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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1970

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Array By MIKE SASGES
r^Sne fraternity president whose land is involved
in$*Re frat row hotel scheme feels his alumni directors
will sell fratiand if the price is right.
'H—vHe" also said Thursday that the first three
frafenTties on Wesbrook have already been offered
up to $175,000 for their combined land, by an
unknown land speculator.
The land would be used for a $40 to $50 a night,
high rise hotel and convention centre, and could set a
precedent in endowment lands sales.
"If it was a good deal we would take it," said
Beta Theta Pi president Keith Margetson Thursday.
Margetson said his fiat "could be screwed
anyway" if their land is re-zoned.
(The land belonging to the first three frats on the
north end of Wesbrook is currently leased to them on
a freehold basis but is zoned specifically for
fraternities. The provincial cabinet would have to
ratify a zoning change to permit a hotel
development.)
One Beta alumni director, Byron Hender, had
. previously told The Ubyssey that the directors were
may soon be rezoned and replaced
approached in late summer about a prospective land
deal, but have heard nothing more since that time.
According to Hender, the Betas are in good
financial condition and therefore are in no hurry to
sell their land.
Rob McDonald, president of Phi Gamma Delta,
said Thursday, "since our alumni own the building
and the lot it would be up to them to sell."
"They realize the potential of the land,"
McDonald said.
"Our frat is definitely not in financial trouble,"
McDonald claimed.
The Ubyssey, however, received contrary
information from R. P. Murdoch, manager of the
university endowment lands.
Murdoch said Phi Gamma Delta is in poor
financial shape and is one of the two frats which have
approached the university to buy their leases.
The other frat is Phi Delta Theta. Together, these
two fraternities comprise two-thirds of the trio whose
land is being eyed by developers.
James Smith, head of J. E. Smith Realty which
claims to represent the unknown land developer, said
Monday that the scheme is still going strong.
"The frat alumni are very anxious to get the ball
rolling," he said.
"I am setting up a meeting with the three
fraternities some weekend and then I am going to see
the board of governors, who seem most interested."
The principals behind the hotel scheme will be
announced after the board meeting, Smith said.
"The money is still coming from England. The
contractors will be a local firm. Everything is very
straight," he said.
Smith's claim of English money behind the
scheme contradicts the statement of a Vancouver
contractor who had told The Ubyssey that the money
involved is to come from a local individual.
The contractor had been approached by this
individual, he said, as a potential investor in the
scheme.
It remains a distinct possibility that two groups
are competing for the frat row site.
Allan Kelly, president of the endowment lands
ratepayers association said Monday he had heard
nothing of the hotel scheme.
"I would not be favor of such a project and it
serves no purpose at this time," he said.
-jim duff photo
IT'S THAT TIME of year again and study space is at a premium. This couple was fortunate enough to
find a cosy nook in SUB, while others were still wandering aimlessly through the library stacks.
Quebec   plans   police   report
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) - In a move to legislate
increased police and state powers, Quebec justice
minister Jerome Choquette plans to bring in a white
paper on police, terrorism, crime and justice in the
light of the Front de Liberation du Quebec crisis, the
minister told the national assembly Friday.
Choquette said the white paper will deal with
powers and organization of the province's police
forces and "the means of control the government
should have."
Choquette supported the refusal to meet FLQ
ransom demands for labor minister Pierre Laporte
and British trade commissioner James Cross with
the same basic argument that he and the Trudeau
government have presented throughout:
"Western democracy is a long conquest of
humanity which we must not betray at the first
blackmail."
Outside the assembly, he reproached his critics
for placing on the government the responsibility for
the killing of Laporte by refusing the FLQ
conditions for their safe release.
The minister repeated that the basic reason for
calling in the army and invoking the War Measures
Continued on Page 2:   See STUDY
p. 5 — Bill Gibson explains his part of the 1970 civic
elections scramble
p. 6 — A look at UCWIC discloses the hard times of
Vancouver's poor
p. 11 — UBC rowing crew wipes out Washington for
second consecutive time
Book publishers
hit students
with high prices
UBC students may be paying more than they should for their
books because book publishers know they are forced to buy certain
books.
The Alma Mater Society book-pricing investigatory committee
has Unearthed information which suggests that publishers offer only a
20 per cent discount to university bookstores because the bookstores
sell to a fixed market and they know the volumes will sell.
A 40 per cent discount is charged by most publishers to private
booksellers, says a committee outline presented to the AMS last week,
because these booksellers must offer greater savings to sell the books.
The committee plans to demand an investigation of the situation
by consumer affairs minister Ron Basford's department.
The AMS approved the establishment of the committee at its
Thursday night meeting.
The committee's proposal also says copyright restrictions limit
and many cases prohibit the import of cheap American editions of
books which are published in Canada at high prices.
The committee plans to call in John Young, chairman of the
prices and incomes commission, and ex-dean of arts at UBC, concerning
passing legislation dealing with price-fixing of text-books, and books
published in the U.S. and sold in Canada.
"We feel confident that making a public cry in the press will start
the ball rolling and encourage the federal government to take
immediate action," said student senator Art Smolensky, who is rapidly
gaining a reputation as UBC's answer to Ralph Nader.
Smolensky expressed his attitude in the whole situation by
saying, "The university should be kicked in the rear end for not doing
something about this situation sooner, as they have known of its
existence long before now."
AMS may donate
to feed-in program
The Alma Mater Society may give $200 this week to a committee
financing feed-ins for unemployed youth in the Lower Mainland.
Students' council decided Thursday to investigate the request for
funds.
Treasure Stuart Bruce was instructed to have a cheque ready to
be turned over immediately to the feed-in committee, if the AMS
approved the expenditure.
Chris Krawczyk, former AMS vice-president, speaking for the
committee, said it was costing about $35 per day to feed 40 to 50
people.
She said the committee — supported by donations — was forced
to undertake the feed-ins Nov. 1, when a summer feeding program,
sponsored jointly by the federal and provincial governments, ended.
Continued on Page 2:   See NO MORE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November, 17, 1970
Teach-in tells the facts of abortion
It is totally unnecessary to
make a woman suffer the effects,
both physical and emotional, ■of
an illegal abortion performed by a
quack, said a Vancouver
psychiatrist at UBC Friday noon.
"I've heard of experiences that
would make your hair curl," said
Mrs. R. D. Makaroff to less than
100 students who showed up to
hear her and others speak as part
of the two-day abortion teach-in
sponsored by the AMS on
Thursday and Friday.
"I certainly wouldn't want my
daughter to go through a bad
illegal abortion, nor should any
girl have to for that matter," she
told students in the ballroom.
"I've spoken to hundreds of
girls with unwanted pregnancies,"
she said. "Usually they are in a
state   of   confusion,   and   quite
upset."
Makaroff said the most
important thing for a girl in this
situation is to find someone to
talk to — especially someone who
knows the facts. Then the girl
must make her own decision as to
whether she will have the child
or will have an abortion.
"Most girls are terrified and yet
despite this overwhelming fear
they are determined to go ahead
with the abortion, in many cases."
Makaroff also said that many
have guilt feelings. "It is a critical
point in their life — they need to
look at themselves and sort out
their basic beliefs.
"There's a lot of Victorian
attitudes to sex left over in our
society,"    she    said,    "and   this
affects girls — they think they did
something wrong, but they're not
quite sure why it's wrong."
"From the girls I have seen,
however, I've decided that a lot of
them can use this crisis in their
life as an experience that will help
them grow up emotionally, if it is
properly handled.
"Improperly handled, it can
damage them physically and
emotionally," concluded
Makaroff.
Explaining the physical side of
abortion to students was Dr. Ken
Knickerson, a Vancouver
gynecologist, who has been
concerned with the question of
abortion reform in this city.
"There is no way an abortion
can be done medically, that is to
say, via pills, or anything placed in
New study will deal with
preserving law and order
continued from page One
Act was the considerable sympathy generated for
the FLQ in student, union and municipal opposition
circles.
The benefits the government received by
invoking the act includeed "detention for several
noisy sympathizers of the FLQ ... and at least a
temporary cooling of the ardor of students and
other movements sympathetic to the FLQ
manifesto, because the FLQ was now illegal," said
Choquette.
At a later news conference, he said the study,
which will be made public early next year, will also
touch on means of preserving law and order in the
face of terrorism and organized crime.
Choquette    said    the    study    will    examine
individual civil liberties as they are affected by
police activities. He raised the possibility that
Quebecois may have to accept new restrictions in
their actions.
However, Choquette also gave assurances that
the government does not intend to act " in a
repressive way" to preserve public order and safety.
Despite these assurances, the study involved in
the white paper would touch upon the issuing of
personal identification cards to all Quebecois and
the legalization of wiretapping and bugging.
Its emphasis, however, he said, would be on the
training, qualifications, equipment and numbers of
police in Quebec.
Choquette said the white paper will prepare the
way for legislation to be presented next year in the
national assembly.
"No more lip service to charity"
continued from page One
The Alma Mater Society may
give $200 this week to a
committee financing feed-ins for
unemployed youth in the Lower
Mainland.
Students' council decided
Thursday to investigate the
request for funds.
Treasurer Stuart Bruce was
instructed to have a cheque ready
to be turned over immediately to
the feed-in committee, if the AMS
approved the expenditure.
Chris Krawczyk, former AMS
vice-president, speaking for the
committee, said it was costing
about $35 per day to feed 40 to
50 people.
She said the committee —
supported by donations - was
forced to undertake the feed-ins
Nov. 1, when a summer feeding
program, sponsored jointly by the
federal and provincial
governments, ended.
The feed-in committee is
hoping to work out a full program
to get jobs and housing for the
youths.
Hostel  to  open  soon
near  Whistler
Attention ski freaks —the Canadian Youth Hostels Association
will open a hostel at Whistler Mountain, Dec. 1.
The hostel, located three and a half miles from the Alta Lake
gondola, is to remain open until April 1971 and offers accommodation
for 21 people.
Reservations, at a cost as low as four dollars per day, can be made
through the CYHA at 1406 West Broadway or phone 738-3128.
"But in the meantime, there
are a lot of hungry people
around," said Krawczyk.
She said there were plans for
other fund-raising activities such
as bottle and paper drives and a
benefit concert, but that more
was needed immediately.
Opposing the committee's
request at council was
vice-president John Mitchell.
"We shouldn't pay lip service
to another charity. We've given
away $10,000 this year already,"
he said.
Said Bruce: "We have to decide
the priorities. By giving money
away we have to cut back on our
own programs."
Another    feed-in    committee
member at the council meeting
said the feed-ins were held daily at
the  Cool Aid house on Seventh
Ave.
Science rep Sven Robinson will
head     a     council    committee
investigating     the    request    for
funds.
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the vagina," he said.
"It's amazing how many
people still attempt getting an
abortion in these ways — all that
does is delay action in trying to
get an abortion."
Knickerson said the first thing
to do upon discovery of a
possible unwanted pregnancy is
to make sure you are actually
pregnant.
