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The Ubyssey Mar 13, 1970

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Array Page 2:    Another deserter wants a wife
Page S:    Sir George students acquitted ot
conspiracy
Page 8:    All the news, and all that
Page 24: A modern-day miracle for tenants
TH? UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 40
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1970
228-2305
SIMULATED PICTURE of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club parking lot, prepared
by West Point Grey ratepayers association, shows the scenic value of 250 parked
cars along the Kitsilano waterfront. The RVYC is presently negotiating with city
council for a permit to develop this area.
English profs gather
support
By JOHN ANDERSEN, LINDA HOSSIE and SANDY KASS
Approximately 66 per cent of tenured English profs
have signed a petition asking that the decision to deny
tenure to English profs Brian Mayne and David Powell be
reviewed.
The tenure issue arose approximately three months
ago when it was disclosed that Mayne and Powell would
be refused tenure because they had not met the publishing
standard set by the tenure committee.
Students at a meeting Thursday noon in Buchanan
lounge passed a motion of support for Mayne and Powell.
A motion in support of the idea of democracy on the
departmental level was deferred until Monday whan an
unofficial university wide teach-in is planned.
Specified in this motion was the idea of student
representation on all faculty committee at the university.
The matter was also discussed at an English
department meeting Thursday.
"The meeting started out pretty well," said English
prof Kevin Alldritt.
"Dr. Stanley Read made an excellent speech,
deploring the present situation, and recalling the humanist
values of our profession," he said.
However, when it came to discussing the tenure
problem, the situation was not quite the same.
The English department council, the highest
legislature within the department brought up a motion
stating: "Be it resolved that the council be requested to
explore means of instituting a tenure committee that may
more effectively represent the views of all the tenured
members of the department."
A request for a vote on the measure was denied by
English department head Robert Jordan.
His grounds for the denial were simple.
"This meeting was set up for informal discussion
only. There is no need for a business motion," he said.
He later said the tenure committee as it now stands is
the most representative body existing who can effectively
deal with the situation.
Perhaps a wider election of tenure committee
members will be feasible in the future, but at present the
English' department can only go along with the
committee's decision."
The refusal to allow the council's motion to be voted
on, sparked the petition of appeal that was sent to
administration president Walter Gage.
Gage was not available for comment on the petition.
The purpose of the meeting in theory was to air some
opinions of the present issues facing the English
department," said Alldritt.
Over half of the faculty members present at the
meeting left after the vote on the council's motion was
denied.
Arts undergraduate society president-elect Don
Palmer said emphasis should be placed on a man's ability
to teach, and not on how much material he may or may
not have had published.
"I know less than anyone else," said fired prof
Powell.
Other Stories, pages 2, 3 and 6
"I have not received any written statement explaining
how I do not fit the criteria necessary for tenure."
Powell has written a book which is presently being
considered for publication, but the tenure committee
refused to put off its decision until after it is published.
Mayne, a former Arts 1 prof, has written several
papers on the credibility of the new course, none of which
have been published, as yet.
The whole issue is not only of concern to the English
department or the faculty of arts, but to the entire
campus," said Palmer.
A   further   meeting   to   discuss   the English tenure
situation will be held today at noon in Buchanan lounge.
Jordan will explain the departmental reasons for the
decision.
The major points of the crisis are the relationship
between publishing and teaching at UBC and the extent of
democracy in the university.
"This is going toward a PSA situation because of the
frustration of students," said Alma Mater Society
president-elect Tony Hodge at a meeting to discuss the
crisis Wednesday noon in SUB conversation pit.
(The recent strike at Simon Fraser University over the
denial of tenure to eight profs in the political science,
sociology and anthropology department lasted three
months and virtually destroyed the department.)
He said students are becoming increasingly aware of
their powerlessness at the university.
The only thing to be done at present is for the faculty
to make a lot of noise, he said.
"There is more involved here than just the English
department. It involves the whole university," said AMS
vice-president designate Christine Krawczyk.
"It happened two years ago in the psychology
department and in the zoology department last year.
We've got to stop this situation now."
English grad student Paul Trout agreed with
Krawczyk.
"What goes on in the English department will affect
the entire university. The policy of publishing made by
the English department will lead to the same policy in
other departments, he said.
"People from all departments should unite to fight
the decision.
"We have to keep badgering (acting arts dean Doug)
Kenny and Gage to show we will not allow this school to
be turned into a publishing mill."
Trout charged that people in the English department
To page 3: see PROFS, STUDENTS
Your new AMS v-p is ineligible
Next year's Alma Mater Society council is without an
official vice-president.
AMS vice-president elect, Christine Krawczyk, was
declared ineligible by student council Tuesday night.
Krawczyk's ineligibility was due to a constitutional
point which states that the vice-president must have spent
at least two full years at this university.
Krawczyk is currently enrolled in second year arts,
thus fails to fulfill this qualification.
Apparently the elections eligibility committee failed
to check out this matter, as did Krawczyk.
Neither the committee nor Krawczyk made any
excuses for their omission.
In an attempt to solve the problem, council declared
Krawczyk as the acting AMS vice-president until
September, when elections for the position will again be
held.
Krawczyk will then be eligible to run for office. Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  13,  1970
US. army deserter relives
horrors in 'Frisco stockade
By JIM DAVIES
The stories of American armed forces deserters
in Canada, although they have a tendency to read
like the plot from a "B" movie are, in fact, a tragic,
true mirror of the times.
After speaking to several deserters currently in
Vancouver, it is clear that the treatment of
individuals who vocally disapprove of the actions of
the U.S. military are severely dealt with.
Typical of the treatment given to members of
the military who dissent is the case of Gary, a
deserter currently in Vancouver.
Gary was an honors student in his fifth
semester at the University of Southern California.
He had obtained a 2S deferment, the status given to
students enrolled'in university.
Despite Gary's 3.8 grade average, he was a
target for the draft. The reason for this was because
he was a member of the Students for a Democratic
Society.
"I made no secret of my feeling for the United
States government," said Gary.
The final cause of his being drafted into the
army was, in his opinion, a speech he made in the
student union building of USC denouncing some of
the policies of the American government, in
particular, the Viet Nam war.
"Originally I was going to evade the draft by
travelling to Canada, however, an advisor in SDS
told me to try to work from within the system,
convincing others of the wrong of the American
policies," he said.
"However, I soon found that I could not
accomplish anything from working within the
armed forces, so I went AWOL."
Gary was soon apprehended and was placed
under a 30 day restriction. He was then told that he
would soon be leaving for his "tour" of Viet Nam.
"I told my commanding officer to shove my
Viet Nam orders."
To   page   20:   see   GARY
English honors students  statement
The following is a statement by English honors
students Ann Jacobs and Gary Paterson. It
represents the position of the English honors
students on the tenure issue currently under
discussions on campus.
Found: One English department that judges
scholraship merely on the basis of publication and
that pays lip-service only to teaching ability.
Wanted: An English Department that is
benefitting both students and faculty, recognizing
the importance of good teaching, and evaluating
scholarship by more humane and just means than
publication.
Dr. Jordan said at the AMS council meeting of
March 10, that the students' welfare and the
reputation of the English department would be
jeopardized if faculty members did not publish.
We feel, however, that excessive weight placed
on publication as exemplified by the case in point is
in itself a more serious threat to the future of
students and the English department. Firstly it has
involved the neglect of a proper emphasis being
placed on teaching; amd secondly, it has involved
the application of limited criteria (that is,
publication alone) in the judgment of a man's
academic ability.
Beyond a doubt the two professors in question,
Brian Mayne and David Powell, do fulfill the criteria
set out by the Faculty Handbook-scholarship as
exemplified by teaching and research-when viewed
from a less narrow point of view.
We question whether proper consideration has
been given to various articles, theses and
manuscripts which, though not yet published,
provide full indication of the calibre of these two
men.
A department is judged by outsiders in two
ways-not only by its publishing record but also by
the students it produces. The former is important,
by all means. Good teachers, however, are needed to
produce good students.
Professors Mayne and Powell are recognized by
their students and peers as excellent teachers, and
they could not be such good teachers if they did not
constantly continue their own research.
The promotions and tenure committee should
remove their blinkers and review the situation from
all angles. The prejudices that have been displayed
in this decision should be laid aside.
We wish to let the faculty know that they have
student support in their attempts to reverse the
decision of the department tenure committee.
HQMaiSih
One of the major issues with which Speak
Easy has had to deal is alienation, probably an
appropriate topic to talk about what with
exams and crammming just around the corner.
Though much is made of the multiversity and
its effects on the individual, it's still sobering to
meet a second or a third-year student who
complains of having no friends, of feeling
lonely, of doing nothing exciting.
This perhaps is one of the tragedies of
university life — and one of its most blatant
contradictions, for while it professes to be
training students in various skills by which he
will benefit society, it is essentially robbing him
of the very qualities that people need ever so
desperately today — the ability to relate to
other people.
This is not so difficult to understand when
one observes the "job" the average graduate is
being prepared for, if it exists at all. In fact, the
university is doing an excellent job in turning
out a docile, impassive, uncreative, and usually
unconcerned individual, just the type of person
our industries and bureaucracies need to keep
going. And any person fool enough to rebel
against this process is immediately labelled a
troublemaker and properly disciplined.
The average student realizes this, but also
realizes the reverse side of the coin — the
powers arrayed against his changing the status
quo are seemingly massive. Indeed, his
alienation — from his work, from his professors,
from people around him — are a reflection of
his professors, from people around him — are a
reflection of his perceived powerlessness, thus
leading to apathy, which just allows the vicious
circle to continue unchecked.
The first, and most important, task in
combatting this rather bleak situation is
becoming aware of the reasons for its existence.
'This necessarily entails utilizing the very
faculties the university always professes to
instill — a questioning, inquisitive mind. It
means questioning your environment, the
courses you take, the society of which you are
a part. It means getting together with other
like-minded students, breaking out of a shell in
which you believe you are the only one feeling
the way you do. And it means developing
programs and alternatives, making the decisions
that will affect your life and others sharing the
responsibility for those decisions.
The catchword is experience — the
replacing of meaningless and void relationships
with people and our environment with true
social interaction, of massive hierarchical
bureaucracy with less authoritarian and more
flexible structures, and of apathy with
communal action.
Speak Easy is now open five days a week,
from 10 in the morning to 9 at night. Drop in
to room 218 of SUB to talk or ask any
questions that might be on your mind. Speak
Easy can also be reached by mail by writing to
Speak Easy, Box 115, SUB, UBC, or telephone
228-3706.
This column is prepared by the staff of
Speak Easy.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
English tenure issue is not closed, says Gage
The English tenure issue is not over, UBC president
Walter Gage said Thursday.
Gage issued a statement to "clarify a statement
which appeared in Tuesday's Ubyssey in an article
reporting on the situation in the English department."
Gage was reported to have said he would not reverse
the decision made by the English department tenure
committee "because no one but English faculty
pembers can judge English scholarship."
The committee decided not to grant tenure to
English profs David Powell and Brian Mayne on the
grounds that they had not fulfilled the criteria governing
tenure.
Gage said the statement in The Ubyssey arose out of
a private discussion with a group of students and did not
accurately reflect the views he put to them.
"At the time of that conversation, I had not had an
opportunity to read the report of the faculty of arts
promotion and tenure committee, with its voluminous
documentation," he said.
"Since reading the report, I have written to acting
dean (Boug) Kenny asking for further information on
some of the points mentioned in the report and asking
that the committee in the report and asking that the
committee consider certain other aspects of the issue
which I felt had not been covered."
Grad students form their own tenure committee
By ROBIN BURGESS
The English graduate students'
committee on tenure has released
a report recommending that the
department's tenure committee
cease to function until it has a
systematic way to evaluate
teaching effectiveness.
"As it presently operates, the
committee cannot possibly make
a fair and intelligent asssessment
of the candidate's qualifications as
either teacher or scholar," said the
report.
The report quoted passages
from Promotion Guidelines, a
document approved by the
departmental council, specifying
that teaching should receive the
same emphasis as publication
when assessing a candidate's bid
for tenure.
According to the report the
guidelines    state    that    "The
department recognizes teaching
and scholarship to be equally
important and deeply
intermingled" and later in the
same vein: "The evaluation of an
individual's teaching normally will
carry more weight in promotion
in the junior ranks . . ."
In regards to the procedure of
the tenure committee the report
recommended that tenure
committee members "be elected
by the process of public
nomination and secret ballot."
The report called the present
method of selecting members of
the committee "a mockery of the
word election".
Other recommendations
included:
• That the principle of
parity be followed in the creation
of the tenure committee;
• that only tenured members
English grad student rep Jim Trout holds forth Wednesday in SUB conversation pit at English student meeting.
-dave «nnt photo
from the full and associate ranks
be allowed to serve on the tenure
committee;
• that every statement of
fact relating to the qualifications
of the candidate be supported by
hard evidence;
• that the candidate have the
opportunity to address the tenure
committee and that the
committee be allowed to question
the candidate orally;
• that the vote on the
proposed final recommendation
be by secret ballot;
• that in the event that the
committee votes to deny tenure
the candidate be immediately
notified of the grounds for the
decision in writing and that he be
allowed to meet with the
committee to discuss the reasons
for the recommendation;
• that when there is evidence
of substantial departmental
disagreement with a
recommendation of the
committee, a confidential meeting
be called in which all full and
associate professors with tenure
debate the decision and
formulate a final position on it;
• that the Guidelines be
revised to read that, in general,
teaching will be the primary
critierion for tenure.
"It is a melancholy thing to
think that the members of this
department have tolerated for so
long the tenure committee's light
and superficial discharge of its
important trust," the report
concluded.
Profs, students express views on tenure crisis:
From   page   1
have been warned to publish or they will not be granted
tenure when their cases come up for consideration next
year.
"You're going to come back to a different school if
you don't do something about this right now," he said.
"You can't fault Jordan," said grad student president
Art Smolensky.
"He went by the procedures although he may have
bent some of these."
Students Wednesday had mixed opinions as to what
action should be taken to support Mayne and Powell.
A member of the audience suggested an occupation
of the fourth floor of the Buchanan building where the
English department offices are situated. Others suggested
that students speak to their English progs to try and build
support for the case.
It was decided to defer further action until the
Thursday meeting, however.
English prof Fred Stockholder charged at the
Thursday meeting the tenure committee had not
examined a manuscript on Browning submitted by Powell
when his case was reviewed.
"The case had been decided and they didn't want to
. re-open the case after the initial decision," he said.
An unidentified engineering student said a situation
similar to that existing in the English department also
exists in the faculty of applied science.
Electrical engineering prof Erci Sigurdson is
recognfced as being the best man in his field of computer
engineering but has now been denied tenure, he said.
'Professionalism
kills education
He said Sigurdson spends his time teaching in the
undergrad labs and in seminars so he has no time to
publish.
"If you don't see the classroom as a place where
knowledge is created, you are not only showing your
contempt for the students but you are closing yourself off
as a student," said anthropology prof Bill Willmott.
"Our whole concept of education seems to be
threatened and maybe destroyed. Professionalism kills the
concept of education that I hold to," said English prof J.
R. Doheny.
Trout said: "The choice facing you is between a good
teacher and a good teacher who publishes at the same
time. If a person spends a good aprt of his time doing
research, it detracts from the time spent on teaching."
"I think its unfair to ask of new teachers the kind of
publishing that's being asked of teachers in the English
department.
"This is an attack on good teaching."
Campus radio to reach Place Vanier
UBC campus radio, CYVR, has initiated a wider
service for students, on campus.
Place Vanier, a campus residence, is now
receiving the station at 650 on the dial.
CYVR previously this year had only been heard
in SUB and various lounges around campus.
"We are trying to facilitate better student
communication," said John Rea, CYVR president.
Rea said future expansion was a goal.
"Within ten days, we hope to increase our
service to the Totem Park residences," he said.
"There has been a lack of informational
programming  of student  concern,  therefore, we
believe that expansion is the key to a benefiting of
an understanding of the university.
"FM, which has always been a goal of UBC
radio, may be soon obtained pending the latest
Canadian Radio-Television Commission policy
decisions.
"There has been a freeze on new FM
applications for the past nine months pending new
guidelines set out by the CRTC."
Rea said students should listen to CYVR as
student information was put forth as well as a large
content of contemporary music, "student views on
programming will be appreciated," he said. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  13, 1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH 13, 1970
Tenure
Tenure, is a word that has recently gained a lot of
exposure and has caused a lot of hassle. Tenure was the
big problem at SFU an now it is deepening the rift in
the English department as the department refuses tenure
to professors David Powell and Brian Mayne.
Tenure basically means permanency of position,
life-long employment.
If a person is refused tenure, he is fired, for he
cannot remain at a university without tenure.
What we want to know about tenure is "why?".
What other occupations have this privilege? Who
besides professors can gain a permanent position? Why
should academics be so favored that they can receive
this stamp of security while everyone else must
continually justify their continued employment?
Tenure is an archaic institution. The granting of
tenure has no place in this age.
We are told that the idea of tenure began as a
defence against the practice of dismissing professors for
having unpopular political views.
We all know now that dismissal of a professor fori
his political views will not be tolerated by the students,!
even in the light of the repressive action of the SFUi
administration against the PSA profs a few months ago]
So why continue this medieval practice? /
We urge that UBC set a precedent in abolishing
the idea of tenure. j
If professors are not willing to come to a university
where they will not be granted tenure, then we will have
that many less lousy profs.
Praise
Our compliments to Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity
for its initiative and effort in putting up "push" and
"pull" signs on the doors throughout SUB.
