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The Ubyssey Nov 20, 1970

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Array p. 3 — The plight of Indian students in a system that
caters to white values
p. 5 — A TA speaks out against his role
p. 15 — Jim Davies examines the eideas of present
mayor Tom Campbell
Bennett flees from unemployed
^"^SVAR ON POVERTY ^/^"^   ' J. #?
"IN RESPONSE TO THAT QUESTION, Mr. Radio Man - Yes it is rather difficult to
keep this inane smile pasted on my cherubic countenance while I'm surrounded by all
these foul-smelling poor people. Where are the good people enjoying the good life in
— marty smith photo
the good province now that I need them? Oh, officer, watch that these rabble don't
fog my dentures with their hot proletarian breath."
Students and workers open new regional college
By PAUL KNOX, DICK BETTS
and KATHY CARNEY
Unemployment was too much Thursday for premier
WAC Bennett.
The premier's planned tour and formal opening of
Douglas College in New Westminster was aborted when his
limousine was surrounded by 125 unemployed trade
unionists, students and unemployed young people.
Without stepping out of his police-escorted black
CadillaCjBennett ordered the driver to flee the fledgling
campus and leave students and faculty, waiting for the
opening, high and dry.
The demonstrators then opened the college
themselves, naming it Tom Clark College after a famous
B.C. labor leader.
The college opening had been planned to follow an
address which Bennett gave at New Westminster
Secondary School to some students and invited guests.
Bennett wheeled up to the Secondary school at about
10:30 a.m. and was greeted by a loud chorus of boos and
hoots from angry trade unionists and unemployed people.
Beaming his famous Beautiful B.C. smile he strode
into the building, ignoring the demonstrators.
The protesters were there to remind him that B.C. is
not in fact beautiful.
Speakers outside the school pointed out the level of
B.C.'s unemployment problem. They said unemployment
in Vancouver is between 30 and 70 per cent in many
union locals.
Groups represented were the longshoremen,
fishermen, building trades, electrical workers, railway &
transport, and woodworkers' unions.
Others were the Unemployed Citizens Welfare
Improvement Council, The Action Committee for
Unemployed Youth and UBC Left Caucus.
Grad enrolment cut down
TORONTO (CUP) - The University of Toronto cut
back its graduate enrolment this fall in areas where
students with doctorates are having difficulties finding
jobs.
Douglas Baines, U of T grad studies dean said
Tuesday that enrollment was cut about 25 per cent in the
basic sciences of physics, chemistry and mathematics,
about 20 per cent zoology and botany, and about 10 per
cent in engineering.
But some other fields — in which a shortage of PhDs
continues — such as geology, metallurgy, computer
sciences and education — have increased graduate
enrolments.
Baines said the result is a graduate enrolment of
about 6,300 students — unchanged from last year.
The U of T move reflects a general slowdown this
year in the growth of Canadian graduate schools which
report an overall enrolment increase of eight per cent
compared with an increase of about 20 per cent a year
since 1961.
The U of T has not cut enrolment in every area where
the supply of graduates exceeds the demand, Baines
added, because "some departments which I won't.name
are not well organized. A lot of professors are still living
in ivory towers and have no idea what's happening
outside."
But he put part of the blame for the oversupplying of
PhDs on students "pursuing a narrow program."
Baines was commenting on a report released
Wednesday by the U of T graduate students' union
showing that many Canadian PhDs can't find work.
Police at the door refused admission to the protesters
as well as many students of the Secondary school. Some
of these joined the demonstration and the march to
Douglas College.
One trade unionist was told by a New Westminster
policeman he could not enter because he was "a
protester."
. "How do you know I'm a protester?" he asked.
"Because you look like one," replied the cop.
A middle-aged man in a natty grey double-breasted
suit, blue shirt and flowered tie was allowed to enter
without an invitation.
"My wife has mine," he apologized, as the cop waved
him through.
Bennett finally consented to a request for an
audience relayed by the protesters through New
Westminster police chief Petey Meehan.