"Early diagnosis is very
important," he said.
Knickerson outlined the
various methods used in abortion,
emphasizing that up to the eighth
week abortion is very
straight forward and safe.
Up to the twelfth week it is
still possible to perform an
abortion vaginally, he said, but
from the twelfth to the twentieth
week, a small Caesarian, or
incision in the uterus, is needed
to effect the abortion.
He said the incision method is
less desirable because it is more
apt to produce complications, and
"will mean that probably all the
future pregnancies of the woman
involved will have to go through
Caesarian."
After the twentieth week, an
abortion is too dangerous.
"Never think of an abortion as.
an alternative to contraception,"
said Knickerson. "It is definitely a
risky procedure - anytime an
operation of any kind is done,
there is a certain danger."
D. J. O'Donnell, a representative of the Women's
Caucus, presented the political
side of the abortion issue.
She outlined the history of
Women's    Caucus    activities    in
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making abortion easier to obtain,
and said that just recently the
Vancouver General Hospital has
"opened up" and has made it less
difficult to obtain legal abortions.
O'Donnell spoke about the
Caucus' clinic which opened
about a year ago, and gives out
information on abortion.
She said that women whom the
problem concerns most are
"welfare and third world,"
because they cannot afford the
price of a good illegal abortion.
"We try to transform theiguiltof
these women into anger against
the institutions which work
against them.
"We tell them that to turn
anger against themselves is what's
done all the time in oppressed
groups, and to try to turn their
anger instead in a positive
direction. That is why our clinic is
political," she said.
Organizers of the teach-in,
which included information
booths, set up all over campus on
Thursday and Friday, generally
regarded it as a success.
However, Tom Palfrey, acting
external affairs officer, said that
he was disappointed with the
turn-out for the speakers on
Friday.
"It would be different if
students knew everything about
abortion, but I've spoken to many
who know very little," he said.
"We were quite satisfied with
the booth end of it, though. It's
interesting to note that the booths
in the Engineering and Law
buildings, both predominantly
male faculties, had the biggest
turn-outs," said Palfrey.
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Winners will be asked a skill-testing question
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25 locations to serve you Tuesday, November 17, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Why does registrar release select student info?
Student senator Art Smolensky
will ask Wednesday's senate
meeting to explain why the
registrar's office releases
information about some students
and not others.
Smolensky announced his
plans   to   student   council   last
Thursday when grad student rep
Evert Hoogers said the registrar's
office had refused to release
information about a student
involved in scuffles with the
internationalists, a Maoist group,
last week.
Hoogers  said  the  office   had
told The Ubyssey, which
contacted it Thursday, that it
could not release any information
about engineering student Rudi
Reschke because he had asked
that it be kept confidential.
"Why     haven't     any     other
students been told they have the
Request for return of stolen pics
Someone has been getting his jollies at the
expense of a local photographer.
During the past few years, the works of local
photographers have been on display in the glass case
outside the games room in the basement of SUB.
Two of these photos have been stolen.
The photographs depict a pair of nubile nudes,
one in each picture. Whether the thief was a
legitimate art-lover or a horny high school student,
he at least had good taste, (see above)
One of the pictures has won several first prizes
in   photography   contests,   and   is   due   in   an
international contest this week.
Its owner values it at over $ 1000.
Aside from the monetary value of the photos,
and the time and effort put into their production,
the theft has made other potential exhibitors wary
of displaying their works in SUB. Some contestants
have withdrawn already.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Hanson Lau
says he does not want to call police into the matter.
"If the person or persons responsible would
simply return the photos to my office, no questions
will be asked," he said.
Jazz and Eskimo art at art gallery
Attention culture freaks!
The Walter Zuber Armstrong Ensemble will
perform four of Armstrong's "African-inspired, free
form jazz" compositions at the Vancouver Art
Gallery, 1145 West Georgia, at 8 p.m. Nov. 24.
The compositions will feature piccolo, flute,
bass clarinet, percussions, and piano.
Armstrong is presently artist in residence at
Fairhaven College, Bellingham, Washington.
His music has been described as "a blend of
classicism, traditional jazz, 'easternism',
Afro-Cuban, atonal dissonance."
Admission: general public $2; members $1.50.
A two-man exhibition of Eskimo drawings and
sculpture, Oonark/Pangnark, will open at the
gallery today.
Infinity Box, an audio-visual student exhibition
continues in the Little Gallery at the Vancouver Art
Gallery until Nov. 22.
Two 8mm films and one 16mm are shown
Monday through Friday, once in the morning and
twice in the afternoons.
For exact times phone the education
department at the Vancouver Art Gallery,
684-2488.
option of not having information
released?" Hoogers asked.
He told the council that the
registrar had released "all kinds of
information" when contacted
some time ago by the Province
newspaper about Art Olsen, a
Dawson Creek secondary teacher
fired for allegedly supporting the
Front du Liberation de Quebec in
contravention of the War
Measures Act. Olsen had
graduated from UBC.
Smolensky    said    he    would
demand an explanation at the
senate meeting.
Reschke, a former B.C. Lions
football player, was involved in
two fights with internationalists
last week in the main SUB foyer,
where the Maoist group was
displaying its literature.
Several assault charges have
been laid against internationalists
as a result_of the fights, but none
against students because the Maoist
group says it does not recognize
the Canadian legal system as
legitimate.
Protesting gears
talked out of it
A petition signed by 50 engineers protesting the misuse of
Engineering Undergraduate Society funds for engineer stunts and
demanding out of the EUS has been withdrawn.
On Friday, the half-dozen engineering students circulating the
petition were attacked by an angry mob of their red-jacketed fellows
and doused with water from fire extinguishers.
On Sunday the dissenting engineers met with the EUS executive
and after discussion agreed to withdraw their attack on the society.
"Our view of the EUS council has changed," said Jim Scott,
engineering 2, Monday.
"They seemed receptive to the proposals we presented. We have
decided to work within the system to modify it."
Scott said the dissenting engineers learned that the EUS
executive, in fact, disapproves of stunts which reflect poorly on the
engineers.
Many of the EUS activities such as charity drives, social functions
and academic tutoring services are worthwhile, said Scott.
The members of the group could see EUS president Chris
Green's point when he said Sunday that stunts are necessary "to
promote spirit among the engineers and keep the campus awake", Scott
said.
The group is now advocating the establishment of a stunt
committee, independent of the EUS, which would screen all stunt
proposals before passing them on to the EUS council.
"We don't know what we'll do if our proposals are rejected by
the engineers. We don't want to quit," Scott said.
VQ must take stand
against fascism'
MONTREAL (CUP) - The Parti Quebecois was told during the
weekend that it must begin to take a stand against the "fascism" of the
federal government's anti-Quebec policy.
Pierre Bourgault, a PQ founder, told a regional party meeting that
"we have enough strength to start a real fight against the fascist
system."
"Don't let yourselves get used to having the army here,"
Bourgault said in an unscheduled address to about 350 PQ members
from 12 west Montreal ridings.
The PQ's executive director, Jacques Parizeau, told the meeting
that "we have to decide how far to go now, and we can't be less radical
that the bishops of Quebec."
Several Quebec clergy have been organizing protest against social
conditions in the province.
The congress adopted resolutions calling for a parliamentary
inquiry to determine how real was the "apprehended insurrection" that
prompted imposition of the War Measures Act and urging members to
take mass action to support forms of "social animation" which would
help the oppressed.
"Speak up! Show them you exist. The worst that can happen is
that you lose your job or go to jail - it's not so terrible - especially if
it means that in five, ten or fifteen years we can speak freely of the
free Quebec we are looking for."
Once again quiet reigns in SUB
The main foyer in SUB is strangely quiet this week.
A literature booth, which was violently manned by the
internationalists, a Maoist group, for several weeks has been taken over
by mild-mannered members of the Varsity Christian Fellowship.
The internationalists, who are connected with the Canadian
Student Movement, have gone to Victoria for a conference, but they'll
be back.
Internationalist Rick Hundal was to appear in court, Nov. 14 on
an assault charge.
Hundal was charged after allegedly attacking Erwin Epp, arts 3,
who tried to break up a fight between Hundal and former B.C. Lion
Rudi Reschke, engineering 4, last week.
RCMP and members of the Alma Mater Society will meet today
to discuss what measures can be taken to prevent future violence in
campus buildings. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November, 17, 1970
rmnrssn
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER 17, 1970
Junior cops
The development of a police state occurs in a
number of ways — partly through major government
action and partly through matters that at first seem
trivial or ludicrous.
An example of the latter is the new plan by the
Vancouver City Policy department to establish a junior
police force. "The Law Enforcement Venture
Company", established by the police force and the
Boy Scouts Association, will be in operation by Jan. 1
for boys between the ages of 14 and 18.
According to Friday's Sun, the aims of the
organization will include teaching the boys respect for
the law and law enforcement and possibly arranging
recruitment of future cops.
Members of the company will be outfitted with
snappy blue uniforms similar to those worn by real
police officers.
It is frightening to think of adolescents being
thoroughly indoctrinated with the typical police
mentality, as is likely to happen.
If the police department stays true to form, the
members of the John Fisk youth corps will be taught
total hatred for those with dissenting political and social
opinions. They will be indoctrinated with the idea of
law and order at all costs and with the ail-too typical
police attitude that the public exists to serve and make
life easier for the police.
Police chief Fisk has not been specific about the
kind of programs that will exist in the group. All he has
said is that the members will not be involved in official
police work and will not be exposed to danger (although
if we remember our experiences while in that age
bracket correctly, any 14 year old kid who went around
wearing a blue uniform and calling himself a junior cop
would have had only minimal chances of ever seeing his
fifteenth birthday.)
It is only slightly far-fetched to imagine the new
venture company awarding merit badges to the kids who
turri\ in ' their fathers as communists or report their
little brothers for raiding the neighborhood vegetable
gardens.
Under the guise of public relations, the police
department is now attempting to grab people while
they're young and mould them in their own image. High
school students are subjected to quite enough
indoctrination without that.
Constitution
It is encouraging to see that the AMS is again
attempting to rewrite its constitution.
After all, what academic year would be official
without its set of AMS constitutional revisions. In the
past few years, there have been so many changes in the
constitution that it must now take some highly talented
creative minds to come up with amendments that
haven't already been tried at least once.
Maybe, just maybe, after a few more years and a
few more constitutions, the AMS will stop fooling
around with structures and try to examine its purpose.
How to waste a column
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City      Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wire       John Andersen
Managing  ■Bt^l.c"r.tii
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate ...-• John Twigg
Ass't News    ... i- . .. Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
°hoto   ...>'.  David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday ,Tlm Wi(son
It was a day of mass confusion
Sandy Kass came in with a large one
conceived last week and born in great
labor over the weekend. Nettie Wild
gave a funeral oration for her axe while
Heide sneaked in the back when Ken
Lassessen wasn't looking. Nathalie
Apouchtine went hunting for bears,
assisted by coureurs de bois Kay
Barnett and Dick Betts. John Gibbs
sprangfrom a nearby tree but was gone
before anyone knew he wasn't there
and Mike acted wise and Sasges
throughout. Thorn Wescott ran out of
animal noises and just moaned quietly,
watched in horror by Arlene Swift.