The Ubyssey has not, in the past, had much good
to say about fraternities, but we like to say that we give
praise where praise is due.
Praise is due.
Thank-you, people, for doing something the AMS
should have done 18 months ago.
Flash
Psst.
The newest campus RCMP radar picket car is a pale
metallic blue 1968 Dodge four-door sedan, licence
number FG*996.
For the sake of the other poor students, give a
couple of light flashes if you see this car or notice a
radar trap set up.
The RCMP has been pretty busy lately, breaking in
the new car, but we don't want to wear them out so
soon.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News   ..._    Paul   Knox
City  Nate Smith
Managing       Bruce  Curtis
Wire      Irene   Wasilewski
Sports           Jim Maddin
Senior    John Twigg
photo  —       Dave Enns
Ass't News      Maurice Bridge
Ass't City — John Andersen
Page Friday  Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Bouncing back from stardom on the
Front page of the "Popular" student
rag arch anti student degenerate writer
Jim Davies and blatant anti-working
class Brian McWatters harassed
reporters Jan O'Brien, Phi) Barkworth,
Ginny Gait and Jennifer Jordan. Dave
Schmidt and Bern Bischoff danced a jig
as Linda Hossie, Sandy Kass, and Bob
Bennett made music for Judy Young.
Jocks Scott McCloy, Tony Gallagher
and Dick Button chased fotogs Dave
Bowerman, Keith Dunbar, Brett
Garrett, and Marc Focus into the
darkroom. Maureen Gans cried when
she was left out. But was she????????
"Once we've taken the students' money, we don't have to tell them what we do with it
LETTERS TO  THE   EDITOR
Degradation
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Dear
Hypocrites,
I praise your hard-hitting
Speakeasy article in Tuesday's
Ubyssey. It lays bare the blatant
discrimination against women in
the male-dominated society which
forces women to adopt the
model-mannequin role. In
particular, it exposes the
despicable practise of our
newspapers of listing job
opportunities in sex categories
when sex is irrelevant to the job.
A good/bad example of this is
Tuesdays Ubyssey. On page 10,
you degrade women to sex-objects
for crass commercial purposes. On
page 14, column 4 you again
stoop to the depths and list jobs
by sex.
Physician,   heal    thyself!
M. HOOG
The male-female designations
have now been eliminated in The
Ubyssey classified, starting with
the next issue. The woman in the
page 10 picture if what you say is
true, degraded herself. We only
took the picture.—Ed.
Thumbing
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
While you were so busy
praising Ontario's (or cutting
down B.C.'s) hydro system,
education system, corrections
facilities, mental health and
welfare systems in the March 3
Ubyssey, it would have been nice
(although it would not have
helped your agrument) to also
mention that in Toronto, at least,
the busses are owned by an
independent corporation, and the
tickets are four for a dollar. (If
you just plunk your change into
the box, it is 30 cents each time.)
And since Toronto is divided into
two zones, to get from the
downtown area out to the
residential areas costs 50 cents (in
tickets). So quit griping about the
prices. For 25 cents you can go
anywhere within the city of
Vancouver.
The next point is that
increased hitchhiking will make
for more muggings and assaults.
There is now one mugging or
assault out of every "N" number
of hitchhikers; therefore,
increasing the number of
hitchhikers will increase the
number of muggings and assaults.
There is no reason why muggers
should decrease their activities
when there are more potential
victims. In fact, that is an
excellent reason why muggings
and assaults should increase.
However there is one thing that
I do agree with, and that is that it
is ridiculous to expect us to
always have the correct change
ready. However, the best way to
combat this is not to boycott the
busses but rather to never have
the correct change ready. So get
out those dollar bills and fight the
real problem!
DIANE WALLACE
arts 1
Toronto, a city much larger
than Vancouver, has a subway
which can take you clear across
town in the time it takes to get
from Georgia and Granville to the
Blanca Loop. Metropolitan
Toronto is divided into far more
than "two zones." Such places
like Don Mills, Etobicoke and
Willowdale are separate
municipalities (like North
Vancouver) and generally further
away. Nevertheless, it takes less
time to take the bus and subway
from Don Mills downtown than it
does to go from North Van to
Broadway and Granville. Besides,
we referred to Toronto's hydro
system, not its bus system.
Furthermore, having just
completed a study of hitch-hiking
that involved thumbing rides and
talking with drivers, picking up
and talking to hitch-hikers, talking
to sociologists, talking to
policemen, talking to people
propositioned and attacked (both
male and female) by drivers,
talking to people who do not pick
up hitch-hikers and so on, we can
absolutely refute your suggestion
that muggings and so on will
increase. The more people
hitch-hike, the more acceptable
the practice will become and the
less chance muggers will have to
attack people. We suggest you talk
to Dr. Howard Boughey in the
sociology department. The
conversations we taped,
unfortunately, were broadcast
over the CBC Radio Network
Wednesday, too late for you to
appreciate them.—Ed.
Fees again
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Next September students
enrolling at UBC will as usual be
asked to pay an AMS fee of $29
as part of their tuition fees by the
board of governors.
As my petitions, which are
now in the hands of the board,
leave grave doubt concerning the
board's right to subsidize the
AMS, you may be wondering
what will be the proper course to
take next fall, should you not
wish to join or support the AMS.
Well, these are the steps to be
taken to avoid membership and
compulsory AMS fees should you
return: Pay your first installment,
less the AMS fees portion of your
tuition ($29) and state to whoever
is receiving the check that you
refuse to pay the AMS fees and to
specifically note this fact on the
record. If asked to state your
objections they can be:
(1) Compulsory payment of
AMS fees constitutes a religious
test which is expressly prohibited
by S 70(2) of the Universities Act,
which reads:
"No   religious   test   shall   be
required    of    any    professor,
teacher, lecturer, or student or
servant of the University, and
no    religious    observance,
according to the forms of any
particular     religious
denomination    or    otherwise,
shall be imposed on them or
any  of them, but the Senate
may make regulations touching
the    moral    conduct   of   the
students.
For    example,    my    money
subsidizes  The  Ubyssey.  It  has
often    expressed    views    which
offend my religious sensitivities.
As I have previously stated—it is a
test of one's faith that one must
financially support views that run
contrary to it.
(2) It has not been
demonstrated to you that it is
proper for the board to levy fees
which goes to an organization
which uses the money to affect
purposes totally outside the
jurisdiction laid out in the
Universities Act.
Until the petitions in the hands
of the board are answered to my
satisfaction and my specific
objections are refuted I feel that I
will be perfectly within my legal
rights to refuse payment of AMS
fees. S. GOLDBERG Friday,  March   13,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  5
Sir George blacks acquitted
on first charge
Mum X,
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 PANGO PANGO (UNS) - A cheering crowd of 40,000 puce
blorgs packed this island's largest arena, D. J. Davies stadium, to
witness the fight of the century, the battle for the national mental
lightweight title.
The bruising match ended in a deadlock as reigning champ D.
D. Bowsey and challenger P. B. Worthless unleashed torrid attacks
and pounded eacli other into senseless submission.
i COME IN TODAY a
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thy. lTiiudi h> [.jkip,'. up their mtu-hoio*. used
in cul canj Iiju: broken 011! vhoieuiK md
iil^s arid dcploy.-d hund.vds of men alorsi1 the
roulc.
'I he iii.irL1 fi>liovi> (wo wjeka oi
durn'Miilrjiioii', which bojjari t'ebnury 26 ivIumi
drmoustiatois stormed !hc Ko>aI Ujnk ol
C.jMdd<. hi.niLli in I'ori-ot-Sp.iin.
lio.iibu-us o! Cdiiidiiin j'ovcmmciH and
o'!"jr i.omine.cil lui'ldingi spu'ad ma-aiie
Mict'i di'inorKt. in inn involving [oris n;
[liotisands ■>] p.iru).ri-
(.'[jngei sa:d Wbdi.osdav thc« '"pooplcV
pd. I..inisii,i" (the lit'iiioni'ntiofisl in mid
*-'.orii\ b.' Inilowcd by "pruple'-i cuurr-' whiv.!'
■a»1I 'iv tlic-SL' "{'"■!l> 'J' ;orrupi.iin .md
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NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
SPECIAL EVENTS
TODAY - MAR. 13 - 12.30 PJL
SUB BALLROOM - 50c
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WESTERN DANCE THEATRE
Clean cut modern-dance, with no head trips, no frills,  by Canada's newest  and  Vancouver's  only  major  dance   company
Choreographed   by  the  resident  choreographer  of  the   Playhouse Theatre
Company:   Norberf   Vesak,
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970
Jordan says Mayne, Powell
qualifications marginal
By JIM DAVIES
English profs Brian Mayne and David Powell
were not granted tenure because their qualifications
were marginal, English department head Robert
Jordan said Tuesday night.
Jordan's statement came as a result of several
questions put to him at a meeting of the Alma
Mater Society council.
He had previously said that there were several
individuals up for tenure in the department with
insufficient qualifications and that two of them
(clearly Mayne and Powell) had chosen to reject an
offer of an extended period before coming up for
final consideration.
"Upon arriving as head of this department, I
was distressed to find that many members of the
faculty did not have sufficient requirements to meet
department standards up for tenure considerations,
so I extended the period before they came up for
tenure by two years," he said.
"However, two wished to obtain tenure
immediately and were considered.
"After adequate consideration, they were
refused tenure. The committee analyzed all evidence
with a great degree of care."
Employment  for   life
Jordan elaborated on the criteria used by the
tenure consideration committee in its evaluation
process.
"The requirements are basically twofold:
scholarship in teaching and research," he said.
He said that in matters such as this, "university
departments use the utmost discretion" as tenure is
representative of "employment for life".
"Several councillors and English department
students questioned the means of evaluation for
professors, stressing that teaching ability was being
seriously understated and that students should have
some say in tenure appointments.
Jordan quoted a Canadian Association of
University Teachers publication which said: "It is
unfair to involve students voluntarily or
involuntarily in university political policies and the
like. '
"Students do not have sufficient experience to
make meaningful decisions in these matters."
Jordan then re-emphasized the care given
tenure considerations and the importance of this
caution.
"The university cannot gamble on the teacher's
promise or his personality but upon his work," he
said.
"In thirty years we want to be sure that he is
not giving the same lectures on the same material.
Progressiveness is essential."
Jordan was then questioned as to the
democracy of the tenure considerations.
"Democracy is not the answer to the question
of evaluating tenure qualifications, he said. Under
the given system, the committee has the
responsibility of evaluating and using such criteria as
judgment of colleagues, ability to stimulate
scholarship, and reputation over a period of time
among students."
Gage   might  be  refused
Students inquired whether or not Jordan
believed that professors who currently held tenure
exemplified these traits.
He replied: "There are variations among
teachers from the highest to the lowest levels.
"This may sound bizarre but I think if
administration president Walter Gage were to apply
for a teaching position in the mathematics
department in 1970, he might be turned down."
Jordan concluded by stating that unfinished
manuscripts of the applicants were considered in the
evaluation and that both Mayne and Powell would
receive favorable letters of recommendation from
the department.
He emphasized that there is no stigma attached
to the failure to obtain tenure at this university,
giving the example that UBC's English department
had tried unsuccessfully to obtain as a faculty
member an individual who had recently been
refused tenure at another university.
Two members of the English department, Ian-
Ross and William Tallman, presented a different
viewpoint to council.
"Some view tenure as embalming the dead,
however, I view it as becoming a full member of a
department," said Ross.
"I believe that professors Mayne and Powell
have not been given a fair shake."
Council   passed   a   motion!
Student council agreed with the latter two
speakers, and passed a motion accordingly.
The motion read: "Moved that a review
committee investigate both the proceedures
governing the tenure hearings for Brian Mayne and
David Powell and the qualifications for tenure of
these two men.
"The committee should consist of members of
English departments outside of this university
competent to judge the academic and teaching
qualifications of Mayne and Powell."
Many AMS bureaucratic posts open
Attention all budding bureaucrats!
The Alma Mater Society has a number of
positions, open in all campus committees for which
all general students may apply.
The AMS assistant positions which are open are
as follows: co-ordinator of activities' assistants
(seven students needed), ombudsman's assistant
(one student), external affairs officer's assistants
(five students), secretary's assistants (two students),
public relations assistants (two students) and
assistant treasurers (several students).
The committee positions which are open are as
followes: winter sports centre management (two
positions open), SUB management (six positions),
discipline (four positions), elections (five students)
eligibility (four students) and finance (four students
needed).
The following standing committees need
chairman; academic activities, Canadian university
service overseas, community visitation,
homecoming, intramurals, speakers, special events
and performing arts.
The remaining committees which have positions
open are: Brock art (several students needed), SUB
art (several students), bookstore (four students),
traffic and parking, (four students) and finally, the
men's athletic committee (one student needed).
For further information call at the AMS offices
or see AMS secretary-elect Anne Clarkson in SUB
248. Written applications should be submitted to
Clarkson no later than noon, March 23.
QUELSTIOM?
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SUB Rm. 218   -   228-3706   -   SUB Box 115
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5:30, 7:30, 9:30 Friday, March  13,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
TACUY member pickets placement centre
—dave enns photo
UCWIC, TACUY see struggle
being taken to the streets
By GINNY GALT
The Action Committee for Unemployed Youth
and the Unemployment Citizen's Welfare
Improvement Council plan to storm welfare
minister Phil Gaglardi's office March 20.
"We've gone through legal channels and none of
them have worked. It's time for us to take our
struggle to the streets," said UCWIC representative
Jeff Marvin, arts 7.
Marvin said the UCWIC feels that Gaglardi
stands for an oppressive and fascist government
which in no way has the right and the good of the
people as its main concern.
UCWIC and TACUY are calling for meaningful
employment for everyone at union wages and
guaranteed annual incomes for people who can't
work.
"Furthermore, if jobs can't be guaranteed that
are both meaningful to the individual and society,
the person should have the right to turn the job
down and not be cut off welfare," said Marvin.
Marvin said Bennett's idea of getting people off
welfare is shipping them to "slave camps" off in the
bush where they work for $5.50 a day.
"As soon as the bush camp projects are over the
people are back on welfare, and if they don't accept
these jobs, Gaglardi is talking about cutting them
off welfare completely," Marvin said.
He said the demonstration in front of Gaglardi's
office is being supported by unemployed people,
employed people, welfare people and students from
UBC, Simon Fraser University and Vancouver City
College.
"The students have got to realize that their fate
is inextricably linked to the people fighting for
survival in the streets," said Marvin.
"We hope they'll show their support by coming
to a rally at UBC Wednesday and the Friday
demonstration."
TACUY held an "information picket" outside
the UBC placement office Tuesday.
Marvin said the picket was designed to make
people aware that no matter how well the
placement office does its job, the problem of
student unemployment is much more serious, and
to show that over discrimination is used in hiring
men over women.
'People power' disrupts senate
in protest against "blackmail'
KINGSTON (CUP) - Approximately 50
students, chanting "power to the people" broke up
a special meeting of the Queen's University senate
Wednesday. The disruption forced the body to
postpone re taliation against doctoral student
Charles Edwards and two others who last December
charged a chemical engineering professor with
political blackmail.
Wednesday's senate meeting was a continuation
of a senate meeting held February 25, where the
senate accepted the report of a special committee
that investigated charges made by Edwards and the
two other students: Tom Good and Glen Macdonell.
The investigation committee found chemical
engineering professor Henry Becker "utterly
innocent" of charges that he attempted to force
Edwards out of his doctoral program because of
Edwards' left-wing political activities.
At the February 25 meeting, the senate forcibly
ejected Terry O'Hara, Edwards' representative on
the investigating committee, after O'Hara demanded
that Edwards be present during the presentation of
the committee report.
Edwards and other members of the left-wing
free socialist movement, which conducted his
defence, have since denounced the report as a
"whitewash" of the incident.
At the Wednesday meeting, David Slater, dean
of graduate studies and research, introduced a
three-point motion calling for support of the
investigation committee report, a "request that Mr.
Edwards be taken from the registration of Queen's,"
and a suggestion to censure Good and Macdonell for
their part in bringing forward accusations against
Becker.
When the senate over-ruled an attempt to
disallow Slater's motion on the grounds it 'was "out
of order at this time," 10 students rose from their
seats in the senate spectator's gallery, chanting "this
is out of order... this senate is acting out of
order."
Other members of the Free Socialist Movement,
who had been picketting the meeting, pushed
through the doors of the senate chambers, and
eventually 50 students blocked the entrance to the
chamber.
Senate chairman John Deutsch adjourned the
meeting and called another for next week. The next
meeting will be closed to the public.
As they left the room, senators ran through a
guantlet of protesters, who raised their arms in nazi
and black power salutes, chanting "sieg heil," and
"power to the people."
Demonstrators then launched their own debate
over the move to expel Edwards from Queen's,
continuing their attack on the investigation
committee's report and terming the senate's action a
continuation of political repression on the Queen's
campus.
Guitar  thief
on  the  loose
A man posing as a destitute U.S. army
deserter has stolen a guitar valued at $300 from
a west Point Grey co-operative house where he
was offered a place to stay.
The man described as 6 feet 2 inches tall
and weighing 250 pounds has frizzy hair and a
scar across his upper lip.
Anyone with information regarding his
whereabouts or the whereabouts of the guitar is
asked to call Don or Jay at 988-4850.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970
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The communications monopoly is a threat to the
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workers, who now find themselves confronting a more
powerful and intransigent employer than ever before.
