ways the landscapes of Zabriskie
Point repeat the theme of Antonioni's 1956 film
L'Awentura in which the bare rocks and pounding
waves of the sea reflect a lostness—both physical
and metaphysical—and a pointlessness for the
protagonists. In Zabriskie Point there is no sea, only
rocks and concrete and sand, but the point is the
same.
As with all his films, Antonioni pays close
attention to the visual detail of this landscape, and
even, in the end, does some blowing up of a
different kind. The last minutes of Zabriskie Point
are-conceptually and visually—nothing short of
spectacular.
Zabriskie Point is now at the Studio.
four hims
By FREDERICK T. R. CAWSEY
There are, at this time, four high-calibre,
entertaining films playing in Vancouver. This is, of
course, a rare but welcome turn of events. Not all
high-calibre films are entertaining (there are those
which present themselves as SERIOUS films), and
not often do four of them appear at once. What
follows is a conglomerate review of the quartet; a
fairly favorable review, as there is really no point in
expending energy on bad films, given the time of
year and the limited amount of space available.
They Shoot Horses
They Shoot Horses Don't They?—those five
words—sum up the blackest, funniest metaphor I've
ever heard to describe the human condition. And
the film of the same name, now showing at the Park
Royal, is the bizarre proof of the axiom. Jane
Fonda and Michael Sarrazin head an excellent cast
in what proves to be an intense dramatization of
Horace McCoy's 1935 novel, from which the film
derives its name.
It is the Depression. A chance to win $1,500
lures losers to Marathon Dances, which turn out to
be side shows designed to cash in on the misery of
the participants and to just what extreme degrees
individuals will humiliate themselves if the need is
great enough is shown in They Shoot Horses Don't
They? Footraces, amateur talent shows spontaneous
marriages are what is expected of contestants, and
most are so desperate they quickly give in.
The thematic link with the title—and the
metaphor—is provided in the opening and closing
sequences of the film, with a straight month of
agonizing marathon filling in the rest.
Director Sydney Pollack keeps the pressure on
throughout the film, keeping the viewer inside the
dance hall most of the time, and cutting in occasional
flash forwards which build the anticipation of what
comes at the end. In an almost voyeuristic way, the
audience is given a close up view of the miserable
existences of the contestants; their cots to sleep on
during 10 minute breaks; their soiled clothing; and
their physical and mental breakdown as the
marathon drags on.
It will upset you, or amuse you. Either way, it
will keep you glued to the screen.
Patton
"No bastard ever won a war by dying for his
country. He won it by making the other poor dumb
bastard die for his country ..."
Those are the words, or a reasonable facsimile,
of General George S. Patton Jr., the meanest,
mouthiest and most effective general the U.S. had
during WW II. His film biography Patton is now
showing at the Capitol, and should not be missed.
If the film is interesting, it owes it to Gen.
Patton himself; if the film has any meaning, it owes
that too to the man. Patton was a rebel and a
soldier; he read the bible and believed in
reincarnation; he loved war and believed in the
honor and reaffirmation of man. He also wore ivory
handled six-guns and swore a hell of a lot.
George C. Scott, a brilliant actor, is outstanding
in the title role of thie film. Scott brings to life the
strange combination of paradoxes that was Gen.
Patton and plays them to the hilt.
Patton was a tank man. He read Rommel's
book on tank warefare and defeated him in North
Africa. He was unsurpassed in his knowledge of
battle history dating back to the Greeks and
Carthaginians and believed he was sent by God to be
a great battle chief.
On the way he incurred the wrath of the
newspapers and consequently of a large number of
citizens. He once clouted a GI for cowardice; he
lost his command. He couldn't seem to control his
mouth; he was almost sent home before his most
spectacular victories in the south of France.
Patton was an incredible egotist and the movie
is his ego trip. He was a legend long before the end
of the war and backed up his swagger with fanatic
insistence and persistence in victory.
Aside from the entertainment value all good
war films have, Patton is an interesting document on
the philosophy and mythology of war. Just as the
Romans and Medieval warriors had a dress ritual
before a battle, so did Gen. Patton. He believed in
the honor of troops doing battle on the field;
missiles for him held no reaffirmation of man's good
as did troop warfare, after a war with these wonder
weapons there are only the dead and the living, no
heroes, he said.
The whole psychology of the film is geared to
this type of thought, and George C. Scott is such a
consummate actor, and the film is so well done that
it wDl make believers of a lot of people.
•pC Sight•
Friday, March 20, 1970
THE       U BYSSEY four films
z
That widely acclaimed political film Z is still
jolting viewers at the Varsity. Although the film has
been dealt with at some length already in these
pages, another point of vie w seems necessary, as the
previous reviewer apparently has no understanding
of the need for dramatic sensibility in film. Z is a
film about real people and historical events of
recent years. It examines the aftermath of a major
political crime—the Lambrakis Affair—in which
Opposition Deputy Gregonos Lambrakis is run over
as he leaves a meeting of The Friends of Peace,
where he has given an address protesting the
installation of Polaris missiles in Greece. Lambrakis
dies, and a young judge gathers enough evidence to
indict the police and military officials responsible
for the assassination. During the investigation, the
film unearths some of the squalid facts of life in a
totalitarian regime. In the end. all the witnesses die
before the trial, the country is thrown into an
uproar and the military forces stage a coup.
Z is not just an objective newsreel rehash of
events in the recent history of Greece—it doesn't
pretend to be-but a drama, on a personal level,
revealing the tensions which affect people involved
in political intrigue. The principals of both
sides—the left and the right—are not just faceless
names in newspapers or distant television forms, but
are shown in close-up as sweating, breathing and
bleeding individuals, and this is where the power of
the film lies. That is what creative film is about,
point of view, and without it, no strength is
possible. In this way, Z is very well calculated, and
only once does director Costas-Gravas carry his
point of view too far. For some reason he overworks
the scenes showing the bereaved wife (Irene Papas)
of the assassins' victim. Costas-Gravas has already
made his point adequately, and although Miss Papas
can be convincing, her tears here seem too obviously
measured to elicit the required response. Other than
that the film is successfully designed and arouses
just the desired degree of indignation, while
remaining cinematieally solid. The camera work
throughout is excellent, especially some of the
inventive cuts and scene shifts.
It is a very good film. Whether or not you ;]re
politically inclined, you should see Z.
>p{ 9ine.
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE
COMPANY
Slawomir    Mrozek's
Black Comedy
TANGO
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8:30   nightly   to   April   3.
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CHINA
"One Fourth Of Humanity"
Widely Acclaimed  Colour Documentary
Produced by Journalist and Author EDGAR SNOW
(Formerly   Associate   Editor  of   Saturday   Evening  Post)
• EARLY STRUGGLES FOR NATIONAL UNITY
• TECHNOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL ACHIEVEMENTS
• INTERVIEWS WITH CHINA'S TOP LEADERS
Plus "BETHUNE" (By National Film Board)
8:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 24th
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
TICKETS: STUDENTS $1.00
At All Vancouver Ticket Centres or At The Door
Do You Know This Man?
BROWN HAIR, BLUE EYES, HEIGHT 5'7",
WEIGHT 150 LBS. AGE-27 YRS.
SUBSTANTIAL
REWARD
is    offered    for   verified    information    j*
leading to the  location  of
Deryl Lee Benton
and eventual family consultation
Call Randall W. Chatfield
1200 Failing Bldg.
Portland, Oregon. 97204
or Call Collect 228-8341
Li '
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
THE SCIENCE COUNCIL OF CANADA has asked that
one graduate student in Science or Engineering and one
graduate student in the Medical sciences from UBC attend
a national meeting in Ottawa, May 4, 1970, to discuss
NATIONAL SCIENCE POLICY GOALS as related to
present educational policies.