The three representatives selected were Lynn Atkins
of TACUY, Bob Clair of the International Woodworkers
of America, and Frank Kennedy, acting president of the
Vancouver and District Labour Council.
The three-minute meeting was closed to the press.
Clair later explained that much of it was taken up with an
argument about Atkins' refusal to shake Bennett's hand.
"Lynn took a principle position," said Clair, "but
Bennett wanted to make that the issue instead of
unemployment.
"We gave him the facts on unemployment and he
turned around and walked away."
Meanwhile the demonstrators marched along Eighth
Avenue to the Douglas College site at McBride. The
"college" consists of four one-storey prefabricated
trailer-like structures.
Motorists and pedestrians voiced general support
although a few were derisive.
continued on page 2: see PROTESTERS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
Safety is civic pride says mayorality candidate
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
A safe city is a just city. Safety is not riot sticks, but
civic pride, said New Democratic Party mayorality
candidate Tony Gargrave Wednesday.
Only 30 persons turned up in SUB's club lounge to
hear Gargrave's noon speech sponsored by the UBC NDP
club.
Gargrave outlined his plans for the financing and
engineering of a rapid transit system for Vancouver.
He said he agreed with the proposals of the Shrum
report - a rapid transit system running north and south,
centre and east, stopping every mile. It would cost $300
million and extend over a construction period of 10 to 20
years.
This system would provide cheaper and faster
transportation, he said.
Quebec eyes police state
with seven-point program
Gargrave said he's convinced that the provincial
government will contribute two-fifths of the cost, $112
million, and is assured that with the help of federal
minister of urban affairs, Robert Andras a grant from the
federal government will be forthcoming.
"The federal government is well aware that in the
year 2,000, 45 per cent of the Canadian population will
live in three cities — Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver,
so they have to support city endeavours to prepare for the
population growth," said Gargrave.
"Don't ever quote me as saying 'What's a million
dollars?', but it would only cost the federal government
$10 million a year for 10 years," said Gargrave, a UBC law
graduate.
The remainder of the financing would come from a
1.1 cent tax per gallon of gas and diesel, a sacrifice which
Gargrave asks every motorist to make.
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) - A seven-point program
which might be the second step toward a police state in
Quebec was unveiled in the. Quebec national assembly
Wednesday by Liberal back-bencher Jean Bienvenue -
apparently with government approval.
Liberal prime minister Robert Bourassa and justice
minister Jerome Choquette enthusiastically applauded
Bienvenue when he called for stern measures to control
violence.
Bienvenue said the government might have to invoke:
•      Compulsory military  service for all Canadian
youths.
Censorship of news media
Strict control of public demonstrations
Identity cards to be carried by all citizens
Re-instatement of capital punishment
A sterner parole policy for prisoners
A   beefed   up   police   force   paid   for   by
re-alocating   money   now  used   for   cultural
exchanges between France and Quebec.
At least one of the measures has already been called
for by the government. Choquette said earlier this month
that Quebecois might be required to carry identification
cards to simplify police identification problems. He said
he thought the majority of Quebecois would support the
move.
Choquette has also been involved in the unofficial
censorship of radio and television stations in Quebec, a
censorship that was repudiated last week by some of the
province's electronic media.
"I see us closing up the central 1,000 acres of
Vancouver and installing an underground, completely
automatic subway. You may say my proposals are
futuristic but that's exactly why Expo '67 succeeded, it
was designed for people," said Gargrave.
Gargrave also discussed the problems of alienation.
If you have a beautiful environment you get beautiful
people.
But those beautiful people can be affected by
unemployment and bad housing, he said.
"The unemployment rate for those under 24 years of
age is 11.4% and its going to get worse in January and
February. When they're unemployed and their housing is
bad they become alienated — and so I'm trying to bring
them inside the system and the city."
Asked if he would cooperate with big corporations
Gargrave answered that he would cooperate in the sense
of having trade unions and corporate executives meet and
agree on the highest priorities.