But it is equally a threat to the interests of the
newspaper consumers as a whole, whose need is for
media that radically challenge the oppressive status quo,
and not merely plead the special class interests of the
business community. On this occasion both producers
and consumers should be seeking ways to unite around
the destruction of the newspaper monopoly in
Vancouver, and the generation of a radical and
democratic media alternative.
How a paper died
Those few of you who may have been unaware that
Vancouver's two "competitive" daily papers were in fact
owned and published by a single company have by now
probably been made aware of the fact by their
simultaneous cessation of publication. This has not
always been the case, however: once upon a time
Vancouver had no less than three independent daily
papers.
Most of Canadian newspaper publishing is
controlled by a number of large national chains. By far
the most important are the Southam, FP, and Thomson
complexes. The latter chain is, at the moment limited
primarily to local newspapers in smaller urban centres
(e.g. Kamloops Sentinel, Sarnia Observer). The other
two chains include a number of major metropolitan
dailies (e.g. FP's Toronto Globe and Mail, Southam's
Edmonton Journal).
Up until 1957 Vancouver had three daily papers:
the Thomson-owned Herald (a morning paper), the
Southam-owned Province and the independent
Vancouver Sun (both evening papers). The Herald had a
small circulation of around 30,000, and was in
considerable financial difficulty. The Province had
originally been the city's leading paper, accounting for
55.9% of the total circulation of the evening press in
mid-1946.
After a strike by the Interantional Typographical
Union in June 1946, the paper shut down for some
weeks — just long enough for management to recruit a
team of professional strikebreakers from across the
country. For some eighteen months the Province was
produced by strikebreakers who ate and slept in the
plant.  In  all the strike lasted for over three years,
settlement being reached in November 1949. During this
period the Province was considered a scab paper by
members of the labor movement, and its circulation fell
off by almost 30%: from 124,000, to 92,000.
The decline of the Province's circulation turned out
to be permanent. By 1957 its share of the total
circulation had declined from the old figure of 55.9% to
33.8%. The circulation in 1957 was still lower than that
of 1946, despite an overall increase of almost 45% in
newspaper circulation in the city. The upshot of all this
was a decline in advertising revenue and serious financial
difficulties for the Province.
An attempt to resolve these problems was made in a
series of intricate financial maneouvres in early 1957.
Southam bought the right to publish the Herald, along
with certain contracts and franchises (but no physical
plant or tangible assets), from the Thomson chain for
just over $250,000. Southam then shut the Herald
down. A new company was formed owned jointly by
Southam and Sun Publishing, each partner holding
800,000 of the 1.6 million authorized shares. This new
company acquired all the holdings of Southam and Sun
Publishing in their respective papers, and undertook to
publish the Province Sun as an evening daily. Advertising
revenue was boosted by a new rule that required
advertisers to buy space in both papers. The new'
advertising rates actually involved a higher cost than
would have previously been entailed by the separate
purchasing iof advertising space in both papers.
This evolution of the communications monopoly in
Vancouver was completed in 1963 when the other major
Canadian chain, FP Publications (the joint venture of
Western Canadian publishers Max Bell and John Sifton),
acquired control of Sun Publishing. Vancouver now has
the dubious honor of being the meeting ground of
Canada's two greatest press giants.
Business connections
Southam had originally been the direct publisher of
the Province and thus its involvement in Pacific Press
tended to be fairly direct. Under the terms of merger it
appointed a publisher of the Province and a specified
number of members to the Board of Directors of Pacific
Press. In practice the Province publisher sat as a director
of Pacific Press, as well as becoming a director and
vice-president of Southam Press. The President and
Managing Director of Southam Press, St. Clair Balfour,
also sits on the Pacific Press board, along with the
chairman of Southam's Globe and Mail, R. H. Webster of
Montreal.
Similarly, the publisher of the Sun (appointed by
Sun Publishing), currently Stuart Keate, sits on the
board of Sun Publishing and FP Publications, as well as
the Pacific Press Board. FP interests are represented by a
key man in the FP complex — Brigadier Richard S.
Malone. Malone is the vice-president, publisher and a
director of John Sifton's Winnipeg Free Press, and
vice-president and general manager of FP Publications.
(V
il*"
or.!'.'!   aWv.   i.   din   ■■
He also acts as a director a:
Sun Publishing and represe*
Press Board.
Because of the proce
good deal of FP infitie
through Sun Publishing, o
corporation but now owns
The president of Sun pub
founders, Max Bell. A n
continue to sit on the boar
on the board of Pacific Pre
the business involvements c
indicate the kinds of
monopoly has with the Va
F. B. Brown is a direc
vice-chairman of Pacific Pr
of the board of Straits T<
shipping interests as chair
Steamships. He was form
industry as president of Cai
40's and more recently as
He still holds a directorsh
also very involved in the
chairman of the board
(wholesale suppliers to th
Valu outlets, and now con
and as a director of B
vice-president and director
the Bank of Nova Scotk
governor Cyrus McLean.)
McLean as a director of B
Okanagan Telephone Co.
boards of North Americ;
Trust, Nelson Laundries, a
summarize, Brown is invoi CRAZED KIDS RUN RAMPANT IN LOBBY OF MUSIC BUILDING
For some time now, ecologists, artists and freaks
have been telling us that one of western man's basic
tendencies is to totally and unconditionally annihilate
the organic environment into which he is born; and
that this drive stems from his basic experience of
alienation from his natural surroundings, which in turn
makes it necessary to engage in life-and-death war
upon it in order to remain alive.
To celebrate Open House, the tri-annual circus in
which this campus opens its gates to hordes of these
alien, aggressive western men, composer Wayne Carr
created a sound-space environment in the lobby of the
music building. It represented a small effort on this
artist's part to show an alternative to the traditional
model of the "hostile environment". It encouraged
people to participate, to realize themselves as an
integral part of an organic sensual process, rather than
as naked, weak animals, cast in a hostile natural world.
The vibes generated by this artistic
environment—a flux of translucent, floating plastic
strips wafted through by self generated sounds—were
calm, inviting, and totally without hostile intent. It is
impossible for any sensually aware person to not have
experienced the integrating congeneality of this
created environment.
Now we generally consider children to be more
naturally sensual and in more direct contact with the
vibrations generated by their environments. Because
children, we theorize, have not yet lived long enough
to become as totally fucked up by the frontier myth.
But this, we find out, is totally untrue. We find
that on Saturday, when the hordes were here, gangs of
young kids tore' gleefully through the music
lobby.-obviously looking upon it very much like
MacMillan   Bloedel   loggers   look   upon   a   forest of
trees—and pulled down every piece of environment in
sight. All this under the sick eyes of their helpless
parents. (There was, after all, no sign up saying that
the strips of space should not be torn down.)
And so on Saturday afternoon, the remnants of
the sound-space environment were lying dead all across
the campus.
It became clear to me that the children of the
hordes admirably display all the aggressive destructive
tendencies of their fucked-up parents. With the
difference that they are less socially inhibited and
therefore more easily give vent to their primeval urges.
I suggest that all these young boys and girls who
have so admirably adapted to the norms and demands
of this society be immediately put up against the wall
and shot—before the bastards grow up and celebrate
their twentieth birthdays with the annihilation of the
world. George & Berny's
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DEPTH CHARGES
PF: What motivated you to make a film?
GREEN: In the process of my work in literary studies I came
across a genuinely disturbing problem, and that is, what is an
"image?" In the criticism of literature we are constantly referred
to image clusters or patterns, to imagination itself, to dreams,
visions, the idea of the fantastic, and words like 'insight' which
suggest the role of optical problems in feeling and comprehending
a work of art. I began to realize that there was infinitely more
involved in getting to know one's own imagination or an artist's
than merely repeating the word. I wanted to find out if one could
enter the visual image and walk around in it, explore inside it, put
it on like a suit of clothes—or armour—, take it in like food, or if
one could go beyond the image as it ordinarily is understood. I
started asking deep questions about the semantics of imagery,
imagination, and the poetics of space. I wanted to live inside the
image. That is, I wanted to experience the image as a living entity
rather than as an object. I think too many critics treat the image
as a Platonic form, which they take to be fixed, finite and dead. I
see Plato's ideas as living things, forms—when one imagines a crab,
for instance, more is at stake in the experience than mere
mimesis: imagination is something living, organic, dynamic and
creative. It always tends towards freedom.
PF interviews UBC film-maker Eric Green on poetry and film.
Green's first film CHOKE is currently running at noon in SUB
auditorium in a FOUR FIRST FILMS package from Los Angeles.
PF: Is there any essential difference between the poet's image,
image systems, metaphors, etcetera, and the film-maker's?
GREEN: Film images assault. But film images must be poetic to
do that, that is, to have impact, authority and truth.
PF: Have you classified your film at all? Is it any easier to put
films in categories than poetry?
GREEN: Films that are good and poems that are good are living
experiences that shatter boundary lines and expand definitions.
They create semantic possibilities; they do not codify them.
PF: Or perhaps they codify some hitherto unknown potential in
the   human ... at   least bring it  into  form,  where  it  can be
experienced. I suppose that means they create it?
GREEN: Yes, that's it. Exactly. We tend to make too sharp a
distinction between the artist's creativity and the creator of the
universe, whatever its character may be ultimately.
PF: What the hell do you mean by that?
GREEN: Well, you have to ask yourself questions: What is the
great artist doing? What does the practice and appreciation of art
do for humanity? Both short range and long range, throughout
history and now you have to take a long hard look at history.
What does it mean? What is it? I believe in history as an aesthetic
proposition,  not   an archaelogical one.  There's an artist in
everyone. You can't survive five minutes without him.
PF: How do you get this kind of idea, this kind of thinking into a
film?
GREEN: How do you get it into a poem?
PF: Touche. You're trying to say the artist who dares to make art
that speaks to the irrational-art that is depth charges-
GREEN: I like that-"depth charges"-
PF: Thanks: let me finish. The artist who goes down to the
bottom, or up to the top, is actually in league with the or a
creator—a bigger creator than himself?
GREEN: Yes. We tend now to talk of the "creative unconscious"
or the "self creating consciousness." It's just new terminology for
an old, an immemorially archaic experience. Call it the artist's
ecstasy, or his agony, if you like. Or both.
PF: Why the image of choking in CHOKE?
GREEN:  I wanted to explore one image. I chose the most
characteristic image of our time: too much matter in too small a
space. Call it abundance, affluence, effluence, crowding, stuffed
bellies, too many bad books, or much too much providence. They
have to pay the wheat farmers not to produce a surplus.
PF: Is CHOKE about the grotesque?
GREEN: Perhaps. I jokingly said to one of the students in the
film production course last summer that it was... A parable
about existential everyman in the polluted modern metropolis. Or
something assinine like that. No artist can ever define his own
work. That's for other people to do. I don't believe self-portraits.
Cont'd on Pf4 - see 'MORE'
pfi 2WO
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970 What's Happened to the VSO?
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Something very peculiar has
happewKL -to ttte 'V»rtc$a*er
Symphony   OreMgrjt. 4wbl£Htt..
prgsentsease*.^   '-,,   j-%■:-}'*?&<■
and local folksinger Tom Northcott's
"... and God created woman..,,"■ a
slick piece of folksong tf&nipan,
making a total of seven works jfo $8
concerts. ■ ■ .-..-:
r
new
tsr s9tm^v-M^ia'mt^§'
..        "-.--'-■" "\1:   *r ■'***:
^*' Instead, 1 -.r^BMi \$q *m$Kmf* •
^grsmn* -variety,.- ipoiBfetft?, '.the
??^|8^g of contemportSry-wo*ttsrOf, to.
iV-fti^R "ati arbitrary dslfc thaw pieces
•Vwrittftft since 1956     '*
;*^* Take this year's Qrdgf&rwim/*&*>
.' Zoatfapfc. U\ the rggutar subscripfdon
'4. cenc&ft. "fftwr* fiave bpon Ae» works
,' i&t&ined that *8ns «m&$br since
£' tSSK, TWo of these wehr wtritt&i to
;? the fastdecade. '
Harry Fresdmanfc Tangents {1967},
was a fairly solid work fay a Canadian
composer, which trteaudiense actually
,<":«njoyed in spite of its twelve-tone
. .'-seawMte. The other work. Variations on
^,-a tMme of Beetnoven. by English
■\'Jjp»spn*er WHfretf Josephs, was an apt
v exercise in fousfcat puer3i$v not worth
£'.4t» paper ft was wtitt^i on.  '
■T»jp more r«entwo^s:^ere heard
on other ^t^nvt^'Sm Concerto
for Four Saltan! tgfimSetorr iSoiild
played by the Romeros last October
The other pieces performed at taw
avant-garde Sounds of the Century
concerts included works by Rorem,
Xenakis,   Penderecfci,    MesstaaA/f
Cinastpra, Fjenyng, Freedman, Warei,.
.aj.V. yt-titoslawski.   Ami -then  tfrefr .was
itfrer    new    wOTkV   ^^ku-,-pV^,   f^urfte Mflfffcs  by $i#r*tt,.
-T6e tjfcprr i SJtameajTw^l.." -J5pr«w antfThe&8ectors,
... was ^.<^mbine-.3^0dj^v>^*,&fe^reason|'have been su&Cste#
%WlftoiM/'w*Jifyg^ in ,$e«tto*rairy
cihcajled becauS^^^STace^W)!^^, J, *hu»6 et tni£ seasons wace/JjpErne of
removal of <§tej^#**J#e auiS»>' ifefcn (rthvr after someaffiff akaacWs
«^S(ifteth^hlBa^e whica^FwSeW'not (jpf' j&fng efforts, a - large" fiafiiber/of
j?»jtfac^lM^efof ane«B*f{'#0)toW}§g *-.patrons phoned the.siymphohy-o,ff|^
tWf^ynday concert One ftonders Jf:' and threatened to witrjdw* tfieir
'tj^-^eal He^son for the cancelation
tha\*f the VSQl
■ lack
£outd '
' "wasn't a lack of taitfeaiu»on-»e part
9f the symphony * managenietfr :^>
finding an alternative -method of
placing the orchestra, such as
platforms constructed above the seats
which could be quickly removed.'
Now, the amount of contemporary
rrftisic played by.the VSO tn&f year
would not be worth commenting on-if
it were not for the fact that during the
previous (1968 1969) season's-
concerts, twenty four works written
after 1950 were performed
Included at the subscription
concerts were such events as the world
-premiere of Assassinations, an
electronic-symphonic Work by
Vancouver composer Lloyd Burritt, a
far-out cantata. The Whale, by English
composer John Taverner which sent
tittle old ladies scurrying for the exits,
as well as works by Britten, Somers,
Henze, and Colqrass
sappflr£;Spth through ticket safn^nd
Artotner reason is that test yea/ the
Sounds of the 'Century concerts were -
not overwhelmingly successful,"
drawing only half full houses for the
first TWOj which combined comments
by conductor Meredith Davies with
.the music, designed to both turn on
and educate listeners at the same time.
In the latter case, I would suggest
that the reason for the failure of these
concerts was more due to a lack, of
general enthusiasm oh the part of die
symphony manaedment and board of
directors, as weii as the accompanying'
advertising campaign, which, like the
concerts themselves, was merely, the
beginmnq of an attempt tp reach a
new audience different fronj the uM&fc-
mmk-coat-and-jewels set traditibnsfh/
associated with the symphony/. -
The respond -which these
powers that-be have shown to the new
music   as   indicated   in   the   general
symphony programming this year fe;
extremely disappointing. It was once-
mentioned that this season would have "-
at least one Sounds of the Century--.
_ ..concert on May 4, but sources closer*
.'the organization, tepont. that t88|r
.chances oi this tafcHft^tiSgVjgu-e.next.MiS
nil., -v" *"'s*"'*
i"' would suggest
powers were ^Irried
- support.fgr suC&Jh c
ties of %em, they
■iook'at the overwhelmirl
qiven tO-'the schmalfcry Dulviaur
concerts and  the Beetho>$fi
*feeth gfcwltiich soM, PtnUycj^
due to both an incnSasfidij^frefMSJ
''the symphony by the #or$£?ajfid"4l
* superior advertising campaigns of
symphpny   designed   fy'jnak*
pubfte more aware
As it is, the iM$f'of ■
modern music is a ftfegrses^
terms of reaching the younfV
which wift some-day makeup'1,
patronage of the symphony as'
educat^rjg  the present audiences to
musicai development which occurrg
since   Beethoven,   S rahms,
. TchatkovskY.
Novt Hist plans are being matfe^
the 1970-71 sesason <whkk>'c
exciting In terms of both
am| ajrt&tsh H- would be'
- th*' syji^ahdny cbulci 'throw;
beh«^4!efedith Davies whc^-t
his- #wore    modem   prog/a
atp&npt^tffliily successfully^ '
tbfns^^Es into what maoy.
dying mst|feti6n.
-suppo^
as
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HOME'S U.B.C. San Francisco Draw
March 6,1970
DOUGLAS C. BRYSON - 1-APSC -
Trip for 2 to San Francisco
ANDREAS J.  RATHGEBER -  1-Comm. -
Dinner for 2 at H/s
ANDREAS J. MacDONALD - 2-Arts -
Evening for 2  at Oil  Can  Harry's
BARRY HINDER - 3-Arts -
2  tickets for Canuck's  Hockey
STEPHEN WONG - 3-Sc. -
2  tickets for Canuck's  Hockey
SAMUEL VESELY -  1-APSC -
Evening for 2 at The Daisy
MICHAEL T. VAN BEIRS - 1-Comm. -
Dinner for 2  at the  Grouse  Nest
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PLAYHOUSE   THEATRE
COMPANY
Final Production of the Season I
Slawomir   Mrozek's
TANGO
A Savagely Funny Twist on the Generation Gap
"full of dramatic surprises?'