Shane McCune vented his wit on a
Doric column and Jinny Ladner was
buried by an avalanche. McCloy forgot
to turn in a list but Don Gardner and
Keith Dunbar materialized partly. Jim
Cluff, David Bowerman, Dave Enns,
Kevan Perrins and Jim Gorman were
around but they were overexposed.
Maestro, play eight bars. Oh yeah, Tim
Wilson helped and Nate went home to
bed.
By SHANE McCUNE
The Big Cheese said I could
write a column. Maybe. If it was
good.
Newsy type that I am, I
therefore, looked around at other
columns to see how it's done.
Actually, there are only a few
different types of columns:
REMINISCENCE: This
method consists of recounting
interesting anecdotes about
people and places that bored you
at the time but become
fascinating when you write about
them.
Well, I could tell you about the
time I was in the hospital.
(At this point, I could insert a
few witty hospital jokes, like "If
your friends don't get you out,
your enemas will." But I won't.)
Or maybe my trip to Seattle. A
trifle less thrilling than Wescott's
Viet Nam epic, perhaps, but a lot
more candid. I went to
Disneyland once, too.
If you're really good, I'll tell
you all about that, and more, at a
later date.
CONVERSATION: Or
dialogue, or whatever. This can
be fun the first couple of times.
Unfortunately, the first couple
of times never show signs of
leading to the last couple of times.
To utilize, this medium to its
fullest potential, (as they say in
the ad biz), the columnist invents
one or more "characters" with
whom he converses from time to
time, usually when he has nothing
better to say.
I may have given away too
much. Because now you can gauge
my inventiveness, or lack of it, by
the number of columns which
lead off with, "The other day I
ran into Oglethorpe, my
Horseshoe Bay friend..."
A   more  imaginative  way  of
using the conversation format is
to fabricate a different character
in a different situation for each
week. That's hard work, but I
wouldn't mind it now and again.
No, Davies has that angle cornered
anyway.
RELATIVES: Now there's a
ripe one. I might use that, because
I certainly have a lot of hilarious
relatives.
Like Uncle John, the
communist who works for the
BBC.
Or Auntie Mabel, the financial
wizard of the Geritol Set.
Or my cousin, who works for
the FBI.
Or my second cousin, who
doesn't work at all.
And as for my
great-great-grandfather — well, if
he were alive today he'd be
considered a remarkable man.
He'd be over 200 years old.
I could tell you more, but I
still live at home.
LOCAL INTEREST: At UBC,
nonexistent.
This breed of article is
sometimes known as gossip. (See
the masthead elsewhere on this
page.)
The "insider" approach comes
under this heading, too. The
insider is one who knows the
ropes, has his ear to the ground,
his nose to the grindstone, his
shoulder to the wheel, his back to
the wall and his hands in his
pockets. And it shows, in the
often vague, nay, meaningless
drivel, he produces. (See editorial
elsewhere on this page.)
So much for different
approaches to and subjects of
columns in general. They have all
been used in this rag at one time
or another.
It looks, then, as if I am left
with nothing to write about.
But that has never stopped me
before. So don't say I didn't warn
you.
LETTERS
Gears
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I feel I have held my tongue
and temper long enough. I wish to
express my views on the
engineering faculty, who consider
themselves   "rough  and  tough".
I heard rumors about these
"redcoats" prior to coming to this
university. I found these rumors
hard to believe, but after only two
months on this campus I can see
the truth in them.
These students (or are they
sheep) seem to believe in safety in
numbers. That sure is being tough
boys — twenty engineers against
one unfortunate. It doesn't take
much guts to gang on a person,
and now that I've seen you in
action, I can see you're all gutless
as I presumed.
When I see twenty to thirty
little boys parading around in
oversized jackets under the
disguise of little red riding hood, I
often wonder how much they'd
appreciate a mid-day bath with
their clothes on and $40.00 worth
of books.
I'm sick and tired of their
displays of ignorance, childishness
and gutlessness. When I see them
walking around in gangs, all
resplendent in their red jackets,
they remind me of little boys
hanging on to their mama's apron
strings. Why don't they grow up
and start acting like university
students, instead of pre-school
boppers??? And you can be
assured, this is a popular opinion.
TED DALY
Arts 2 Tuesday, November 17, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
CIVIC ELECTIONS
PART FOUR
Gibson has a plan for city
By JIM DAVIES
Bill Gibson is running for mayor.
The trouble is, not enough Vancouver voters know.
They don't know that Gibson, 57, is an
internationally respected academic or that as a professor
of the history of medicine at UBC he has received the high
honor of Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
They don't know that Gibson has made trips to
Montreal and New York for talks with urban rapid transit
experts.
They don't know that Gibson recently made a trip to
the White House in Washington, D.C. to discuss the
development of a regional college in B.C., possible at the
present Royal Roads college site.
They don't know that he has just written a book on
former UBC president Frank Wesbrook which will be
published later this year.
What's worse is they don't care.
What they do care about are the plans Gibson has for
Vancouver and how he would differ from the present
mayor, Tom Campbell.
In a Monday interview with The Ubyssey in his quiet
domain within Woodward library, Gibson spent two hours
answering these and other questions.
BILL GIBSON . . . few know him
His over-riding message throughout the interview was:
"Vancouver must be humanized."
"The central core of the city should be developed so
that it can keep renewing itself rather than becoming a
derelict area as in so many American cities," he said.
"The flight from the city which seems to be so
prevalent now must be arrested. The centre of the city
must be made liveable."
One of Gibson's plans to "humanize" the city
involves the immediate beginning of construction of a
rapid transit system.
Although Gibson is in favor of rapid transit, he is
staunchly opposed to freeway proposals for Vancouver.
"This would just increase the vehicular traffic into
the city," said Gibson, "and it would be virtually
impossible to find any parking stall once downtown."
The latest parking study concerning Vancouver traffic
problems substantiates his claim.
In the downtown area, there are currently some
33,000 parking stalls. By the year 2,000 A.D., with the
projected population increase, some 55,800 additional
stalls will be required, costing about $167 million.
"The cost of the increased parking facilities would be
staggering, but these would pale beside the fantastic
increase in pollution and human frustration," said Gibson.
the solution to this problem is clear to Gibson -
rapid transit.
"The whole job would cost about $300 million and I
am sure that the provincial and federal governments
would split 75 per cent of the costs.
Gibson noted that there were routes already
established where the rapid transit system could be laid
out - the old B.C. Electric corridors.
When could a rapid transit system be ready under a
civic administration run by Gibson?
"It would be ready in less than ten years. All of the
system would be underground, and the land above would
be utilized for some important social use."
Other proposals by Gibson which could alleviate
of the downtown congestion problems include a possible
Sunday closing to traffic of the central downtown arteries
and a special toll on any vehicles which enter the central
business district with less than three persons inside.
Gibson's stands on other civic issues presented
include:
On housing: "The West End will be saturated by
1973. Kitsilano will be saturated by 1976. Unless some of
the derelict industrial areas are re-zoned for housing,
Vancouver will run out of available useable space within
a very few years.
"Garden apartments, townhouses, and condominiums
— all forms of high density residential land use — should
be constructed where possible."
On False Creek Development: "Here is an area of
wasteful industrial concerns.
"As mayor, I would like to see the area established as
a total community with parks on the waterfront, marinas,
educational facilities, neighbourhood parks, and housing
staggered up the hills on both sides.
"I am not sure if a commercial area would be
essential. The existing facilities may be sufficient."
On parks: "Parks are a densely populated city's safety
valve.
"Vacant city land in the east end of Vancouver
should be reserved now for parks. In all areas of the city
where there is a concentration of housing, we must
demand more parks.
"All unsold city land in the Jericho area should be
placed under the jurisdiction of the Parks Board."
On pollution:  "Rapid transit would cut down on
many types of pollution, not the least of which is noise
pollution.
"The disposal of waste causing pollution can be
greatly reduced through the recycling of garbage. Garbage
can be profitably used for fertilizer and compressed fill
and it is time we started seriously considering these
alternatives."
On Vancouver culture: "I am anxious to establish a
Fisherman's Wharf in Vancouver similar to the one in San
Francisco.
On trees: "I think it is imperative that we save the
trees in Vancouver.
"Trees in the West End and other similar areas
should be preserved. All of the trees in the city should be
placed under the jurisdiction of the Parks Board, not the
city engineering department."
On voting procedures: "The city has no provision for
voters who are in hospital at the time of a civic election.
"Ballot boxes must be put in hospitals. I would
estimate that there are some 5,000 citizens in Vancouver
who will not be able to vote unless this step is
implemented."
On Council power: "Certainly the civil servants in
Vancouver civic government hold a lot of power, perhaps
too much power.
"We must rely to a greater extent in initiative from
the councillors themselves. This means we have to be less
dependent on appointed civic officials solving Vancouver's
problems."
On Vancouver: "Mother Nature has done a pretty
good job of it but man has hurt it.
"We have to use our brains and not our throats to
make it progress into a beautiful, liveable city.
"Shouting is not the answer."
On his chances: "I'll have to let the electorate decide
that."
ooc
...on Campbell
"Campbell's administration has been four years
of drift.
"After his recent national proclamation of what
he would like to do with the War Measures Act, there
are serious doubts, even among his most ardent
supporters, about his motives.
"His use of the Act is nothing less than frivolous.
It was absolutely for publicity purposes and
demeaning to the office of chief magistrate.
"Campbell is coasting on the developments
initiated by his predecessor, Bill Rathie. His record of
attendance at important committee meetings makes
me wonder if he takes his position seriously.
"He practices the politics of fear as propagated
by Spiro Agnew. The level of anxiety in the city,
especially among the elderly is high. This anxiety has
been created by the mayor and he still has no policy
to reduce it.
"Campbell has served to inflate violence in
Vancouver.
"The enormous growth of crime in the city over
the past four years suggests to many electors that the
mayor's war cry of "peace and order' is just window
dressing.
"Now he is trying to get the youth vote by
making statements like 'our young people are the
hope of the future'. This is a deathbed repentance
and a hollow one at that.
"Campbell's campaigning began the moment he
took office."
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November, 17   V970
UCWIC and Vancouver's unem]
myth of the "dead-beat skid ro*
By SANDY KASS
The Unemployed Citizens Welfare Improvement
Council is the one group in Vancouver that seems to know
where it's at with the city's poor.
UCWIC, which is now barely two years old, began as
a small group of welfare recipients who felt they could do
more by grouping their resources than by facing the harsh
world of welfare life alone.
Since the organization's birth in late 1968, they have
aided more people than they could ever begin to keep a
record of, often over 200 a week.