"The fault up till now has been that city hall sends
their lowest echelon people to meet the corporations.
Block 42-52 is a giant embarrassment, an example of what
happens when the people are not involved," said Gargrave.
In response to questions about basic changes he sees
in city hall Gargrave proposed: an increase in the number
of councillors, a ward system and "a complete turnover of
new people."
Hlookoff elected
Peter Hlookoff, arts 5, has been elected Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer.
Hlookoff received 181 votes out of a total of 291.
His opponent, Craig Anderson, arts 3, received 93.
There were 17 spoiled ballots.
Heaviest turnout came from the SUB poll, where 171
voters cast their ballots.
Protesters march to new college
from page One
Many rolled down their car
windows to- accept leaflets and
some waved unemployment
insurance and welfare cards.
Said one: "I used to do the
same thing when I was younger.'
Police tried unsuccessrully to
keep marchers out of Douglas
College where they milled around
in the cafeteria and outside
awaiting Bennett's arrival.
After about 15 minures the
premier's limousine arrived by a
circuitous route at the college.
It pulled into the parking lot
and was surrounded by about 30
of the demonstrators. One
produced a rag and began
polishing the premier's car, saying;
"Shine yo' shoes, massa? '
The car pulled away from the
group and left the campus.
Flamenco
invades IH
Angel Monzon accompanied by
two female dancers will present
Flamenco dances Saturday Nov.,
28 at 8:30 p.m. in the
International House Upper
Lounge.
Theatre in the round will be
used to encourage audience
participation.
Monzon is lead dancer and
choreographer of Los Mojos, and
was formerly with Jose Greco's
company.
Monzon has danced in Spain,
Europe, and South America, and
performed at UBC two years ago.
Tickets are available from
members of El Circulo or by
phoning 738-8629.
Tickets are one dollar per
person or fifty cents for El
Circulo members.
Then the real opening
ceremonies began. Students and
workers crowded around a
make-shift platform and amid
cheers and applause they declared
the college open in the name of
the working people of B.C.
The name Tom Clark College
came from a former vice-president
of the IWA who was jailed in
connection with the 1966 strike
at the Lenkurt Electric plant in
Burnaby. Clark died two years
ago.
Charlie Boylan of the Canadian
Brotherhood of Railway,
Transport and General Workers
said leaders such as Bennett
should be confronted with similar
demonstrations everytime they
appear in public.
"We have to organize the
unemployed in our locals," he
said. "Bennett and Gaglardi and
all the federal politicians should
be forced to answer for their
policies."
EDUCATION - P.E. INFORMAL
NOVEMBER 21
BANQUET & DANCE
COACH HOUSE INN
REFRESHMENTS? P.M.
Dinner 7:30
Dance 9-1 •
(Natural Gas)
ED WEEK
BASH
Tkts. (Going
• Fast)
$9.00/Couple
Economics of bigotry
Democracy, Liberty, Ideology and Equality will be the topic of a
lecture by Dr. H. Scott Gordon at 1 p.m. Thursday, in room 2,000 of
the Biological Sciences building.
Dr. Gordon, an internationally known economist, has done recent
research on the economics of discrimination and bigotry.
On Friday, Nov. 27, at 8:30 p.m., in room 2,000, Biological
sciences building, Gordon will speak on Economic Growth and the
Ending of Economic Growth, Property and Pluralism, and Science and
the Control of Knowledge.
Gordon is fall and winter professor of economics at Indiana
University and summer professor of economics at Queen's University.
He is appearing in the E.S. Woodward lecture series.
* ■"' Jl> it X iC ■   H ■'
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'J
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10% Discount to U.B.C.
Students with AMS Card
BOUTIQUE ,
Imported Swedish Leather Fashions   j
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440 Seymour St./688-2732
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QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd
8:00 P.M.