—N.Y. Times
MARCH 13 to APRIL 3
8:30 p.m. nightly Sat. Matinees 2:30 p.m.
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Friday, March   13,   1970
THE      U BYSSEY More about that "Business of
the Image—Inside Aesthetics
GREEN: I decided that since I was going all
that way, I might as well get experience
directing actors. I had three: Greg Bell, who is
the man who suffers the choking anxieties.
Michele Meugens, a beautiful Belgian girl. And
Velma Berrarducci, who plays the dark lady he
is parted from early in the film. There is only
'voice over', a kind of humorous interior
monologue of the lead actor reacting to things
around him.
PF: How did you manage to get that much film
done?
GREEN: I kept the unit 'tight' and we moved
fast. The distances between locations in L.A.
are immense. I shot in seven locations PLUS. —
The L.A. Zoo, the Airport — my opening shot
of airplanes is taken at the exact spot where
they shot the Easy Rider sequence, the
heroin sale.
PF: I've seen some of the still photographs you
used in the film. The techniques are very
interesting.
GREEN:  Those  are Bob Flick's. He did the
cinematography for me. I think he is one of the
greatest photographers in North America. Bob
had   a   show   here   last   fall.   The   Fine   Arts
Department is putting out a book with some of
his prints in it. He's got a book in the works
called L.A. Book of the Dead.
PF: The other three films?
GREEN: Three excellent films. Marilyn Miller is
from    Royal    Oak,   Michigan.   Her   film   is
thematically   oriented.   She   uses   images   of
woman . . . actually,    the    Postal    Customs
Department thought I was trying to import a
pornographic film. It's called Woman, Woman.
It took a month to straighten that out. They
sent the film to Ottawa, to have it checked out.
Marilyn's film is fun. She shows a great deal of
wit   and   sensitivity.   Brian   McMaster   is   at
Purdue    University;   he's    from    Lafayette,
Indiana. His film, Warren Hamilton, deals with
the identity of one man, a statistical listing of
facts.. . like    E.    E.   Cummings'   Unknown
Citizen, with a really powerful psychological
twist at the end. Fukuhara's film uses music
brilliantly   and   the   professionals  praised  his
colour photography highly. His film is called
Children. At the two-day session of showings at
the end of the course, I stood up and praised
Richard Fukuhara's film—which is in the Four
First Films package. I said that Orson Welles
believed the film image should be an extension
of the poetic image, and Richard's film
achieved this.
PF: I want to get back to that business about
the image. What, specifically, did you "learn"?
GREEN: I think I discovered how to get inside
aesthetics. We tend to have observer
experiences of art, not participator experiences.
The Poet in Residence at UBC, J. Michael
Yates, has a line in one of his poems: "Not
whether suicide but which". My
generation . . . has brought that higher question
back into focus. Is life beautiful? May it be
beautiful? Do we decide in favour of existence
because of fear or love?
PF: You learned how to ask a question?
GREEN: Revolutions result from asking
embarrassing questions. Questions are very
powerful things. A question creates a social
vacuum: the energy released in trying to
destroy the questioner by answering his
question brings great men, great eras, great
events to an end. Socrates was above all
someone who knew how to ask dangerous
questions.
PF: So what did you learn about trying to put
' an image of CHOKING on film, into some kind
of artistic shape?
GREEN: I learned that film-making is both
easier and more difficult than we think it will
be before we try it. More difficult always in the
essential artistic process, the personal
exploration, the self-discovery, and the social
thing between the people involved. The really
difficult thing in film-making is keeping your
cool. That is, in having an executive capacity to
get things done.
PF: Is this your first contact with film-making?
GREEN: First as director. I have had two
dramas produced by CBC television, and
completed another commissioned script for the
series now called The Manipulators.lt was called
The Clients before they changed the format.
PF: I understand you have an original musical
score?
GREEN: Yes. I was introduced to one of the
greatest people I've ever met after I got to Los
Angeles: Paul Lewinson. He is a musician and
composer. He is presently working on an album
combining his playing of the Moog Synthesizer
and Ananda Shankar, Nephew of Ravi Shankar,
playing the sitar. He said he wouldn't mind
trying to work something out on the Moog for
my film. So I screened the film for him after I
got it edited into a rough workpoint, and he sat
down and ad-libbed a score. In the Zoo
sequence he actually made it sound like vicious
animals.
PF: And final words?
GREEN: Just — go see the package. Remember
they're first films made under adverse
conditions. And help promote film-making in
B.C. It's here to stay in the world. Let's try to
get into it here. When you set out to make a
film you don't succeed completely, but then
you don't know what you were trying to do in
the first place. Between those two things is a
trip.
HI;
BU
-al
"Gassy Jack" - in front of the Hotel Europe is Gastown.
"I've never had any trouble with the drunl
ones who tell me I'm beautiiul." — PF'S Oh
to Greenwich Village, in search of imprest
PEOPLE get hung up on Gastown. They come here for a •
stay for weeks," said Barbara Noakes, a twenty-year-old
the Interior. She likes living in Gastown and in the Alhambr
at the corner of Carrall and Water. "It's quiet here except on tou
There's no heavy trips, no freaking out, it's really nice."
People get hung up on Gastown for various reasons.
"If we lose Gastown, we lose Vancouver's past." That's the
Assistant Professor of Fine Arts, H. Kalman, explains his interest in
"If the Stanley and New Fountain Hotels on Cordova are torn c
made into parking lots, Gastown has had it. They're the two most i
buildings in the area, perfect examples of commercial hotels of
period which lend scale and character to the area."
Kalman, who teaches architectural history and is from M<
where protective legislation regarding historic buildings has existed s:
— started to take "an amateurish interest" in the area when he firs
Vancouver two years ago. He then became aware of the problf
revolving around disappearing historic buildings. Now he's t
committed to Gastown and he's also got twenty-five students doing
Gastown.
I became interested in Gastown, because like Kalman, I'm int
the preservation of old buildings, not because I know kiu
architecture but because I'm also hung up on Canadian history.
Canadian history remains to be written but at the same time it is
standing in the form of old buildings in the cities of Quebec, Mo
Toronto.
That isn't to say that everything has been preserved in these
by way of example, a number of fine, old Toronto buildings exist
as photographs in Eric Arthur's Toronto: No Mean City. Hopefully 1
Eric Arthur at large in Vancouver taking pictures rapidly of the
homes which are just as rapidly disappearing.
OLD historic buildings in Vancouver are hard to find, as I <
when we moved to Vancouver from Toronto some years as
there's lots of concrete, stucco and glass, "Modern stuf
might become historic in another hundred years, if they last that lor
Feminine logic led me to conclude finally that Vancouver's hf
historic buildings would be in the area where Vancouver's historj
had begun. So enter historical research.
In 1865 Colonel Edward Stamp started up a sawmill at the fo<
is now Dunlevy. In time Stamp's Mill became better known as Has
and now, having been re-located to Alma and Point Grey, as a m
1867 "Gassy" Jack Deighton, who came by his nickname because h
talk, started up a saloon, Deighton House - in the middle of wl
Water and Carrall — to cater to the needs of the small settlemen
started around the mill.
Deighton House looked out on Maple Leaf Square, when
plaque and cairn mark its original site at Water and Carrall. Across
in front of the Europe Hotel, is a statue of "Gassy" Jack, recently c
the city by Lawrence Killam Jr., one of the major investors in the ai
On March 1, 1870 the area between modern Carrall, Ha;
Cambie St. and north to the present waterfront received the offici;
the town of Granville, after the Earl of Granville, British colonial si
though even on Admiralty charts, the town was unofficially called
Today the boundaries of Gastown, referred to by City Plann
Granville Townsite area, are roughly the waterfront, Columbia ti
Cambie to the west, and Hastings to the south.
A few months after Granville was named Vancouver i
disastrous fire swept through the town, levelling the hithert
settlement. Therefore, the buildings in Gastown today date gene
the late 1880's and on. In particular, a number of hotels sprang up
Klondike Gold Rush.
Despite this information as to the whereabouts of Vancouve
area, it wasn't 'til a couple of months ago that I actually found
Water and Carrall. The main reason for this, I suppose, lay in the ft
recently Gastown has been associated less with historic buildings
with Skid Road.
In fact, vice, murder, etc. which the citizens of Vancouve
with the Gastown area is one of the problems facing redevelopir,
area, because it keeps people from coming down and taking a lool
going on there today.
"But how do we convince the women of Vancouver that it's
safest place in Vancouver?" asks Terry Willox, editor of the Gastov
and Chairman of the Gastown Merchant's Association. He think
pS 401W
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970 STORY
HOLDING PEOPLE
in GASTOWN
ong with bums and debris
i. They're really sweet. They boost my morale. They're the only
aUuskin digs around Gastown, Vancouver's struggling answer
Ions.
ay, then
irl from
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ay UBC
astown.
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tary —
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ng the
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ociate
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izette
it the
opening of Pier One on the periphery of Gastown will attract women in
search of a buy. A franchise set-up from the United States, Pier One will have
50 per cent of its items selling for under a dollar.
Patti Shantz, who runs a Carroll St. boutique, bears out Willox's claim.
"I've never had any trouble with the drunks," she exclaimed. "They're really
sweet. They boost my morale. They're the only ones who tell me I'm
beautiful."
Larry Killam feels that it will be the children, brought down in busloads
from the schools, who will re-educated their parents about Gastown.
EVEN though most Vancouverites, like myself over the past decade,
never got further into Gastown than Eaton's and Woodward's
parking lot (and parking is another Gastown problem) it was
apparent that a general sprucing up (paint, etc.) was commencing on adjacent
buildings, such as the Brimstead Block. This sort of thing had in fact started
in 1958 in the West Townsite area of Gastown. (Killam's development is
largely in the East Townsite Area. And in the middle, around the 100 Water
St. is Project 200.)
And then in November of 1968 came the "Great Walk" through
Gastown, sponsored by the Community Arts Council, which has played a
■ major supportive role in Gastown's re-development. A lot of enthusiasm and
publicity was generated for Gastown, though Killam commented that the two
walks (another having followed last year) in fact cost him money because the
value on property he was negotiating for went up. And rising property value
is another Gastown story.
Finally, after all this, I had my first real look at Gastown a couple of
weeks ago. More recently I went down to speak to Larry Killam in his office
at 2 Water St. in the former Alhambra Hotel. He's associated with Town
Group Ltd., composed of his brother Eugene, Ian Rogers, Howard Meakin,
Bob Saunders and Hank Gourlay who in all own nine buildings in the
Gastown area and another at 1313 W. Pender.
Killam, who belongs to a prominent Vancouver family, first became
involved in buying historic buildings in 1965, when he purchased the pioneer
McCleery home on Southwest Marine Dr. where as a boy he had worked on
the McCleery farm. He started off at UBC in architecture (his uncle, by the
way is Geoff Massey) took a few years off hitchhiking around the world and
finally got his degree in Fine Arts the same year he bought the McCleery
house.
The following year, he and his brother Eugene, also a UBC grad, got
involved in Gastown as a result of buying the original Royal Bank building at
Carrall and Cordova. Now the Boulder Rooms on its top floors, the space is
being renovated into youth-oriented apartments such as exist on the upper
floor of the Alhambra Hotel, the Killams' next financial venture in 1968.
Now Killam is really involved in
Gastown, but not only as a
financier and landlord. He also
guides the design of the renovations
and does have to do things like
trying to find out where plumbing
disappears to in a blank wall of red
bricks.
A block away from the
Alhambra, housed in the back of
Gastown Vintage Cars, is the office
of Terry Willox, the editor of the
Gastown Gazette. Willox, who calls
himself "a former junk man"
because he ran an antique store on
Cambie — has left antiques behind
for the Gastown Gazette which
began as a monthly in August, 1969
and will shortly become
weekly" ... in order to build up a
cultural voice in Vancouver." His
editor is Eric Green, whom he
describes as a "perennial student at
UBC."
BUT there are still other reasons why people have got involved in
Gastown. Peggy Misener and Heather Steele operate Andromeda, an
attractive boutique on Water St. Gastown offered them the
opportunity of doing what they really wanted to do but couldn't up to this
time: making and selling clothes. Their husbands, grad students at UBC in
geophysics, work during the summer, and it was with last summer's earnings
This is Terry Willcox,
Editor of the Gastown Gazette.
that they were able to set up their boutique in a former Water St., garage now
painted purple. One of the items that Andromeda carries are batik tops made
by a girl called Persimmon from Tofino, who goes from store to store in
Gastown selling them.
"There's a lot of talent running around here. If Gastown hadn't been
here, it would have been lost," Marje Kettlewell commented. She runs Kiana
Village, a small shop specializing in wood carvings and sculptures, some of
which she does herself, her interest in wood carving having led her to
Gastown.
She described how a young wood carver had come to her about carving
wooden furniture. Because she couldn't use his talents, she sent him "up the
street" to another merchant, who then directed him to a shop "across the
street" where he now carves.
Others have become involved with Gastown accidentally. Mary Frazee,
whose gallery is in a flat-iron building bordering on both Water and Cordova,
chose the location not because of Gastown but because "... where else
could I find such a high ceiling.",She doesn't think of herself as part of
Gastown, though people do associate her with it.
Bud Wood, an architect, has his office in the world's narrowest building
at Carrall and Pender (four feet, eleven inches). Talk of a projected freeway
through the Gastown and Chinatown area got him involved. He'd like to see
Gastown become not just a boutique area, but a total community involving all
strata of society. His firm is designing townhouse accommodation over the
liquor store on Carrall St.
And then there are those who are part of Gastown because it's part of
Vancouver's Skid Road. Sometimes these people are called the "socially
indigent" or "bums" or "winos." The area does in fact have 3800 registered
residents, many of them old age pensioners attracted in the past by low rents.
But as the rents in the area go up and as some of the hotels are redeveloped
for other uses, these residents become displaced persons. Where are they to
go? A Social Co-Ordinator, George Whitman, has been recently appointed to
work with agencies in the area on the hostel propblem.
To tackle all of Gastown's problems is a community way the
Community Development Association has just been start started and is made
up of all residents, old and young, as well as merchants and developers.
Gastown can be a very quiet place on a weekday, with a few people in
the shops or on the streets. Willox claims that this is because people think
Gastown is open only on Sunday, the only day the well-publicized Flea
Market is open. Most stores are closed on Mondays only, some on
Wednesdays. And this brings up the point of making a business go in
Gastown. Some merchants make it, others don't. For one thing, Killam
explained, there is a business recession. One of the galleries in the area,
Deighton House, has just recently closed.
On the other hand, Roger Brewton who runs "Happiness", a
consignment store for local craftsmen, feels that his business is getting better.
Brewton also helped to start a Free University in Vancouver, which is now in
its second semester.
Artist Tonia Marks who has a basement corner in the Flea Market
which she calls the Gastown Gallery feels that her association with Gastown
has brought all the business she can handle, in the form of portrait
commissions. On a busy day in the summer she counted three hundred people
going through her gallery.
The success formula for a merchant, Willox claims, is not to become
"an artsy-craftsy specialist." Killam on the other hand would like to see
Gastown become another Greenwich Village, and not another trap like
Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco.
Some of the buildings and interiors in Gastown have been attractively
renovated and are interesting to see. There's the white-waffled ceiling in
Labyrinth, an ultra smart interior design store where the grey plumbing pipes
have been left exposed effectively against red brick walls.
New Look Interiors recently expanded into a former Gold Rush Hotel,
the Arlington, and now as part of its showrooms has incorporated the hotel's
old fireplaces, the narrow windows and high staircase, the taste of another
age.
In the Malkin warehouse along Water St., The Old Spaghetti Factory is
going to open soon. You'll be able to eat spaghetti on board an old B.C.
Electric Street car. The concept though is not unique to Gastown because
there's one of the same in Portland.
The focal point for Gastown redevelopment though is in the block
where Gassy Jack originally opened his saloon. Killam iis developing Gaoler's
Mews here (the site of Vancouver's first jail). Projected plans are for a
restaurant, Le Petit Montmartre, an Irish woolen shop, a hairdressing shop
and Rumpelstilskin. Adjacent Trounce Alley, a dismal looking lane with a
historic past, is recommended for future development in "Restoration
Report: A Case for Renewed Life in the Old City," which was commissioned
by the City Council and the major property owners in Gastown.
Across from Trounce Alley, Alexander Street is also being developed by
the Town Group who will occupy No. 1 as their office. Further along a
French pancake house La Creperie is opening soon. Kalman feels that these
various restaurants are important because they'll bring people down to the
area and keep it from becoming a dead museum.
ULTIMATELY it will be the people of Vancouver who will decide
what sort of place Gastown will become, for invariably all roads out
of Gastown lead to the City Hall. Within the month, specific
proposals for the beautification of Gastown are being brought before City
Council. Also, if there is to be any protective legislation regarding Gastown in
the future, it must come from the city. Killam doesn't want Gastown to
become a historic site. Willox on the other hand said he's going to fight
"tooth and nail" for it.
As for Gastown now, what is it?
"Gastown is a living community struggling to survive" Willox
exclaimed.
"Gastown is people doing things, helping each other out. It's the spirit
there," says Dirk Visser, Ubyssey photogrpher.
As for me, Gastown began as old buildings but now it's people as well.
Both are part of the continuing story of Gastown.
friday, March  13,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
pf Sive TANGO!