Their office is located at 1726 West Seventh, in a tiny
room donated by the Alexandra Neighborhood House,
just a block down from the sprawling Social Assistance
headquarters of the city of Vancouver from which welfare
is distributed.
According to former UCWIC chairman Alex Bonde
more persons are unemployed this year than ever before.
From their tiny office, approachable only from a
back' door through a muddy playground, UCWIC workers
are there around the clock to insure that everything
possible is being done to help those in need.
UCWIC workers are volunteers and receive no salary.
All are welfare recipients.
In constant operation is a free store, in which UCWIC
workers distribute used clothing, furniture, and household
appliances free of charge, with no questions asked.
All goods are donated by citizens, and all must be in
good condition.
"Our store is a self-help thing, and junk isn't going to
help anyone," said Bonde.
"People are so amazed when they come in here and
find they can actually get something for nothing," he
added.
UCWIC also offers advice on housing, collection of
welfare, and any other problems which may incur while
living on the city's relief.
"A majority of welfare recipients are lonely. They
need to feel needed, and have a purpose in life. Creating
these purposes is one of our main objectives," Bonde said.
Welfare propaganda
There is, he said, an incredible amount of propaganda
being pushed into people's minds about receiving welfare,
the worst being the "dead-beat skid row bum" myth.
He cited, as an example, one woman who came to
UCWIC with 27 cents in her pocket, and barely enough
strength to walk up the office steps.
The woman was 35, single and in very poor health.
She had a part-time job as a switchboard operator, but
when her company decided a full-time girl was needed she
was unable to fill the position because of her health.
She searched and searched, but could not find
another job. Her financial situation became desperate, and
she had barely enough money to pay for food and
medication.
She refused to go to the city for help, because she did
not want to be considered a "dead-beat skid row bum".
She moved out of her apartment into a one-room
hole-in-the-wall, and finally had to sell her furniture to
pay for food.
It was at this point when she came to UCWIC.
"She had 27 cents in her pocket, holes in her shoes,
and had run out of medication weeks ago," Bonde said.
"The first thing we did was put her on welfare. Then
we had her put in a hospital, where she's been for several
weeks. We just hope she'll pull through," he said.
"We cannot continue to imagine this problem does
not exist."
Bonde said that young people are usually better off,
because they can more easily find suitable recreation, and
have friends who are not on welfare.
"But as they get older, welfare recipients find that
their only friends are in the same financial situation that
they are in, and it's not very reassuring," he said.
A major problem for older welfare recipients, Bonde
said, is trying to find decently private housing.
"Most older people like to have a certain degree of
privacy that doesn't seem to matter to the younger ones,"
he said.
"And that kind of housing is not abundant under the
existing welfare structure."
Bonde was formerly on the Vancouver United Appeal
board, but recently resigned because the organization
seemed to him a "charade and waste of time".
"I was the only board member on welfare, and when
trying to work with 45 businessmen, I only served as a
token representative of the poor.
"It was an impossible situation."
At present, no action has been taken to add another
board member to fill the vacancy left by Bonde's
resignation.
Bonde recently resigned as UCWIC chairman, to take
a position as a night watchman. He had been unemployed
since February, 1969.
UCWIC which helped sponsor the Inner-City feed-in,
is now working on another type of food co-op service for
the city's poor.
Earlier this year, the Alma Mater Society granted
$2,700 to UCWIC going towards the purchase of a
truck, enabling the council to set up a producer-consumer
food co-op.
The principle behind the truck purchase is mobility.
"With a truck such as the one we hope to purchase
for $2,700 we would be able to travel out to Richmond
and the Fraser Valley, and buy many foods directly from
farms at cost price," said Bonde.
"We would, in turn, be able to resell the products
with little mark-up, spreading welfare food allowances a
lot further than if goods were purchased from a regular
retail outlet," he said.
Co-op threatened
However, there is one fly in the ointment.
It's called the Vancouver Marketing Board,
administered by local businessmen, and set up to protect
big firms from individuals who wish to buy and sell at
cost price.
The board is supported by the city, and virtually
outlaws anyone from selling goods at less than the
suggested retail price.
However, UCWIC isn't scared.
UCWIC worker and independent aldermanic
candidate in the up-coming December civic election, Jack
Maley, said Thursday that UCWIC will go ahead with their
plans, "regardless of the cost".
"A food co-op such as the one we plan is vital to the
well-being of many people. If the city doesn't realize it,
it's just too bad. We're going ahead with it, if we have to
go to jail for it," he said.
Added finances have been coming in gradually from
private citizens' donations and profits from UCWIC
workers' speaking engagements.
UCWIC also has for the first time applied for a federal
grant, but does not expect to hear the results of that
application for quite some time.
"Sometimes there is so little money, people have to
make the choice between food and rent," he added.
For the first time welfare is giving out cash
certificates rather than food vouchers if people want
them.
"This is definitely a step in the right direction," said
UCWIC worker Irene Wolenski. "It's just too bad that it's
not a big enough step."
She added that a lot of people, especially UBC
students, could be doing a great deal to help improve
conditions.
"This is especially true, now that Christmas is
approaching," she said.
Last November, a number of student volunteers from
UBC travelled about the university and Point Grey area
collecting funds for welfare recipients.
A total of $ 1,700 was collected.
The money was distributed by UCWIC.
Plans for a food blitz this year are going ahead under
the direction of psychology prof David Albert.
However, the situation is worse this year than it has
been in the past.
The city's Christmas Bureau has recently indicated
their intention to only offer assistance to families, and not
single welfare recipients.
"There are so many transients living in the city at the
moment, it would be impossible to offer assistance to
them all," a bureau spokesman said.
"There is just not enough money."
UCWIC recently learned that 52 per cent of all 1970
graduates from Simon Fraser University in Burnaby are
presently unemployed and on welfare.
"It's just incredible that people can devote four years
of their lives to getting a decent education, and then have
to go on welfare because they cannot get a job," said
Maley.
Statistics were not available for UBC.
City  social worker Bruce Clarkson discounted the
SFU statistics.quoted by Maley, and said that in his post
at the East Single Men's Unit, he sees very few university
graduates.
"Of course, the situation may be different in
Burnaby," he added.
He said that the city's welfare would be distributing a
$4 Christmas voucher to all families on welfare, but added
that the Christmas Bureau could only support families,
because of their weak financial situation.
"Single people can always mooch, and we don't want
the children of welfare receiving families to become
welfare recipients themselves," he added.
"The public has got to start taking the responsibility
for this kind of action, or very serious things will start
happening in Vancouver," Maley added.
When asked of he thought welfare should be a federal
responsibility, Bonde said: "No, I don't think it should be
left up to the federal government, but on the other hand,
I don't think Canadians should have the right to turn
another Canadian away when he has no money."
Last Thursday, the city's welfare board changed the
regulations governing transients who have come to
Vancouver.
Where previously, single men must have lived in the
city for at least six months, and obtained work at least
once in Vancouver in order to qualify for welfare, all they
have to do now is live in the city one month before their
first welfare application.
Restrictions on past work in the city have been
abolished.
"The regulations were changed, I presume, because of
the growing number of appeals of welfare refusals," said
UCWIC worker Peter Pratchett.
"However, a single woman has to practically be
pregnant in order to get welfare," he added.
The regulations by which the welfare board has been
turning away transients is length of hair.
One long haired youth said Friday he was refused
welfare on the grounds that his hair was just "too long".
"Come back to us with short hair, and we'll see what
we can do," they said.
"Sometimes transients just came to us because their,
home lives were unbearable, and they just wanted
someone to talk to," Wolenski said.
During the summer, several reports were received by
UCWIC of single girls who had miscarriages while residents
at the Jericho Hostel.
The girls went to the welfare board, but were told
they had not yet been Vancouver residents a long enough
time to be eligible for financial assistance.
Socreds ignore problem
"The girls were not admittable to any hospital
because without welfare, they were not covered by any
legitimate medical insurance plan, since they did not have
the finances to join themselves," Wolenski said.
"As it was, they just laid on their beds and suffered. I
think most animals in this province get a better
treatment," she said.
According to Bonde, the B.C. government is making
no attempt to alleviate the present situation, and said that
there are not nearly enough social workers to visit the
poor of Vancouver.
"They (B.C. government) know what's going on.
They just refuse to do anything about it," he said.
Clarkson agreed.
"Our cry is that there are not enough of us to do the
job we would like to," she said.
Over the past few months 15 social workers have left
the city's welfare board, and as yet, no action has been
taken to replace them.
"It's a tricky situation," said. Pratchett.
"The workers who left, left for personal reasons, and
were under provincial auspices. The city is not allowed
to fill positions left vacant by provincial social workers,
and as yet, the B.C. government has made no move to
replace them," he said.
"Provincial budgets have held down the hiring of
more social workers, as it is the feeling of certain
politicians that social workers are more of a luxury than a
necessity when helping the poor," said Clarkson.
"Yet we are so busy, we can only spend a few
minutes -with each person we see," he added, "and that is
several hours too short a time."
Clarkson is employed by the city of Vancouver.
. As far as young transients are concerned, Clarkson
said, the feeling around government circles, is that socigl
workers are encouraged to send young people back to Tuesday, November 17, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
loyed:
r bum"
their parents whenever possible.
He said that politicians are becoming increasingly
alarmed at the growing number of young people applying
for welfare, but feels that nothing can be accomplished by
taking a tough approach towards them.
He said that as a social worker, he is in a constant
state of turmoil with himself over welfare policy.
"I feel the human situation should take precedence
over policy, but if I acted against policy, I would be guilty
of misconduct against the city.
Delegates to the annual convention of the B.C. Social
Credit League in Vancouver's Bayshore Inn Friday gave an
overwhelming vote of confidence to B.C. Welfare Minister
Phil Gaglardi's policy to insure thai: "able-bodied people
should be required to earn their welfare allowances."
A spokesman for his office declined to explain the
statement, and said only that, "new plans are in the
offing."
There are an estimated 100,000 welfare recipients in
B.C., about five per cent of the province's population.
"Conditions are getting worse," said Mrs. Margaret
Mitchell, another UCWIC independent aldermanic
candidate in the December civic elections.
"It's high time the poor were represented on city
council," she added.
Clarkson said that when public housing was
originated, it was designed to accommodate both welfare
and non-welfare families.
"However, it didn't quite work out that way," he
said.
"As soon as a non-welfare family realized just who
their neighbors were, they moved out faster than they
could give notice," he said.
"It seems like this dead-beat philosophy is going to be
a hard one to shake."
Besides Pacific Hostel, and their public housing
schemes, the city operates Taylor Manor, at 951
Boundary, a boarding home for elderly welfare recipients
who cannot afford to live elsewhere.
Origins of welfare
Alexandra Neighborhood House, which donated free
office space to UCWIC, also offers a day-care program for
mothers who have little money.
The program fee is adjusted according to what the
mother can afford to pay.
"Welfare was originally set up as a temporary
financial assistance between jobs, when times were bad,"
said Bonde.