Tickets are now on sale at
the Vancouver Ticket
Centre, Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
ALL PROCEEDS TO CANADA'S NATIONAL SKI TEAM
ALL SEATS
RESERVED $2.50
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
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2609 Granville at lOrh
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
Hosiery, Handbags, Boots —
both Men's & Women's
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shaes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE BETWEEN 10th & 11th - 738-9833 Friday, November 20, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Panel probes white education of Indians
By NATHALIE APOUCHTINE
Indians would be better off
without white man's education, a
young Indian told UBC students
Tuesday noon.
"It would be different if we
could retain the determination of
our identity and at the same time
learn about your culture," said
Bob Hull, 25, of the B.C. Native
Youth Conference, which put on
the multi-media play "Xa?awthen
(Four)" in Vancouver this week.
"But, under the system, we are
conditioned and brainwashed to
do certain things," said Hull.
He led a panel of speakers who
addressed a crowd of almost 250
students on White Man's
Education in Ed. 100.
However, as the discussion
continued, the audience dwindled
to less than half that number, due
perhaps to apparent frustration of
the audience because of the
Indian's negative attitudes
towards questions asked by the
white students.
Frank Rivers, 19, from
Capilano College, explained why
the Indian students cannot fit into
the school system.
Rivers said the Indian "strives
in the minimum for material
things and in the maximum for
gaining respect and friends.
"There is also the element of
time. Before the white man came
to North America, the moon and
the sun were the Indian's
timepiece. From this comes a
different regard of time - doing
things when he feels they should
be done," said Rivers.
"The language and
environment  that  the  Indian is
-maureen gam photo
"YOU TALK BIG WORDS of integration in the schools. Unless
there is integration of hearts and minds you have only a physical
presence," said  Chief  Dan George in a  moving soliloquy to
capacity crowd in Ed. 100 Tuesday.
Year and faculty
information available
UBC registrar Jack Parnall said Wednesday that his office had no
right to with-hold basic information about the student status of Rudi
Reschke.
"The public is entitled to information about the year and faculty
of any student. If this wasn't done it was a misunderstanding," Parnall
told senate.
Student senator Art Smolensky had asked why information about
Reschke, an engineering student involved in fights with Maoist political
pamphleteers last week, was not released to The Ubyssey.
He said information, including the birth place of Art Olsen, a
Dawson Creek secondary school teacher who was fired for allegedly
supporting the FLQ, was given to the Province newspaper some time
ago.
But when the Ubyssey called inquiring about Reschke, they were
told he had requested that no information be released.
Parnall said Reschke and all other students have the right to
request that their address and phone kept confidential, when they fill
out registration forms at the beginning of the year.
But Reschke's year and faculty should have been released, he
said.
With regard to Olsen, Parnall questioned whether his birth date
had been released but added that "it might have come from our files."
He said it is common to release only the degree held by graduates of the
university.
used to make him more of a
thinker than a talker in class. But,
he probably is more with the class
than the others, because he uses
all his feelings and senses all the
time.
"The Indian religion is respect.
The Indian respects the person
next to him — which makes for a
great community feeling," said
Rivers.
He compared these basic
characteristics of the Indian to
those promoted in our schools:
competition, rigid time tables, and
the   student-teacher  relationship.
Rivers said Carson Graham
Secondary School in North
Vancouver is the only B.C. school
which had been successful in
basing education on the "Indian
way of life."
UBC arts student Angie Todd,
who formerly taught in the
Interior, decried the unfair
treatment of Indian children in
white schools.
"They teach you to step on
your brother and sister,' she said.
"Say a teacher asks an Indian a
question and he doesn't know the
answer and she asks other Indian
children the same question.
"Even of the others know the
answer, they won't put him down
by answering — and for this
sensitivity, Indians are called
dumb, and savages," she said.
"And it's up to you, those of
you who will be teachers, to
rectify this situation as it comes
up — tell your students that
Indians are not savages, every time
they read it in a history book,"
said Todd.
All the panelists said that
Indians have no way of changing
the educational system to make it
suit their needs.