METAPHYSICAL NOTES (AND OTHERS) ON THE
FORTHCOMING PRODUCTION OF MROZEK'S PLAY
AT THE PLAYHOUSE — FROM THE HAPPY PEN OF
"INSTANT REDUCTIONS INC."
by Norbert Ruebsaat
At times, with some dismay, and
possibly anger, we realize that rebellion
and construction, like youth and middle
age, are merely the opposing ends of a
basically unified process. And it is very
easy for these two poles to completely
cancel each other out of actual
existence and thus transform the
originally concrete and organic proces?
into a purely formal and artificial one.
This transformation is sort of how
games are born, and also art.
"All the world ..." therefore
becomes what the Bard maintained it
was all along, and so that is what we will
accordingly write plays about.
The absurdist playwrights have been
kind of kicking this idea  around for
some time now; constructing formally
perfect plays about the formally not
quite as perfect play around
them . . . and this was no doubt also on
Polish playwright Slawomir Mrozek's
mind when he wrote his first full-length
play Tango.
This play is the final production
of the Playhouse Mainstage this season
and begins tonight at 8:30, under the
direction of Peter Dearing . . . and it
promises to be one of the most
provoking plays to bave been put on by
the Playhouse thus far. (Mrozek is of
course not entirely unknown around
Vancouver, for we saw his one-acter
Strip-Tease in the Dominion Drama
Festival last year.)
While displaying entirely the
above-mentioned awareness of the
game-like absurdity of life, Mrozek, is
nevertheless not giving us, in Tango, a
totally absurdist play. Mrozek is Polish,
he stems from that side of the iron
curtain where the 'fact' of overt
political oppression is as unavoidable (if
not more so) as the metaphysic of the
existential dilemma is here in the west.
"Polish theatre is traditionally a
theatre of dissent," said Professor Adam
Tarn, a world authority on modern
drama (and personal friend of Mrozek)
who we had the distinction of hearing
last week in a special lecture at UBC:
"And Mrozek is squarely within the
Polish tradition."
And   therefore,   where   Beckett  or
Ionesco (for instance) immerse us
unconditionally in a blatantly absurd
stage world, Mrozek sets before us a
deceptively real one, much more subtle
in its absurdity. We are set in a family
where the son, a progressive intellectual,
is confronted with a status quo of
anarchy, which his parents have
instituted after successfully completing
their own youthful rebellions. The son
tries to re-establish decency and order,
and is gratefully joined in this effort by
his discontent grandfather, an ex-cavalry
officer. He is constantly up against
things like his father's fantastic
"experiments" in conceptual theatrics
and his mother's unabashed
promiscuousness with the house
"parasite" Eddie (who wandered in one
day and sort of never left).
The son tries to reinstate order by
drawing on the old social forms - the
marriage ritual for instance — which are
of course now dead and totally without
content. In the end he realizes the
essential impossibility of this, and in
fact any, "action" — except,
significantly in terms of "death" - and
inevitably falls prey to the brutal
animalistic power of the bum-like
Eddie, who now takes full control of
the household.
On this level of course, the play is
brilliant political allegory — describing
what has been called "the decline of the
West": permissiveness and and decadent
materialism gives way first to
intellectual    authoritarianism    of   the
theoreticians and finally to the brute
totalitarianism of of the armies. And the
Poles — also the Germans with slight
variations - saw the play in entirely this
way. (It was of course immediately
banned in the Iron Curtain countries.)
The more basic existential (in
contrast purely political) experience
in Tango however, is reflected in its easy
adaptability to the North American
scene. We here, experience the
son-parent relationship as a basic role
shift which becomes tremendously
effective as a kind of prophesy of what
will happen when the "youth revolt" is
completed and becomes instituted as the
new norm. And we realize that the same
thing will happen again. And again,
and . . .
Because the basic existential — and
absurd — realization of the play is that
no one extreme can exist except in
relation to the other, that there is no
content, no truth, no realness to the
whole damn thing except the
relationship itself — which is,
scientifically speaking not a "thing".) It
must only always "pretend" to be a
thing in order to remain alive.
And that is why we write act and
watch plays about it.
*   *   *
It is definitely recommended to see
this play. It opens tonight and runs to
April 3. Student night (Cheap!) is on
March 17 and tickets are always
available at the Vancouver Ticket
Centre.
pf 6ix
Wanted!
For Hurrying
JOE MIZSAK
10th & Discovery Hilltop (224-7212)
CLARENCE BARIL
Broadway & MacDonald (733-2215)
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UBC FILM SOCIETY presents ROMAN  POLANSKI'S
ROSEMARY'S BABY
-WITH  MIA FARROW-
*—#+—#»»»»»»—»»»»»»<
FRIDAYTHE13TH
AND SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY
7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM - 50c
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used   University  Texts
Bought and  Sold
146 W.   HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
KING BISCUIT
BOOGIE BAND
AT   THE
SAT. - MAR.  14
Friday, March   13,   1970
THE       UBYSSEY The second double album
by Chicago (Columbia KGP
24) is a triumph of good
music and good taste.
Side one of the new album
contains four up-tempo cuts
similar to most of the tracks
on their first release. On that
album, Terry Kath's guitar
work dominated for the most
part, but on the new effort,
emphasis is more on the
horns, sax, and vocals. And,
as usual, the group's ensemble
work is incredibly tight.
Side two has one more
up-tempo big band-rock
number, and then goes into a
six-movement suite by
trombonist Jim Pankow
called Ballet for a Girl in
Buchannon. In this piece I
particularly enjoyed the
influence of The Mothers in
the opening cut as well as the
constant tempo and mood
changes.
Side three contains Fancy
Colours, with some wind
chimes as well as good flute
and guitar solos, as well as 25
or 6 to 4. The four remaining
sections which close this side
are an attempt at a
chamber-sized classical work.
However, it comes to life
only when the straight string
riffs are interrupted by
outbursts inspired by
Stravinsky and Zappa. Still,
it's not dull like Deep
Purple's April Suite.
The fourth side of the
album could be perhaps
termed a political finale in
that the group sings lyrics like
"It better end soon," "Let's
all get together soon before
it's too late," and "Where do
we go from here."
Musically, though, the
material is still top notch,
even Walt Parazaider's flute
solo in the second cut which I
first found boring, but am
beginning to like after more
hearings.
This new album from one
of the world's top groups, a
true "musical community",
has managed, quite
amazingly, to keep up the
high musical standards set by
their first. It's an album that
won't leave your turntable
for some time. So buy it. And
listen.
-MICHAEL QUIGLEY
John Renbourn and Bert
Jansch are, together, the
guitar-playing heart of an
innovative four-man one-girl
British folk group called The
Pentangle. Both have spurned
commercialism, and have
opted instead for the relative
obscurity which dedication
often brings. They have cut
several albums, and
Renbourn's latest is, as usual,
a unique listening experience.
It's called Sir Jon Alot of
Merrie Englandes Musyk
Thing and Ye Grene Knyghte
(Reprise RS 634). If you can
decipher the Gothic-written
title, you're halfway there.
The album is a blend of
medieval minstrel music and
modern jazz and folk, most
of it composed by Renbourn
and his sidemen, flautist Ray
Warleigh and percussionist
Terry Cox. It spans the gap
between then and now, and
brings    the     music    thing
together with a rare
spirituality which renders
classifications academic.
Warleigh's flute is gentle,
ethereal, spiritually aloof, at
times almost mystical.
Renbourn's sensitivity is
shown by his ability to
compose and play music in all
genres, from traditional to
Charles Lloyd. His picking is
very good, and often borders
on the miraculous. The soft
combination of flute and
guitar at times evokes
enchantment and visions of
antique beauty.
-BILL STOREY
*  *  *
THE    BYRDS:    Preflyte.
Together ST-T-1001.
This piece of nostalgia has
incredibly good sound for its
age (a whole six years old).
Recorded in 1964 before the
group's first Columbia album,
it's notable for the lack of
McGuinn's twelve-string
omnipresence which was to
dominate on later albums and
also for the style influences
ranging from early Beatles to
the Everly Brothers and
Chuck Berry. My faVorite cut
is She Has a Way which is
"reminiscingly real", as Mike
Love would say.
-M. Q.
* * *
The Well- Tempered
Synthesizer. Columbia MS
7286.
This successor to
Switched-On Bach is a
disappointment. Aside from
the Orfeo Suite based on
Monteverdi and the third
movement of Bach's 4th
Brandenburg Concerto, the
new album contains little of
the spontanaiety or
sterephonic contrapuntal
complexity of the earlier one.
As well, the surfaces of my
copy gave the impression that
it was pressed on fine
sandpaper.
-MARK JACQUES
*     *     *
SIR   DOUGLAS   QUINTET;
Together After  Five. Smash
Stereo SRS 6 7130.
There's only one word for
this album - poor. The lead
guitarist can't play, the lead
singer can't sing, and the
resulting overall musicality is
dismal. The album notes say
that "With this album, the Sir
Douglas Quintet proves that
it is one of the top
contemporary groups in the
world." Sure it does. This
album makes The Monkees'
Headquarters sound like a
masterpiece.
-M. Q.
*     *     *
BLUE MINK. - Phillips PHS
600-323.
This has been a hard
album to review. First I
started out putting it in the
"immature, but not infantile"
category. Then after more
listening, it sounded better,
much like Merry weather's
first album with its synthesis
of blues, rock, and a bit of
jazz.
Though none of the
individual work of Blue Mink
is particularly outstanding, as
a whole the group is fairly
successful. This is maybe
helped by the album's very
high quality sound.
-M.J.
^/i*i**s Wig
mmlJen Le/iuS , .1
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THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, March   13,   1970 On Tuesday our roving photogrpher Marc Kenton hustled off down to the Totem Residence beach
access to partake in and photograph "IN THE FOREST", a ritual of love and animal quest poetry put on
under the artistic wing of the Contemporary Arts Festival. In the freaky sunshine of late winter, this is
what he found there on this afternoon.
Jlaminq (Dunq
flj> J-G.ttQ.fl
PF 8
HOT MERDE
16.5 ems
And next week laddies and gentlemenne, the
Contemporary Arts without a capital F Festival
continues with the following items for your
edification and general interest:
Mon., March 16 — Films by Campus and Local
Film    Fiends-,    12:30-2:30,   continuing   'til
March 18.
Tues., March 17 - Pollution Shock Event in Old
Auditorium at noon.
Wed., March 18 — Preview of Sprong by RARE
Wearables,   fashion   parade   and   postures,
SUBPIaza at noon.
Thurs., March 19 — Second Sprong preview same
place, same time to be followed at 8:30 P.M.
at night at the Vancouver Art Gallery by
Sprong itself, featuring a live rock band.
Also   on   next Thurs. all day in Lasserre 204
is a film Free-for-AII.
Fri., March 20 - Rites of Spring take place all
day at Totem Residence Beach Access.
AND YET MORE happening includes next
Wednesday at noon in the Old Auditorium , Bull
Durham, an outrageous and hilarious cowboy
farcespoof directed by John Gray.
ABSOLUTELY FREE!!!!
30
***<*; *.«'K^^
Dear Editor of Page Friday:
In response to Touglas' (sic) film review of
"Z" as appeared in Friday, Feb. 28 Ubyssey, I
can only reply to it as bullshit. Touglas
"casually" and I think mistakenly has
"put-down" a truly fine movie with such remarks
as "a nice simple commercial film without any
political signifigance (sic) . . . dishonest . . .
insignifigant" etc. I have disagreed with film
critics before, but I felt the faults Touglas has
picked with "Z" are themselves insignifigant.
After viewing "Z's" premiere, I enthusiastically
joined many others in the audience in a rousing
applause for a worthwhile movie. "Z" is a
hard-hitting gutsy movie that has political
relevance to all societies, not just the military in
Greece. I was very impressed with "Z", and in
light of Touglas' remarks, I can only say that the
Ubyssey has another Les Wedman in the making.
TREVOR TODD (sic)
Arts 3
IT IS NOT THAT X AM MERCt
FUL/ BUT I SHALL WANT EVERY
EARTUUNG ALIVE,  SO THAT
THERE WILL BE MANY TD SERVE
/v\E/ AND NOW, I SHALL SWPLY
LOSE AAYSELF   IN A BANK OF
CLOUDS, FOR I GROW WEARY
OF THIS CONFLICT... IT IS  LIKE
BATTLING CHILDREN/
THE NEXT TIME I APPEAR,
I SHALL BE THRU TOYIHQ    ,
WITH THESE PUNY HUMANS.' •
WHEN NEXT THEY SEE ME,
I SHALL HAVE COME TO
TAKE POSSESSION OF
AU. MANKIND/
courtesy of Marvel Comics.
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Friday, March  13,   1970
THE      U BYSSEY Friday,  March   13,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
ws monopoly:
win; f.i.1 o( ui" lur !""n oma h 'u-.-
Im
Bv i •uwU'n-r Irr -«."i* ■■■ <■ "f - '
nr+-,n\v "i-. -■•■> «■■■"* V i- ■•ii"
"»7n '  iiork    idoui >n  »!«■   ■■r:* n»"
Ttw a-.- !>'lirvr» I'M' M'
Sii   V'Kinn,,i kivi-v w^" i.
im   wnirn » mow or len •thai :Jip
"xtrvp.* dovn t. (V V S would cnmian
would 'if raurv u.-rifHv "he AWihem
rrximr   "i.  ih*  "i-rctrr »-prne«   ->f  "h"
I'mrjnj'-i*!*
!' u *iW *-.H-:'   ' ml*-' *-l»n-   «iw' •
qurtfiM
immbii   he,  v-u ill :his vot'Ii i
HPnuliRn of mi nujrft hlaad mid trp
uiv*
An (Ink fiiffonl ■ rnerlrr-iw m
>uu miuI, hwioiy nlone nus [mw ;ip
rwnl Whrrhnr ilir ll S unouM n"i It'
■at invnlml at nil. ni uhcihrr rulhl
hntntnnj al lfc» No.rh rRiirhi taw turr
:Iip lidr. IhPir mf rlAimt nor nnmai
turf, but ifcffir.j.c In pravr »runji.
'..'mil ihf anntrn err availed** It
hurdlt irnnd unui in inm al (he Aim
:•"■ '-ii »Vir mi^iakn   V.r are ah
cecutive vice-president of
P interests on the Pacific
" acquisition, however, a
is   exsreised   indirectly
ally a local, independent
1.2% by FP Publications.
lg is one of FP's original
?r of local businessmen
iwever, and some are also
: may be useful to sketch
more^ active members to
ections   the   newspaper
ver business community.
)f Sun Publisher and the
le is currently chairman
>, and has other coastal
of the board of Union
involved in the timber
n Forest Products in the
lent of Vanwest logging.
Capilano Timber. He is
1 industry, currently as
Celly,   Douglas   &   Co.
ston monopoly's Super
d by the Weston group),
Foods. He is also a
aland Natural Gas, and
ere he  sits  with SFU
has further ties with
slephone Company and
ddition he sits on the
fe* Assurance, National
C. Transformer Co. To
n no less than fifteai
corporations: three as chairman of the board, one as
vice-chairman, two as vice-president and director, and
nine simply as a director. His main activities are in
coastal shipping and food processing and wholesaling,
although lie lias a wide range of other interests.
Monopolists and gougers
J. Lawrence Dampier is a vice-president and director
of Sun Publishing. He too is on the board of Pacific
Press, and was formerly managing director of Sun
Publishing. More recently he has joined Brown in his
connections with the Weston group as vice-president,
director and general manager of Nabob Food (a Kelly,
Douglas subsidiary). He continues to sit on the board of
the Sun's Davie Building and Sun Building Co. He is also
a director of Standard Broadcasting, and B.C. Bearing
Engineers.
C. B. Delbridge is the Chairman of the Board of Sun
Publishing. His Burrard Building Operations was recently
bought by Block Bros. Industries for $2 million, and he
is now a director of Block Bros, and of their subsidiary,
First National Mortgage.
J. L. Farris is a director of Sun Publishing. A
humble lawyer, a member of the firm of Farris, Farris,
Vaughan, Taggard, Wills and Murphy, he too sits on the
Kelly, Douglas Board. His father, senior partner in the
law firm, is Senator John W. Farris. The Senator is a
director of Famous Player's Canadian Corp., a subsidiary
of Paramount Pictures, and a major owner of movie
outlets across Canada. Famous Players also has extensive
interests in radio, TV and cablevision across the country,
and hold the pay-TV franchise for Canada. Among its
interests are B.C. Television Broadcasting, operators of
CHAN-TV in Victoria and CHEK-TV in Vancouver.
(Increasingly  enough,   Southam Press, through  a  few
holding companies, has a 26% interests in B.C.
Television.)
j. M. Lecky is executive assistant and director of
Sun Publishing. A comparative small-fry, he holds only
one other directorship: Cunningham Drugstores, which
with annual sales of $33 million is Canada's second
largest retail and wholesale drug business.
James N. Hyland is a recent addition to the Pacific
Press board and is not a member of the Sun Publishing
board. He docs not appear at first glance to be involved
with any of the major newspaper chains. However he is
involved with the Weston interests as former chairman
and chief executive officer of B.C. Packers. Weston
recently took over B.C. Packers (71% interest) and
Hyland has been succeeded as head of the company by
George Creber of Toronto. He remains as a director,
however, and both he and Creber are on the board of
Burns Foods, where they are joined by two other
representatives of Sun Publishing-Pacific Press, F. B.
Brown and R. Howard Webster of Montreal. Also on the
board of B.C. Packers are H. R. MacMillan, his son-in-law
John Lecky, and none other than Gordon Southam,
Vancouver scion of the Southam family, president of
Pioneer Envelopes and a director of Southam Press.