He said bad times were presumed not to last more
than six weeks at a time, but at present a person is on
welfare for an average of two to five years at a time, if not
more.
Welfare provides financial assistance to those who lack
the income to maintain what they determine as a
reasonable and healthy existence.
It is known as the Social Assistance and
Rehabilitation Welfare Program — in short, welfare.
Those applying for welfare are permitted:
• to own their own home;
• to have $500 unless the applicant is single and
transient;
• own a car if it's value is less than $ 1,000
• to have $1,000 cash value in insurance;
• to earn up to $ 100 per month; and
% to receive contributions from children not living at
home under the provision that only 50 per cent of these
contributions are exempt from welfare assistance.
All welfare applicants are granted the right of appeal
— if they wish to wait six months on the chance they
might one day be given financial assistance.
The welfare board also offers a free marriage and
family counselling service.
"We are doing all we can," said Clarkson.
Some disagree.
"We don't want welfare, we want work," said Maley.
"And we want it now."
Maley and Mitchell are running on a More For The
Poor Platform, and hope to express the views of the
underprivileged on a traditionally businessman city
council.
Their platform consists of the following points:
• doubling of welfare rates;
• free bus passes for all unemployed, students, and
veterans;
-,      • a guaranteed monthly income of $250 for every
adult and $60 for every child;
9 development of an underground rapid transit
system to double (in all seriousness) as a free hotel for the
city's homeless;
• decent public housing for all who want it;
• lowering of the voting age to 17; - attempting to
institute a job-producing rather than the present type of
service economy for Vancouver;
• instituting a civic tax on tickets to all cultural and
sports events, as payment for 10 per cent of the seats at
those events, so they may be donated to the poor;
• adequate food distribution for the poor;
• effective pollution control in the city's slums;
• increasing the number of free day care centres in
Vancouver.
"We are not going on an all out massive campaign,"
said Mitchell, "we just haven't the resources.
'Our main concern is helping the poor, not sitting on
city council."
But what does the welfare board think of all this?
A Ubyssey staff reporter who waited three hours at
the board offices Friday trying to find out, was finally
handed a little yellow pamphlet and told the board was so
tied up administratively in trying to find a new
administrator (former administrator F. J. McDaniel
recently resigned for unspecified reasons), that this was the
only information that could be given out at this time.
"If you come back next week,, maybe we can make
you an appointment," acting administrator Rolan Asbury
told the staffer.
"We simply do not have time to spend answering
questions," he said.
The pamphlet told in glowing detail of the types of
welfare offered, and additional grants available.
There are three types of welfare: hostel and food
vouchers, rent and/or food vouchers, and cash.
Rates run at monthly maximums of $95 per adult —
—david bowerman photo
$35 for food, $15 for sundries, $30 for shelter, and $15
for rent.
Monthly maximum for a child is $70.50 — $33 for
food, $15 for sundries, $15 for shelter, and $15 for rent.
"Welfare rates are changing," said Pratchett, "but for
the worse."
"Previously the board made a special allowance if a
person's rent did not include his heat. The board,
following one of Gaglardi's recommendations, has now
cut out this allowance altogether," he said.
"So now a person can freeze whether he has a roof
over his head, or not."
The annual winter works project, which is federally
subsidized has now been made official, and after earlier
speculation, local welfare officials have been given the
go-ahead.
The project is subsidized for every major city in
Canada, and provides winter work for welfare recipients
such as clearing debris from parks, and cleaning sewers.
Administrative difficulties
"Something has got to be done to relieve the
desperate situation of the poor," said Wolenski.
"If nothing is done, there is going to be a civil war on
our hands like we've never seen before.
However, at least one welfare recipient does not agree
with her.
One elderly woman sitting in the welfare offices
Friday said she was so occupied with her position she did
not have time to worry about waging war.
When asked what her position was, she replied,
"Collecting welfare, and trying to live on it. And if you
don't think that's a full time position think again."
Pratchett hinted Friday that a sit-in at the welfare
offices may be in the offing.
"We just cannot keep going according to the rules any
longer," she said.
"The stakes are just too high." Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
in the
Tuesday, November, 17, 1970
classroom
By ARLENE SWIFT
To the tune of varied
"musical" instruments
accompanied by the din of
"melodic" voices, the busses
pulled away from the UBC Arts I
building and headed for Squamish
Valley.
It was Friday, the thirteenth,
and the first day of Arts I group
C's symposium at Paradise
Retreat. None of us were
exactly sure of what was going to
happen there, but we felt that in
one way or another it would be a
unique experience.
The moon was out by the time
we rolled up to the cabins and we
piled out to claim our knapsacks
and sleeping bags and set forth to
stake out accommodations.
After capturing one of the rare
mattresses, I set out for the
communal food factory to
appease my growling stomach.
First item on the loosely
organized agenda was the National
Film Board movie, Flowers on a
One-Way Street.
This is a graphic description of
difficulties faced by young
"villagers" when they proposed to
the city of Toronto that Yorkville
Street be transformed from a
smoke jungle of mechanical
monsters into a meeting place for
people.
The film served to introduce
the theme book for the
symposium, The Making of a
Counter Culture by Theodore
Rozak,     which     gives    his
. °. ',>•■
SECONDERS STATEMENT
Peter Hlookoffs candidature
for external affairs officer is
another chance to bring to the
Alma Mater Society a critical and
progressive perspective on the
university and its place in society.
Peter is not just another nice
guy who wants everyone to like
him, nor is he just another arts
faculty radical who has nothing to
lose by a little militant rhetoric.
He has come out for law and
order; the criminals must be
brought to justice. The criminals
who allow one in five people in
our age group to be unemployed
this winter. The criminals who run
us though the university like rats
in a maze, as if our minds can be
weighed and measured, only to
see us selling Stanfield underwear
in the Bay after we get the piece
of paper.
Peter Hlookoff, former editor
of the Georgia Straight, with
inside knowledge of the prison
system and UBC, his soul
mortgaged to the Bank of
Montreal needs your vote and you
need his on council and on the
executive
DAVID MOLE, seconder
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART EIGHT
After about five months of training I was on a
plane headed for Viet Nam.
Of the 130 or so men on that plane, I had
known a quarter of them for most of the last five
months.
There was Thomas. He claimed to be a cousin
of singer B. J. Thomas and his constant expression
was a piteous "What am ah doin' here?" He would
be assigned as an MP in Da Nang and I would never
see him again.
Theisen had earned himself the name of
company animal by his unbelievable wildcat
impersonations. I lost track of him in Okinawa but
ran into him once in Viet Nam and again in Camp
Lejeune back in the States.
Jones had been sworn in with me at Seattle, I
had to tie his tie for him the day we graduated from
boot camp. I talked to him for about ten seconds in
a barbershop in Okinawa when we were on our way
home.
Wenske, Whipple, Waggoner and I had been
together a lot through training because of our last
initial. That last initial got Wenske, Whipple and
myself kept together right down to the same squad.
But of all of them, I knew Waggoner best. He
was the one responsible for my first promotion. All
he had to do to get it for me was to pick me to help
him polish the troop handlers' boots in infantry
training.
Wag and I were separated in Okinawa. The next
time I saw him was the day I checked into Camp
Lejeune. He had been shipped back to the States
after   six   months  for wounds he  received while
charging a machine gun nest. He eventually got a
Silver Star for it, the highest decoration a Marine
can get without being killed.
Just to show some of the weird coincidences
that happen in the Marine Corps; after spending all
our time in training polishing boots together, when I
got   to   Lejeune,   I   was  working  on   the   secret
documents and Wag was in charge of keeping in his
classified files.
They say join the navy and see the world. The
only things I saw on my way to Viet Nam were the
Anchorage, Alaska airport at four in the morning,
Fujiyama from about 40,000 feet and a twenty mile
stretch of Okinawa from a bus window.
Okinawa   is   the   big   sorting   place   for   all
American troops coming from and going to Viet
Nam. It's a lousy place to be, especially when you
have only eight dollars and are restricted to base.
And when you eventually do get out with some
money   to   spend   you   find   that   it   has   been
completely ruined by the American occupation.
Okinawa is an island between Japan and
Formosa.
Three times a day all the men waiting for a
place "down south" fall out in formation to find
out if their name has come up.
When we arrived we were assured that we'd
have about four or five days before going on to Viet
Nam. I was one of the lucky one who was called at
our second formation. I spent about 46 hours on
Oki.
All the way to Oki we had been flying on
Boeing 707's. When the six of us who had been
picked got to airport we found we were filling up
empty seats on a cargo plane, a monster known as a
C-130.
The plane was six hours late taking off. I spent
the eight hour ride wedged between a major and a
first lieutenant, staring at a huge shipping crate one
foot from my nose, and shaking like a spastic from
the vibration of the propellors.
the collector
the collector
the collector
the collector
the collector
from John Fowles' novel
with
Terence Stamp
Samantha Eggar
THURSDAY 20 & FRIDAY 21
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 22-7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
SUB FILMSOC
presentation
AMS-5W
Others - 75rf
NHWMM
VMM
A three day class
in a natural setting
"reflections on the technocratic
society and its youthful
opposition."
On Saturday morning most of
us managed to pay a pre-lunch
visit to the nearby Cheakymus
river, where the salmon had come
to spawn.
Many of the thrashing fish
were battered and bruised from
their journey and still others lay
dead on the shore or in the
shallow water.
In the afternoon came the key
speakers, Ian Kent, a dynamic,
existential psychiatrist, and Bill
Nicholls, a professor in the UBC
religious studies department.
Their theme was the revolution of
consciousness.
Kent   was   able   to   establish
immediate     rapport     with    the
people at the symposium. He is an
enthusiastic speaker and offered
for     our     consideration      a
"panacea"   in   the   form   of   a
triple-decker sandwich.
Later  that night, with Walter
Young,   chairman   of   the   UBC
political science  department, we
discussed our reactions to Kent's
and  Nicholl's   talk   and   also   to
Young's   skepticism    over   what
they  said. Who says  discussions
are dull?
Not too early the next morning
we   were   treated   to  tapes   and
records of poetry reading by Allen
Ginsberg, who was described as a
protest     poet     who     is   an
exemplification   of   the   counter
cultural life.
EAST INDIAN MUSIC
by
KENNETH and DOMETRIA
(Sarod) (Tampura)
with a reading of Sanskrit Poetry
(translation by Sir Edwin Arnold)
Wednesday, Nov. 1 8 at 8 p.m.
at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
ADMISSION BY DONATION
DIVING SPORTSMEN
who want the best
shop at
WILLOUGHBY'S DIVERS DEN
* Wet Suits I T|\
* Tanks LIU"
* Regulators
* Spear Guns
* Complete Line of
Diving Accessories
STUDENT RATE ON RENTALS
I     WIUOUGHBY'S
d
ivers
en
2745 W. 4th    738-6929
CHRISTMAS .TORONTO
$139 °° RETURN
Lv. Vancouver 19 Dec. 1970
Lv. Toronto 3 Jan. 1971
Contact the Travel Office .„.