It is expected that successful applicants will compile and
present a brief at the Conference. A full report to the
GSA must be made on their return.
Application forms and further information may be obtained
from the GSA office in the Graduate Centre and should
be returned there or to the Secretary, GSA, Miss Joyce
Stapleton, Dept. of Biochemistry, no later than 5:00 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 25.
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970 diot
(pOOfL
RITES OF SPRING
OM  Sri   Ram je   Ram je jc
Ram OM
First day of Spring is Fri.
20.
FESTIVAL '70
WRITES OF SPRING
OM Sri, Ram jc Ram je je
RamOM.
Friday, March 20 is the
first day of spring.
Celebrations and invocations
on University Beach from
noon unto sun-set.
HOLI, the Hindu Festival
of Colour: Mantra Singing,
Reading of the Upanishads,
Dusk Event Procession to the
Beach from SUB starts at the
lunch hour.
SING:   Song   to   Bring   Fair
Weather (Nootka).
You, whose day it is, make it
beautiful.
Get     our     your     rainbow
colours.
So it will be beautiful.
***NEW FAERY   TALES
MAGICK    TELLINGS    by
Arnold   Saba,   Kurt   Hilger.
Fred Cawsey.
TUES. 24-THURS. 26 12:30
- 1:30.
On    the    Lawn    north    of
Buchanan
If it Rains, in the Fine Arts
Lounge.
Sponsored by the Fine Arts
Dept.
Norbie     or     Quickley    or
someone:
Can you fit in a plug in PF
for My Indole Ring-they're
playing noon this Friday in
the old auditorium at a price
of 50 cents. The thing is to
make money for them — it's
not a benefit or anything, but
considering the number of
benefits they have done, it
would be good if they kept
on their feet and solvent and
all like that. Can you put in a
plug — they've got something
in Tween Classes, but could
use something more.
LESLIE—otherwise known as
ROSIE- otherwise known as
MISS ELVIRA FINCH
M1SSE
pS lOeni
a film by
allocking
amamed
couple
Technicolor" I
".. PIERCING AND UNFORGETTABLE, A RICH,
MANY LEVELLED EXPERIENCE .."
— Saturday Night
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— Knelman, Globe & Mail
".. SO FUNNY AND L0VEABLE, SAD AND TENDER
... UNDOUBTEDLY THE MOST IMPORTANT
FEATURE FILM MADE IN CANADA TO DATE .."
— Mikos, Star
£ *   ...thejones they're not
Starts WEDNESDAY
FINE ARTS
CINEMA
1117 W.Georgia St.
^^H^jwffl^^
WA RN I NG- "Repeated
use of very coarse
language."
R. W. McDonald,
B.C. Censor
ANTONIONI'S
iiilMllllk Jll urn
"ANTONIONI
AT HIS
CREATIVE BEST!
Haunting,
meaningful,
dynamically
contemporary—
about the powder
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United States,
seen warped by
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and false values."
—Cot MiuIm
IMGM
^"ffljffiffl^^
GRANVILLE AT SMITHE—68J-15M
"Coarse    language,    a    nude,
suggestive scene."
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Censor
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THEATRE  INFORMATION
681-4255
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THE MOVIE PATTON  IS AS FASCINATING AND TERRIFYING A  STUDY OF THE
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including
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■   DOCTOR ZHIlftGO I j
PATTUJi
A Satiilw to a Rebel
vVARNING   Much   swearing   ar.d   coarse   language
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
EVENINGS    8:00    P.M.
SUNDAY THROUGH THURSDAY $2.50
FRIDAY,  SATURDAY &  HOLIDAYS J 3.00
MATINEES  2:00  P.M.
WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY,  SUNDAY &  HOLIDAYS
PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED   683-2634
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MATS 2 00 SAT., SUN.
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EVENINGS 8:15
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SAT., SUN., WED.
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LOUGHEEDMALL EVENINGS
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SAT.,   MON.,  TUES.  12:45
255.   5:00,   7:15,   9:25
SUN.   2:45,   4;55,   7:00,   9;15
DELTA 3>tive-Jn        ,
i mile: south cf fraslr street bridge
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"THEY SHOOT HORSES
DON'T THEY?"
PARK ROYAL A
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suggestive scene."
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STUDIO
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3RANVILLE AT SMI"! HE—683-1511
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NO ASMirTANCI TO
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20,  1970 a
Juweat
reacting
Auweat
tfo'hpJ
Latest feature in the series of poetry
readings presented by the Department of
Creative Writing at the University of Britisli
Columbia is an appearance by Andreas
Schroeder, one of the most dynamic and
versatile figures on the Canadian cultural scene
— "a member of a race of young writers unique
in the tradition of Canadian letters —
cosmopoitan, multilingual, multimedial, enfant
terrible".
His first book of poems, The Ozone
Minotaur, was publiished last year by the Sono
Nis Press in Vancouver, and his first volume of
fiction, Sprung Traps, is forthcoming from the
same publishers this year. His poetry is
anthologized in Contemporary Poetry of British
Columbia, (Sono Nis, Vancouver, 1970), The
New Generation of Poets, (Black Sun,
Brooklyn, 1969), West Coast Seen, (Talon
Books, Vancouver 1969) and the Poets of the
Northwest, (New Orleans Review). Since 1967
his poems have appeared internationally in
several dozen magazines and journals, including
Prism International, (Canada) Mundus Artium,
(U.S.A.) New Measure, (England) Poetry
Australia, Poesie Vivante, (Switzerland) Poet,
(India) and Malahat Review.
Equally various are his contributions to
film and the media. He managed the production
of the feature film, The Plastic Mile; he was also
camera-man and script writer for Immobile, and
is currently scripting, producing and directing a
feature-length movie, The Pub, in Vancouver.
Schroeder is an experienced performer. He
has had engagements at many B.C. colleges and
high schools, and other cultural centres, most
recently at the Vancouver Art Gallery, the
University of Victoria, and the B.C. Institute of
Technology. His Thursday night reading will
feature both poetry and short fiction, read with
electronic backing and special effects. That's
Thursday, March 26, at 8:30 p.m. in Bu. 106.
-PAUL GREEN
■p£ 11 lev en.
FOR STUDIENTS
& THEIR DATES
FREE MIDNIGHT
PREVIEW...
All you need is
your identity
card • ••
POSITIVELY NO
ADMITTANCE
AFTER SHOW
STARTS!
WITH THE
UNINHIBITED SEVENTIES
COMES
DUE TO LIMITED
CAPACITY, r-IRSJT
COME FIRST SERVED
He's not worried
about his future.
He's almost got it made. A different hunk of youth on the make
and rising fast. He wheels his camper wide open with one
hand, keeps the other free for action.
But when he speaks, you listen. You wonder about the freaky
things you hear and the people he raps with.
Then some rich dirt begins to spill about the doctor's murdered
wife and they give this dude the broom—and he shakes up
the place pretty good.    	
YOUR EYES
WONT BELIEVE
ALL YOU HEAR
mGOULD dianaMULDAUR kathlien CROWLEY robert COLBERT
Went., SIDNEY J FURIErtHAROlDBUCHMAN Prcd-.ceo t> BRAO DEXTER D-ected s,-SIDNEYJ FURIE   in COLOR
SPi'lMCuNl PICTj-t
TONIGHT
at 11:45 p.m.
