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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1970

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Array Army land
in Seattle
reclaimed
by Indians
By
Peter
Ladner
SEATTLE (Special) - A third-year arts student from UBC was
among 16 Canadian Indians arrested Monday for occupying Fort
Lawton, a 1,100-acre army base in a rich residential area here.
UBC student Michelle Pierre'was just one of many Canadians
who drove down two days ago to join forces with several hundred
Indians from all over North America.
A week ago Monday about 100 local Indians scaled a bluff to
the fort, overlooking Puget Sound, and laid claim to the area for an
Indian and Alaskan native culture centre.
The Indians are reclaiming the land-due to be abandoned by
the U.S. army in July—by right of discovery.
They want to use it as a centre for native American studies, an
Indian university, a centre of ecology, a school and a restaurant
serving genuine native foods.
The invading force was rounded up and arrested by the
military police (MP's) on the base, but the Indians then started
gathering support from natives who have been occupying Alcatraz,
other local natives, and young Indians from Canada.
A second attack force scrambled up the cliff to the fort on
Sunday night. Led by five U.S. natives who had recently returned
from Vietnam, this contingent of about 100 again evaded the fort's
elaborate heat-activated radar defence system.
They were able to set up a tee-pee and get a bonfire going
before they were met by 200 MP's from the base armed with riot
To page 2: see 3,500 RIOT
VIETNAM VETERAN Gary Bray, whose leg was twisted by MPs at Ft. Lawton. Indians' actions have been
endorsed by Fraser District Indian chiefs, representing 47 bands. Many of Canadian Indians arrested for
trespassing on a military base (maximum penalty $500 or six months) were speakers at Indian WeekMarch 2-6 at
UBC. See story above.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol.LI, No. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 1970
228-2305
N'Tenure result
will establish
precedent for
future'
By SANDY KASS
English profs Brian Mayne and David Powell have still
received no official explanation as to why they were
denied tenure.
The two were, in effect, fired March 9 when acting
arts dean Doug Kenny upheld the recommendations of
the English department tenure committee.
The committee ruled that Mayne and Powell had not
met the existing publication standards and could not be
granted tenure.
Mayne believes the outcome of the current dispute
will set a precedent for similar problems in the future.
"The situation this year is a crucial one, and I feel the
future will be guided by it," he said.
"It's not so important for our futures specifically, but
for the future of the issues behind it."
No comment from Jordan
Students have voiced their opinions in petitions and
letters of protest to various faculty and administration
representatives.
At an open meeting Friday on the Buchanan steps,
students and faculty passed a motion of non-confidence in
English department head Robert Jordan.
Jordan was unavailable for comment.
"Students have a right to be involved with the people
who teach them," said Powell. "However, not much more
can be done at the moment."
No further action will take place, until administration
president Walter Gage has concluded his review of the
situation.
Gage says he is examing certain aspects of the issue
which he feels have not been given thorough
consideration.
"We have still not received any official written
statement of the reasons for which we were released," said
Mayne.
Good teaching 'crucial'
"I believe good teaching to be crucial to a good
university," said English and arts 1 prof Ian Ross.
"To make professors publish at gunpoint is not
conducive to either."
Ross has been acting on behalf of Powell and Mayne
throughout the issue.
Political science head Walter Young, a spokesmanfor
the Faculty Association personnel services committee, said
the committee has been reviewing the situation but
cannot act without administration authorization.
The committee was set up within the Faculty
Association to deal with grievances of faculty members
and defend their interests.
A closed grad student meeting Monday discussed an
ad hoc committee report on the existing tenure situation.
Recommendations
The report made several recommendations, including:
• Establishment of teaching as the primary criteria
for tenure.
• The tenure committee cease to function until it has
a systematic way to evaluate teaching effectiveness, and
until it^reads one work by each candidate.
• If tenure is denied, a candidate should be
immediately notified of the grounds for this decision in
writing, and should be allowed to meet with the tenure
committee to discuss the situation.
At a closed meeting Friday, tenured English prof
Keith Alldritt said: "This report should be a useful basis
for discussion, and hopefully new legislation."
"The kind of research that will support publication is
generally not the kind of research that will support good
teaching," said grad student and co-author of the report
Paul Trout.
TENURE
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
RELATIONSHIP OF CTIIH
UNIVERSITY TO COMMUNITY        O I UL
STUDENT PARITY
Open Discussion of English Department
Administration responsibility to students.
_ FREE MIKES IN THE BUCHANAN PLAZA   -  WEDNESDAY NOON Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  17,  1970
3,500 riot troops
the next time
From page 1
sticks, tear gas, a flame thrower, a 25,000-gallon spray tank and
machine guns.
The Indians remained passive while 77 of them were arrested.
The arrested Canadians, were Michelle Pierre of UBC, Richard
and Jane David, Ed Moody, Barbara Gregory and Bob Hall of
Vancouver City College, Gerri Larkin and Bob Jack formerly with
the Native Alliance for Red Power, Daryle Flemming, Wendy
Sparrow and Gordie Williams.
"We're expecting 100 more from B.C. to be down there by
Friday," a member of the group said Monday.
"The activities at the fort will continue until it's officially in
Indian hands."
The colonel in charge of the fort suggested the U.S. Bureau of
Indian Affairs step in to mediate the struggle, but warned he'll bring
in 3500 riot troops from nearby Fort Lewis if the Indians try
another occupation.
The Indians are hoping their occupation, plus the right of
discovery, will establish their claim to the land, which :s eagerly
sought by the coast guard, city officials, the parks board, and real
estate developers.
"We feel that this land of Ft. Lawton is more suitable to
pursuing an Indian way of life, as determined by our own standards. '
By   this   we   mean—this   place   does   not   resemble   most  Indian
reservations."
Indian leaders are expecting about 500 supporters for another
possible invasion in the next few days. Meanwhile, the fort is being
picketted 24 hours a day.
The natives flooding into Seattle as well as those already there
are desperate for food and sleeping bags, or just money.
If you're sympathetic, send it as soon as possible to: United
Indians of All Tribes, P.O. Box 508, Seattle, Wash., 98111.
Constructive theology?
Thomas W. Ogletree, associate professor of constructive
theology at Chicago Theological Seminary, will speak on "Religion
and the Radical Impulse" in SUB Friday at noon and "Openings in
the Christian-Marxist Dialogue" in Buch 104 at 8 pm.
Ogletree has authored several articles for journals and a
number of books, including "Christian Faith and History" and "The
Death of God Controversy".
Preferred parking reservations
to be continued next year
Traffic Superintendent J. H. Kelly has announced that a
system for reserving preferred student parking space will again be
instituted for the 1970-71 academic year.
Students enrolled in fourth year or higher level courses for
1970-71 are eligible for the system. Applications will be accepted at
the Traffic Office, Wesbrook Crescent, beginning at 7:30 a.m.,
Wednesday, April 1.
Preferred parking is available in "A", "C", "L", "O", "R",
"S", and "U" lots.
Specific spaces have been allotted to graduate students in the
Fraser River Lot, the Student Union Lot, and a limited number in
"A", "C" and Stores Road Lots.
Each student receiving preferred parking will be charged
$1.00.
CHINA
"One Fourth Of Humanity"
Widely Acclaimed Colour Documentary
Produced by Journalist and Author EDGAR SNOW
(Formerly Associate Editor of Saturday Evening Post)
• EARLY STRUGGLES FOR NATIONAL UNITY
• TECHNOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL ACHIEVEMENTS
• INTERVIEWS WITH CHINA'S TOP LEADERS
Plus "BETHUNE" (By National Film Board)
8:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 24th
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
TICKETS: STUDENTS $1.00
At All Vancouver Ticket Centres or At The Door
A lot of students have come in to
Speak-Easy in the last two months asking about
encounter groups.-Therefore, this column will
answer some of the basic questions about them.
Firstly, it is almost impossible to give an
all-inclusive example of what an encounter
group is. They vary from being almost exclusively
verbal encounters to a mixture of body
awareness, relaxation and verbal encounter.
Q. What is an encounter group?
A. An encounter group is basically an
experience of encountering one another, of
becoming aware of how we communicate with
others through our body movements and verbal
expression. It can make one aware of how he
can change this communication.
Q. How are T-groups, encounter groups
and sensitivity groups different?
A. Howard Polsky, Columbia University
School of Social Work, says that "the idea of
the T-Group is to create the most favorable
learning and emotional environment for gaining
insights into individual, group and organization
behavior ... It occupies a disciplined
middle-ground between psychotherapy and
coffee-klatches where individuals can learn
more about themselves and experiment with
new behavior." T stands for training and the
group is task-oriented.
Sensitivity groups are very similar to
encounter groups but sometimes involve a
concentration on body awareness. Sensory
relaxation is focused on discovering others and
oneself through body awareness and does as its
title says — relaxes the body. Some authors use
sensitivity and encounter interchangeably.
Q. What is the goal of an encounter group?
A.   Simply,   to  discover  one's  self,   the
"I-amness"   as   some   people   would   put   it.
William Schutz of Big Sur in his book
Joy-Expanding Human Awareness states that
the ultimate goal of an encounter group is
personal growth, beginning with the
exploration of feelings within the group and
proceeding to wherever the group members
take it. "A strong effort is made to create an
atmosphere of openness and honesty in
communicating with each other. Ordinarily, a
strong feeling of group solidarity develops and
group members are able to use each other very
profitably."