Rm. 237B   S.U.B.
OR
Western Student Services
1955 West Broadway
Tel.: 731-9331
Seat Assured — No  Stand-By!
Normal Return Prices:
$256 FULL FARE
$I54      YOUTH STAND-BY Tuesday, November 17, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Those who 'play FLQ game7 condemned
MONTREAL (CUP) - Jean Marchand, continuing his
role as Quebec "heavy", denounced le Front d'Action
Politique, Parti Quebecois, and other individuals and
organizations who have gone so far as to support the
Front de Liberation du Quebec manifesto but condemn
terrorism.
The federal manpower and immigration minister
condemned all those who "play the FLQ game".
Marchand gave his hard line speech Sunday at a rally
in St. Jerome in support of the Liberal candidate in
Monday's byelection. The Labelle riding was formerly
held by Leo Cadieux, a Liberal defence minister.
The Montreal Star says that "in the heat of his
argument, the minister appeared at one time to use the
term FRAP when he meant the FLQ."
"Just what are these objectives of FRAP which some
people, like priests in the Gaspe, say they support?
FRAP's   objectives   are   to   take   over   the   provincial
government and touch off a revolution by violent means.
These are the objectives of FRAP."
The Star added in parentheses:
"(FRAP is a municipal opposition party in Montreal
which has taken no positions, violent or otherwise, on
provincial matters)."
Marchand said organizations like FRAP that do not
condone violence, but that then concentrate on long lists
of grievances against courts, unions and elections, are as
much as suggesting that people have no other recourse but
violence.
The FLQ has "also controlled the CBC, for instance,
and it is well known that they have most of the journalists
in the palms of their hands," he said.
Magazines like Quartier Latin, Quebec-Presse and
Point de Mire were "infected" and "full of verbal
violence," Marchand said.
Attacking   PQ   leader   Rene   Levesque,   Marchand
charged him of "preparing the way for violence," because
of Levesque's attacks on Trudeau.
"If little kids grow up hearing people like Trudeau
described as sell-outs and blackguards, they will come to
think the only solution is to kill them.
"Claude Ryan may weep about supposed
infringement of civil liberties and the CNTU (Quebecois
Trade Union Confederation) president may wail about the
army, but we are determined to make a career in the
political system safe for those who wish to enter one,"
Marchand said.
The Labelle riding is forecast to continue in Liberal
hands in the byelection.
The rural riding is about 35 miles north of Montreal.
It is also the site of the new jumbo jet airport,
scheduled to open for service by 1974. The federal
government estimates are for about $212 million to be
spent on the airport facility by 1985.
"B.C. industry controlled by foreign capital"
By DICK BETTS AND
AL ENGLER
This article was prepared as
part of educational program
carried on at UBC by the
Community Education and
Research Centre. The bulk of the
material was covered in a
noon-hour presentation at UBC
last week by Al Engler of the
Centre.
Future programs on campus
will be:
WED., NOV. 18 - COURTS
AND POLICE.
WED., NOV. 25 - WELFARE
AND UNEMPLOYED
STRUGGLES IN B.C.
These presentations will
feature lectures and performances
by the Vancouver Street Theatre.
All presentations will take
place at 12:30 in the SUB
Ballroom.
The economic structure of B.C.
is  determined and regulated by
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare  or  Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
A, l$vcKia"fc;sT m
Se.h«»l.   jxjr\ tTuesTiOTt ®r
LUTHERAN
CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd.
L.S.M. "FIRESIDE"
Nov. 27
Sunday
5:30 P.M. - Supper
6:45 P.M. - Dr. Mollerup
our position as a satellite of the
U.S.
Our strategic resource
industries are dominated by U.S.
capital. This means a steady flow
of resources and capital out of
B.C.
Other centres of domination
are Toronto's Bay Street and
some sources of European capital.
The total picture presents itself as
one of outside control of foreign
ownership.
A survey of some of the major
industries in B.C. will illustrate
this point.
Alcan, a U.S. company,
controls the B.C. aluminum
extraction industry. Its centre is
Kitimat, B.C.
The petroleum industry is
controlled by Standard Oil of
New Jersey and Standard Oil of
California. The B.C. based Pacific
Petroleum is now controlled by
Phillips Petroleum of the U.S.
Coal from B.C. is being
extracted   by   Kaiser   Coal,   an
BERNARD'S
BARGAIN STORE
3217 W. Broadway
Casual Wear
CORDUROY JEANS
Flairs — Washable
Dark Brown & Green
Sizes 29-36
only  $795
EXPRESS STRIPES
Jeans with Blue
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Sizes 29-36
only
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TERRY CLOTH BATHROBES
Beautiful Colors
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only $695
PYJAMAS
Comfortable and warm
and come in fashionable
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Sizes A-E
only s495
Keep Dry for Only  $2.25
Vinyl Raincoats
Full Cut       only
Waterproof—Durable _n__
Sizes S-M-L-XL 2
American-owned and operated
company. Roberts Bank and the
coal fields of southeastern B.C.
are the property of Kaiser Coal.
Water resources are similarly
being diverted to the U.S. from
projects like the Columbia, Peace
and other Kootenay projects.
Banks are an important
mechanism of control in any
capitalist system. B.C. banks are
dominated by men who sit on
boards of foreign companies and
financed by eastern Canadian
capital.
The Royal Bank of Canada has
on its board Frank MacMahon of
Pacific Petroleum which is part of
Phillips  Petroleum   of the  U.S.
The Bank of Nova Scotia has J.
V. Clyne of MacMillan Bloedel on
its board of directors and the
Toronto-Dominion Bank has as a
board member W. C. Koerner
former president of the UBC
board of governors and president
of Rayonier Forest Products, also
a U.S. owned company.
Another mechanism of control
is the Employers Council of B.C.
This council by it own
admission does not welcome small
business. Its economics are of the
monopolist order, the economics
of capitalism.
Its politics can best be summed
up by its president, F. G. Peskett:
"If you try and get a consensus
from 12,000 people it is bound to
be a little more whishy-washy
than if you get it from 40
people."
Among the directors of the
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce are J. E. Richardson of
B.C. Telephone, a wholly owned
subsidiary of the New York based
firm, General Telephone and
Telegraph and R. G. Rogers of the
U.S. owned Crown Zellerbach Co.
This group is the group
working people face in the fight
for decent living and working
conditions and the fight for wages
to match the spiralling cost of
living.
It is a part of U.S. domination
and the domination of a
complacent Canadian capitalist
class who can turn a fast buck and
who can realize profits in the
sellout of jobs and resources.
®
B.C. HYDRO & POWER
AUTHORITY
requires
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
THERE ARE EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATES
TO OBTAIN A VARIETY OF TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE IN
LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE. LEADING TO PROMOTIONS AND INCREASED SALARIES COMMENSURATE WITH
DEMONSTRATED ABILITIES AND PERFORMANCE.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
November 26, 27, 30
WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO DISCUSSING YOUR CAREER
PLANS WITH YOU AND IN EXPLORING HOW YOUR INTERESTS
AND TALENTS COULD BE BEST UTILIZED IN THIS RAPIDLY
EXPANDING ORGANIZATION. PLEASE ARRANGE AN APPOINTMENT TIME THROUGH THE STUDENT SERVICES OFFICE. Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November, 17, 1970
External  affairs election
to take place Thursday
It's democracy time again!
Elections for Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer
will be held Thursday and two
candidates are in the running.
They are Peter Hlookoff, arts 5,
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - It
was an omnisciently dismal day
when the chief indelible
ultramarine blorg came to the
closing ceremonies of the
pomegranate-building contest held
annually on the island republic.
Blubbering puce blorgs wept in
the streets at the approach of
threatened mass work and their
ochre minds curled at the edges.
Even the closing ceremonies
including the merciless whipping
of a raving turnip failed to stir
them. It was then that the
indelible ultramarine blorg
decided to rebuild the entire
island using only the bristles of
elastic    toothbrushes-.
and Craig Anderson, arts 3.   '
Ballot boxes will be ready and
waiting from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
election day at the Bus Stop,
SUB, and the Buchanan and
Education buildings.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED
Film   on   natural   childbirth,   12:30  in
Wesbrook 201.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Film on Chinatowns in Canada, 12:30
in Bu.   102.
SAILING   CLUB
Lecture   on  racing,   12:30  in Bu.   104.
UBC  NUDIST CLUB
Meeting   in   SUB   215   at   noon.   New
members welcome.
CANOE   CLUB
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 125.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
General meeting at 12:30 in SUB 211.
NEWMAN   CLUB
Meeting in Music Room of St. Mark's
College at 12:30.
AYN   RAND SOCIETY
Lecture on objectivist ethics at 12:30
in SUB 130.
PATIO.
EAT IN »TAKE OUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-
Week days to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Fully
Licensed
Live
Entertainment
3TH. « FIB, VANCOUVER, §£.
MONDAY to FRIDAY
8:30 to 2 a.m.
Saturday 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Phone 736-4304
THIS COUPON ENTITLES
BEARER TO 2 ADMISSIONS
FOR THE PRICE OF ONE
GOOD MON.  TO   FRI.  ONLY
YOUR QUESTIONS ON
ABORTION
1. How quickly can arrangements be
started?
2. How promptly can surgery be
scheduled?
3. What are the qualifications of
the surgeons?
4. Where will the abortion be per.
formed?
5. Will it be painful?
6 What abortion procedures are
commonly used at different
stages of pregnancy?
7. How much will it cost?
8. Are there residency requirements?
9. What is New York's legal age for
abortion?
10. When would I need parental consent?
11. Is a professional abortion service
taboo or does it perform legitimate services?
12  How much does a referral  cost?
CAN ONLY BE FULLY
ANSWERED BY
PROFESSIONALS
First three answers: 1. Immediately 2. Within 24 hours 3. Qualified gynecologists or specially
trained surgeons. For more answers, speak to a nurse, social
worker or psychologist at Professional Scheduling Service.
(212)490-3600
24 HOURS/365 DAYS
PROFESSIONAL
SCHEDULING SERVICE,Inc.
545 Fifth Avenue, New York City 10017
#4
POPULAR MISCONCEPTION
Insurance is dull and
so are the people that sell it
This misconception has been circulating for years.   It was
probably started by a life insurance agent who wanted to keep his
favourite resort in Tahiti from becoming overcrowded.
We've heard somewhere around 168 misconceptions just like this one.
Why don't you drop into the placement office and ask about
Crown Life's Graduate Career Programme.
We'd like to talk about some misconceptions.
CROWN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY ■ TORONTO, CANADA
B.C. MAINLAND AGENCY
1550 West Georgia St., Vancouver 5, B.C., Tel. 682-6511
CROWN LIFE REPRESENTATIVE
ON CAMPUS NOVEMBER 30 & Dec. 1, 1970
WEDNESDAY
UBC  ANTI-WAR  COMMITTEE
General meeting in SUB 213 at 12:30.
voc
General meeting in Angus 104 at 12:30.