ORPHEUM
Friday, March 20, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY Labyrinth Theatre
And even more far out freaky experimental
theatre and... is being brought out to
campus this coming week again . . . SO:
Don Soule of the Theatre Dept., along with
colleagues Norman Young, Ian Pratt, Richard
Kent-Wilcox and a group of students are
enticing us to come "Inside the Ghost
Sonata" nes Monday evening and for two
weeks after that.
In what he describes as "a theatre
labyrinth", Soule plans to adapt Strindberg's
original play into a multi-media theatre
experience. "Although it is in may ways
realistic, it is also in many ways quite
non-realistic. It is a semi dream-play." The
play, he feels, calls forth this multi-media
approach.
Soule received a grant from the university
this year to explore into various experimental
staging techniques for contemporary theatre,
to probe the resources of the stage in terms of
new alternatives to the traditional concept of
theatre. In this production therefore, he has
incorporated numerous concepts springing
from other media ... in the effort to create a
more total theatre experience. The "stage -
actually the whole Somerset Studio - has
been remodeled into a complete environment;
consisting of numerous "space units" of
varying sizes. The actors, as well as the
audience will be moving around freely in these
spaces', i.e. they will be "right inside" the
piay, as the title suggests, rather than "viewing
it from far-away seats. This mutual constant
body proximity will encourage direct
participation in the play by everyone.
Other imported media - films, tapes, etc.
- will also contribute to the total
environment effect. The original play will
thus, of course, be very broken up into
individual fragments - image impressions —
designed to call forth a more immediate,
primary sensual rather than a plot-oriented
reaction to the play. The three main scenes,
however, will be presented, somewhat intact
- in the main "space of the environment.
"These scenes will offer people a minimal
plot-line to hold on to, but leave them free to
roam and experience their own kind of thing
at the same time," Soule outlined, very much
of it or very little."
As a result of this environment make-up,
the audience will have to be limited to about
sixty people.
Soul's main interest in this whole research
project is the relationship between the theatre
- which uses the human body as the tool of
expression — to the pure media, such as film
and tape, which are totally artificial images.
'"I'd like to see if I can edit bodies and media
together in such a way, that we get a more
complete image." Thus we will be seeing
things like actual actors walking out of view
and then reappearing on a film screen.
The cast also has been working on this
production . . .
Flash Flash Flash . . . a bomb alarm has
just gone off and we must clear the building
immediately!! So this article can
unfortunately not be finished
But go see the play anyway. It opens
Monday at the Somerset Studio.
-NORBERT RUEBSAAT
Well, it was quite a struggle, but we did make it this week. During
production of this rag Wednesday we were interrupted for more than a
few minutes by a bunch of weird cops and firemen who said they were
looking for a bomb and kicked everybody out of SUB. That made us
late at the printers who have to have the copy Wednesday night if they
are going to get it out by Friday (ah, the many and varied wonders of
typography). On the way we had the pleasure of consuming a pizza or
two at Boston Pizza on Tenth, where we were impressed with the food
and surroundings, but we did make it as you can see, and were helped
along the way by David Bowerman, who took pictures of Morse Clary's
prints and of the play Bull Durham, while the Roon took pix of Clary's
sculpture (seen in this week's centrespread), Tim Wilson, next year's PF
chief, was along with valuable assistance too, as was Norbie Ruebsaat,
who took off in a fright without finishing his assignment (see this page).
Michael J. Quickley came in with some lustful muzak for one of his
lovelies to round out the week's offering. One more this year and . . .
That's all Folks.
F.C.
■pf I2welvei
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Are you sure that you are not missing out?
Enquire about the Regular Officer Training
Plan or, the Medical Officer Training Plan or,
the Dental Officer Training Plan.
Visit, Phone or Write
THE CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
PHONE 666-3136
Going Away
This Summer?
COME
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Phone 224-4391 or 228-2980
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20,  1970 Friday, March 20,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  21
Yacht club
parking lot
plans get
no action
from city
council
By GINNY GALT
Vancouver city council won't make
any decisions on the Royal Vancouver
Yacht Club's bid to build a parking lot
off Pioneer Park until a decision from
the board of variance has been received.
Council heard delegations for and
against the proposed parking lot
Tuesday, but decided to table the whole
matter until a report came in from the
board of variance which met Thursday
afternoon.
The results of the board of variance
meeting were not available at press time.
The issue is a development permit
application by the Royal Vancouver
Yacht Club to fill—beyond the existing
high water mark—property occupied by
the RVYC to provide a 1 79 car off-street
parking area for the exclusive use of
RVYC members.
In support of the proposal at
Tuesday's council meeting were the
RVYC and Point Grey resident L.
Ireland.
The opposition was UBC's Alma
Mater Society, Sierra Club of B.C.,
Norman Freshwater on behalf of
residents, Citizen's Council on Civic
Development, Point Grey Road and
Cameron Avenue Ratepayers
Association, and M.Baker on behalf
of petitioners.
RVYC filed its redevelopment
application with the technical planning
board on Jan. 30, 1970 which approved
the application but withheld the permit
To page 23: see PARKING
GOING TO
A BALL ?
and    need    a    new   gown?
a yet undiscovered design
genius has sewing machine, but
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Op«n Fin Doyi a W—k—Friday until 9.I Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
Weedkiller ban
asked by SPEC
The Society for Pollution and Environmental Control is asking
B.C. Hydro customers to send notes to B.C, Hydro protesting their
use of a number of herbicides in clearing powerline right-of-ways.
Notes containing a large black spot symbolic of a "plague" of
herbicides should be sent along with power bills.
The herbicides, 2, 4, 5-T and picloran, have been banned in
various areas of the United States because of potential danger that
they may cause birth defects.
Hydro   assumes   that  until   these  chemicals  are  completely
proven  to be harmful they can be used, SPEC president Derrick
Mallard said.   "But it is the whole approach of our technological
society toward using such discoveries that is harmful."
SPEC is asking B.C. Hydro to stop using the herbicides near
human habitation for at least a year.
During this time, said Mallard, Hydro should conduct
extensive ecological research to find a better method.
Mallard said Hydro is not aware of any alternatives because it
has never tried to find any.
INSIDE THE GHOST SONATA
a   mixed-media   theatre   labyrinth
based  on  August  Strindberg's   play
March 23 - April 4
in  the
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Student Tickets $1.00
Reservations — 228-2678
or  Room  207  —   Frederic Wood  Theatre
Wanted!
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Give number and dates of accident in last 5 years,
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Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA Friday, March 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
'Parking lot isn't a progressive step'
From page 21
until the adjoining property owners had
been notified of theboard's approval.
As of March 16, 24 communications
had been received from individuals in
favor and two from organizations; 53
had been received from individuals
opposed, 12 from organizations and one
petition representing 104 persons.
Six appeals have been filed with the
board of variance. Under section 573 of
the Vancouver city charter, the board of
variance is given exclusive jurisdiction to
hear and determine appeals by persons
who disagree with a technical planning
board decision on the question of
zoning.
The land in question is provincial
land on lease to RVYC until 1980 for
floats and boat moorage purposes only.
The provincial government can cancel
the lease at any time if it feels the land is
not being used in the interest of the
public.
Alderman An: Phillips said a letter
was in the mail from deputy minister of
lands David Bortwick stating that the
provincial government will not make any
decisions or changes in the lease until
hearing the city's position on this
matter.
RVYC    representative   A.   J.
Forsyth  said  the  proposed parking lot
would be landscaped and would include
a public walkway.
"There hasn't been any access from
the upper part of Pioneer Park to the
foreshore for 20 years. Since there has
been none, our development will include
a sloping walkway across the face of the
cliff," said Forsyth.