Q. Everything today is "group" this and
"group" that. Do they really work or is this a
fad?
A. The popularity of the group experience
has definitely grown in the last few years and
because it is so new certain things have not
been considered. Little or no foUowup is done
to discover the effectiveness of the groups;
some people swear by encounter groups, others
have had devastating experiences and would
never return to a group. In addition, there is
some question as to the transferability 0f the
encounter experience to the social environment
outside the protective confines of the
encounter group.
Q. How can I join an encounter group?
A. Speak Easy has a few resources that are
available if you phone or come in. Most groups
have a fee, often out of reach of the student
pocket book. If anyone knows of encounter
groups the student could afford Speak-Easy
would appreciate the information.
Speak-Easy is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
in SUB 218. Or you can write to Box 115,
SUB, UBC, or phone 228-3706.
This column is prepared by Speak-Easy
staff.
Scandia Ski Shop Ltd
SPRING SALE
Clearance on:-
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* ARLBERG
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BIG SAVINGS ON NANCY GREENE SKI WEAR
TOURING AND CROSS-COUNTRY SKIS AND EQUIPMENT
Also on Exclusive Ski and Apres' Ski Wear From Norway
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1804 W. 4th Ave. at Burrard
732-6426 Tuesday, March  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
By JOHN ANDERSEN
"Ours is definitely a middle-class university."
This was one of the conclusions reached by
commerce profs Vance Mitchell and Larry Moore,
designers of a survey of the backgrounds and interests of
UBC students. The questionnaire was circulated in the
spring of 1969 and was answered by 940 students.
The survey showed that 36 per cent of UBC students
come from families with an annual income of less than
$7,500. However, 68 per cent of the families in B.C. earn
less than $7,500.
The survey also showed that 42 per cent of students
come from families with earnings of more than $10,000
while only 15 per cent of B.C. families have incomes
above that figure.
Almost two thirds of the students surveyed said they
receive assistance from parents in financing their
education.
More than 82 per cent reported they had summer
jobs but of these, 48 per cent were unable to save more
than $500 from their earnings.
Almost 86 per cent of students agreed that "a
university should be a place where equal opportunity is
afforded to all students regardless of level."
Survey of UBC students finds middle-class bias
The most important interest of students appears to be
"self-realization." Over 82 per cent of students considered
this to be important while less than three per cent
attached no importance to it.
39 per cent of students considered bringing about
change in society as an important part of their lives.
Almost 47 per cent rated this as being "somewhat
important" while less than 15 per cent attached no
importance to this.
The survey concludes that students' interests are
largely centred around their university education and
vocational plans rather than events outside the university.
Food prices
being raised
'far too much'
Ruth Blair is boosting food prices far above what is
needed to combat increased food and labor demands,
former ombudsman Sean McHugh said Monday.
Due to 10 per cent increases in food and labor costs
and the increased cost of cleaning the SUB food area food
prices will be going up 20 per cent as of May 1.
But McHugh said a 10 per cent increase in food prices
and 10 per cent increase in labor costs means only a 10
per cent in the final product assuming these are the only
two cost factors. He said food services has many fixed
costs which would make the final cost increase something
less than 10 percent.
This is all on top of the fact that some things will
actually increase by 50 per cent. Blair said that because
students don't mind paying a few cents more prices will
be increased to a round number, i.e. 10 cents to 15 cents,
he said.
There may be a suitable reason for the price increase,
he said, but the students have yet to hear it or see the
figures.
"Most of the committee members want to increase
the prices immediately but Blair objected on the grounds
that she had given her word that no price increase would
take place this term," said Dean of Women Helen McCrae.
The committee which is supposed to have an equal
number of students and faculty members, is short three
students. Douglas Broome, the only student rep was not
present, when the decision was made.
A proposed snack bar similar to the one in the
Buchanan Building was turned down by the committee.
—david bowerman photo
MANGLED  MAIN  MALL  succumbs to  fast-rising  needs of  UBC's. Sedgewick  undergraduate library. Sedgewick
extension will run from present building out under library lawn beyond present site of main mall.
Judge urges deportation,
fines Sir George students
MONTREAL (CUP) - Eight black students, found
guilty on one of five charges of conspiracy in
connection with the Sir George Williams affair,
received stiff fines or the alternative of prison
sentences Friday, along with a promise from presiding
judge Kenneth MacKay that he would recommend
their deportation.
The students will not have to worry about
providing the money for the fines themselves: the
government of Trinidad and Tobago, under severe
pressure from the poor at home, immediately promised
to deliver the funds, totalling $33,500.
ALL EIGHT GUILTY
The eight defendants, all found guilty Thursday by
an all-white jury of conspiracy to interfere with the
lawful use of the Sir George computer, may still appeal
their verdict.
Found guilty on the one conspiracy charge were
Jose Amoroso, Ian and Valerie Belgrave, Glenda
Edwards, Hugo Ford, Edmund Michael, Robert
Ranjutsingh and Kelvin Robinson.
Robinson was also found guilty on a charge of
conspiracy to interfere with the lawful use of a faculty
lounge.
Following the Thursday verdict, defence lawyer
Robert Lemieux announced the appeal, declaring the
jury's decision set the legal precedent of punishing
General   meeting
About 2,000 people are needed Thursday at the
Alma Mater Society general meeting to make a
quorum.
Although there is still no definite agenda for the
meeting, to be held in the SUB plaza, a number of
issues will be discussed including the question of tenure
in the English department. Also to be discussed are the
questions of food services, the pool, a new pub in SUB
(in case the drinking age is lowered) and the
appointment of an AMS auditor.
An agenda will be released today.
students for taking part in a sit-in.
Two other defendants in the trial - Robert and
Kenneth Williams — were acquitted of all five
conspiracy charges: conspiracy to set fire to the Sir
George computer room, to interfere with the lawful
use of a faculty lounge, to destroy cafeteria furniture,
to destroy university computers, and to interfere with
the use of the computers.
ANOTHER COURT DATE
The two Williams were ordered released from
custody immediately following the trial, but all 10 of
the defendants, who face seven more charges in
connection with the Sir George affair, will have to
return to court May 4 to have a trial date set for
completion of their prosecution.
The charges are a conspiracy count pertaining to
endangering life, the substantive offences which go
with the charge, and the substantive offences relating
to the other five conspiracy charges.
The defendants — all natives of Trinidad and
Tobago — were the first group from among 87
defendants charged in connnection with the Feb. 11,
1969, incident.
In sentencing the defendants, judge MacKay said
he preferred to impose fines rather than jail terms
because "It has already cost the Canadian taxpayer
enough."
MacKay cleared the courtroom of spectators
before announcing the fines, after a coughing bout
broke out following remarks by the judge that the
defendants received "an extremely fair trial".
FINES ANNOUNCED
Fines for the eight defendants were: Robertson,
$15,000 or six years in jail; Ian and Valerie Belgrave,
$1,500 or two years each; Ford and Michael, $5,000 or
three years each; Amoroso, $3,000 or three years;
Glenda Edwards, $1,500 or two years; Ranjitsingh,
$1,000 or one year.
To page 8: see REACTION
BIRDS WIN
CANADIAN TITLE
See Story
page 11 Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   17,  1970
TMIimSlY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH  17, 1970
Final fiasco
With only two days to go before the new AMS
council takes office, the incoming council already has
one screw-up to its credit and the lame-duck AMS
hierarchy has chalked up its parting blunder.
Last week, council suddenly discovered that
vice-president elect Christine Krawczyk is ineligible for
the office. Council had no choice but to declare
Krawczyk's election invalid. Then, in a neat bit of
constitutional trickery, they appointed her acting
vice-president until September, when she will be eligible
to run again in a new election.
Council will now be without a voting vice-president
through the summer, when most of the major work is
done, and we will all be subjected to an election at the
start of the school year, when we're least prepared for
such nonsense.
The AMS constitution quite plainly states that the
vice-president must have successfully completed second
year and must have been on campus for two full years.
Krawczyk, who is currently in second year arts, is
indeed ineligible.
Krawczyk admits she had doubts about her
eligibility when she first decided to run, but says AMS
president-elect Tony Hodge assured her she had nothing
to worry about. If Hodge plans to be president of the
AMS, it might be a good idea for him to sit down and
read his own constitution someday.
Whatever advice she may have been receiving,
Krawczyk should have checked the constitution herself.
Even on a campus where little is expected of student
politicians, we should at least be able to ask that much
of them.
Then there is the AMS eligibility committee, a
nebulous body that has no purpose in life other than
making decisions on such matters. The fact the
committee routinely okayed Krawczyk as a candidate
indicates they couldn't be bothered to do their job and
properly investigate her eligibility.
They, at least, must have been familiar with the
constitution. The minutes of the same meeting (at
which only three of the five committee members were
present) show that another aspiring vice-president was
ruled ineligible because he didn't fulfill the two-year
residence requirement, the same requirement Krawczyk
fails to meet.
The last time this happened was two years ago,
when Stan Persky was declared ineligible after winning
the presidential election by an overwhelming majority.
Persky was not permitted to be acting president. The
election was voided and a new one held.
There is a difference, of course. The council of that
day viewed Persky as a dangerous radical who would
destroy the whole AMS system. The present council
seems look on Krawczyk as a token semi-radical who
will add a touch of variety without rocking the boat.