It should be clear even from these limited sketches
that the Vancouver newspaper industry is very closely
tied to the major corporate interests in the city. Many of
the principal press advertisers sit on the boards of the
papers in which they advertise, thus exerting much more
than an indirect voice in newspaper policy. The city's
newspapers appear to be under the control of some of
the worst monopolists, price gougers, and anti-labor
elements in the economy — the real estate, food and
drug, forest products and coastal shipping interests.
This is a free press?
'.yvs- - '
- * *   4   *?9* '* *
By Brim Slocock, Tfce J^ftaggSgElfi
trt£t£t£^
EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT  REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry   Brownlee,   Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
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224-3939
2180 ALLISON
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JIM   ABERNETHY    MANAGER
2046 W. 41st       263-3610
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654 Seymour Tel. 681-8621
Opposite 'The Bay'
Mon. to Sat.
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970
Former president
revisits old haunt
Former administration
president Kenneth Hare
returned to UBC for a brief
period Wednesday.
Hare, presently teaching
geography and physics at the
University of Toronto, was
lecturing at a geography
colloquium.
Hare resigned as
administration president in
January 1969 due to bad
heahh and the pressure of the
job. He was at UBC only
seven months?
The Ubyssey asked the
state of his health: "I'm
staying on top of things. I
feel fine," he said.
There is little chance of
Hare returning to UBC in the
near future.
"I'm very happy in
Toronto and I've got a good
position there. But after my
children get through school,
who knows?" he said.
There is also no
possibility of Hare returning
to an administrative role.
"I've served ten years
hard labor," he said, "I
happened to get into
administration by accident
and I j;ot out of it on
purpose.
"I like teaching. I lecture
KENNETH HARE
.  . . "happy in Toronto."
to about 500 students a week
in Toronto and I enjoy it very
much.
"I regret having left UBC
before the job was done.
However, when you^ are
physically incapable of doing
the job you have no other
choice."
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Bennett refuses to mediate
in Pacific Press lockout
Premier W. A. C. Bennett has refused to act as
mediator in the continuing dispute between Pacific
Press and its 1,100 locked-out employees.
A week ago the premier offered his services as a
"binding arbitrator to settle the Pacific Press
dispute", but then changed his offer to say that he
didn't necessarily mean he should be the man to
arbitrate.
Bennett said one man should take charge of the
dispute and make a binding report regarding
settlement of the dispute.
After a meeting Tuesday the joint council of
newspaper unions, acting on behalf of the
negotiating unions, said the issues are too involved
to be successfully left in the hands of only one man.
However, the joint council did recommend that
Bennett act as a mediator to get the parties involved
back to the bargaining table.
When informed of the recommendation,
Bennett declined.
The unions have sent a letter to the Pacific
Press executive requesting negotiation be continued,
but the company has returned a letter which, in
effect, said the unions are still acting in an
irresponsible manner.
The company can sit tight until mid-April and
still collect its strike insurance of approximately
$30,000 a day.
Despite rumors of lawsuits against individual
members of the unions set forth by the company to
regain money lost in alleged slowdowns, there have
been no formal charges laid.
Meanwhile, as the locked out employees collect
meagre strike benefit checks, the company
continues to collect substantial strike insurance
benefits.
March against
oppression
A march against oppression will be held in
Vancouver Saturday.
The demonstration is intended to show the
unity of various groups fighting against oppression.
Groups involved include the Native Alliance for
Red Power, the Vancouver Black Action Group, the
American Deserters Committee, the Women's
Caucus and the UBC Industrial Workers of the
World.
The demonstration will begin at 1:30 p.m. at
Kitsilano beach and will move across the Burrard
street bridge to the Vancouver courthouse where a
rally will be held.
Students:  liaison  in  Mexico
Mexican villagers don't know what they have to
offer rich "Americans" said Peter James, president
of Coordination of Inter-American Student Projects,
commenting on Canadian students working in
Mexico.
"But the villagers really like the idea of
students wanting to learn from them," he said.
He explained that the Canadian students who
go to Mexico do not involve themselves
ideologically with the Mexicans. The villagers set up
their help in community development programs.
The Mexican and the CIASP students act as a
liaison between government agencies and the
villagers said James, who has already spent two
summers in Mexico.
Often the villagers don't know how or where to
apply for aid.
Through CIASP we can help the villagers realize
what agencies there are that can offer technical
assistance and information and avoid dealing
through the graft system common among the
officials there, he said.
This year six students will go to the Mexican
town of Uruapan for the duration of the summer to
gain an awareness of cultural inter-relations.
CIASP, a volunteer organization, receives
money from the Miles for Millions Walk to send
students to foreign countries in order to gain an
awareness of cultural inter-relatedness, James said.
Wherever you
go in B.C.
you're never
far from
HOME
There are 298 Home Oil Service
Stations throughout British Columbia,
which means you can't go far
without seeing the familiar red,
white and blue HOME Oil symbol.
HOME Oil markets only in B.C.
and so has a special understanding
of British Columbia motoring needs.
And since we're smaller, we work
a lot harder at filling those
needs. After all, we're not even
number two. Yet.
But go HOME just once. You'll find
that, at HOME, we work hard to earn
your business. For your Credit Card •
just phone HOME - 685-9131.
HOME
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f*M Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970
t*r?
Gary finds himself
deserted by family
From   page   2
For this insubordination, Gary was charged with "conspiracy
against the United States government". He was placed in the Presidio
in San Francisco.
While in the stockade, he was told one morning to participate in
the morning exercises. He refused.
At that time, Gary was in a six by six foot cell with one barred
window,. However, after disobeying this direct order, he was placed
in desegregation, a cell of similar size with no window.
"I saw nobody else except for the times I was fed my 'rabbit
chow' which consisted of bread, water, and greens," he said.
"I tried to act crazy in order to get out of desegregation. I
slashed my wrists and beat my head against the wall until it bled.
"Finally, I was allowed to see two army psychiatrists who, after
examining me, recommended that I should receive a psychiatric
discharge."
However, the commanding officer did not agree with the
psychiatrists' decision.
In one final act of protest against his situation, Gary, with a
fellow stockade prisoner, burned his uniform.
"I was then placed in desegregation once again and given an
additional 100 year sentence for mutiny, which meant that I now
had a total of 135 years to spend in military prisons."
"I could see no hope for my situation, so I went on a hunger
strike, drinking only water."
Gary's weight went from 170 to 115 pounds. Rather than let
him die, the army placed him in a hospital where he was fed
intravenously.
After he was released from the hospital, Gary decided that his
only hope for a future outside of prison walls was escape, so he was
on his best behavior, thus drawing less security.
During a recreation period some time later, he left the gym, hid
underneath the buildings, and tunneled under the fence. As he ran
from the stockade, he was shot at but the shots missed and he
escaped.
If Gary can find a wife, he can try to start a new life for himself
in Canada. If not, he is destined to spend a life behind bars in a
stockade, "fed out of a pan tike a house dog."
EXAMS ARE UPON US!
Spend the last month studying, not commuting
. . . move into Phi Kappa Pi
• Be close to  exams  and   library
• Eat  well  and   regularly
• Study  in  quiet  rooms
• Free   coffee  for all   night   study  sessions
COST — $95.00
Contact  Ernie at 224-9667
or drop over to 5745 Agronomy Road
«:    Ci   .    //7v       I p.
9
(ran (i   ^slcur for Uic  ^suture .
**»
«*•-*'
S273
l**&x^*£"~
M&P^:
'***«-
W^UjfW
Budget  Terms, of course       *J£±>S
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER,  AMERICAN GEM  SOCIETY
Granville of Pender Since 1904
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FOR  RECORDED
THEATRE  INFORMATION
681-4255
24 HOUR
SERVICE
"MAGNIFICENT! I recommend 'PATTON' to you
without reservation!" —Judith enst, nbc-tv
RESERVED
SEATS
IVOWAT
BOX-OFFICE
OR BY MAIL
PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED
683-2634
CAPITOL
THEATRE
$2.50
$3.00
EVENINGS   8:00   P.M.
SUNDAY THROUGH  THURSDAY
FRIDAY,  SATURDAY &  HOLIDAYS
MATINEES  2:00  P.M.
WEDNESDAY,  SATURDAY,  SUNDAY  &  HOLIDAYS      $2.00
RESFRVED  SEAT  BOX OFFICE
12  NOON TO 9:00 P.M. SUNDAY FROM 1:30
PATTON
2t> c.«-,.f.. ,        ciih •'«w« *
<;i:oiu;i:<. K\Ki.
scon    / m ui,i;\
WARNING  Much swearing
and coarse language
m.w.      R.  W.   McDonald,   B.C.  Censor
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR
Peter OToole
"Goodbye, Mr. Chips'
FINAL TWO WEEKS
STRAND
EVENINGS 8:15
MATINEES 2:00
WED., SAT., SUN.
RESERVED SEAT BOX OFFICE
12 NOON TO 9:00 P.M. SUNDAY FROM 1:30 P.M.
A.AUNJXmnMl!»4_
folHTKHlR wagon
kmusjos' TKHMcaar AMwootfncTtie
ADULT INTUTAINMEHT
STANLEY
EVENINGS 8:00
MATS 2:00 SAT., SUN.
GRANVILLE AT 12TH AVE. -733-2622
RESERVED SEAT BOX OFFICE STRAND
11 NOON TO 9:00 P.M.      tt«.3«SI
NOMINATED FOR
7 ACADEMY
AWARDS
including
BEST PICTURE
RIDGE
ARBUTUS AT 16th AVE.
738-6311 - FREE PARKING
EVENINGS 8:15
MATINEES 2:15
SAT., SUN., WED.
RESERVED SEAT BOX OFFICE STRAND
12 NOON TO 9.00 P.M.
681-2193 (EXCEPT SUNDAYS)
NOMINATED FOR 7 ACADEMY AWARDS including BEST PICTURE
DENMAN PLACE
FAUL NEWMAN
ROBERT REWORD
BUTCH CASSIDVAN0
THE SUNDANCE KID
1737 COMOX STREET-6834647
EVENINGS 7:00, 9:00
MATINEES 2:00 SAT., SUN.
NOMINATED FOR
9 ACADEMY
AWARDS
including
Best Actress
JANE FONDA
THCY 8H00T
HORSES,
DON'T THCY?
PARK ROYAL &.
WEST VANCOUVER   - 532-9174 -- FREE PARKING
EVENINGS 7:20, 9:30
SUNDAY 3:00, 5:00,
7:20, 9:30 P.M:
Ej£lSt of
the Mobile
Hot-shots
NO ABMITTAMCf TO
PARK ROYAL J&.
WEST VANCOUVER - 922-9174 - FREE PARKING
EVENINGS 7:00, 9:00
SUNDAY 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
CHILDREN'S MATINEE SATURDAY 1:00 P.M.
i WINNER OF 6 ACADEMY AWARDS
DOCTOR ZHilAGO
IN PANAVISION- AND METROCOLOR
~f,e BAY
DENMAN ft BARCLAY- 685-9822
EVENINGS 7:45
Isafieffe
12:00, 2:00, 4:00
6:00, 8:00, 10:00
STODIO
GR-NVILLE AT SMITHE—bS3-:&: 1
SUNDAY FROM 2:00
S^SBfBfSB&k     WO *DMITTANC( TO
Romeo
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ADULT   SNTERTAINWEhT
L0UGHEED MALL
CINEMA 0
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VEUTWAR
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FRflNKENSniN
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f»t"a att^-v. tion — d;;:1.-_ ■'•■ o>'i.v
DRACUIA HAS RISEN FROM THE GRAVE'
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GATES 7:30 - S.HC'-Y B:C0 P.M.
MARLO THOMAS   mALAN ALDA
AS
Meirar
COLUMBIA
SUNDAY F'-,0,V 3:00
MON. TL.E5. 7-00. 9:00
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
STEVE REEVES - WADE PRESTON
"LONG RIDE FROM HELL"
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
Plus HOT ROD ACTION
RICHMOND SQUARE
twin
theatre
NO. 3  ROAD  - 2 7 3 -4A 74   - FREE  PARKING
"HOT  ROD"   7:15     " LONG   RIDE"   8:40
SUNDAY HOT ROD 4:15
LONG RIDE  5:40, 8:40
LOUGHEED Jbuve-Jn
BROADWAY JUST EAST OF BOUNDARY
-2987848 SHOW 7:30 P.M. Friday,  March   13,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
Earth's axis of rotation changed, says Velikovsky
By PHIL BARKWORTH
More than 1,000 people heard
Dr. Immanuel Velikovsky
Thursday in Hebb Theatre, yet
the Science faculty refused to
sponsor his lecture.
Velikovsky was branded as a
heretic 20 years ago for suggesting
such things as magnetic fields in
the solar system, hydrocarbons on
Venus, and radio signals emitted
by Jupiter.
Today all these predictions
have been verified yet Vladimir
Okulitch, dean of the science
faculty, said in an interview that
"just because one or two of his
theories were true doesn't mean
his process is scientific."
The science fiction society,
which sponsored Velikovsky's
lecture, managed to collect the
$400 fee for Dr. Velikovsky's
lecture by getting: $200 from the
AMS speakers' committee, $50
from Arts 1, $50 from the
University Lectures Committee
headed by Dr. MacGregor, $50
from a political science prof and
$50 from the science fiction club.
Robert Bells of the science
fiction club said Okulitch described
Velikovsky as a charlatan and said
that the science faculty would
refuse to sponsor him. However,
Nathan Divinsky, assistant science
dean, agreed to sponsor him.
In his lecture, Velikovsky
outlined the theories he first
presented twenty years ago in his
three books: "Worlds in
Collision", "Earth in Upheaval",
and "Ages in Chaos". The theories
VELIKOVSKY
. . . ridiculed by scientists
are: the existence of
electomagnetic fields throughout
the solar system, the presence of
hydrocarbons and a high
temperature on Venus, the
presence of argon-40 on the
Earth and the Moon and the
existence of a magnetosphere
around all planets.
Velikovsky said when he asked
Albert Einstein to help verify his
assertion that there were
electromagnetic fields in the
universe, Einstein refused.
When it was discovered that
there were fields Einstein said
about the theories, "I am deeply
impressed."
Velikovsky also felt that the
axis of rotation of the Earth
changed around 600 B.C. He
based this prediction on the fact
that numerous ancient
civilizations including the
Babylonians and Incas recorded a
stoppage of the sun at this time.
Babylonian records show that
around 600 B.C. all the clay
tablets in Ninevah in Babylon
were somehow changed to stone.
This, he said, can only be
explained by some catastrophic
event on the Earth.
Elaborating on his theories
Velikovsky said several scientists
had ridiculed him but in most
cases his theories were proven
true.
Recently a Mariner spacecraft
proved the existence of
hydrocarbons on Venus.
Velikovsky thought with the
verification of his theories,
Newton's laws had collapsed.
The existence of
.electromagnetic forces in the
universe defies classical laws
which predict only gravitational
and inertial forces.
Velikovsky said one scientist
challenged his theory of the
existence of a terrestrial magnetic
field by saying it couldn't extend
as far as the moon. Recently it
was found that the Earth's
magnetic field extends a distance
at least thirteen times as far away
as the moon.
Velikovsky's theories also
predicted electromagnetic fields of
the order of 10x1019 volts around
the    sun    which    was    thought
ridiculous. Velikovsky said that
this theory of his has also been
verified.
In concluding Velikovsky said
he hoped that his theories
wouldn't become dogma' but
would at the same time be
earnestly studied by the scientific
community.   "In   1952  scientists
branded my theories as nonsense,
a year later they were termed
unbelievable, now I fear they will
become dogma.
Whether Velikovsky is right or
wrong no one can deny that over
1,000 people including many
science profs listened to his
lecture.
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
225 E. 2nd Are.
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
879-0491
U.B.C. CURLING
CLUB
GENERAL MEETING
March 19, 1970
BUCHANAN 204
-  12:30 -
there's
The following positions are open
and we need You! And I do mean
you. Applications are being
accepted for positions in The
Student Union Building
management committee (5
positions).
The Finance committee needs 4
students interested in the financial
operations of the A.M.S. For
further info, contact Stuart Bruce,
SUB 2$2.
There is a position open for
chairman of the Academic
Activities Committee. This involves
organizing programmes on campus
that will stimulate discussion.
Fine Arts students, here's one for
you! SUB Art committee requires
several students to help in gallery
displays. If your stomach turns at
the thought of higher food prices
on campus, apply for one of the
four positions open on the Food
Services Committee.
in eve
"&mm
All written applications should be submitted to Anne
Clarkson, Secretary-Elect, SUB 248 by 12:30 on
Monday March 23, 1970. Please direct any further
questions to the above. Page  22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  13,  1970
Safeway
boycott
continues
The United Farm Workers'
organizing committee is keeping
the grape boycott alive.
Tonight a picket line will be
formed "at the Denman and
Robson Safeway store from 7:30
to 9 p.m.
Saturday afternoon a motor
calvacade will be organized
Further information is available
from committee member Pamela
Smith at 876-2291.
"Huelga", the story of the
grape strike, will be shown at the
St. John's Anglican Church at
18th and Granville at 7:30 p.m.
The movie will be followed by a
discussion of the local boycott.
'tween
classes
FRIDAY
HISPANIC   &   ITALIAN   STUDIES
"Henry the Navigate*" film, Bu.
100,   noon.