"The point isn't that we may or may
not have access on the rim of Pioneer
Park, the point is that we don't want a
parking lot there," said Point Grey Road
and Cameron Avenue Ratepayers
Association rep Marjorie Dallas.
"We are unalterably opposed to
putting a private parking lot on a beach
which belongs to the public," Dallas
said.
"In any case the RVYC has
outgrown its space, perhaps it could be
relocated in False Creek sometime in the
next ten years."
William Chalmers of the Sierra
Club of B.C. said the purpose of his club
is to fight for environmental
improvement and to combat air and
water pollution.
Forsyth said that by club regulation,
no member boats are permitted to
discharge effluent into the Coal Harbor
area.
Point Grey resident L. Ireland
supported RVYC.
"I'm not a member of RVYC, but
both my kids have taken sailing lessons
through their summer program. I admire
the   facilities   that   are   made   available
because of the club," she said.
AMS president Tony Hodge presented
a brief to council.
"Students are currently concerned
over a development project not totally
unlike the proposal under debate today,
(referring to the Parks Board's proposed
development plans for around the tip of
Point Grey).
"Students should deservedly be
labelled hypocrites if their so-called
concern for community development
was confined to areas which happened to
be located directly beside university
grounds," Hodge said.
Hodge said the parking lot proposal is
not in line with the plan to gradually
acquire all the land on the north side of
Point Grey road for parks purposes.
"From discussions with the
properties and insurance department of
City Hall I was led to believe that the
city council was committed to a
waterfront park and roadway scheme for
this area."
Hodge said a landscaped bank, an
asphalt parking lot or a roadway fringed
on the outside with rip-rap hardly offers
a desirable alternative to a pebbly beacl
"I don't believe that .j parking lot on
Pioneer Park is a progressive step. I do
believe the citizens of this city want
their beaches kept natural and
unmolested."
Last Training Class
For
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Meet   in
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March 23rd, Noon
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did you?
You don't have to leave HOME to enjoy new motoring
products and services. We have a special understanding of
British Columbia motoring needs, so we're usually way
ahead with products that fill those needs.
Products like HOME Premium gasoline with its detergent
additives to give you a cleaner engine-for easier starts,
better mileage, longer engine life. Products like HOME Exel
Long Life Motor Oil. Up to 6,000 miles of protection
against rust, engine deposits and wear.
Go HOME just once. There are 298 HOME Oil Service
Stations throughout British Columbia, so wherever you are,
you're not far from HOME. And you'll find we try harder.
Apply for a HOME Credit Card.
Write, or phone HOME-685-9131.
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400   ONE   BENTALL  CENTRE.   505   BURRARD  STREET.   VANCOUVER  I.   B.C.
HOME Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
Spring Vietnam mobilization
culminates in April parade
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Labor does not intend to be
the scapegoat in a phony war
against inflation when a major
cause of inflation is the war
against Vietnam.
This was the message brought
to the Vietnam Action
Conference Feb. 28 by Ray
Haynes, executive secretary of
the B.C. Federation of Labor.
Haynes pledged the full support
of the federation for the spring
mobilization against the war.
The Vancouver march will
assemble at 10:30 a.m. at the
CNR station and march to the
courthouse.
Over 100 people, representing
labo;. women's liberation, the
NDP, high schools, universities,
deseners and draft resisters, and
churches, participated in the
conference.
Some of the other events
planned for this spring are: a
picket and "speak out" at the
Dow Chemical Office, 796
Granville, March 21: a protest at
Abortion
caravan
on  its way
Vancouver Women's Caucus
representative Dawn Carroll left
March 15 for Ottawa on the first
leg of a cross-Canada tour to help
co-ordinate a national abortion
campaign.
The campaign to remove
abortion from the criminal code
began publicly in Vancouver with
a demonstration on Valentine's
Day.
A car caravan, carrying a coffin
in memorial to the thousands of
women who die each year from
illegal abortion will leave
Vancouver April 29 and arrive in
Ottawa May 9, stopping in cities
along the way.
The abortion campaign will
culminate on Mother's Day, May
10, with a major demonstration in
Ottawa staged by concerned
women from all over Canada.
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the legislature in Victoria, March
25 or 26; a draft resisters picnic
March 28; arid a courthouse
theatre demonstration, March 29.
On April 2, "In the Year of the
Pig" will be shown at Vancouver
City College. Two picketing
demonstrations   are   planned   in
front of B.C. Hydro April 4 and
U.S. Navy ships docked at
Centennial Pier on April 11.
The main protest on April 18
will be preceded on April 17 by a
candlelight procession sponsored
by the World Peace Congress
Symposium ad hoc committee.
Gallivanting president
praises  food services
By ELVIRA FINCH
Food services can't be all bad.
That's the impression The Ubyssey got after talking to Stewart
Saxe, president of Canadian University Press.
Saxe, who breezed into town recently to attend a conference
of noted dignitaries and university press gurus, said he travels all over
the country and eats often at other student union buildings.
"I get the impression that food services here really tries to
make good hamburgers,'" Saxe said.
Saxe, described by a colleague as being "always somewhere
between Ottawa and Edmonton," plans to return to the coast in the
near future to again sample SUB cuisine.
THEA KOERNER  HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
First Annual General Meeting
The first Annual General Meeting of the Graduate
Student Centre will be held on Wednesday, March
25, 1970 at 12:30 p.m. in the Lower Lounge of the
Centre. Nominations are now open for student members of the Board of Directors. Nominations close on
March  23.   Elections take place on March  26.
Wear
TUXEDO RENTALS
10%  UBC Discount
JIM   ABERNETHY    MANAGER
2046 W. 41st       263-3610
AFRICAN STUDENTS
PRESENT
tomtom
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SAT. MARCH 28 AT l.H.
7 p.m. Dinner (Canadian)
9 p.m. Dancing to the
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Dinner and Dance $3.00
Dance only $1.50
in advance from l.H.
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SOUND Friday, March 20, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 25
—marc kenton photo
NO, IT HAS no significance. It's just Lynda Walman and five seagulls on the beach.
Rankin reveals plan
to spread empire
Vancouver city council is directly involved in a plan to bring
investment by American corporations to B.C., alderman Harry
Rankin revealed Monday.
Last week, at an "in camera" meeting closed to the public and
the press, city council voted to participate, at a cost of $195,000 to
the city, in a survey to bring about a "national and international
focus of attention on Vancouver" and to "increase confidence in the
area and attract new development," said Rankin, in his weely
column for the Committee of Progressive Electors.
The survey, expected to cost $725,000, is to be carried out
under the direction of the Ford Foundation which will pay half the
cost of the survey.
UBC and the greater Vancouver regional district will
contribute the remainder of the cost, said Rankin.
His reasons include his opposition to making decisions of this
kind in secret, and "to making a study just to help big corporations
determine where they can most profitably invest their own money."
"The kind of study project we need in Vancouver is one whose
starting point will be what the people of Vancouver need in the way
of low cost housing, rapid transit and pollution control."
Musicians,
young, play
Young Musicians' Noon Series,
a series of monthly concerts
designed to give young musicians
a chance to play in public, will
begin Tuesday, March 31.
A quintet, composed of the
principal clarinettist and string
players of the Senior Division of
the Vancouver Youth Orchestra
opens the series.
The concerts, beginning at
12:15, are free to the public.
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Weekdays—9 a.m.-9 p.m.     Sat.—9 a.m.-5 p.m. — 327-0461
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
Scandia Ski Shop Ltd.