We really don't care whether the other council
members want Krawczyk among them or not. If the
elected vice-president is not eligible, the students have a
right to elect a new one. Not in September, but now.
-IM.S.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News   .     Paul   Knox
City    Nate Smith
Managing        Bruce  Curtis
Wire       Irene   Wasilewiki
Sports   Jim Maddin
Senior     John Twigg
Photo       Dave Enns
Ass't News  Maurice Bridge
Ass't City  John Andersen
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Agitation for tolkien students on
tenure committees spread rapidly
across campus. However, rumours of
impending exams did too. Witness
today's paper. Another reason may be
that Shane McCune came back. The
faithful were: Sandy Kass, Jan O'Brien,
Bob Bennett, David Schmidt, Ginny
Gait, Jenny Jordan, Chris Krawczyk,
Robin Burgess and Brian McWatters.
Sports types were Dick Button, Tony
Gallagher and Scott McCloy. Photogs
were Marc Kenton, Maureen Gans, and
David Bowerman. Peter Ladner bitched
about having his name left out of
Friday's masthead. All past, present
and future staffers are also reminded of
the annual banquet and party Saturday
night.     Attendance     is     mandatory.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Resignation
The Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I enclose a copy of this letter
for your information, and for
publication in the newspaper, if
possible.
Professor Elliot B. Gose
Chairman: major's committee
Department of English
Dear Mr. Gose:
Due to the events to date
regarding the refusal of tenure to
Professors David L. Powell and
Brian H. Mayne, I no longer wish
to be associated with the
administration of the English
department at UBC. I, therefore,
respectfully submit my
resignation as a member of the
department's major's committee,
effective immediately.
I would like to take this
opportunity to thank you for the
privilege of serving under your
chairmanship this year.
RICHARD G. SMITH
arts 4
French
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Recently, I was invited to a
"soiree" organized by the five
classes of conversational French
215. Being Montreal-born and a
recent arrival to this beautiful
city, I awaited "le bash" with
great anticipation.
What I saw that night was a
superbly well-prepared party by
teachers and students alike. It
began with some very witty and
tasteful French sketches where
virtually everyone participated to
the best of their "acting" ability.
After an amusing student-made
film and some games, the room
was then suddenly turned into a
discotheque with flashing lights
and amplified sound.
In my eyes, this was more than
just another social gathering. What
one felt here was taste, sincerity,
and a total communication
between teacher and student.
Such events should always be
recognized and appreciated. I feel
since they epitomize what a true
education is all about. Without an
unbiased, purely objective
attitude from the students there
can be no contact and without
contact, no possibility of learning,
of understanding and then,
criticizing.
It was also very heart-warming
to me personally because having
lived on both "sides" of Canada, I
know .that this is the sort of
bi-culturally active attitude this
country desperately needs. Many
people may not realize that these
students now hold the power that
overwhelms the thin separating
line between our two founding
nations, and actively sincere and
total recognition of a culture. I
feel Expo '67 has been the great
instigator of Canada's stronger
beliefs in bi-culturalism and
bi-lingualism and in that
continuing spirit, the complete
Canadian should realize that
Canadian culture is also the magic
names of Vigneault, Felix Leclerc,
Leyrac, Ferland, Sullivan, etc.
An educated person living in
this country who truly desires to
know what it is to be a Canadian
will never accomplish this until he
or she has demonstrated this
constructive action. Expo proved
it, action does speak louder than
words and action is what will
make this country or break it. In
that respect, these students and
their teachers are a credit to this
university, this city, and
especially, to Canada.
JOHN SBRAGIA
applied science 1
P.S. Fooled you! That's Italian
origin!
Sorry Jeff
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In Friday's Ubyssey, I was
interviewed about the upcoming
demonstration in front of welfare
minister Phil Gaglardi's office.
However, in that story, it was also
stated that his office would be
"stormed". Not wanting to appear
as an agitator (the spirit of Che
forbid) I would like to make it
clear that at no time did I ever
mention the word "storm".
JEFF MARVIN
arts 7
Free Love
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
This is my first year at UBC
and also my first year in Canada. I
enjoy life here very much, but am
sad because there is something
missing.
This "something" is the free
love society (one of many) to
which I belonged in my native
Norway. Many were the happy
hours I spent with my friends.
Here things are different and
things seem very dull by
comparison.
I am surprised that a country
as advanced socially in other
aspects as Canada should be so
backward in this area of life.
If university students knew
what they were missing I am
certain that they would form a
free love society of their own.
JOHN OSMUNDSON
arts 4
Peace
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
One would be deaf not to hear
the cries of those about us
pointing out the pertinent
problems of western society.
Among us are people who do not
live in isolated worlds of self,
people who realize that abortion,
drug, and prostitution laws are a
farce and that social injustice
abounds. It is unfortunate that
many people who apparently
exhibit such perceptiveness in the
recognition of our problems do
not exhibit that quality in
realizing a solution.
The recent Vancouver City
College Tower supplement gave a
resume of our social injustices,
one of which was the effect of
militarism. This was delivered in a
paper with a clenched fist
brandished on the front page. The
last page invited all to attend a
protest match, guerilla theatre, or
street dancing.
What is given is an illustration
of the horror of this society, but
no attempt is made to propose a
solution. Is there sense in calling
down militarism and then
intimating a readiness to fight for
peace? The revolution is not for
the sake of the revolution, but for
change.
Can we not redirect our efforts
to solution?
HOWARD SMITH
arts 4
We are currently in possession
of a lengthy letter and two
allegedly satirical articles on the
university endowment lands
situation.
It is not the policy of The
Ubyssey to publish anonymous
submissions. Whatever the
possible merit of these items, they
will not be considered for
publication until the author or
authors come to the Ubyssey
office and identify themselves. Tuesday, March  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Mystical, fetishistic food displayed
Wax models of Japanese food
until April 11.
on display at Fine Arts Gallery
The Fine Arts Gallery at UBC continues its
practice of presenting far-out exhibits for your
enjoyment and edification this Friday till April
11 with a double-bill display.
JAPANESE CULINARY POP, as the
official press release says, "is an extraordinary
collection of wax models of food of the types
commonly displayed in the windows and glass
cases of popular restaurants in Japan, shown
together with signs, banners, objects, artifacts,
and photographs, concerned with the ambience
of Japanese vernacular eating places . . .
"The wax models, in their extraordinary
fidelity to the original dish, manage to emit an
almost mystical quality-possibly because they
look so very real and yet are fake. They have a
surrealistic air, even fetishistic, and are
somewhat reminiscent of plaster food sculpture
done by Claes Oldenburg.
"The wax models are quickly made by
anonymous artisans and there are no aesthetic
pretensions  in  their manufacture."
Also on the programme is an exhibition of
35    3-dimensional    objects    fashioned    by
advertising designer JOHN GILBERT.
According to again that press release,
Gilbert "conveys ideas through 3-dimensional
construction which have some of the
characteristics of dolls . . . The "models" were
originally designed for photography and from
the basis of an illustrative technique which is
peculiarly well suited to all phases of
advertising and editorial work, including
television.
*  *  *
FREE STUFF IN
MUSIC BUILDING THIS WEEK
Tuesday    noon    —    Beethoven    sonata
spectacular continues.
Tuesday, 8 p.m. — Grad student Michael
Longton psychedelicizes you with his own
music.
Wednesday    noon    —    soprano    Lucy
Gomersall warbles.
Friday noon and night — UBC Choral joins
UBC Symphony for cheap thrills.
Mrozek  play
TANGO'-in TV land
•» FORMULA:    Portray    a    uniquely    average
interpersonal situation, in which social roles and
behavioral norms are thoroughly institutionalized and
to which a wide audience can relate easily. (The
Family is always a sure bet.) Overlay this scene with
the thick web of a socio/cultural phenomena
which everyone has read about in the papers and
immediately   rehearsed   into their daily lives...
~»    the  "generation gap"  is a regular winner in this
category.
And now inject that classic shift, that ever so
slight perversion of the expected, that dissonance in
one element that immediately erupts: and
illuminates everything with is inauthentic unreal
light, (i.e., in terms of our model, simply reverse the
roles in this "generation" thing.)
*■ And waddya get . . LAFS LAFS LAFS! - '
cause that's what show biz is all about, ain't at right
J.B.?
But you see the difference between bad Lafs
an' good Lafs, between show biz and theatre
(theoretically . ..  hopefully)  lies  entirely  in   the
,       subtlety and deftness, in the degree of consciousness
with    which    this,   shift    is   administered.    The
Hollywood producer of Doris Day type 'sit-coms'
just says, OK men, let's just turn this generation
v    thing around — parents play kid; kid plays parents —
and then flog it for every Laf it's worth.
The   director   of a stage  play (hopefully . . .
ideally) realizes the deeper ramifications of this role
shift and subtly utilizes it to explore the various
reality players of his whole scene, and to probe into
the crevasses of paradoxical unreality which mar the
4     agreeable surface fabric of the play — if it is a good
play. (Here, the resulting lafs are less often of the
canned variety.)
* * *
I plugged Slawomir Mrozek's Tango — which
opened at the Playhouse last Friday — fairly heavily
in last week's PF. I did this because I consider it a
very fine play; in fact, it is by far the best play the
Playhouse has undertaken this season and could well
have developed into The Theatrical Event of the
year.