CLASSICS   CLUB
Meeting, home of Prof. Sandy, 3887
W.   14th   Ave.,   7:30  p.m.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP    SOCIETY
General   meeting,   noon,   Bu.   225.
FREE   LOVE   SOCIETY
J. Osmundson addresses a meeting
on free love in Norway; also election of next year's executive. We
need   new   members SUB   125
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
(leneral meeting and elections, at
12:30   in   International  House.
NATIVE   YOUTH
Meeting  in  SUB  115 at  12:30.
VIETNAM   COMMITTEE
faculty-student   meeting  in   SUB   213.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Forum: "Who Rules Canada". To be
held  at  1208 Granville  at 8 p.m.
NEWMAN    CATHOLIC    CENTRE
Volleyball game and party, Little
Flower Academy (25th and Granville)
at   8:30.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
General meeting in SUB 105A at
noon.
SPECIAL    EVENTS
The    Walter    Zuber   Armstrong    Ensemble  (flutes,   clarinets,   piccolo,   and
Oriental  flutes)   will   perform   in   SUB
ballroom   at   12:30.
%*.     SATURDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Meet the new executive at 8:30 p.m.
at the Lutheran Campus Centre, 5885
University. Blvd. Free coffee and
food.
SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
Discussion on pollution, 7 p.m., Union
College.
UBC   SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
Lion-Lamb   gymkhana,   9   p.m.,   B-lot.
MONDAY
PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVES
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB   211.
FORT    CAMP   WOMEN'S    COUNCIL
Bill    Mundey    speaks,    8    p.m.,    Fort
Camp  men's lounge.
HILLEL
Life    on    the    Kibbutz,    noon,    Hillel
House.
LEGAL   AID
Every   Mon.,    Wed.,    and    Fri.    noon,
SUB   237   and   237A.
TUESDAY
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Insurance seminar to be held in SUB
105A.
SPECIAL    EVENTS
Norbert Vesak of the Western Dance
Theatre performing in SUB auditorium.
UBC   SOCREDS
The   general   meeting    and   elections
will  be  held  in Bu.   224 at  12:30.
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 215. All
members attend.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Navigation course starts at 7:30 p.m.
in   SUB   215.
UBC   PLAYERS   CLUB
General  meeting  and  elections  to  be
held   in   SUB   105B   at   12:30.
mm.      WEDNESDAY
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Meeting   in   Bu.    104.
THURSDAY
UBC   CURLING   CLUB
General  meeting at   12:30  in  Bu.  204.
mm
EAT IN •TAKEOUT. DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THE LAST BIO BASH OF THE
year. Come to the Crystal Ball,
Sat., March IlUi, al the Lamplighter Supper Club. Tickets on
sale in  Hebb Theatre  Lobby,  12:30
__to_ 2^10.	
LAST POLKA " PARTY THIS
year! Live band, refreshments,
Fri.   !)-l,   $1.25   each   at   l.H.
Greetings
12
DROP A LINK, c/o BOX 115.
Phone 228-3706 or stop by and
see us at Speak Easy, Monday -
Friday, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., SUB,
Rm.   218.	
.MEET THE NEW EXECUTIVE OF
Lutheran        Student       Movement,
Saturday,   March   14,   at   7:00   p.m.,
Lutheran   Campus   Centre.
NOT   a"LOVK   POEM
Darken  is the sky as
clouds   all   moved   in;  ■
Bent   are   all   the   strong   oak   trees
to  salute  the  cold   blowing winds.
Still   more   frightening   it   is   as
thunder   would   follow   lightning;
It  would   even   then   be   the   pouring
rain,   wet  as  well as  cold.
Let   it  be   fearful   to  you  no  more,
my   sweet  gentle   nightingale,
It's  only  the  change  of weather,
plainly   necessary  and   natural.
Prejudiced as you are, it can't be
compared with peaceful moon-lit
nights,
Cut   how   can   you   brighten   your
feathers   without   rain?
Bet it rain hard and let the wind
blow  cold   this   Saturday  night,
For  I  will  come  to fly    with  you,
for   s'ire.
 To  B.   Lee  from   P.   Tse
Wanted Information
13
INFORMATION    WANTED ON
trail   from   Port   Renfrew   to Clo-
oose.    Please   phone   Dan   or Liz,
228-98M.
Lost  &  Found
14
LOST: ONE FINE! ARTS 125 NOTE
book. Please call 261-8533. Mary
Locke.    Reward — desperate.
FOUND: ONE A.M.S. CARD, SUB
Plaza, last week. Claim at Lost
and  Found,   SUB.	
TAKEN . . . FROM SEDGEWICK,
green carrying case. Please return: Reward. Ph. 736-6926 or
SUB  Lost  and  Found.
LOST: BROWN LEATHER
shoulder jmrse with AMS Card
and   wallet.   Please   call   277-4981	
HOST:    JAKE'S   21st.
FOUND:   Jake's  22nd.
at   the   Coach   House,   Friday.	
LOST: MALE BROWN & WHITE
tabby cat. Extra toes on front
paws. Large reward. Leave message at 224-9073 or 2120 Wesbrook
Cres.
Rides  &  Car  Pools
15
NEED RIDE FROM TSAWWAS-
SEN; have car. Phone Mike —
943-3540
Special Notices
16
LOLA'S  DATING  CLUB
New  modern  fun way to  meet
UNATTACHED  LADIES
AND GENTLEMEN
Ages 18-70 Welcome
Open   9   a.m.-9   p.m.   314   West
Hastings,   -tf103   or   call   688-0396
JOSEPHINE BARCLAY—PLEASE
call Barbara Claghorn in the in-
formation   office,   228-3131.	
WANTED —WALKERS OR SPON-
sors to participate in the Moccasin Miles Walk, April 3rd, 4th,
and 5th: From Vancouver City
Hall at 7:00 a.m. to Hope. The
money raised will go to Indian
organizations to help them in their
fight for social justice and community development. For sponsor
forms or to make pledges, phone
685-4730 or write: Resources For
Native Progress Association, Box
8746, Postal Station H, Vancou-
ver   5,   B.C.	
AQUA SOC BEER NIGHT POL-
lowing General Meeting, Thurs.,
March 19, 4-8 p.m., 4640 W 9th
(Richard's place). Come and meet
the   new   executive.
THE LAST BIG BASH OF THE
year. Come to the Crystal Ball,
Sat., March 14th, at the Lamplighter Supper Club. Tickets on
sale in Hebb Theatre Lobby, 12:30
to 2:30.	
PLACE VANIER HAS GOT IT.
Totem is next. CYVR - UBC radio
at 650 on your radio dial.
THE. OFFSPRING OF A STRANGE
combination comes to the screen
— see "Rosemary's Baby" Fri. &
Sat., 7:00-9:30: Sun., 7:00, SUB
Theatre.   Still  only 50c.	
EPLORE INNER SPACE — FILMS,
discussions, lectures, on the
Undersea WTorld, March 10th, 17th
and 24th, at the Vancouver Aquar-
ium,   8:00   p.m.	
AQUA SOC. GENERAL ELEC-
tion Meeting, Thurs., March 19,
12:30, Brock 303. Come out and
choose your Club Exec. Special
bonus —. one free beer for attend-
ing  meeting!   (really!)	
THE NEW LUTHERAN STUDENT
Movement executive wants to
meet you Saturday, March 14, 7:00
p.m., at Lutheran Campus Centre,
5885 University Blvd.
FIRESADE DISCUSSION ON POL-
lution. Everyone welcome, Sunday, March 15, 7:00 p.m., Union
College of B.C.	
I DESPERATELY NEED A WIPE
for immigration reasons. Any woman 21 or over. For further information contact me, Gary. Ph.
738-4065,  ask for John.
Special Notices (Cont.)
BKCOJIK A LEGALLY OR DAINED
minister. $2.00 donation, appreciated. World Life Church, Box
717-1),   Ceres,   California   95307.
B()'JTT)Y I. AX'S P It EVIOI" SLY'TJN^
published Tarantula now available
UBC   bookstore    magazine    rack.
Travel Opportunities
17
CANOE EXPEDITION OX NA-
hanni XWT, July-Aug. Male and
female    participants    wanted.    Ph.
 683-3054,    738-0489,    5-7    p.m.
SCUBA DIVER'S D"AY—TRTp—TO
Gulf Islands, 87.50, March 22. I'll.
Al,   224-0942,   5-7  p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: WOMEN'S THREE
speed bicycle. Phone 731 -2872
e\ enings.
WANTED: BLENDER ~TO PUREE
Baby Food. Phone 731-0897 even-
ings.	
WANTED TO RENT 16' - 20'
Trailer, May 1-Sept.l). Purpose:
Research living quarters, Loon
Lake.   Con tact  224-7128.	
WANTED: 10 SPD. BICYCLE. PH.
Iris,   277-8579  after  6.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1954 CHEV. WELL MAINTAINED.
Above average condition, can
demonstrate.    929-4129    nites.	
1902 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE. AUTO-
matic, excellent condition. Anyone
interested please call Pam or Bar-
bara at  684-4679.	
1968 EPIC DELUXE STILL UNDER
warranty. 4 new tires, 2 good
mounted snows. Good shape
throughout.   Call   738-1156.	
1965 FORD FALCON 2-DR. SEDAN,
6-cyl.   Auto,   radio,   $800,   732-8128.
1964 CHEV. 6. STD. RADIO, NEW
tires, good condition, clean. Of-
fers.   879-0372.	
1964 ECONOLINE VAN. RECOND.
gears, steering, muffler, etc., $700,
224-4846.	
1964 PLY. 6. AUTO. MUST SELL,
$550   or   best,   224-0684.	
1967 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS —
31,000 miles. P.B., P.S., radio,
air conditioning. Best offer. Call
collect 532-1071.
"63 AUSTIN 850 S.W. REBUILT
motor 1968, trans. 1969, exc. cond.
Phone   Ross,   261-5940.
'54   METEOR,   $50.
Barrett,   224-1581.
59  FORD,   $250.
'65    MGB,     EXCELLENT    ENGINE.
Phone  224-7767	
1965   RAMBLER   CLASSIC   550.    SIX
cyl.,  auto,  trans.,  excellent condn.
Phone   224-7438	
1968 TRIUMPH GT6, 18,000 MILES.
$2200.    Phone   224-9458
1965 RAMBLER CLASSIC AUTCT
matic, 64,000 miles. Original owner.
Good condition. Phone 224-6408
'68 V.W., ONLY 20,000 MILES. IN
perfect condition. Must sell. $1450
or best offer. Phone after 5:00.
683-5415	
1965 MGB IN MINT CONDITION.
Radial tires, new- paint job, $1150,
or  offers.  Ph.  731-4339	
1961    VW,    RADIO.   OFFERS.
738-3870        	
1960 BUGEYE SPRITE: NEW EN-
gine:  only needs clutch and paint;
_ call  Steve at  738-9484	
1969 DATSUN 1000. EXCELLENT
cond. 8-track Stereo. 733-1943,
6:30-7:00   p.m.	
1 OWNER: 1960 Chev. Bel-Air,
Stand. 6 cvl. Radio! Excel condn.
Low   mileage.   Tel.   879-5641
1961 VW, GOOD COND.; RADIO,
$450. Will take Van. S.W. or Panel
in   trade.   228-8572
Automobiles—Paris 23
ONE VOLVO SHOULDER BELT,
including anchor, $10. C all 228-2835
at noon or 224-6870 eve. Ask for
Jake.
Motorcycles
25
LARGEST SELECTION OF 10
speed bicycles, French and Japanese.  As low as $69.00.
THE   CYCLE   SHOP
5895 Fraser St. (43rd & Fraser)
327-4229
WANTED: VEZPA MOTOR SCOOT-
er.   Phone 731-2872  evengins.	
'66 "100 CC" ZUNDAPP SCRAMB-
ler,   $200.   Barrett,   224-1581.	
1968 NORTON 650. ONLY 1700
miles. Asking $950. Phone 261-
1903.    Ask   for   Bruce.
'67 HONDA 250CC SUPER HAWK,
$350. Bell 7V8/500TX helmet, $25.
Leather jacket, med., $15. 1849
Trafalgar St., Apt. No. 1, after 6
p.m. weekdays.   Anytime  Sat., Sun.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPE-
cialists in Graphs, Maps, Text
Book Illustrations, Complex Formulae. Scientific Displays, Advertising.   Phone   733-4506
Photography
34
FOR SALE: DURST J-35 EN-
larges with 50 mm f/4 Componon
lens. Worth $125 — only $75. Ph.
228-8380  after 7.
Scandals
37
AQUA SOC GENERAL ELECTION
Meeting, Thurs., March 19, 12:30,
Brock 303. Come out and choose
your Club exec. Special bonus —
one free beer for attending meet-
ing.   (really!)	
CYVR - UBC RADIO HAS SCORED
in Place Vanier (who hasn't).
Tune 650 on your wireless, 8 a.m.
to 10 p.m., Monday through Saturday.
Scandals (Cont.)
37
SEE A SPECIAL FILM OX THIS
Special Day — Friday the 13th —
a time for witchcraft, devilry,
and "Rosemary's Baby", SUB
Theatre.	
NABS,     C   R  A   W  T  C  H  ,     P.   B.,
Strooille, Alalicrney, Zee Arab, and
other assorted animals will be
there. Jake rolls 22 on Friday the
13th   at   the   Coach   House.
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.    Phone   263-5317.	
OX-CAMPUS ACCURATE EXP.
typing. 40c per page, IBM selec-
tric.   Phone   224-9183   after   5   p.m.
FAST, EXPERT TYPING DONE
at a reasonable price. Will pick
up   and   deliver.   Phone   988-9781.
ACCURATE TYPING — GERMAN,
Dutch, French, English. At home.
Reasonable   rates.   Phone   261-3751.
"FAST, ACCURATE TYPIST —
will do typing in my home. Please
call   263-0196.	
ELECTRIC TYPING; UBC GRAD;
English major; 35c a page; 736-
9874. ,	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy,   738-8794,   35c   page   —   5c
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver home.   988-7228.	
TYPING SERVICES
Electric   machine
 Phone:    526-9842	
EXPERIENCED ELEC. HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work, reasonable
rates.    Phone   321-2102.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING, 35c
a page; 5c copy. Mrs. Stewart,
733-6098.	
NORTH VANCOUVER. PHONE
988-5420. Experienced typist. Thesis, manuscript, essay. Reasonable   rate.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist, (Italics, symbols, other types).
Experienced essay and thesis typ-
ist.   Reasonable   rates,   321-3838.
EXPERT TYPING —■ THESIS 35c
a page. Essays 30c/page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Ph.
325-0545	
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING
my    home.    Essays,    Thesis,    etc.
Neat   accurate   work.     Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317
TYPING        DONE       MY*       HOME.
Term   papers,   thesis,   essays,   etc.
Reas. rates, pick up & del. Phone
277-5807	
GENERAL        TYPING,        ESSAYS,
thesis,    etc.    Phone   224-5963.    Mrs.
Brown.	
ACCURATE     ELECTRIC     TYPIST,
theses,    manuscripts,    etc.    Phone
688-7051   around   6,   after 10  p.m.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric   machine.   Reas.   rates.   Phone
738-7881
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
LOOK REQUIRES GIRLS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call 879-5911 for info. Also full-
time summer work.	
NEEDED—SOMEONE TO COME
in five afternoons a week to do
housework and cooking for professional family. References need-
ed.     224-7714.	
ATTRACTIVE WOMEN FOR
florist firm. Evening work, Wed.
to Sat. Car or driver's license an
asset.    Call   684-2618   or   684-5612.
Summer employment
available for women students
with a minimum net typing
speed of 35 wpm.
- Office experience helpful -
- Many clerical jobs
also available -
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
540 Burrard Street
684-7177
FEMALE TO WORK AS NIGHT
staff in home for disturbed children. Job provides time for studying   and   sleeping.    Phone   874-2931
Help Wanted—Male
52
FULL TIME MALE LIFEGUARD
required May 17-Sept. 7, Langley.
Phone Linda, 733-2004 wkdys.,
after   5:30   for   information.
Male or Female
53
WANTED: PART TIME Assistants to work on psychological
research project. No experience
required. Pay: $2 per hr. Phone
738-9429
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
PREMIER DRUMS. L U D W I G
Snare. Ziljian Cymbals. Hard shell
cases. Excellent condition. $350.00
Phone  266-5025 eves.
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IX .MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats. by Ph.D. Instructor.
S5.00   per   hr.   Phone   733-6037   eve.
SPAXISH C O X V E R S A T I O X'
COURSES — University Professor will offer special private summer courses, at a downtown office,
starting next May, for beginners
and advanced, inexpensive. Call
738-5692, after 4 p.m., for registration   and   to   get   planning.
Tutoring
TUTORING  IN   SPANISH,   $3   hour.
Ph.   738-5692   eve.
Translations
TRANSLATIONS Spanish-English -
Spanish.    Call   738-5692   eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
•TERINIT" TRACK SUITS — IM-
ported from FINLAND. Assorted
colors and sizes. Also brand name
camping and outdoor equipment at
20% savings. See Hank, room 305,
Memorial Gym, Mondays and Wednesdays   (12:30-2:00).
YAMAHA      AMP
Organ.   Phone
p.m. Best offer.
AND
John   738
COMBO
■8851,   5-7
TOP QUALITY TERM PAPERS
available in: psychology, history,
political science, English, art, etc.,
etc., etc. Essays also available in
most areas of the above disciplines. Saturday and Sunday, Mar.
14 and 15 ONLY. Phone 524-1893
or come to 7685 Haszard Street
in Burnaby.	