But it is a vicious circle — to
get control of his own education,
the Indian must get an accepted
education in the white school
system appropriate or not.
"Sometimes when I walk
around campus, I feel like a
bloody token Indian," said Todd.
AMS opposes beach road plan
By GINNY GALT
Students' council Wednesday
night voted to oppose the city
park board's plan to include a
road in its latest proposal aimed at
controlling cliff erosion on
University Beach.
Speaking for the motion, Alma
Mater Society president Tony
Hodge said he supported the rest
of the park board's proposal,
based on a study by
Swan-Wooster Engineering Ltd.
"Their proposal combines
erosional control with a minimal
effect on the environment which
is good. But in no way, shape or
form is a road acceptable down
there."
Hodge said the university and
the alumni association
contributed money to the beach
study, but only on the
understanding that there would be
no road.
The 12-foot wide road was not
part of the original Swan-Wooster
proposal which recommended a
$235,000 layer of gravel, one to
three feet thick for 6,200 feet
west of Spanish Banks to halt
erosion on the cliffs above the
beach.
Hodge said the road was
"plopped onto the original plan
by park board officials."
"The road is totally
unnecessary, but the park board
officials claim they need it for
emergency purposes.
"They're really afraid that
students will have drinking parties
down there," Hodge said.
He said the park board "can't
seem to understand the value of
natural recreational facilities."
When asked how much
influence the AMS decision would
have on the park board, Hodge
replied: "The board said it
wouldn't decide whether to
accept the Swan-Wooster proposal
until it heard from the AMS, the
alumni association and the
university.
"But park board chairman Stu
Lefeaux wants a road down there,
and what Lefeaux says usually
goes."
The councillors voted 22 to
three in favor of a motion giving
$200 dollars to a committee
financing feed-ins for unemployed
youth on the Lower Mainland,
headed      by      former      AMS
vice-president Chris Krawczyk.
The feed-in committee, (the
Joshua Foundation), is supported
by donations. It started its feed-in
program Nov. 1 when a summer
feeding program sponsored jointly
by. the federal and provincial
governments ended, Krawczyk
said.
Treasurer Stuart Bruce
amended the motion to read that
the Foundation should repay the
AMS if it clears $35,000 or more
on a 12-hour benefit concert it
plans to sponsor at Pacific
Coliseum Dec. 13.
Grad student rep Bob Smith
spoke against the feed-in motion.
"Instead of giving $200 to the
Joshua Foundation, we should
give $200 to the Yippie bail fund,
which is used only for vagrancy
charges," Smith said. But this
suggestion didn't get anywhere.
Pollution control
in the classroom
Pollution — and how to control it — is being directly studied by
students in at least 30 courses at UBC.
And UBC also has other courses indirectly concerned with
pollution control as well as at least 18 pollution control research
projects currently underway, a president's special committee reported
to senate Wednesday.
The courses dealing directly with environmental preservation are
spread across nine different departments, most of them in the
agricultural science and applied science faculties.
The four-man committee under chemical engineering head E. F.
Murray, was commissioned by senate in Januray to investigate what
UBC was doing to solve pollution, and the plans for continued research
in the area.
After receiving the printed report, which will be discussed at a
later meeting, senate voted to establish the pollution committee as
permanent. Studies will be referred to it as they become necessary.
The committee distributed printed forms to all departments and
had 23 forms returned.
The report concluded that pollution can best be attacked by the
university on an inter-disciplinary basis.
The report describes three inter-disciplinary anti-pollution
programs at UBC, two of which are in the planning stages:
Using a federal grant of $50,000, the university is currently
studying how best to establish a water resources research centre, which
would promote new research programs and co-ordinate existing studies^
With a provincial grant in hand, the chemical and civil engineering
faculties are currently recruiting staff for a pollution control centre that
will begin work in about six months on B.C. pollution problems,
including the wastes from the pulp mills, and the handling of sewage
from municipalities;
And the Environmental Crisis Operation established in December
1969 by concerned students and faculty, is co-ordinating and compiling
pollution control information, for release to individuals and agencies,
and also directing people who need help to other agencies. About 10
requests per day are being handled by the cross-reference file.