However I remember having the perverse
thought, a few days before the opening, that, in the
hands of a somewhat strange director, this play
could almost be made to degenerate into this very
TV-sit-com-type exploitation of this very role
reversal gimmick . . . Peter Dearing is after all a
distinguished Canadian theatre person and one
really wouldn't think that. ..
On Friday night, Dearing's production more or
less (and very_ angrily) fulfilled my perversest
expectations. Where Mrozek used the reversal of the
generation thing—almost tangentially, as a technical
device — to point to something far deeper and more
profoundly in need of illumination, Dearing seemed
simply to stop there, and rode it out for
(presumably) lafs. (And even these weren't coming,
easily.)
And, on top of all this, the acting itself was
even awful.
Dearing seemed to have taken the hip-parents
thing at extremely face value . . . "give 'em really
long hair, gawdy clothes and that'll do it." He
mistook the cultured, intellectual anarchism of
Stomil and his wife for loud, obistrous animalism.
He mistook the authoritarian structuring efforts of
the son for a psychotic extension of almost
understandable youthful idealism. He mistook
decadence for slovenliness. Etc.
* * *
Even if the acting in this production improves
— as it no doubt will as the play progresses in time
— I cannot really recommend it: decidely not as an
introduction to Mrozek and actually not even as an
entertaining theatre evening. Read the play instead.
NORBERT RUEBSAAT
TODAY-12:30 P.M.
SUB AUDITORIUM - 50c
WESTERN DANCE
THEATRE
Clean   cut   modern - dance,
with   no  head  trips,
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Choreographed  by the
resident choreographer of
the Playhouse Theatre
Company: Norbert Vesak.
THE NORBERT VESAK
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THEATRE
WE STOCK PARTS ON OUR OWN
to ensure you don't have unnecessary delays
watting for your car repairs...
- one more reason we're Number 1
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FILM SOCIETY:
presents:
Casino Royale
PETER SELLERS    //    DAVID NIVEN
URSULA ANDRESS     //    WOODY ALLEN
DIRECTED BY JOHN HUSTON
FRIDAY & SATURDAY - 7:00, 9:30
SUNDAY - 7:00
SUB Auditorium - 50c Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  17,  1970
INSIDE THE GHOST SONATA
March 23 - April 4
a   mixed-media   theatre   labyrinth
based   on   August  Strindberg's   play
in   the
SOMERSET STUDIO
Student Tickets $1.00
Reservations — 228-2678
or   Room   207  —   Frederic  Wood   Theatre
HOURLY
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An outgoing arts president, self-confessed
radical and supporter of the new left took part in
Saturday's March of Repression. The march
confirmed some general anxieties he has been
feeling about the direction in which the Vancouver
left is heading, and in the following article he
outlines these anxieties.
More than 250 people assembled at Kits Beach"
Saturday to March Against Repression       . /
The march was sponsored by thP- .Amebic in
Deserters Committee and organized by vjrious
groups including the Red Collective from Simon
Fraser University, Women's Caucus and the
Vancouver Black Action Group. Peopf'tiom Native.
Alliance for Red Power (IMARP) 3"*^^**
Unemployed Citizens' Welfare -Ijmjjrovmiejt
Council as well as UBC students were present at-the
march. Out of these only UCWIC put forward a
speaker. ^
The slogans were along the south of the border
lines  of   "Seize  the   Time".   "All  Power to tl
People" and other such things that the colonial
relates to.
The march route led us across Hie Burrard
bridge to a rally at the courthouse Nnihere white
Canadian radicals screamed "Right Ort" and "All
Power to the People", slogans that the American
brain drain has forced us to relate to in place of
Canadian movement politics.
The colonial people did in fact get a chance to
hit out at "Amerika" once. One of"the marchers
close by us was deliberately run into
American Cadillac complete with A
a "Love it or Leave it" sticker. Several well-placed
boots to the fenders and sides of the symbol of the
American ruling class showed the driver where it
was at.
The rally itself once more provided us with a
clear-cut case of colonial mentality. It seemed that
few people were aware that there is a political
struggle in Quebec or that Canada's branch-plant
economy makes us a highly developed colony of the
U.S. Instead we heard again about the Chicago
Seven, Bobby Seale, the oppression and repression
in    the    U.S.    military,   and    other   things   tl
middle-class Canadians get guilt complexes about.
The struggles of native people in the provir
of B.C. were not mentioned. Alex Bonde from 1
UCWIC got a dig in at the crowd when
mentioned that members of his group could r
participate in the rally because their organizati
was only notified a few days in advance.
"We're too poor to afford telephones so <
couldn't contact all of our people", said Bonde.
But people were too busy screaming "off t
pig" to catch the impact of Bonde's statement.
At| that should be in Canadian left politics w
■gnorfcdj Jt the march. The threat to Canad
existence was ignored and, in fact, augmented
the* obvious*. J m penalization of the Ii
demonstrated atjrhe rally. One asshole talked a bo
M'ttmg up a Yfppte movement in Vancouver tr
would do things about the Chicago trial.
Natiprfgvdbout the fact that two men have be
JJolitjcat1 prisoners in Quebec for three years witho
tnatrQns^vas jusjp'e'leased but there are hundreds
QuebecMikevjfarfn/<S8Veral UCWIC people have be
jailed in Vancouver in recent months but the
these as well were either unknown or forgotten.
■N \ Ttre niQtfcjhntf the story is this. Unless the left
Vancouver relates:t6 the fact that the struggles
Canada are relewaW on their own merit and ne
not be ai
border then-
revolution.
The issue i
and .removal
Mid-Canada
policy which
the detriment
'■ by constant referral south of t
lere   is  little  hope  of  a   Canadi
n Canada right now is independen
of such things as the proposi
rridor and the continental enen
selling out our natural resources
the people of Canada,
terns such as lack of jobs should !
related to the lack of secondary development
Canada due to the rip-off of our resources by tl
U.S. If the Vietnam teaches us anything it is tl
need for an independence struggle for ;
independent socialist Canada. Neither is mutual
exclusive, as an aside to my socialist friends vv?
organized the march against repression. If we wa
socialism in Canada then we will have to get throui
independance and if we want independence trwtn v
will need a Canadian left which can recognize tl
need for a truly Canadian struggle.
Colonial mental
during weekenc
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
By Dick Betts
Maureen Gans photo
fty displayed
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732-0114                  LARRY GREENWOOD
P.M.
«Si
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BUDGET
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S- CAMPING TOURS
tALL GROUPS
AND-WALES $99.00
^-PORTUGAL $179.00
USSIA $205.00
*N TOUR $367.00
nt Countries
Zosts to a Minimum
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Charter   Flights
Daltes,  Etc.,   Call
QUARTERS
327-1162
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Brentwood — Park   Royal — Varsity
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 61
GREATER VICTORIA
NEEDS TEACHERS
Applications are invited from PROFESSIONALLY CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL for teaching positions commencing
September  1970. Vacancies as follows.
ELEMENTARY
-KINDERGARTEN and PRIMARY TEACHERS
-INTERMEDIATE TEACHERS
with special training in art, science, music, or
physical education.
-REMEDIAL SPECIALISTS
Advanced training in diagnosis and remediation of
learning difficulties.
-TEACHER for HARD-OF-HEARING CLASS
Advanced  training   in   the  education   of  deaf  and
hard-of-hearing children.
SECONDARY
-ALL ACADEMIC  SUBJECTS
-PHYSICAL EDUCATION - Boys & Girls
-COMMERCE - INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
-HOME ECONOMICS - MUSIC - Instrumental & Choral
-OCCUPATIONAL - TEACHER-LIBRARIAN
-GUIDANCE & COUNSELLING
-REMEDIAL READING
ELEMENTARY and SECONDARY
SCHOOL SPECIAL COUNSELLORS
(Specialists who   have  or  qualify for  a
B.C. Teacher's Certificate)
Application forms may be obtained from the office of the
District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 61
(Greater  Victoria),  P.O.  Box  700,  Victoria,  B.C.
NOTE: Interviews— Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C. Monday and Tuesday, 30th and 31st March, 1970; 9:00
a.m.-12 noon;  1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
ELEMENTARY      -
SECONDARY      -
Mr.    H.   C.   O'Donnell
Mr. G. A. V. Thomson
Also, School Board Offices, 3128 Foul Bay Road, Victoria,
B.C., Thursday and Friday, 2nd and  3rd April,  1970. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  17,  1970
WSS federation to begin
student newspaper ad co-op
Western Student Service has decided to go
ahead with its own student newspaper ad co-op in
opposition to a proposed Canadian University Press
co-op.
The decision was made last weekend at a WSS
conference in Regina. WSS is a federation that was
set up by western university student councils after
the Canadian Union of Students fell apart.
Last December, the CUP national convention
proposed that the national executive investigate a
proposal for a national co-op and find an ad agency
for such a co-op.
WSS plan to set up an ad co-op through an ad
agency in Edmonton.
CUP has devised a formula to adjust the ratio
which would distribute the ads evenly. Bigger papers
would not be getting all the ads and smaller papers
would pay less.
Cameron and Associates Ltd. (a Toronto ad
agency) has agreed to act as the CUP agency for 20
per cent of the gross.
"The best way of handling ads is through one
national agency," said Ubyssey news editor Paul
Knox.
"The CUP co-op would basically help smaller
papers at first. After a couple of years we would
benefit."