Membership   fees   due   Shd   payable   at
meeting or in clubroom.
PRE-DENTAL
Dr. Wells speaks on setting up practice in SUB 213 at noon.
SLAVONIC STUDIES
Dr. Victor Erlich gives talk on "Gogol"
at  3:30 p.m.  in Wesbrook 201.
ONTOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
Talk   on  "Friendship"  in  Bu.   232  at
12:30.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting in SUB 105B at 12:30.
mmsmm
'tween
classes
THURSDAY
PRE-MED
Those going on field trip to G. F.
Strong rehab, centre meet in front of
Wesbrook 10O at 12:30. Bring cars if
you can.
ANGLICAN-UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
"A Celebration" in chapel of Lutheran
Campus Centre at 12:30.
UBC  SKI TEAM
Ski films from Rossignol and Nevada
in Wesbrook 100 at 12:30.
COMMERCE   SEMINAR   COMMITTEE
Seminar on "The Future of Canadian
Autonomy" in Angus 212 at noon.
SIMS
Paul Horn on trancendental meditation in SUB ballroom at noon.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Meeting for everyone interested in
planning International Week and fair
to be held Feb. 8-13. in IH 402 at 12:30.
GSA
Meeting in IH 401 at 12:30.
SLAVONIC  STUDIES
Dr. Victor Erlich talks on "The writer
as witness: the achievement of Aleksandr
Solzhenitsyn"  in  Bu.   106   at   12:30.
VARSITY  ROD AND GUN
General meeting in SUB 113 at 12:30.
PHOTO SOC
Studio classes in SUB 245 from 7-8
p.m.
CAMPUS  CRUSADE   FOR   CHRIST
"Is God a God of Love?" in SUB 205
at 12:30.
LUTHERAN  CAMPUS CENTRE
Chaplains class at 8:30 p.m.   and worship  at  9:30  p.m.   in  Lutheran  Campus
Centre.
T-BIRD  WARGAMERS
Meeting  SUB  119 at  12:30.
UBC  CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Ivor    Benson     speaks     on     southern
Africa in SUB 209 at noon.
AQUA SOC
Beer night in SUB 215 from 4-9 p.m.
FRIDAY
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Dr. Clark speaks on the state of tax
reform in Canada in SUB 125 at 12:30.
POLK SOC
Apple  and  Stone  folk and blues festival in SUB party room at 8 p.m.
FILM SOC
Film   "The   Collector"   in   SUB   auditorium 7 and 9 p.m., Saturday same time
and Sunday at 7 p.m.
PHRATERES
Phi   chapter   meeting   in   SUB   party
room at 12:30.
VCF
Nigel   Goodwin   on   "The   Beatles  Revisited" in  SUB  art  gallery at  12:30.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Prof and student from UBC school
of social work to speak in SUB 105B at
12:30.
SATURDAY
IL   CAFFE
Wine, pizza and dance at IH from
7:30 p.m.-l a.m. featuring Nicola Man-
fredi and I Modesti. $1 per person, $1.50
per couple  and 75£  for members.
cvc
Dance in SUB ballroom from 8:30-
12:30 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL AID
Every   Mon.,   Wed.,   Fri.   at   12:30   in
SUB  228  and 232.
CAMPUS MINISTERS
Mon., Wed., Fri., 10 a.m.-12 noon
and 2-4 p.m. in SUB 228 and Tues. and
Thurs., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
i!i§§§p§g||§^||j^^
||j|j|j|§§^^
ISaSiililil^
IlllllftliW
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
NOV. 20 9-1 IN SUB BALLROOM
to  Sunshine  S1.25  per person.
DIG SANTANA BS&T CHICAGO!
hear Stronghold, Sat. Nov 21 SUB
Ballroom 8:30-12:30. Another CVC
production.
12
Greetings	
THERE ARE 2400 HOMOSEXUAL
students on campus! Graduate
student 22 sends free 36-page essay on how to meet them. 683-486*
Box 8969, Station"H", Vancouver
5, B.C. Skeptical? Ask Speakeasy.
Lost & Found
13
LOST. LADIES SOLAR WATCH.
Black  strap.   Ph.  224-1607.	
LOST: BUCHERER WATCH WITH
black dial last week on campus.
Substantial reward. Phone 874-
4362.	
LOST: ONE IMITATION - SPOKE
hubcap for '70 Camaro, possibly
on 16th extension. Phone 876-
9417.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FROM MARINE
and Hamilton, New Westminster,
M-P, 8:30-4:30. Please phone Joyce
at 526-8762.
Special Notices
15
STUDENT    ENCOUNTER    GROUP
forming. Phone 228-8184.
SKI INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mtn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included. See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14, Grnd. fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., Wed. and
Fri. noon.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, Jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
ValuV Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat, till 7 p.m.
EAST INDIAN MUSIC
by
Kenneth and Dometria
(Sarod) (Tampura)
with   a  reading  of  Sanskrit  Poetry
(translation   by   Sir   Edwin   Arnold)
Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 8 p.m. at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
        Admission by donation
TIRED OF TACTFUL T-GROUPS.
Tired of subtle pressures to be
polite, rude, or 'real'? Come and
enjoy a short weekend of uninhibited spontaneity. For further
information call 736-5751 before
noon.
THE MOON: MEN DATING MEN
Association. Wide choice of dates.
Fully confidential. Legally approved. Tel. 733-8754 or Box 3835, Van.
B.C.	
LEARN  TO SKI  AT
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
6' weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transpor-
taion; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver  9.   Tel.   738-3128.
THIS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE.
William Wyler's "THE COLLECTOR." Almost a love story. Fri.
& Sat.. 7:00, 9:30. Sun., 7:00. AMS
50c,   Non-AMS   75c.   Nov.   20-22T
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2856 or 224-0087. 108-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
NEED TRANSPORTATION? 1957
Dodge Custom-Royal, full running
order. $150. or close offer. Phone
929-4026.	
1960 VOLVO 544, EXCELLENT
condition, new paint. Best offer.
Phone 733-0096 after 6 p.m.	
'59 VW, EXCELLENT MECHANI-
cal condition. $225 or nearest offer. 926-5055.
MORRIS   MINOR   1968   HARD
26,000,  good  condition.  Phone
3728.
TOP,
261-
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Day Care 8c Baby Sitting
32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
HAVE YOU EVER SEEN AN AL-
most love story? If not, come and
see William Wyler's "The Collector." Fri. & Sat., 7:00, 9:30; Sun.,
7:00. AMS 50<c, Non-AMS 75c. Nov.
20-22.	
CORKY'S MEN'S HAIRSTYLING.
Escape from the ordinary, see
Corky! 3644 W. 4th, Alma on 4th.
Appointments,  731-4717.	
DIRECT FROM OIL CAN'S: HEAR
Stronghold playing Santana 3-
dog nite BS&T Sat. Nov. 21. SUB
Ballrooom,  8:30-12:30.
38
Sewing k Alterations
Typewriters k Repairs
39
Typing
40
FAST   ACCURATE   ELECTRIC
typing.   Theses,   essays,   papers,   35c
page,  call  Mrs.  Duncan.   228-9697.
ACCURATE  EXP.   TYPING  FROM
legible work;  reas.  rates. 738-6829
after 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.	
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERV-
lce. Theses, Essays, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche.   437-1355.	
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays.
Thesis. Reasonbale rates. North
Van. 985-0154.	
TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, Engineering, Social Science,
Psychological Terminology, High
Quality,  Low  Charge.   733-4708.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED, YOUNG ATTRACTIVE
nmie. and females for part-time
modelling. Call No. 1 girl. 688-
5898.	
WANTED,     ATTRACTIVE     MALE
and female demonstrators to demonstrate products such as toys,
tools, etc. in local dept. stores for
pre-Christmas promotions. Phone
No.   1  girl,   6#8,5898.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION k SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101.
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
TWO STUDENTS FROM PARIS
will help you to learn French.
Call Denis or Daniel, 224-0145;
cheap.
EVERYONE HAS TROUBLE WITH
at least one of their courses. Register at UBC Tutoring Centre and
find help in the course that's
dragging you down. SUB 100B, 12-
2p.m.,   weekdays.   228-4583.
SPANISH CONVERSATION. THE
shortest way to speak. Prof.
Pareja (Colombia, Argentina &
UBC) will teach, $3 hr. individual,
no group, M to S. 10 to 9. 12 hr.
paid in advance. 1405 Cypress
(nr.  Cornwall). Ph.  738-5692.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW  AVAILABLE  $1.00
at the Bookstore and
AMS Publications Office
Pre-Sate tickets  redeemed only at
Publications Office
CHEMISTRY LAB. FAIRLY Extensive equipment, large assortment chemicals. Best offer. 6S3-
5668.  After 5,   261-5643.	
RENTALS k REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM TO SHARE WITH 4TH
Year Student. Private entrance,
toilet, shower, kettle, and toaster.
224-6757.	
BED - STUDY ROOM, KITCHEN
privileges. Washer and Dryer. Girl
student or business - woman. Call
224-6757.	
FREE BED-STUDY ROOM, PRTV-
ate bathroom in Lovely South
Granville Home for responsible
male student, on bus line. No
cooking.   224-6090.	
BRIGHT ATTRACTIVE ROOM IN
young household. Kitchen privs.,
phone, washer. Near U.B.C. $50
p.m. plus some baby sitting. Girl
only.  228-9597.	
SLEEPING ROOM WANTED FOR
out-of-town male & female (unmarried) students on/near campus for week-nights only 291-
7041.	
FURNISHED ROOM, BASEMENT,
bath, separate entrance. Quiet
person (male) only. Call 228-9105
after 6 p.m., 4244 W. 10th.
Room k Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
SENIOR STUDENT (FEMALE) TO
share three - bedroom suite with
two others. $55. Near Fourth and
Macdonald.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. k Unfurn.
86 Tuesday, November 17, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
•»:.. .i-S"--   •   i:   . ^ -j,
UBC FORWARD DOUG BUCHANAN (14) didn't score and Tom Williamson (6) didn't grab the
rebound on this close play, but the Thunderbird hockey team scored enough times Saturday night to
defeat Chilliwack 7-6 in a pre-season game held at the Thunderbird Arena.
Hockey Tbirds winners,
prep for season opener
Rowing Birds win
2nd over Huskies
The Thunderbird rowing crew continues to show that they are a
team to be reckoned with by defeating the University of Washington
Huskies for the second time this year. The first time the birds
defeated Washington in Coal Harbour, but this time they beat the
Huskies on their own course.
The Varsity beat the Huskies in the open eight coxed and the
coxless four events.
The Jayvees turned in a similar performance by squeaking by
their Washington counterparts by a slim one second margin.
In other races UBC came second in the coxless pair and the
freshman eight events, and fifth in the freshman coxed four.
In the open eight event UBC defeated the Huskies by a margin of
just over six seconds with a time of four minutes, ten seconds to
Washington's four minutes, sixteen and eight-tenths seconds.