SPRING SALE
Clearance on:-
* HART
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TOURING AND CROSS-COUNTRY SKIS AND EQUIPMENT
Also on Exclusive Ski and Apres' Ski Wear From Norway
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1804 W. 4th Ave. at Burrard 732-6426 Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 20, 1970
FRIDAY
FILM   SOCIETY
"Casino    Royale"    in    SUB    Theatre,
Friday   and  Saturday   —  7:0O   &   9:30;
Sunday—7:00
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Sea   Vue   Invitational   at   Sea   Vue   in
Blaine.    10:00    late    show.    Five    star
rating   called   the   Scavengers.
SCM
Thomas    Ogletree    in    Bu.     104    at    a
p.m.    Openings   in   Christian    Marxist
Dialogue.  Admission, stud.  50c, others
$1
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting   12:30   in   l.H.
AIESEC
Meeting    12:30    in    SUB    100A
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Poetry reading,   12:30 in clubs lounge.
NOP   CLUB
Meeting,   12:30  in  SUB 211
VCF
Meeting,   12:30    SUB   125
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Dynamics     of     Imperialism,     8     p.m.,
1208   Granville.
FILMSOC
My   Indole   Ring   concert,    12:30,    Old
Aud.
SPEAKERS    COMMITTEE
Thomas  Ogletree,   12:30   in   SUB   Aud.
Religion   and   the   Radical    impulse.
TRANSCENDENTAL    MEDITATION
Don    Freeman,    12:30,    Bu.    102.    Bliss
Consciousness and  Mind  Effects
LEGAL   AID
Every   Monday,   Wednesday,   and   Friday,   noon,   SUB   237   and   237A
SINCLAIR-DICKIN
Executive    lynching,    SUB    pit,     12:30.
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
DANCE  CLUB
Hth annual competition, 7:00-1 a.m.,
SUB   Ballroom.
SUNDAY
UBC   SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
Bay of Pigs rally, 8:30 a.m. at B-lol
75   cents   entry.
MONDAY
FOLK   SONG   SOC.
Folk Concert featuring Dick Coe, The
Oracle, Admission by donation, benefits to CKNW Orphans Fund. SUB
Ballroom,    12:30.
TUESDAY
GRAUER   LECTURES
Harry Johnson on Foregoing Control,
12:30.   HA.
GRAUER   LECTURES
Meeting,   noon,   SUB   211
PROG.   CONSERVATIVES
Harry   .Johnson   on   The   Pearson   Report.   8:15  p.m..   Totem   Residences
WEDNESDAY
UBC    SCIENCE    FICTION    SOCIETY
Elections   of   chairman,   vice-chairman
and   treasurer at   12:30,   SUB   125
UBC   KARATE  CLUB
General  meeting and elections at 7:00
in   SUB   Ballroom
FNGLISH   DEPT.
Professor   J.    W.    Lever    lectures    in
Bu     100   at   12:30   on   "Jacobean   Re
venge  Tragedy."
THE    RHO
Meeting to discuss next year's publication  in STJB 215 at noon
THURSDAY
COMMERCE    UNDERGADUATE    SOC.
16th   annual  public  speaking  competition   at   12:30   in   Henry    Angus      10
Free    coffee    and    donuts    and    door
prize.
DEPT     OF   CLASSICS
Professor Frederick Combellack —
University of Oregon. 12:30 p.m. in
Bu. 204 on "Homer's Imaginerv
Worlds".
HODGE
From page 8
contribution to the University
Community. No other student
union can say they have financed
17 per cent of the total physical
plant of the University. No other
student union has sucli a fine
Union Building as ours nor has
any other student union
contributed to such facilities as
the War Memorial Gym, the Brock
Hall, the Winter Sports Centre and
others. Yet on top of all these
physical contributions the
student government as this
university has consistently been a
leader in terms of a sensible
attitude and a sincere effort in
bettering our university, hi the
next few months you can look
forward to substantial changes
within the AMS which I believe
will give it a great deal more
effectiveness and also the
continuing of a second campus
newspapei to give you an
alternative view of the goings on
on this campus.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students,  Faculty  &  Club—3   lines,   1   day   750,   3  days   $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications OSice, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of  B.C., Vancouver  8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DAXCE   TONIGHT   TO   MILES   AT
Place    Vanier,   [>-l.    $1.00.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
14
Lost  &  Found
TAN HAT LOST IN CHEVROLET
Monday night, couple with wheelchair    hitch-hiking    on    16th   Ave.,
_224-5231.   	
GUY" IX REJJ (JON VERtIbLe
who picked up hitehers on Fri.,
please look in back scat for a
purse — address    inside.
Rides  &  Car  Pools
15
NEED HIDE FUOJI TSAWWAS-
SEN;    have    car.    Phone    Mike   —
_ 943-3540	
RH7ERS TO DENVER OOLoRA^
do.    Alter   21sl    March.   433-3781.
Special Notices
16
EXPLORE INNER SPACE—FILMS,
discussions, lectures, on the
Undersea World, Marcli 10th, 17th
and 24th, at the Vancouver Aquarium,   8:00   p.m.
BECOME A LEGALLY ORDAINED
minister. $2.00 donation, appreciated. World Life Church, Box
717-1),   Ceres,   California   95307.
BOB DYLAN'S PREVIOUSLY UN-
published Tarantula now available
UBC   bookstore   magazine   rack.
AJ>'RTO AN ST U l> i •: NT S~~P R rJ SENT
"Tom-TVi^n 1' Afrique", Sat., Mar.
28th at l.H. 7p.m. dinner (Cana.-
dian). 9 p.m. Dancing to the
sounds of Tom - Tom I'Afriuue.
Dinner & Dance, $3.00. Dance
only, $1.50. In advance from I.H.,
224-45-35.
PHOTOSOC GENERAL MEET.
Tuesday, March 24th, 12:30. Sub
245.
SEE "CASINO ROYALE", A NEW
Bond with an all-star f^ast, Fri.
and Sat., 7:00 & 9:30. Sun., 7:00.
We're still the cheapest theatre
in   town   —   only   50c.
RUMMAGE SALE TOMORROW —
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Tenth &
Crown. Point Grey De Molay
Mothers'   Club.
ANYONE OBSERVING SOMEONE
damaging right side ol a Red
Citroen in Brock lot on Sun,,
please   phone   Neil,   732-6479.
FOR   YOUR
NEXT
DANCE
if   you   want
Blue   and   Rock
you
want
MILES
For  bo
3kings
call
732-6028
or   224
-3626
Travel Opportunities 17
SCUBA    DIVER'S    DAY    TRIP TO
Gulf  Islands,   $7.50,   March  22. Ph.
Al,  224-0942,  5-7 p.m.
LEARN HOW TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON A LIMITED BUDGET.
A meeting will be held at 7:45
p.m. on Monday, March 23rd in
the auditorium of Eric Hamber
School, 5025 Willow, Vancouver
(33rd & Oak) to help all those
travelling abroad on a limited
budget. Bring along your questions and learn how to travel on
a  shoestring.
A    panel   of   experts,    including   a
qualified   travel   agent,   who   have
travelled     to     all     parts     of     the
world,   will  be  on  hand  to  talk   to
you   and    answer   all   your   questions  on  foreign   travel.
No   admission   charge  —  so   bring
your friends who are interested in
travel    and    learn    how    to    save
hundreds   of   dollars!
Canadian  Youth   Hostels Assoc.
1406   West  Broadway,  Van.    9
738-3128.
THREE ONE - WAY CHARTER
Flights to London. Leaving May
9th.   $140.   Ph.   299-4233  or 291-3144.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TO RENT 16' - 20'
Trailer, May 1-Sept.l). Purpose:
Research living quarters, Loon
Lake.   Contact  224-7128.