The whole idea of CUP is a co-op, we want to
be as much a member as possible; the Alma Mater
Society is not conscious of our commitment to
CUP, said Knox.
"The western councils have a lot more financial
control over papers. This means if we want to join
an ad co-op the AMS has to consent."
CAMPUS LAUDROMAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   &   Dry   Cleaning
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Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant  Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354 W.   10th 224-9809
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to  U.B.C.  Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT  REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.   to  11:30  p.m.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,  DARK  SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED  JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
UBC social work brief urges change
in Gaglardi's outmoded attitudes'
A committee of students and faculty from the
School of Social Work are up in arms about the B.C.
Social Assistance Act.
The committee has prepared a brief on public
assistance for presentation to welfare minister Phil
Gaglardi.
"We are in the process of getting in contact
with Gaglardi's office now, but we have no
appointment yet," said Don Morrison, social work
1.
"Gaglardi reinforces outmoded attitudes
towards welfare reminiscent of the old workhouse
attitudes in 18th century England."
The brief is "an expression of concern over the
state of this essential public service in B.C."
The committee states the principle of access to
a decent minimum of food, clothing, shelter and
sundries should be a clearly defined right of every
member of society.
"In this regard we take clear and unequivocal
exception to a letter from the Assistance Deputy
Minister of Social Welfare dated March 14, 1968,
which would deny assistance to needy individuals
on the basis of their failure to observe
"conventional dress and grooming habits" or "who
live communally," the brief continues.
The brief also urges simplified welfare eligibility
forms, the citizen's right to appeal against any
decision he feels has been made against his best
interests, yearly readjustment of the rate structure
of social assistance, and confidential welfare files.
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.
Trinidad reaction  low
From page 3
In addition to paying the fines,
the Trinidadian government
announced that all of the students
would be allowed to take up
studies at the University of the
West Indies upon their return to
the Caribbean islands.
The government's offer
undoubtedly came as a response
to massive demonstrations on the
island, originally sparked by the
Sir George trial, which spread to
include the entire issue of foreign
(predominately Canadian)
domination of their economy.
Reaction to the Montreal trial
was relatively low-key in Trinidad,
as leaders of the island's black
power movement made no
statements on the outcome.
When the final verdict and
sentences were announced, several
hundred demonstrators from
northern oilfield districts were
gathered at Port Of Spain, the
island capital.
The demonstrators listened to
speaches   for   several  hours,  and
then marched around the office of
Prime Minister Eric Williams.
They stopped outside the
headquarters of the People's
National Movement, Williams'
party, and jeered at government
and business dignitaries gathered
to say farewell to the island's
ambassador to Ethiopia, but no
incidents occurred.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) -
Millions of blorg studs ejaculated
in this island capital today.
Deformed sources say they were
extolling the virtues of Rosie, the
green bourgeois blorg.
PATIO
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TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie  St.
Vancouver   15,  B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
Teachers
Wanted
School District No. 65
(Cowichan)
Representatives of Cowichan
School District will be on Campus,
University of British Columbia, for
the purpose of interviewing both
Elementary and Secondary teacher
applicants on Tuesday, 24th March
and Wednesday, 25th March.
Appointments for interview may
be made through the Placement
Officer,   Office   of   Student   Services.
ATTENTION. . .
EDUCATION STUDENTS
COME TO EDMONTON
Employment Opportunities for 1970-71
Interviews with a representative of the Board will be available
on April 3, 1970 to education students and experienced teachers interested in teacher employment starting September, 1970.
Whereas our staffing situation is adequate at most grade levels
and subject area fields, applications are solicited for the
following:
ELEMENTARY
(particularly Division One)
SECONDARY
(1) Industrial Arts (Multi-phase)
(2) Merchandising
(3) Instrumental (Band) Music
(4) Vocational Teachers—Beauty Culture, Food
Preparation & Services, Graphic Arts-
Lithography, Commercial Art, Merchandising,
Institutional Services and Horticulture.
(5) Drama
Applicants must be eligible for Alberta teacher certification requiring a minimum
of two years of post-secondary (university) education beyond Senior Matriculation if education program commenced September 1, 1967 or earlier, or three
years of post-secondary (university) education beyond Senior Matriculation if
teacher education  program commenced September  1968  or  later.
For application forms, employment information and interview
appointment please contact:
CANADA MANPOWER CENTRE
125 EAST 10th AVENUE, VANCOUVER, B.C. Tuesday, March  17,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Grads give gift to blind library
"The 1970 Grads are pretty great." said Paul E.
Thiele, head of the Charles Crane Memorial Library.
- Thiele expressed his sentiments to The Ubyssey
Monday and enclosed an open letter of gratitude
addressed to the 1970 graduating class for their gift
of $4,400 to the library.
He said that blind students on campus and
throughout B.C. received news of the gift with
"great enthusiasm and joy."
Thiele went on to compare the "gratifying and
generous gesture" of the absorption of the Crane
Library into the main library system as "another
step forward."
He said that most blind students must rely
heavily upon taped texts, which are difficult to get.
The $4,400 grant will go toward the purchase
of several heavy-duty recording machines, playback
machines, a high-speed duplicator and some 500
reels of tape. With this equipment the library will be
able to record textbooks on campus.
Thiele concluded by terming the gift a "great
and wonderful sign of confidence which you, the
graduates have placed in your fellow students who
do not see."
Beach parking lot
draws Tony's ire
Alma Mater Society president-elect Tony Hodge will lodge a
protest regarding the Vancouver Yacht Club's plan to build a parking
lot off Pioneer Park to Vancouver City council today.
A public hearing is being held in city coucil chambers at 2 p.m.
to discuss the proposed parking lot.
Hodge said the plan to build a parking lot is not in line with
the city's plan to gradually acquire all the land on the north side
(beach side) of Point Grey road for parks purposes.
"They eventually want a rim of parkland all around the sea
and the parking lot plan contradicts this," he said.
Hodge said the parking lot would cut off the public beach at a
time when most citizens in Vancouver are beginning to realize the
priceless value in the natural beaches surrounding Vancouver.
"Also, the plan was conceived and presented to the city
Planning Board without the residents in the area being consulted,"
he added.
SPEC   needs   volunteers
The Point Grey branch of SPEC needs six to eight student
volunteers and a dump truck Saturday for its "Cleanup for Spring"
campaign.
The areas to be cleared up are Imperial Ave, the scenic points
along Marine Drive, and the Simon Fraser lookout over the Fraser
River.
Students interested in helping or providing a truck should
contact campaign director Terry Slack at 224-5730.
Talk   on   US   conspiracy
Noted zoology prof and scientist E. W. Pfeiffer will speak on
the topic "Is there an American Conspiracy in Cambodia?" Sunday
at 8 p.m. in the Teamster's Union Hall, 490 E. Broadway.
Pfeiffer has recently returned from Cambodia where he
studied the effects of the Vietnam war.
Colored movies and slides will also be shown. Admission is $1.
COME IN TODAY
HAPPINESS . . .
IS LETTING
BLOCK
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TAX
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we make any error* that ceit you any penalty or inlereit,
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Canada's largest Tax Service with over 3000 offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST.        |        6395 FRASER
3582 E. HASTINGS            3397 KINGSWAY
Weekdays—9 a.m.-9 p.m.     Sat.—9 a.m.-5 p.m. — 327-0461
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
'" ° PT77X
PATIO.
EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
King of Indian Dancers
NRITYA SAMRAT GOPI  KRISHNA
With Sabatri Devi
and Troupe
Vibrant   KATHAK   DANCES
1st Time  in  Western  Canada
Old Auditorium
SATURDAY,  MARCH  21
SUNDAY, MARCH 22-7:30 P.M.
Admission   $2.00
Tickets   available   ot   International   House
and Thunderbird Shop
DON'T MiSS THIS
SCINTILLATING
DANCE  GROUP
One Call to Westco
Could Save You Hundreds
of Dollars on Car Insurance
Over the Years
YOU COULD SAVE AS MUCH AS $20, $30, $40. $50 OR
MORE ON CAR INSURANCE THIS YEAR.
At WESTCO you get at least the same insurance
coverage you have now at lower rates.
You deal directly with WESTCO because
we have no salesmen.
So sales commissions, one of the most expensive
costs of typical insurance companies are returned to
you in the form of much lower rates.
DIRECT CLAIMS SERVICE
You do business with WESTCO's Head Office.
You get fast action from WESTCO's streamlined
claim service system, without going through a
salesman, agent or any other "middle man".
Great time saving. Much less paper work.
Additional savings passed on to you.
ONE PHONE CALL WILL TELL YOU
HOW MUCH YOU CAN SAVE.
And if you need additional insurance to meet the
new government requirements of $50,000 minimum
coverage (Bodily Injury and Property Damage
Liability) or if you are planning to change or renew
your present coverage — call WESTCO first and
learn how much you can save.
PHONE NOW!
OR MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY.
NO OBLIGATION — NO SALESMAN
WILL CALL!
MAIL THIS  COUPON   FOR OUR  LOW  RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Residence
Address  ....
(Please Print)
Occupation	
Phone: Home    Office 	
City -  Prov.
Age    Male Q   Female G
Married □    Single □
Date first licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accident In last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended? .
Year of automobile
Make of automobiie
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from work}?
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in   last 5 years.
Car No. t
Car No. 2
Yes Q No D
Yes □ No P
Are you now insured?	