PUREBRED PEKINGNESE PUP-
pies, gorgeous balls of fluff. Must
see   to  love.   872-1747
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GRAD. STUDENT & WIFE NEED
room   with  kitchen   facilities.   Phone
224-9774  after 7  p.m.  Ask for  Chua,
room   316/leave   message.	
FURNISHED ROOM. POINT GREY
and MacDonald. Private entrance,
laundry. Available immediately,
$45.    After   6,   738-1770.	
SLEEPING ROOM IN OLDER
W'est End home. No hassels. $50
per   month.   Call   684-2618.	
SHARE HOUSE (MALE). OWN
bedroom,   $65,     876-2366.	
FURNISHED ROOM AND FULL
cooking facilities. 2038 W. 5th.
Phone after 5 p.m. Single girl
only.    733-5156.	
FULLY FURNISHED — PHONE,
light, heat included. Share house
facilities. Guy(s). Kitsilano. Study-
ing   facilities,    etc.   Ph.    738-0784
SLEEPING ROOM. PRIVATE EN-
trance; bathroom, $45. 14th and
McDonald.   738-4309	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE. PH.
733-5436,   $35   per  month.	
STUDENT ACCOMMODATION NR.
Campus in home. Grad student,
first-class amenities, non-smokers.
Serious students only. Any nationality  welcome.   Ph.   228-9127
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION NOW
available at the Sigma Chi House
the newest dormitory on Campus.
Summer rates on request for both
room and/or board, 5725 Agronomy.   224-6374   or   224-9620
MEN WHO WANT GOOD BED-
room for summer available 1st
May, near UBC Gate. Private ent.,
tel.   use.  Call  224-7623	
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM, PRIV-
ate bath, in lovely South Granville
home for responsible student, on
bus line, no cooking: male preferred. Available April 1. Phone
224-6090
ROOM AVAILABLE IN SHARED
house. Male or female. $50 month.
Ray or Phil 731-1930	
NEED CHEAP ACCOMMODATION
on Campus? Quiet clean rooms for
male students. $50 month, with
kitchen privileges. Clean linen &
parking. Board $45 if desired.
Close    to    Libraries.     224-0327    or
come to 5760 Toronto Rd.	
MALES: EXCEL. ACCOM.; W.W.
carpet; TV room; kitchen facilities;  near UBC.   228-8040
Room  &  Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student. $80 per month. Fraser &
22nd Ave. Phone 879-7061.
Furn. Houses &  Apts.
83
3 FEM. GRADS WANT HOUSE OR
apt., pref. furn. Kits, or Pt. Grey.
Immed.     733-3601.	
FURNISHED, CLEAN, 2 - ROOM
suite. Female grad. student.
Available immed. 731-9841. 2525
West   7th   Ave.,   after   1   p.m.
MALE ROOM-MATE WANTED —
Share Beach Avenue apartment,
summer or logger, $75 mo. Avail-
able   now.   Rod,   688-9683	
WANTED: FURNISHED APART-
ment or house for visiting physics
prof. His wife and two children
from aprox. June 10 to Sept. 10.
If interested contact Joyce Sjerve
at  263-9982
Unf. Houses  &  Apts.
84
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE 3-
bdrm. apt. with 2 others, $60 mo.
685-0735,   after   6,	
YOUNG COUPLE WANT TO RENT
house near UBC in $150 price
range.  Call 732-8777	
ASSISTANT PROF., MALE,
single, seeks reasonable sized private accommodation, preferably
Kitsilano  area.   733-0234 Friday, March   13,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
—keith dunbar photo
ACTION CONTINUES hot and heavy in the B.C. High School
Basketball Championships at the War Memorial Gym. Sixteen of the
best teams in B.C. are battling for the elusive title of the number one
team. Scoring above is Jim Ciccone (13), a potential all star from the
Prince Rupert Rainmakers. Watching in vain are Bill Fraser (33) and
Mark Schretlen (34) from Vancouver College. As expected. Prince
Rupert won 51-48. Also winning yesterday as expected was MEI,
who defeated Winston Churchill 65-46. Games go all day today, with
the final two games slated for the Pacific Coliseum Saturday night.
Birds advance
Laurentian next
The UBC basketball
Thunderbirds took their first step
toward the Canadian
Championship by downing the St.
Mary's University Huskies 74-55
before a capacjty house in
Hamilton . . .
Trailing 33-30 at the half, the
Birds came out in the second half
and ran the'Huskiesoff the court.
Shooting 30 per cent from the
field, the Birds were unable to get
on track in the first half but
roared past the Huskies early in
second frame.
The leading scorer for the Birds
was forward Bob Molinski who
had 19 points, Derek Sankey
added 17 and Ron Thorsen had
16. For the losers it was Al Brown
and Phil Carny with 14 points
each.
The Final shooting percentages
tell much of the story as the Birds
finished with a 42 percentage
compared to 34 per cent for St.
Mary's.
Much of the credit for sparking
the comeback goes to Jack Hoy as
he was off the bench to hit two
field goals, which resulted in the
ignition of the Birds. Alex
Brayden and Terry MacKay also
had good performances; both
playing good defense and scoring
eight points each.
The Birds now advance to the
semi-finals against Laurentian
University who had a bye last
night. The winner of that game
will take on McMaster Marauders
on their home court as last night
they downed Loyola of Montreal
in last evening's other semi-final.
The Laurentian contest will be
played at 6 p.m. tonight
Vancouver time with the final
going on Saturday afternoon on
coast to coast television.
Applications for Men's Athletic
Association President,
Vice-President, and Secretary for
1970-71 must be submitted to Mr.
Bus Phillips, Athletic Director, by
12:30 Tuesday, March 17.
SP0R TS
Soccer Birds
try for four
It looks like the Thunderbirds
Soccer team is finally showing the
fruits of coach Joe Johnson's
efforts as they are currently on a
three game winning streak. The
year has been a little
disappointing for the team but the
final three games have been
encouraging.
Last week the Birds showed a
lot of the poise they have missed
all year. Rookie Jim Kitsul proved
his worth as a competent goalie as
he recorded his first shutout in an
impressive 3-0 win over Victoria
O'Keefe's.
Team sparkplug Gary
Thompson proved the leader once
again with a two goal and one
assist performance.
Rugby team
Coach Donn Spence's
Thunderbirds rugby squad put out
an all out performance Saturday
against the University of Victoria
Vikings but fell short in their bid,
bowing 14-9 in one of the better
played games this year.
Playing without star
backfielders Doug Shick and Dave
Austin the Birds still managed to
harass the Vikings throughout the
contest.
This loss leaves the Birds in
solid third place in the Northwest
Conference at the moment.
This Saturday the team plays
their final game of the season
when they take on second place
University of Washington Huskies.
If the Birds beat the Huskies it
will put them ahead of the
Huskies by one point, however if
they lose they will drop to a
disappointing fourth place.
No football
Head football coach Frank
Gnup regretfully announces that
there will be no spring training
this year for his football
Thunderbirds.
The WCIAA has done poor
Frank dirt by disallowing any
training one week before
registration. Gnup will be
stretching that rule to the limit by
starting practices on the first day
that the league will allow in
September.
With but three games left 4n
the season the boys are hungry to
end the year off on a winning
note.
This Saturday, 2:00 p.m. at
Thunderbird Stadium , the Birds
hope to upset fifth place
Eintracht in a bid to climb out of
the league cellar. As this was
merely a rebuilding year coach
Johnson is pleased that the team
is proving they will be serious
contenders in the coming season.
Also with these three wins
coming at the end of the season it
stands the boys in good stead
morale-wise for next year.
In other play, the Tomahawks
beat the Simon Fraser Clansmen
2-1, Thursday afternoon at
Thunderbird Stadium. Goal
scorers for UBC were Rick Noble
and Bruce Wilson.
New coach gets rowers winning
UBC's rowing crew is back to
their winning ways of a few years
ago, and is anxious to continue on
the same'trail this weekend.
Last weekend, UBC won their
first race of the season by taking
an eight length win over the
University of Puget Sound and
Pacific Lutheran University. The
crew rowed a good time of 6:28
for the 2000 meter course, not
bad for this early in the season.
This weekend the crew will
row in two regattas, the first at
Tacoma and the second at
Bellingham.
Saturday the opposition will be
UPS and PLU again, and Seattle
University. Sunday the regatta
will be against Western
Washington State College.
The team is under the coaching
of former Yugoslavian national
coach Peter Klavora. He is doing
his masters degree in economics at
UBC and took over the coaching
duties when John Cartmel left the
university at Christmas. Klavora
coached the Yugoslavian team to
a bronze medal in the 1964
Olympic Games in Japan.
This year's team is built around
veterans Rod Bell-Irving (captain),
Benj Clarke, and Bob Advent.
Action gets heavy for the crew
when they head south for the
Western Sprints at Long Beach on
May 14 and 15. The main aim is
to qualify as the Canadian entry
in the World Rowing
Championships which will be held
in St. Catharines, Ontario this
summer. Eliminations for the
Canadian entry start at the
beginning of August.
Girls keep
on winning
This weekend the UBC
women's basketball team journeys
to St. John, New Brunswick for
the Canadian Senior A Ladies'
championship. They will represent
British Columbia at the
tournament.
It has been over 20 years since
UBC has won a provincial
championship, which is a tribute
to the quality of this year's team.
Former Thunderbirds star Ken
Shields has taken over the
coaching reins this year and fused
a fair amount of talent into a
winning club.
The first game will be Friday
morning for UBC, and they will
be playing Alberta. In addition to
counting for points in the
tournament, the game will decide
the Western Canadian
championship, and carries a
trophy for the winner.
Last weekend the UBC
women's gymnastic team accepted
an invitation to the Canadian
Intercollegiate championships and
walked away with the prizes.
Sandra Hartley of the UBC
team won the individual title, and
in so doing won a berth on the
Canadian team which will
compete in the World Student
Games in August.
Ike
filaden and* titurraif
CxkibitivH
Work by Canada's two greatest living sculptors
now at
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
IT45 West Georgia
ROT P
MOT P
DOT P
Are you sure that you are not missing out?
Enquire about the Regular Officer Training
Plan or, the Medical Officer Training Plan or,
the Dental Officer Training Plan.
Visit, Phone or Write
THE CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
PHONE 666-3136 Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 13, 1970
Dear landlord:
get stuffed...
How UBC students will benefit
from B.C.'s new tenant legislation
It's almost enough to make you believe in
democracy.
Several weeks ago, a delegation from the Vancouver
Tenants' Council bussed over to Victoria and confronted
attorney-general Leslie Peterson with some suggestions
for providing tenants with basic rights.
So far so usual.
Peterson gave them the Socred snub: he ignored
their brief, told them they were being misled by
communists and politely asked them to run along —
business was beckoning.
Then, unexpectedly, right out of the red as it were,
Peterson presents a bill in the legislature on Feb. 25 for a
new landlord and ienant act containing most of the
proposals of the Vancouver Tenants' Council (VTC).
At a meeting Tuesday night at the New Veterans'
Legion Hall, 1335 Burrard, 150 tenants, mostly old folks,
eagerly listened to Alderman Harry Rankin explain the
provisions of the proposed bill. Rankin was not unhappy
at all: "It's far from perfect, but it has gone a long way
in protecting tenants' rights," he said.
There were almost no students there, but student
tenants will feel a lot more secure and safe from
marauding landlords when the new bill passes.
For one thing, once you've rented a place in
September, the landlord will be forbidden by law to
raise the rent before the end of the school term. All new
tenants will have a one-year freeze on rental rates.
The bill included all existing landlord and tenant
legislation in Vancouver and then some.
Three  months,   throughout   B.C.
For example, under the Landlord and Tenants Act
passed by city council in November, 1969, the landlord
must give three months notice of any recent rent increases.
This is now the rule for all of B.C.
The existing Vancouver rules on locking out tenants
and upkeep of suites now go province-wide.
No landlord can lock out a tenant for having a
raucous party the night before. In fact, the new
legislation keeps him right out of your place except after
he's given you 24 hours' written notice, and then he has
to venture in between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m.
"Dear landlord, You are asked to note our new
visiting hours ..."
The other Vancouver legislation that goes
province-wide is a general ruling that suites must be kept
in a fit state of repair, up to local health and building
standards and so on.
In Vancouver, damage deposits were limited to $25
(unfurnished) and $50 (furnished) by the November
municipal by-law. The new legislation will do away with
them completely outside this city.
The VTC is planning a campaign to have the
Vancouver minimum deposit ruling thrown out, putting
the city under the province's no-deposit policy.
If you are already paying a deposit, or start paying
one when you rent next September, you're now eligible
for six per cent interest on it. Rankin jokingly called this
a new source of savings for tenants.
The new bill will also put the onus on the landlord
to pay back the deposit to you within 15 days after you
leave, unless he can convince a judge that he deserves it.
"In my opinion the most important issue in all this
is the security of tenancy," Rankin told the meeting.
By
Peter Ladner
"You can have the best landlord and tenant act in the
world, but if the tenant's security is not guaranteed, it's
useless," he said.
This was the problem with the Vancouver by-law. If
you ever complained to the Vancouver grievance board
about a naughty landlord, he could just turf you out.
Now he's required to give you a month's notice (if
you pay rent by the month), and a small debts court
judge may cancel the eviction if you've only been
agitating for your legal rights.
One man stood up at the meeting and said his
landlady told him she was going to evict him because he
belonged to the VTCNow it will be the landlady, not
the tenant, who can get stuffed.
No   grabbing   TVs
Another provision for agitators is the proposal in the
bill that canvassers at election time can't be kept out of
an apartment building. Last provincial election a Socred
apartment owner wouldn't let opposing parties peddle
their propaganda in his private domain.
One alternative to eviction that has been used up
until now to undermine a tenant's security has been
seizure of a tenant's property when he's not looking.
Rankin said a woman had phoned him earlier in the day;
she had been two days behind in her rent and her
landlord grabbed her stereo and color TV to make her
hurry it up. This will be illegal in future.
If you do finally get legally thrown out, or decide to
leave your apartment as many students will be doing at
the end of April, you aren't bound to pay a whole extra
month's rent if you don't remember to give a full
month's notice.
If the landlord can rent out your place as soon as
you go, you no longer have to pay him rent. It is only
necessary to pay him for the time in the month when
the suite is unoccupied.
If you're now aware of your rights, secure in your
tenancy, and ready to take on the landlord, more relief
is provided for you.
No longer will you have to take your case to the
county court with its exorbitant lawyer's rates. Now you
will take it to the small debts court, where total costs
will be about $10 to $12 if you want to be your own
lawyer, which Rankin says is quite possible.
If you win, your landlord is liable for fines up to
$1,000.
As soon as the new bill was brought into the
legislature for first reading, VTC president and prime
mover Bruce Yorke, called a meeting of all the tenants'
councils in B.C. to discuss it.
Ignore   it  and  don't   pay
Yorke and newly-elected B.C. Tenants' Organization
(BCTO) president John Motiuk (a lawyer in Rankin's
firm — definitely a small minority of agitators at work
here) were also at Tuesday's meeting in the legion hall.
Yorke said they immediately noticed that landlords
around the province leaped into ungodly action when
they heard the news of upcoming tenants' rights. They
were serving notice of rent increases to avoid the
one-year freeze on every tenant's rent that would begin
when the bill passes.
So Yorke and company fired off a telegram about
this to Peterson, who added an amendment to the bill
which would nullify all rent increases or notices issued
after Feb. 25. Can this be? The Socreds heeding the
recommendations of a mere tenants' organization?
If you've received one of these notices of rent
increase  since  Feb.  25, keep  the  envelope  with  the
postmark on it, ignore the date on the notice, and doif't
pay it.
The next encouraging response from the Socreds
was their complete willingness to have representatives
from the BCTO meet with the bill-writers in the
attorney-general's department Monday night to go over
the bill.
Yorke too is very happy with the Socred bill, but is
still eager to see more security for tenants: "The way the
bill is now, there's no necessity for the landlord to give
you a reason for eviction.
"This reinforces us as second-class citizens.
"We want eviction to be possible only under certain
conditions: a tenant being two months arrears in rent,
being a gross nuisance to his neighbors, causing excess
damage, using his premises for illegal activity, or if the
landlord needs the premises for his own or immediate
family's use."
Motiuk added: "I can still foresee the situation that
landlords will be evicting people for sticking up for their
rights. The act only says a judge may refuse a landlord's
eviction order if the tenant is demanding his rights.
"This should be changed to say the judge shall
refuse an eviction order under these conditions."
Yorke    is   also   perturbed   the   landlord—tenant
mediation boards authorized by the bill to be set up in
every B.C. municipality. He said they have very vague
powers, and can do nothing about rent levels.
"We think the board should be able to judge a rent
unreasonable and refer it to a judge for a decision," he
said. Motiuk added: "The landlord may be prevented
from evicting you, but there's nothing stopping him
from giving three months' notice and doubling the rent.
"After a year's tenancy, they can still raise the rent
four times a year and the sky's the limit."
The other big criticism of the bill is its
discrimination against people who have been in the same
place for a year or more. "The long-standing and stable
tenants get no benefits, and hence are being
discriminated against," Yorke explained.
What this means is that students, who are often
shifting from one apartment to another, will benefit
most from the one-year rent freeze for new tenants.
To see this kind of action out of the Socred
government, expecially when they did it in consultation
with a man (Bruce Yorke) whom Peterson calls a
communist, is nothing short of a miracle.
But then Bennett, or God, or whatever his name is,
always was up on his miracles.

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