WANTED — TWO INEXPENSIVE
bicycles.   Ph.   683-0962   aft.   5   p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale 21
'64   BEAUMONT^V-8   STD.   RADKX
Good  condition.   $825.   Ph.   435-0732.
1967 COUGAR: "6" CHROME
wheels, belted tires, stereo tape
leek.   Good   cond.   Phone   732-8339.
1968  TRIUMPH  OT6,   18,000   MILES.
$2200.   Phone   224-9458
*68 V.W., ONLY 20,000 MILES. IN
perfect condition. Must sell. $1450
or best offer. Phone after 5 00
683-5415
1965    MGB   IN    MINT   CONDITION.
Radial tires,   new paint job,  $1150,
or  offers.   Ph.   731 -4339
1960 "BUGEYE   STOTTF7;   NEW EN-
gine: only needs clutch and paint:
call Steve at  738-9484
1969 DATSUN 1000. EXCELLENT
cond. 8-track Stereo. 733-194:,,
6:30-7:00   p.m.
Autos For Sale (Cont.)
21
1961 RENAULT, GOOD CONDITION
very economical and reliable. $225
or   offer.   Phono   Paul,   Room   428.
__ P h. _ ^24-9 720.	
RESTORED MGA, A VERY GOOL
one indeed. Going to Siberia,
must   sell.   929-1819. ' 	
68VOLKS;  PERFECT CONDITION,
radio    &    options;    ph.    Doug    221
7235,    5:30-6:30    weekdays   or   434-
4603  after  6:00   p.m.   daily.	
'61 TR3. EXCELLENT CONDITION,
new   paint.   Bruce,   733-3762.
1962 V.W., PERFECT CONDITION,
low mileage, will accept any reas-
onable   offer.   After   five,   738-5257.
$450—1962 DODGE DART 440 HARD
top,    P.S.    P.B.    auto.    Phone    988-
_0544.	
FOR SALE 1964 VIVA, $295 OR
offers, good transportation. Phone
325-0774.	
64 FALCON 6 STD, GOOD SHAPE,
must sell by end of month, best
offer.   684-0609.	
'64 PEUGEOT, $359. 4-DR. SEDAN,
4-speed syn. tran. headrest, radio,
neater, 26-31 mpg, top running
cond.   879-7997   nite  or  Sun.	
1965    MGB,    ENGINE    LIKE    NEW
_phline   224-7767.
68 VIVA DELUX, 70 H.P., DISCS^
4-speed stereo tape, 18,000 mi. $14,-
500  or  besL_ Jim,   224-1769.
56 V.W., GOOD CONDITION ALL
around.    Asking   $150.    Call    Frank
 laj^_;ibijut  11   p.m.   685-2648.	
1962 VOLVO 544 B18 MOTOR GOOD
condition, must sell, $600 or offer.
Jim,   298-7991.	
1951 FORD, FOUR COLOURED^
one owner, classic, fine condition,
inspection sticker, offers. Phone
261-2124,   Rob.
1963 FORD GALAXIE 289, V-8,
auto. 228-4178 days. $650. 1949 W.
5th,   No.   205.   Exc.   shape.
Automobiles  Wanted
22
WANTED: MINI COOPER, GOOD
running condition or a little work.
Under   $400.   Ph.   732-8448.
Automobiles—Parts
23
VW VAN RACK (USED) 6'x4'
$49.50 (Cost $125.00) Good cond.
224-9152   Evenings   and   Weekends.
Motorcycles
25
1965 YAMAHA 250 CC. LOW MILES
$250 or offer. Darrel, 224-7665,
2260 Wesbrook.	
67 SUZUKI HUSTER. NEW TRAN-
smission, excellent condition $450
with  all   accessories.   Ph.   733-6203.
FOR SALE 1969 HONDA 450, ANY
offer around $650, "really broke"
so call Kelly at 327-1086 any time^
T67 BLK HONDA 450~ 2 YR. IN
storage: under 1000 mi; immac.
cond; oversize rear tire; Girling
shocks; 2 helmets; shop manual,
etc. Owner must choose between
bride & bike; best offer. Ph. 731-
0998   after   5.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPEC-
ialists in graphs, maps, text book
illustrations,     complex     formulae.
Scientific displays advertising, phone
733-4506.
Photography
34
FOR SALE: DURST J-35 EN-
larges with 50 mm f/4 Componon
lens. Worth $125 — only $75. Ph.
228-8380  after 7.
Scandals
37
SEND YOUR AGE AND QUES-
tions for 21 pages on how and
where to meet perfectly normal
looking homosexual guys. Box
8969 Station H, Vancouver 5. (no
complaints   in   144   replies).
DANCE TONIGHT, TO MILES AT
Place   Vanier,   9-1,   $1.00.	
IS URSULA ANDRESS REALLY
James Bond? Or maybe it's
Woody Allen? Come and find out
while you laugh this weekend in
SUB  Theatre.
Typing
_ j40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (DOClT-
ments, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS".
Treacy,   738-8794.   35c   page   —   5c
EXPERIEXCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reporls etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancouver  home.   988-7228.
TYPING  SERVICES
Electric   machine
Phone:    526-9842
EXPERIENCED ELEC. HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work, reasonable
rates.    Phone   321-2102.	
FAST, ACCURATE TY'PING, ~35e
a   page;    5c    copy.    Mrs.    Stewart,
_ 733-6098.	
ESSAYS, THESE, AXTPtECHN!^
cal matter typed by experienced
secretary at my Dunbar home.
Reasonable   rates.    263-6256.
Typing (Cont.)
40
TYPING DONE—MY HOME. WILL
pick up and deliver — Richmond
area.      IBM     electric     typewriter.
277-5807.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
theses, term paper, essays, manuscripts. 6707 Angus Drive, Ker-
risdale,   266-4264.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, ESSAY'S,
theses, etc. 35c a page, 5c copy.
738-5200.
EXPERIENCED  TYPIST  — ELEC-
tric   machine.   Reas.   rates.   Phone
738-7881.
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c/
page. Essays 30c/page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Ph.
325-0545.	
NORTH VANCOUVER. PHONE
988-5420. Experienced typist. Thesis, manuscript, essay. Reasonable   rate.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist, (Italics, symbols, other types).
Experienced essay and thesis typ-
ist.   Reasonable   rates,   321-3838.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays. Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317	
GENERAL TYPING, ESSAYS,
thesis, etc. Phone 224-5963. Mrs.
Brown.	
ACCURATE ELECTRIC TYPIST,
theses, manuscripts, etc. Phone
688-7051  around  6,  after  10  p.m.
TYPING   DONE.   30c   A   PAGE.   PH.
732-9488,   Petra  Graves.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work.	
NEEDED—SOMEONE TO COME
in five afternoons a week to do
housework and cooking for professional family. References need-
ed.     224-7714.	
ATTRACTIVE WOMEN FOR
florigt firm. Evening work Wed.
to Sat. Car or driver's license an
asset.    Call    684-2618    or    684-5612.
STUDENTS TO WORK IN A SUM-
mer camp program for crippled
children. Camp dates, July 24th
to August 21st. Some financial
assistance available. Contact Mrs.
J. Preston, School of Social Work.
ATTRACTIVE. WOMAN WANTED
by florist firm for summer em-
ployment.   684-2618,   684-5612.	
NEED WORK? LEADING ADVER-
tising firm has positions available
for ambitious men and women.
Must be neat and able to meet
the public. Full or part time. Earn
$150 per week, salary & bonus.