Date current policy expires
This   coupon   is   designed   soleiy   lo   enable   non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVI
■RS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
#r
#2
%
%
%
%
%
...
%
OCW-UBC   1
□
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
OO
o
o Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   17,  1970
'tween
classes
TUESDAY
PARLIAMENTARY   COUNCIL
General meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB 111.
Election of next year's executive.
DANCE   CLUB
General meeting,   12:30 p.m.. 207 and
209    SUB.    Election    of    next    year's
executive.
GERMAN  CLUB
Meeting    at    noon    in    international
House.
UBC   SAILING   TEAM
Meeting   12:36   to    1:30   in   SUB   215.
All members  attend.
UBC   FLYIN6   CLUB
Navigation course, 7:30 p.m. SUB 215.
UBC SOCREDS
General    meeting    and    election     of
officers.   Bu.   224,   12:30 p.m.
CREATIVE    WRITING
UBC poet Richard Geller, a lecturer
in the English department, will read
at 8:30 p.m. tonight in Bu. 106.
Geller will read from his first book,
a long poem called Iowah. Admission is free.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Western Dance Theatre. Norbert
Vesak    12:30,   SUB   auditorium.
UBC   PLAYERS  CLUB
General meeting and election, SUB
105B,   12:30.
LIFE   SCIENCES   CLUB
Dr.      M.      Pernarowski,      pharmacy,
speaks     on     "Pollution     in      Homo
Sapiens",   12:30.   SUB   207-209.
CIASP
Training meeting, 9:30 P.m., 3035 W.
10th.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Insurance   seminar,   SUB   105A,   12:30.
WEDNESDAY
LEGAL  AID
Campus Legal Aid panels, every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon,
SUB 237 and 237A.
CUSO
Information meeting, 8 p.m., International House.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
Michael Cecil, guest speaker, noon,
SUB 211. Topic: "Love and Completeness".
CHRISTIAN    SCIENCE   ORGANIZATION
Meeting,  12:30,   Bu.   3201.
THUNDERBIRD    MOTORCYCLE    CLUB
Meeting,  noon,   SUB   130.
SAILING   CLUB
Annual general meeting, noon, Bu.
104.
THURSDAY
UBC   CURLING   CLUB
General  meeting,   12:30,   Bu.   204.
PSYCHOLOGY    EXPERIMENT
All day.   Prizes, gifts,  etc.   for  everyone    taking   part.   No   electricity,    or
pain involved, SUB 224.
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
French film "Le Ble en Herbe" with
Gerard PhiUippe — free. 12:30 and
7:30, Bu.  100.
MATH    DEPARTMENT
Film about the late John Von Neumann who is noted for his work in
computers, economics and physics
as well as math,  12:45, Angus 104.
FRIDAY
SCM
"Religion and the radical impulse",
noon, SUB ballroom.
SCM
"Openings in Christian-Marxist dialogue," 2 p.m., Bu.   104.   50   cents.
FILM SOCIETY
"Casino   Royale",   Friday   and   Saturday, 7 and 9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 7 p.m.,
SUB theatre.
VIETNAM   MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE
Meeting,  noon.  SUB  213.
WOMEN'S    LIBERATION     MOVEMENT
Discussion   on   women   in   China   and
Israel.   12:30,  SUB 207-209.
EXPERIMENTAL    COLLEGE
Karl Burau, "What Experimental
College could mean for UBC", noon,
SUB 125.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Wayne Padgett and Ole Juul. selected
readings by author with flute accompaniment,  SUB  auditorium,  noon.
CLASSIFIED
Rates* Students, Faculty & Club-3  lines,  1   day 750, 3 days  $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25ts 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not excepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline a 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications OBtce, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
UHOP A LINK, c/o BOX 115.
Phone 228-3706 or stop by and
sei' us at Speak Easy, Monday -
Friday, 10 a.m. - !t p.m., SUB,
Km.   218.
Wanted Information
13
Lost  &  Found
14
LOST: ONE FINE ARTS 125 NOTE
hook. Please call 261-8533. Mary
Locke.    Howard — desperate.        	
"l.OKTr~MALE~FltO\VN & VVHTtK
tabby cat. Extra toes on front
paws. Large reward. Leave message at 224-9073 or 2120 Wesbrook
Cres.	
LOST: TOYOTA '& HOUSE KEYS
ill key case Friday. Ph. 73:1-6803,
around   6:00   p.m.
Rides  &  Car Pools
15
NEED KILE FROM TSAWWAS-
SEN; have car. Phone Mike —
943-3540 	
NKE1) RlDi: TO CAMPUS FROM
White Rock March 31—April 19.
Phone   736-5846.
Special Notices
16
LOLA'S  DATING CLUB
New  modern  fun way  to  meet
UNATTACHED LADIES
AND   GENTLEMEN
Ages 18-70 Welcome
Open   9   a.m. - 9   p.m.   314   West
Hastings,   .£103   or  call   688-0396
JOSEPHINE BARCLAY—PLEASE
call Barbara Claghorn in the information   office,   228-3131.	
AQUA SOC BEER NIGHT FOL-
lowing General Meeting, Thurs.,
March 111, 4-8 p.m., 4640 W 9th
(Richard's place). Come and meet
tlie   new   executive. 	
I^LORJ^NNERTsT'ACE — FILMS,
discussions, lectures, on the
Undersea World, March 10th, 17th
and 24th, at the Vancouver Aquar-
ium,   8:00   p.m.	
AQUA SOO GIONERAL ELEC-
tion Meeting, Thurs., March 19,
12:30, Brock 303. Come out and
choose your Club Exec. Special
bonus — one free beer for attending  meeting!   (really!)	
|7aST BIG CAMPUS DANCE OF
the year! Come and see Miles!
Smash hit at Aldergrove! Friday,
March   20,   9   to   1.   $1-00.	
fifibTwEEKEND-A NEW BOND
"Casino Royale" with Peter Sellers, David Niven, Woody Allen
and Ursula Andress. Fri. & Sat.,
7:00, 9:30: Sun., 7:00. Sub Theatre
only.   50c.	
[tTbTcTeiTyTng club insurance
Seminar   today.    Noon,    Sub,    105A
—   Navigation   course,    7:30    p.m.
__Sul>,   215.	
BECOME A LEGALLY ORDATNED
minister. $2.00 donation, appreciated. World Life Church. Box
717-D, Ceres. California 95307.
BOH DYLAN'S PREVIOUSLY UN-
published Tarantula now available
UBC   bookstore   magazine   rack.
Travel Opportunities 17
SCUBA DIVER'S DAY TRIP~TO
Gulf   Islands,   $7.50,   March  ii.   1'h.
Al,  224-0942,  5-7 p.m.	
CHARTER"^ TO ENGLAND. ONE
seat.   Mav   24   to   June   24.   Days,
228-4135J   Uvea., _926-2359.	
LEARN HOW TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON A LIMITED BUDGET.
A meeting will be held at 7:4;.
p.m. on Monday, March 23rd in
the auditorium of Eric Hamber
School, 5025 Willow, Vancouver
(33rd & Oak) to help all those
travelling abroad on a limited
budget. Bring along your questions and learn how to travel on
a shoestring.
A    panel    of   experts,    including   a
qualified   travel   agent,   who   have
travelled     to     all     parts     of     the
world,   will  be  on  hand  to  talk  to
you   and   answer   all   your   questions on  foreign  travel.
No   admission   charge  —  so   bring
your friends who are interested in
travel    and    learn    how    to    save
hundreds   of   dollars!
Canadian  Youth  Hostels Assoc.
1406 West  Broadway,  Van.,   9.
738-3128.	
THREE ONE - WAY CHARTER
Flights to London. Leaving May
9th.   $140.   Ph.  299-4233  or  291-3144.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TO RENT 16' - 20'
Trailer, May 1-Sept.l). Purpose:
Research living - quarters, Loon
Lake.  Contact  224-7128.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1962 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE. AUTO-
matic, excellent condition. Anyone
interested please call Pam or Bar-
bara at  684-4679.	
1968 EPIC DELUXE STILL UNDER
warranty. 4 new tires, 2 good
mounted snows. Good shape
throughout.   Call   738-1156.	
1967 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS —
31,000 miles. P.B., P.S., radio,
air conditioning. Best offer. Call
collect  532-1071.
•66 CORVAIR CORSA. VERY NICE.
Must  sell  at  a  loss.   Please  phone
_224-3_12L	
'64   BEAUMONT   V-8   STD.   RADIO.
Good  condition.   $825.  Ph.  435-0732.
1967 COUGAR' 6" CHROME
wheels, belted tires, stereo tape
deck.   Good   cond.   Phone   732-8339.
1951 FORI) 14-TON P.U. EXCELL.
Cond.   $ 250.   255-8678:	
1961 SUNBEAM RAPIER. SEE AT
1846 Wesbrook Cres. or phone
Jim,  228-3898  Lab.   228-9609,  home.
1964 CHEV. 6. STD. RADIO, NEW
tires, good condition, clean. Of-
fers.   879-0372.	
1965 FORD FALCON 2-DR. SEDAN,
6-cyl.   Auto,   radio,   $800,   732-8128.
1964 PLY. 6. AUTO. MUST SELL,
$550   or   best.   224-0684.	