In the open four coxed, UBC won with five minutes, 33 seconds
to Washington's five minutes forty and one-half seconds.
And in the closest race of the meet it was UBC over Washington
by eight-tenths of a second in the open four without cox.
The Jayvees won over their counterparts by margins of one and
one-third seconds and came second by 49.5 in eights and coxless pairs
events.
Third rugby team wins
7th in as many starts
The    UBC    Rugby   Thunderbirds,   facing   the   last   of   easy
competition   they will meet this season, walked away with a 45-3
victory over Seattle City Rugby Club in Saturday's rugby action.
Never seriously pressured, UBC
The UBC Thunderbird ice
hockey team completed their
exhibition games last weekend in
preparation for the season opener
this weekend.
Last Saturday against
Chilliwack the Birds displayed a
much improved brand of hockey.
They were slow in starting and
trailed 5-2 midway through the
second period before they started
skating. By the end of the period
the score was tied at 5-5.
In the third period the birds
outscored Chilliwack 2-1 to win
the game 7-6.
Sunday's game against the New
Westminster Schmyr Flyers was
no contest; at least no contest for
the Birds.
The hockey team skated to a
9-4 victory in an injury filled
game. Doug Buchanan suffered a
broken nose and Steve Fera was
cut by a skate.
The most pleasing aspect of the
wins has been the prolific goal
production by the team's rookie
line. In the two games on the
weekend Norm Park, Bob
MacAneely,   and   Rich   Longpre
accounted for no less than five
goals out of the team's 16 goal
total.
According to trainer Rick
Noonan, the three newcomers
play very well together pass well,
and above all are in the right place
at the right time.
The team itself seems to be
shaping up according to schedule.
A fair assessment of the team
can't be made at this time because
the teams they have been playing
in exhibition games are below the
calibre of the university teams.
provided a good display of ball
handling to record their seventh
victory against no defeats.
The upcoming match,
November 21, will be the key
game of the season when the Birds
meet the Georgians in what
should be the championship game
for the Tisdal Cup.
Georgians have one defeat over
the season and a win over UBC
would likely give Georgians the
championship. A fair appraisal of
the two clubs is shown by their
respective wins over Capilanos,
who two weeks ago had a 5-0
win/loss record. UBC defeated
them 14-5 on Armistice Day.
Georgians handed them loss
number two, 25-0, last Saturday.
UBC's second team, the Braves,
came up with a sterling effort in
Second Division totalling 47
points to nil over Seattle II. The
Braves also are preparing for next
weeks clash with Georgians II in a
bid for the Second Division title.
Braves scored 13 trys in moving
their season record to 6 wins and
one tie.
UBC Ill's defeated Ex-Brits III
26-6 in other action Saturday.
Intramurals
All first round Badminton matches
must be completed by today, Nov.
17. The nets will be up this noon
hour, and every Tuesday at 12:30.
The soccer league play ends today, check the notice boards outside
the intramural office as the playoffs
will be starting very soon.
In last weeks paper an error was
made in the point standings. Beta's
scored 690 points in football for a
total of 1,173 which is iust 20 behind
the   leading  engineers.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In-Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732, University Blvd. 224-6121
WEDNESDAY NOV. 18
E.D. -P.E. WEEK
BOAT RACE
Wednesday- 12:30
Empire Pool
♦
VOLLEYBALL NIGHT
Wed. 7:30-9:30 MG
♦
ALL DAY P.E. STUDENTS
WEAR GREEN
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
SPECIAL PRICES FOR
STUDENTS AND FACULTY ON
HAIRSTYLING   AND   CUTTING.
4605-W. 10th
228-9345
Open 8-6 - Tues. - Sat.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
FOLK NIGHT
Folk Singers
Dick & Wolfe
THURSDAY NOV. 19
CECIL GREEN PARK
8-12 p.m.
GRAD CLASS
ALUMNI & FACULTY
WELCDME
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
Fill in and return this coupon or phone today. No obligation. No salesman will call.
■ -m ■■ tm ■■ ■■ HHHMHBHHiHHHiHHBMHIHHB
MAIL THIS  COUPON   FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Residence
Address  ....
(Please Print)
Occupation   -   - -	
Phone: Home  Office 	
City   -  Prov.
Age .            Male D   Female Q
Married D    Single Q
Date first licensed to drive	
Give  number  and  dates  of  accident  in  last  5  years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Model (tmpala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, e/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Give number and dates
of trattic convictions
in   last   5   years.
Car No. 1
Car No. 2
Yes n no n
Yes D No D
Are you now insured? 	
Date current policy expires
This   coupon   is   designed   solely   to   enable   non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIV
EUS
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Male or
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Relation
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Married
or Single
% ol Use
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
OO Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November, 17, 1970
U.B.C.
Theatre
For Boys Only
—keitti dunbar photo
RIGHT, VICTOR YOUNG as Feste, left Larry Lillo as Viola in
Twelfth Night.
Mirrors and mystery are part of the magic
in the FWT production, Twelfth Night.
Twelfth Night plays with appearance and
reality. Thee focal point of the confusion are
identical twins, Viola (disguised as a boy) and
Sebastian. Viola adores a count, who loves a
countess, who in turn loves the disguised Viola,
and iss loved by her steward Malvolio.
At the height of the confusion Sebastian
enters, and the dizzying whirl of broken hearts,
mistaken identities, and mingling realities
dances to a dazzling conclusion. Self-deception
and misconception reveal that "you are not
what you pretend to be"; but appearance and
reality are forever intertwined.
The FWT production reaches beyond the
trappings of time to enchant, delight and
capture the essence both of the theatrical
experience and of the play itself.
Under John Brockington's direction, all the
facets of the production form a dynamic and
complete whole. Set, music costume, and
casting combine and interrelate.
The scene opens on a delectable,
shimmering gauze-and-reflective ribbon curtain,
promising mystery and enchantment. Behind,
the dull flash of a feast of mirrors turn and
whirl.
And then the music, slow, langorous, and
sweet, begins to wind its magic.
Onstage is a chariascuro of black and white
costumery, ingeniously suggestive in line and
revealing of character.
The mirror-setting (by Richard Wilcox),
the music (Gait McDermot and John Owen),
and the costumery (Kurt Wilhelm) are a
combination of originalities at the heart of the
appearance/reality puzzle.
As the characters appear, a further
demonstration of reality reversals appears in the
reversion to the use of men for all women's
parts.
The mind adjusts quickly, and on one level
the fiction assumed, while on another the
double-entendre is appreciated.
These fabulous experiments are,
fortunately, not mere novelties but interrelate
in a superb performance of Brockington's
vision.
Taking devices which could easily become
gadgetry, the actors manipulate the
environment and the senses, making us wonder
which way really iss through the looking glass.
The acting is, generally, expressive of the
mood, evoking a reality beyond appearance.
Countess Olivia (Richard Ouzanian) is
majestic and self-willed, if not fulfilling the
promise of his/her fatal beauty and charm.
Viola and Sebastian (Larry Lillo and
Arthur Ross) are, unfortunately, a weak part in
the web of enchantment. They are remarkably
alike, but something is wanting.
Viola's feminine grace and delicacy are
unexplored too the same extent as Sebastian's
growing irritation and masculine assertion.
Youth is there, but litheness is not. A rather
strained intonation as well denies spontaneity
and sincerity.
Malvolio (Derek Ralston), excellent
throughout, reveals his success ultimately in his
final, bitter speech, where a pompous fool is
revealed in his heart-break a bitterly wounded
human being. To his credit, he makes us there
ashamed to have laughed at him.
The sideline comics are frothy, sometimes
pithy delight. Shakespeare's local humor,
sometimes so obscure, is here in pun and
bellylaugh made not simply intelligible but also
uproariously funny.
In general, Shakespeare's vivid
characterizations are exploited to the full. The
characters intensify human reality in a total
world of sight, sound, and inter play which is
fresh and constantly revealing.      TlolAp
Gen U5 PAUL HORN
Speaks on
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
Paul   Horn,   who  has   toured with
MAHARISHI   MAHESH   YOGI   to
become a teacher of Transcendental
Meditation.
He speaks on this profound
technique for expansion of
consciousness.
12:30-Thurs.,Nov.l9
SUB BALLROOM
further info.: 266-0862
Over 1000 New & Used
Typewriters
ADDING MACHINES
CALCULATORS
OFFICE FURNITURE
AT THE
\
LOWEST PRICES
IN CANADA
*   *   *
NEW TYPEWRITERS
from  $49.50
USED TYPEWRITERS
from    $19.50
IBM ELECTRICS
from    $149.50
New Electric Adding
Machines    .$89.50
*    k    *
All Makes and Models of
RENTALS-LOW RATES
CASH & STUDENT
DISCOUNTS
Trade-Ins A ccep ted
Every Machine Guaranteed
POLSON
TYPEWRITERS LTD.
458 W. Broadway Ph. 879-0631
World's FIRST Office
Equipment Supermarket
*m
THERE'S A NEW
RESTAURANT
ON ^JU
CAMPUS!^*
You didn't notice? . . . Well, it's there whenever you want it! It's "Hot-n-Handy",
the one and only "drive-out" restaurant, and we do all the driving. This newest
concept in dining pleasure allows you the luxury of dining-out-in. Each and every
Hot-n-Handy van is a complete, fully-equipped chefs kitchen, even complete with
chef, just waiting to prepare your dinner order in the time it takes to reach your
door. The next time you feel like dining-out-in, call "Hot-n-Handy", the one and
only "drive-out" restaurant!
•O • MENU-0- (     \
Special $1.00 savings voucher good on any
two of the following complete dinners:
Price
Barbecue Ribs 'n Sauce $3.25 ^~m_^gZZlm*/.*,-*t w       .- -» *
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce $175 \w /       "■ l^vr" "'• • * **'•
Barbecue Chicken  $1.60 \^   ; ..<6$55?N
Other complete dinners available on a regular \ \ • ;
basis: 'I'" «; ;
Prime New York Steak  $4.25 \        ..'* *, . f
Ravioli with Meat Sauce $2.15 *•*• '•.„.!*
Chili Con Came  $175 ha   M    f%f%mmmm .« 	
Stuffed Cabbage Rolls  $150 V\w_W/_\ ■ < JCTI
Corned Beef on Rye $.80 -J^__*^   \Jw I   I
$^^^P^^^^ This voucher entitles you to a saving of $1.00 on any combination of two
t^^H m »m» of the following complete dinners:
i   ___M   ^mw ^^ Barbecue Ribs 'n Sauce
^H     fxwrwf  envoi AT Spaghetti with Meat Sauce
0^^ OFF  SPfcCIAL Barbecue Chicken __¥___*_*   M   ffJIlOHY
Hot-n-Handy has radio controlled "drive-out" restaurants near you in Vancouver,       MM.™ B\    !•  ttHUl/J
North Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster and Richmond.    One central COil   00*1*1
number serves all areas       0FFER GOOD T|LL NOV. 30 3^4"OOl I

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