Apply in person, 9:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.—Intern. Business Creat-
ors Assoc, 808-510 West Hastings.
YOUNG MEN INTERESTED IN
part-time work go-go dancing,
contact Mr. K. at Box 8671, Sta.
H,   Vancouver.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY —
General Secretary. Com. Aug.
1970. Salary: Open. Appl. due
Apr. 30. Information from Placement office or World University
Service of Canada, 328 Adelaide
St. West, Toronto 133, Ont. Tel.
(416)   363-3481.
INSTRUCTION
Wanted
61
EC    200    TUTOR    NEEDED,    CALL
Barb,   874-5375   after   5   p.m.   eves.
Music
62
PIANO VOICE THEORY COACH-
ing by qualified teacher. Colling-
wood   and   Fourth.   731-5459.
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats. by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00   per   hr.   Phone   733-6037   eve.
SPANISH CONVERSATION
COURSES — University Professor will offer special private summer courses, at a downtown office,
starting next May, for beginners
and advanced, inexpensive. Call
738-5692, after 4 p.m., for registration   and   to   get   planning.
Tutoring
TUTORING  IN   SPANISH,   $3   hour.
Th.   738-5692   eve.
Translations
TRANSLATIONS Spanish-English-
Spanish.   Call   738-5692   eve.
EXPERT  FRENCH  TUTORING
before     exams.     Cheap,     efficient.
Phone   Camyle,   736-0953.	
MANDARIN     BEGINNING    &     IN-
tensive     classes     by     experienced
teacher.  Call 732-0016.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YAMAHA      AMP.      AND      COMBO
Organ.   Phone   John   738-8851,   5-7
 p.m. Best offer.
"PUREBRED PEKINGNESE PUP-"
pies, gorgeous balls of fluff. Must
see   to  love.   872-1747
SONY~ 3 5 FtAI'kT)ECK WITH~To"
recorded blues .. albums. Perfect
cond. $250 (or best offer) 224-
7116.
Misc. for Sale (Cont.)
71
ROLLIFLEX TLR 2.8 F WITH
case, filter. Just $198. Ph. 738-
9471.	
LARGEST SELECTION OF 10
speed bicycles, Fren and Japanese.   As   low   as   $69.00.
THE   CYCLE  SHOP
5895    Fraser    at    43rd 327-4229
SKI BOOTS, LANGE STANDARD
10'/2,   new.   Phone   Roger,   731-8088.
HEAD MASTER SKIS, MARKER
binding 190 cm, three yrs. old.
736-9351.	
TOP QUALITY TERM PAPERS
available in most areas of the
following disciplines: psychology,
English, history, political science,
etc., etc. Essays also available.
Phone 524-1893. 7685 Hazard St.,
Burnaby, Saturday & Sunday,
March   21   &  22.	
WHITE    BRIDAL   GOWN,    TRAIN, -
veil,   size   11.   Best   offer.   731-4550
 wkend,   or   after   6:00   weekdays.
SPRING STEREO
SALE
STEREO COMPONENTS
BIG   TRADE-IN
ALLOWANCE
House of Stein Electronics
Ltd.
901  Granville
1005 Granville
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM IN OLDER
West End home. No hassels. $50
per   month.   Call   684-2618.	
FURNISHED ROOM AND FULL
cooking facilities. 2038 W. 5th.
Phone after 5 p.m. Single girl
only.    733-5156.	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE. PH.
733-5436,   $35   per   month.	
STUDENT ACCOMMODATION NR.
Campus in home. Grad student,
first-class amenities, non-smokers.
Serious students only. Any na-
tionality  welcome.   Ph.   228-9127	
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION NOW
available at the Sigma Chi House
the newest dormitory on Campus.
Summer rates on request for both
room and/or board, 5725 Agron-
omy.   224-6374   or   224-9620	
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM, PRIV-
ate bath, in lovely South Granville
home for responsible student, on
bus line, no cooking; male preferred. Available April 1. Phone
224-6090	
NEED CHEAP ACCOMMODATION
on Campus? Quiet clean rooms for
male students. $50 month, with
kitchen privileges. Clean linen &
parking. Board $45 if desired.
Close to Libraries. 224-0327 or
come to 5760 Toronto Rd.	
EXCEL. ACCOM. MALES; FULLY
furnished; W.W. carpet; T.V.
room; kitchen fac. Quiet, near
UBC.   228-8040.	
QUIET ROOM WITH ADULT
family available at end of this
month,    $40/mo.    Ph.    732-8448.	
ROOM FOR RENT IN LARGE
west end house. Shared facilities.
$50/month.   684-2618,   684-5612.
ROOM FOR RENT. PRIVATE ENT-
rance.    Phone   738-7897.	
FREE ACCOMMODATION IN RE-
turn * for light housekeeping.
Couple or 2 girls. First or second
year  preferred.   261-3595.
Room  &  Board
82
FREE ROOM & BOARD FOR GIRL
student in exchange for help with
children. Near U.B.C. gates, 224-
6192.
Furn.  Houses  &  Apts.
83
MALE ROOM-MATE WANTED —
Share Beach Avenue apartment,
summer or longer, $75 mo. Avail-
able   now.   Rod,   688-9683	
WANTED: FURNISHED APART -
ment or house for visiting physics
prof. His wife and two children
from aprox. June 10 to Sept. 10.
If interested contact Joyce Sjerve
at  263-9982	
SENIOR GIRL TO SHARE FUR-
nished apt. during summer. Phone
224-0927.	
BASEMENT BED SITTING ROOM
near Hemlock and 16th. Fully
furnished. S.C. Married couple or
male. $60 month. 738-4090 after 6
p.m.
Unf. Houses  &  Apts.
84
WANTED GTRL TO SHARE 3-
bdrm. apt. with 2 others, $60 mo.
6S5-0735,   after   6.
Accom.—Other Cities
87
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION IN
Toronto from May 11 to Sept. 11.
Rooms as low as $10 per week,
meals $10 extra. For information
and applications write Campus
Co-op. Room ill, 395 Huron St.,
Toronto 181, Ontario. Telephone
964-1961. Friday, March 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
Apo/d hoik
The year is essentially over for athletics at UBC and the
coaches will be as happy as anyone about it.
Being a coach at UBC in the system that the athletic
department is forced to work under is not all that its cracked up to
be. Coaches are pretty well required to be professors, except in a few
minor sports where there is the chance to pick up an expert in the
field.
The average professor in the physical education department
has somewhere around 18 hours of lectures, committee meetings,
grad student seminars, and other incidentals that the department
requires him to do. If, in addition, he is chosen by the Men's
Athletic Council to be a coach of a university team, he is allowed
something around 5 hours out of his teaching program to coach.
I defy you to find a coach at UBC that spends as little as five
hours per week on his team, not counting games and travelling on
weekends. But rules are rules, and until the rulers decide to do
something about it, that's the system that a coach works under.
How do coaches adapt to this ridiculous system?
The number of answers to that question is the same as the
number of coaches. At one end you have Peter Mullins, undoubtedly
one of the best basketball coaches in Canada. He manages to draw
out as much talent as he can possibly use to his team, then moulds
the best collegiate team in Canada.
At the other end of the line there are coaches who are into so
many extra committees and associations that by the time you add
on their coaching duties they don't quite make it to the classroom.
And their teams end up in fourth place.
In between there are perennial losers that keep on trying,
football being a prime example. Frank Gnup is the only coach at this
time who the phys ed department allows to be a coach first and
teacher second. Unfortunately the results have left something to be
desired, like basically a football team. Of course there are some good
football players on this campus, only a lot of them don't turn out
for the Birds. Most are scared away by the stigma which goes
something like you have to be a good loser to be on that team.