1968 TRIUMPH GT6, 18,000 MILES.
$2200.   Phone   224-9458	
^8 V?w7rONLY 20,000 MILES. IN
perfect condition. Must sell. $1450
or best offer. Phone after 5:00.
683-5415	
1965 MGB IN MINT CONDITION.
Radial tires, new paint job, $1150,
or  offers.   Ph.   731-4339	
1961   VW,    RADIO.   OFFERS.
738-3870
I960  BUGEYE   SPRITE;   NEW  EN-
gine: only needs clutch and paint;
call  Steve at 738-9484 	
1969   DATSUN   1000.    EXCELLENT
cond.      8-track     Stereo.      733-1943,
6:30-7:00   p.m.
23
Automobiles—Parts	
VW VAN RACK (USED) 6'x4'
$49.50 (Cost $125.00) Good cond.
224-9152   Evenings   and   Weekends.
Motorcycles
25
LARGEST SELECTION, OP 10
speed bicycles, French and Japanese.  As low as $69.00.
THE   CYCLE   SHOP
5895 Fraser St.        (43rd & Fraser)
327-4229
SIIZ UK I MOTORCYCLE FOR
Sale 250cc. Good condition. Ph.
Boyd  224-7646.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Art Services
31A
Photography
34
FOR SALE: DURST J-35 EN-
larges with 50 mm f/4 Componon
lens. Worth $125 — only $75. Ph.
228-8380 after 7.
Scandals
37
AQUA SOC GENERAL ELECTION
Meeting, Thurs., March 19, 12:30,
Brock 303. Come out and choose
your Club exec. Special bonus —
one free beer for attending meet-
ing.   (really!)	
SEND YOUR AGE AND QUES-
tions for 21 pages on how and
where to meet perfectly normal
looking homosexual guys. Box
8969 Station H, Vancouver 5. (no
complaints   in   144   replies).	
SEPTA-SUPER SPY-SPOOF WITH
an all-star cast; it's an altogether new and different James
Bond this weekend, in Sub
Theatre.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY TIM, FROM
Totem,   S.F.U.   and   V.G.H.
Typing  40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (DOCU-
ments, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy,   738-8794.   35c   page   —   5c
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable   rates.   In   my  North   Vancou-
ver home.  988-7228.	
TYPING  SERVICES
Electric   machine
 Phone:    526-9842	
EXPERIENCED ELEC. HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work, reasonable
rates.   Phone   321-2102.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING, 35c
a page; 5c copy. Mrs. Stewart,
733-6098.
Typing (Cont.)
40
NORTH VANCOUVER. PHONE
988-5420. Experienced typist. Thesis, manuscript, essay. Reason-
able   rate.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist, (Italics, symbols, other types).
Experienced essay and thesis typ-
ist.   Reasonable   rates,   321-3838.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays. Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317	
GENERAL TYPING, ESSAYS,
thesis, etc. Phone 224-5963. Mrs.
Brown.	
ACCURATE ELECTRIC TYPIST,
theses, manuscripts, etc. Phone
688-7051'around  6,   after  10 p.m.
UNIVERSITY GRAD. TYPING
Service — 25 cents per page. Ph.
681-0221 anytime. Two typists —
Royal   Electric's.	
TYPING DONE. 30c A PAGE. PH.
732-9488,   Petra  Graves.	
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates; 738-6829
after  9   a.m.   to   9   p.m.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work. .	
NEEDED—SOMEONE TO COME
in five afternoons a week to do
housework and cooking for professional family. References needed.     224-7714.
ATTRACTIVE WOMEN FOR
florigt firm. Evening work, Wed.
to Sat. Car or driver's license an
asset.    Call   684-2618   or   684-5612.
Summer employment
available for women students
with a minimum net typing
speed of 35 wpm.
- Office experience helpful -
- Many clerical jobs
also available -
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
540 Burrard Street
684-7177
FEMALE TO WORK AS NIGHT
staff in home for disturbed children. Job provides time for studying   and   sleeping.   Phone   874-2931
Help Wanted—Male
52
FULL TIME MALE LIFEGUARD
required May 17-Sept. 7, Dangley.
Phone Linda, 733-2004 wkdys.,
after   5:30   for   information.
Male or Female
53
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats. by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00   per   hr.   Phone   733-6037   eve.
SPANISH CONVERSATION"
COURSES — University Professor will offer special private summer courses, at a downtown office,
starting next May, for beginners
and advanced, inexpensive. Call
738-5692, after 4 p.m., for registration   and   to   get   planning.
Tutoring
TUTORING IN SPANISH, $3 hour.
Ph.   738-5692   eve.
Translations
TRANSLATIONS Spanish-English-
Spanish.   Call   738-5692   eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YAMAHA AMP. AND COMBO
Organ. Phone John 738-8851, 5-7
p.m. Best Offer.
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al  the  Bookstore,
AMS  Publication!   Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
Misc. for Sale (Cont.)
71
"TERINIT" TRACK SUITS — IM-
ported from FINLAND. Assorted
colors and sizes. Also brand name
camping and outdoor equipment at
207c savings. See Hank, room 305,
Memorial Gym, Mondays and Wed-
nesdays   (12:30-2:00).	
PUREBRED PEKINGNESE PUP-
pies, gorgeous balls of fluff. Must
see  to  love.   872-1747
SONY 350 TAPE DECK WITH 70
recorded blues albums. Perfect
cond. $250 (or best offer) 224-
7116.	
HELP! MY CAR INSURANCE IS
up. I must sell some part of my
stereo  system.   224-5194.	
ROLLIFLEX TLR 2.8 F WITH
case, filter. Just $198. Ph. 738-
9471.	
SCUBA EQUIP. 2-STAGE, 2-HOSE
aqua-master regulator, $75. Tank,
$40.   Excel,   cond.   683-8077.	
MAHOGANY DRESSER, VANITY
and bench, bed and nightstand,
$80. Mahogany dining table $50.
Wood, silver, stainless canape
dishes, etc. never used. Steam
iron.   255-8678.
TYPEWRITER
733-6656.
PORTABLE   $35
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM. POINT GREY
and MacDonald. Private entrance,
laundry. Available immediately,
$45.    After   6,   738-1770.	
SLEEPING ROOM IN OLDER
West End home. No hassels. $50
per   month.   Call   684-2618.	
SHARE HOUSE (MALE). OWN
bedroom,   $65.     876-2366.	
FURNISHED    ROOM    AND    FULL*
cooking    facilities.     2038    W.     5th.
Phone   after    5   p.m.    Single   girl
only.    733-5156.	
FULLY FURNISHED — PHONE,
light, heat included. Share house
facilities. Guy(g). Kitsilano. Study-
ing   facilities,   etc.   Ph.   738-0784
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE. PH.
733-5436,   $35   per  month.	
STUDENT ACCOMMODATION NR.
Campus   in   home.   Grad   student,
first-class amenities, non-smokers.**
Serious   students   only.   Any   na-
tionality welcome.  Ph.  228-9127
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION NOW
available at the Sigma Chi House
the newest dormitory on Campus.
Summer rates on request for both
room and/or board, 5725 Agron-
omy.   224-6374   or  224-9620	
MEN WHO WANT GOOD BED-
room for summer available 1st
May, near UBC Gate. Private ent.,
tel.  use.  Call  224-7623	
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM, PRTV-
ate bath, in lovely South Granville
home   for   responsible   student,   on
bus   line,   no   cooking;   male   pre-^
ferred.   Available   April   1.   Phone'
224-6090	
NEED CHEAP ACCOMMODATION
on Campus? Quiet clean rooms for
male students. $50 month, with
kitchen privileges. Clean linen &
parking. Board $45 if desired.
Close to Libraries. 224-0327 or
come to 5760 Toronto Rd.	
EXCEL.   ACCOM.   —MALES.   W-W
carpet,   T.V.   room,   kitchen   facili- T
ties.   Quiet,   near U.B.C.   228-8040.
Room  &  Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student.  $80 per month.  Fraser &
22nd Ave.  Phone 879-7061.	
FREE ROOM & BOARD FOR GIRL
student in exchange for help with
children. Near U.B.C. gates, 224-
6192.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
3 FEM. GRADS WANT HOUSE OR
apt., pref. furn. Kits, or Pt. Grey. -
Immed.     733-3601.	
MALE ROOM-MATE WANTED —
Share Beach Avenue apartment,
summer or longer,  $75 mo. Avail-
able   now.   Rod,   688-9683	
WANTED: FURNISHED APART-
ment or house for visiting physics
prof. His wife and two children
from aprox. June 10 to Sept. 10.
If interested contact Joyce Sjerve
at  263-9982	
WANTED— FEMALE TO SHARE
house and expenses. Phone eves.,
224-7745.
Unf. Houses  &  Apts.
84
WANTED     GIRL     TO     SHARE     3-
bdrm.  apt.  with 2  others,  $60 mo.
685-0735,   after   6.	
. ASSISTANT PROF., MALE,
single, seeks reasonable sized private     accommodation,     preferably
Kitsilano  area.   733-0234	
SELF-CONTAINED    1-BED. -SUITE
for   rent,   $95.00.   Vicinity   70th   &
Granville    St.    Available    immediately,   263-4773.
FOR BEST RESULTS USE YOUR UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Tuesday, March  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
SPOR TS
Basketballers
take two titles
The seemingly endless pursuit
of the Canadian basketball
championship finally came to a
close on Saturday afternoon for
the UBC Thunderbirds as they
downed the McMaster Marauders
96-75 in Hamilton.