Others complain that the coaching they get (not referring to Gnup
who possesses a wealth of football knowledge) leaves a lot to be
desired. Gnup is also a great guy, and a real character invaluable to
reporters. But there must be something missing in the football
organization.
There are other coaches who win consistently, some who lose
consistently, and some who meet with mixed success. Most of them
are resigned to working under the present conditions, and while they
don't like it. they tolerate it. Most of them are at the mercy of
whatever talent shows up for their teams. The football and
basketball teams are the only ones which get a scouting budget, all
of $200 each.
The appointments to coaching jobs are made at UBC by the
Men's Athletic Committee (MAC). It is made up of student, alumni,
and faculty members, with an elected head. Unfortunately, most of
the members are pretty well resigned to agreement with Physical
Education director Bob Osborne, also a member. Hence, the
possibility of the MAC changing the system is just about nil.
Until such time as the athletic department gets out from under
the guiding hand of the great white father, Osborne, avhletics at UBC
will continue to grind on in its haphazard manner. The change to
recognize coaching, the basis of any sports program, as a full time,
highly specialized job is logically the first move in thatt direction,
but alas it appears that it is going to be quite some time before a
brave soul will come forth to challenge the stranglehold which the
phys ed department uses to keep the athletic department small time
at UBC.
RCB
New union formed
Following the lead of men's
intercollegiate athletics in Canada
the Canadian Women's
Intercollegiate Athletic Union has
been formed to promote
competition between university
women on a national scale. These
women are often the tops in their
respective fields and many
represent Canada in international
competition.
Marilyn Russell of the UBC
physical education department
was elected the first president,
and as such inherits the task of
welding it together. The union
will attempt to increase the level
of competition and hence improve
the public image of women's
sports.
For 1970-71 it is proposed to
conduct competition in
gymnastics, swimming and diving,
and volleyball. These sports have
the highest skill level across the
nation right now.
In 1971-72 basketball would
be added to the list, and probably
track and field soon after.
SAM VANDERMUELEN
.  . top athlete
Sam Vandermeulen is this
year's winner of the Bobby Gaul
Trophy for outstanding athlete of
the year.
In his outstanding four year
career at UBC Vandermeulen has
played two years of junior varsity
basketball and competed with the
UBC track team for all four years.
He has never been beaten in his
main event, the high jump, in
Western Canadian competition,
and holds the Canadian Collegiate
reord of 6'5". The JV basketball
team won the Canadian
Championships both years that he
played with them.
His track coach Lionel Pugh
said "With his enormous ability,
Sam is the quietest, most
conscientious, hardest working
person I've ever known."
Two Honorary Undergraduate
Awards were given to Bill Enefer
of the Booster Club, and Bill
McKittrick, ice hockey manager,
for their outstanding work in
athletics.
Gymnastics
performs
Tonight, the Japanese Olympic
gymnastics team will perform at
the UBC War Memorial
Gymnasium at 8:15 p.m.
The team will display all the
competitive Olympic events which
won them the gold medal at the
1968 Olympic games in Mexico
City.
The team is composed of five
men and five women who have
performed together for three
years.
Tickets are on sale at the ticket
office in the gym. Reserved seats
are $2.50 and rush are $1.50.
Car rally
The UBC Sports Car Club will
present a very novice car rally for
the uninitiated this weekend.
The only required equipment is
a par and a map of the Fraser
Valley to aid you when you get
lost.
Cars leave B lot at 8:30 on
Sunday morning. The course is
about 130 miles long and the
entry fee is 75 cents.
TRAVELLING ABROAD ?
WORKING AT HOME ?
Full complement of
SLEEPING BAGS - RUCKSACKS
HIKING and CAMPING GEAR
Work  Clothes —Boots—To  Meet  All   Requirements
3 VETS ltd
832   Main   at   Prior—free   Parking — 685-0856
Wrap up of the
big winners —men
Writing a season wrap-up of the UBC Thunderbirds' basketball
team this year becomes a process of trotting out every superlative
imaginable, and applying them to- the personnel involved . . . Let us
start with Peter Mullins.
Clearly the major factor for
which Mullins was responsible was
the tremendous spirit and good
will on the club which surely
proved beneficial. As opposed to
last year, Mullins was constantly
encouraging his players, never
failing to congratulate them on
good performances and criticizing
them only in the context of a very
real affection.
He exuded the genuine feeling
of confidence which every player
recognized and contributed to in
their own personal way. It was
this atmosphere which was
created by the players and to a
large degree by coach Mullins
which meant more than just
winning; it was an experience of
far more value.
When one considers the
players, one of the first names
that comes to mind is guard Alex
Brayden. While most of the
traditional raves have gone to
counterpart Ron Thorsen,
Brayden has been playing superb
defense, leading the fast break,
grabbing clutch rebounds he had
no business getting and handling
the duties of the captain. While
his name has not always been
prominent in the scoring
summaries, it is not inconceivable
that he may be, in fact, the most
valuable player.
Then there is Bob Molinski and
Ron Thorsen. The best way to
describe these rather talented
athletes is through the old reliable
statistic. Thorsen scored 566
points for a 20.3 average, bagged
156 assists which was good for the
WCIAA lead in both categories.
Molinski finished with an 18.9
points average, finished third on
the club in rebounds and was an
outstanding defensive performer
throughout the season. Derek
Sankey and Terry MacKay were
so improved over last year that it
becomes difficult to believe.
Combined with Molinski, the trio
bagged over 1,000 rebounds, a
first in UBC history.
And women
While the UBC Thunderbirds
were busy winning the CIAU
championships in Hamilton, the
Thunderettes were in St. John,
performing feats of no less
repute . . .
Co-coached by Norm Vickery
and Ken Shields the Thunderettes
closed their season on Saturday
by downing the Winnipeg grads
83-54 to win the Senior A ladies
Canadian championship, merely
another trinket to their credit.
Earlier the team had won the B.C.
Senior A ladies championship, the
WCIAA title and finished with a
season record of 32 wins to only 6
losses.
The eastern jaunt also included
victories over the University of
Windsor 67-35, St. John Alpines
65-36, and the University of
Alberta Jasperettes 80-38.
"The success we had was due
to everyone that worked with us
this year," said co-coach Ken
Shields, "the girls worked real
hard and Norm (Vickery) and
myself just had a great time."
The main contributors to the
success experienced by the team
were Terry McGovern, who
despite having the flu still
managed to come up with 21
points in the final against
Winnipeg. In that contest Betty
Ross chipped in 13 points while
Cathy Williams added 10.
The Thunderettes showed
admirable balance through the
tournament however as against St.
John Joanne Sargent and Brenda
McFarland led the way scoring 1 5
and 17 points respectively.
Against Windsor it was Linda
Williard and Terry McGovern with
17 and Wendy Grant dumping in
12 points.
"We shot over 50 percent from
the floor during most of the
tournament," said Shields about
the girls, "We played the best
basketball we've played all year."
PRE-INVENT0RY SALE
OF
SKIS and SKI WEAR
PARKAS   -     Down  &  Fortrel  filled 40%    OFF
SKI SLACKS and SKI SWEATERS 40% OFF
SKI BOOTS 20% OFF
MEN'S & LADIES' AFTER-SKI BOOTS
Sealskin & Nyon T/«j   Qpp
SKIS and SKI POLES 20% OFF
SALE LASTS ONLY UNTIL END OF MARCH
North Western Sporting Goods
LTD.
3715 W. IOHi Aye.
224-5040 Page 28
THE      UBYSSEY

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