As well as the CIAU
championship, the win also
represented the Birds' 25th victory
without a loss to Canadian
competition, the seventh straight
playoff win, and the 28th victory
against four losses on the season.
Leading 45-44 at the half on
Saturday, the Birds came out and
scored 13 unanswered points to
take a 14 point lead, never to look
back. UBC was able to break the
Marauders 2-3 zone defense by
shooting 51 per cent from the
field in that second half.
Derek Sanke was the man with
the hot hand as he hit on 12 of 21
from the field and 6 of 7 from the
line to finish with 30 points.
Forward Bob Molinski, playing his
final game as a Bird, made it a
good one as he scored 19 points,
grabbed 22 rebounds, and
committed only one turnover.
Ron Thorsen who was selected
the most valuable player in the
tournament had 19 points while
Terry MacKay and Alex Brayden
had 13 and 6 respectively.
Despite playing their third
game in less than three days the
Birds were able to beat McMaster
at their own game, in their home
court, by outrunning them both
on the fast break and defensively
with their full court press.
"Everyone was just great on all
three days," said a happy coach
Peter Mullins upon his return to
Vancouver. "They all did the job
just when we needed it."
The Birds got to the final by
first dropping the St. Mary's
University Huskies 74-55
Thursday and dumping the
Laurentian Voyageurs 107-78 in
the semi-final. In Friday's affair
the Voyageurs were simply unable
to match the Birds size, speed and
experience and bowed out in a
fashion exquisitely displayed by
most WCIAA teams earlier this
year.
Once again the statistics
revealed untold phenomena as the
Birds had a cool 79 rebounds
compared to 42 for Laurentian
and UBC also managed 28 assists
during the romp. The Birds were
led by Thorsen who had 28
points, 7 rebounds and 7 assists,
Molinski with 25 points and 21
rebounds and by Sanke who had
19 points and 13 rebounds.
PATIO
EAT IN -TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W, Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
The earlier win over St. Mary's
of Halifax was probably the
toughest of the three contests but
UBC again had a great second half
to win it 74-55. Molinski again led
the winners this time with 19
points while Derek Sanke dropped
in 17 and Ron Thorsen 16.
The women's Basketball
Thunderettes also did a fine job
and won the Canadian Senior A
Women's title in St. John on
Sunday by defeating Manitoba
65-36.
UBC advanced to the final
game by defeating Ontario 67-35,
New Brunswick 83-54, and
Alberta 80-38. The Alberta game
also won the Western Canadian
championship for the
Thunderettes.
Manitoba also went into the
final game with a 3-0 record.
And another
The Thunderbird soccer team
surprised a lot of people,
including themselves, Saturday by
beating fifth place Eintracht 4-0
for their fourth straight win.
The boys were hungry for this
game and came out fighting from
the start culminating in a goal off
a header by Doug Wilson after
barely two minutes of play.
Fifteen minutes later the
premier players of the team, Tony
Mayor and Gary Thompson
contributed their first of the game
and that's where the score stayed
at the half.
Coming out in the second half
the team seemed to be resting on
their laurels with a few good
rushes by Eintracht, but soon
settled down. Gary Thompson
made his first goal of the match
on a penalty kick. The scoring was
completed with fifteen minutes to
go on a goal by Dave Durante off
a Gary Thompson pass to stand
the score at 4-0 for the game.
It's interesting to note that
rookie goalie Jim Kitsul recorded
his second shutout in as many
games. And this win pulls the
team, temporarily at least, out of
the league cellar and up a rung.
The Birds play their last two
games of this season on the 27th
and 28th of this month with
Croatia and Firefighters
respectively.
TRIUMPHANT UBC BASKETBALL TEAM returns home after taking the Canadian intercollegiate
championship in Hamilton this weekend. Team captain Alex Brayden is holding the trophy symbolic of
that title, while coach Peter Mullins apparently curses his return to Vancouver's eternal rain.
Rowing wins   Big Block awards
The UBC varsity rowing crew
had another successful weekend as
they took first place in both
regattas they competed in.
Saturday the Thunderbird
crew defeated Pacific Lutheran
and University of Puget Sound at
American Lake at Tacoma. UBC
rowed a time of 6:41.5 for the
2,000 meters while second place
PLU turned in a 7:09 time.
In the next race the UBC
Jayvees came second to the
University of Washington frosh,
15 seconds behind them.
Sunday the Birds rowed a very
fast 6:03 for the 2,000 meters,
aided by strong tailwind. The
UBC Jayvees came third in the
same race, narrowly losing out to
Western Washington.
Rugby  loses
There aren't many games that
the Thunderbirds rugby team has
deserved to lose this year but they
deserved to lose to the University
of Washington Saturday.
What burns coach Donn
Spence is that they could have
won the game with ease instead of
losing 11-9. Basically they just
played poorly as a team.
Individually there were some stars
but on the whole team play was
extremely ragged.
"I don't know what it was,
whether it was the
disappointment of losing the game
last Saturday or just general
fatigue, but it was the 'worst
display of university rugby I've
ever seen."
The Braves rugby squad played
the University of Washington
seconds and won by a score of 6-3
in the second division of the
Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby
Conference.
GO NORTH!
Looking for a SUMMER JOB? Ifs your choice: make $300
monthly in the city or up to $1700 a month working up
NORTH.
$ MO N E Y $
We can supply you with complete information on where to go, what to do,
who to see to get those high paying jobs on pipelines, construction, oil rigfc,
or in mines forestry, transportation. The YUKON, N.W.T., and other northern
areas need labourers, equipment operators, technicians, skilled labour and
women in offices, labs, lodges . . . Conditions are generally good, room
and board free or nominal, transportation to job is often financed. Turnover
is high everywhere with on the job training  in certain areas.
For your copy of our comprehensive 38 page booklet forward $2.00 (ad*d
15c exch. on personal cheques) to:
NORTHERN JOB INFORMATION
BOX 295, SOUTH BURNABY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Big Block banquet on
Wednesday, March 18 this year
will see a record 49 new blocks
given out in 18 sports.
Blocks are given to players
with two years of varsity
experience or two years of
junior varsity and one of
varsity, and nomination on the
basis of outstanding play.
This year's winners of a
block for the first time are:
Badmonton:     Morley     Jameson,
Victor Yang.
Basketball:    Terry    MacKay,    Ron
Thorsen.
Bowling: Vern Huculak.
Cycling: Joe Hailey, Helmut Meisl.
Fencing: Norm Price (Mgr.).
Field Hockey: Kelvin Wood.
Football:     John     Bellamy,     Roger
Gregory,     Ian     Harriman,     Ian
Jukes,   Don  Lumb,  Fred Maier,
John Wilson.
Golf: Ross Ellison, Larry Haddock,
Doug     Stewart,     Ole     Nielsen
(Mgr.).
Ice     Hockey:     Dwayne
Doug      Buchanan
Darnborough,    Wayne
Barry Wilcox
Rugby:     Gary
Biagioni, ;
Mike;
Schaab,
Tom Williamson.
Hoskins,     Bruce
Johnson,    Eric    McAvity,    Ross
Mcintosh, Spence McTavish.
Soccer:   Robin Elliot, Tony Mayor,
Wayne Larson, Doug Wilson.
Swimming:     Don     Cooper,     Dave
Goodman,   Bruce   Melton,   Bob
McKay.
Tennis: Ted Kaplan, David Rollins,
Roger Skillings.
Track    and   Cross   Country:    Ken
Hirst, Gordon Larson.
Volleyball:    Dan    Clark,    Meredith
Spike, Wayne Taiji.
Wrestling: Bob Ormond.
DIRECTIONS DAY
Directors and members of each department will be present to counsel education students and transfers in courses
and majors.
MARCH  19th — 12:30-2:30
Education  Lounge
Designed by Ingmar Relling
Isn't this what you deserve at the end pf a
long, difficult day? Layers of leather to sink
into. Sculptured, body pleasing contours. A
footstool that's not just an ornament. And
design that's -a collector's item. So nice to
come home to.   .   .even   if  you're  not tired.
SC/IXD/X1U4H FURNITURE CO
1804 West 4th  (at Burrard), Vancouver, B.C.
732-6426 Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,.March   17,  1970     »
'■m*y\^%\r*fr»~
^.■ri^if^j'-.'.^-.-'S
'SO I SAYS TO HIM, I says, who was that lady I saw you with last night. And he says,
hell, that was no lady, that was my wife. Get it?' Well, what else do you talk about
beside the pool in Nitobe Gardens when the sun is shining?
—david bowerman photo
UBC PLAYERS CLUB
GENERAL MEETING and ELECTIONS
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
- 12:30 -
SUB  Room  105B
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
First Annual General Meeting
The first Annual General Meeting of the Graduate
Student Centre will be held on Wednesday, March
25, 1970 at 12:30 p.m. in the Lower Lounge of the
Centre. Nominations are now open for student members of the Board of Directors. Nominations close on
March  23.   Elections take place on March  26.
Ontological  Society  Presents
MICHAEL CECIL
on
)>
LOVE AND
COMPLETENESS'
•
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 18
SUB 211
The Studentbank closes in
5 minutes and this idiot's got to
prove himself!
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
___
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
We relate to students.
Student Union Building Branch — T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch — G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr.

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