Courses directly concerned with pollution are offered in
departments of agricultural engineering and food sciences, chemical and
civil engineering, microbiology, mineral engineering, plant and soil
science, zoology and the institute of animal resource ecology.
Other faculties and departments, including forestry, chemistry,
oceanography, law and economics, offer courses concerned with
pollution control in a peripheral way, the report states. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
MU8YSSM
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER 20,1970
DAVIES' RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Bennett's retreat
It isn't often than any politician, least of all such a
consummate political con artist asW. A. C. Bennett, will
openly admit to his fear of the people he is supposed to
represent.
But that is exactly what Bennett did Thursday
when he abruptly cancelled his appearance at the
opening of New Westminster's Douglas College. Bennett
fled from the new "campus", without setting foot
outside his limousine, after discovering that a number of
trade unionists, unemployed workers and students had
also shown up for the ceremony.
In a way, it's hard to blame Bennett. It must be
embarrassing for a politician to come face to face with
the results of his policies.
It's one thing for Bennett to glad-hand the
Kamloops druggists who attended the Social Credit
convention at the Bayshore Inn last week, but it's
something quite different for him to meet the workers
and the unemployed of B.C.
It is Bennett's government that has reduced
employment opportunities in B.C. by not developing
secondary industry and by encouraging foreign
corporations to take the resources and run.
It is Bennett's government that has introduced
Canada's most repressive labor legislation and uses
organized labor as a political scapegoat.
It is Bennett's government that starves essential
services and treats the poor like eighteenth century
beggars.
Fittingly, Bennett's retreat took place at Douglas
College — one of the many muddy "junior college"
shantytowns that we are told to regard as institutes of
higher learning.
After all, it is again Bennett's government who we
can thank for the province's poor educational facilities
at all levels and for further limiting the accessibility of
university by denying needed funds.
No, if we were in Bennett's place there would have
been no way we would be willing to meet the people
either.
Side- lines
So there we were, casually leafing through the
Woodward's Christmas catalogue, looking at all the
overpriced and totally useless goodies available, when
we began to wonder if we'd been drinking too much.
We turned to the men's wear section and couldn't
believe our eyes. Right there, in full living color,
modelling green paisly bathrobes, spiffy pants,
multi-colored shirts and innumerable other things with
that familiar model's "You too can be a Greek God"
pose, was none other than our friendly neighborhood
AMS vice-president, John Scott Mitchell.
Mitchell's part-time job (which, the employment
situation being what it is, we can't begrudge him) opens
up a new vista for UBC heavies looking for some extra
cash.
Just think, dean of women Helen McCrae could
endorse the latest swinging fashions from Sweet Sixteen
and Walter Gage could become a celebrity as a TV
pitchman for Ralph Williams.
Davies meets public
Okay gang, time to reach into
the  old  mail bag and pull out
some of those wild zany letters
from those wonderful cut-ups.
Dear hippie freak,
What da hell do ya think yur
doin, talkin against us enginears
alia time. I otta kick you in the
teeth so hard that you'd be
chewing yur toenails. I otta kick
you in the ass so hard you'd be
sitin on yore sholders. I otta kick
you in the top of the head so hard
. you'd  hafta  unzip  yore   fly  to
blow yore nose. Haw Haw.
Youse guys down at The
Ubyssey are reely askin for it.
We're gonna get youse and yore
gonna be sorry.
I dare you to print this.
Screw you,
An E.U.S. Spokesman
' V4 c/wJT heac  the 8ieo%
CHl(?P(M6    cfkXC   OF  THE   I^OWJS     ^
or cflcs Ano re^xs.>'__(~$rjAt
'ift CAU'T SMEU THE oCK<, Og
FIOWEKS (WTHE F(ELO CAdSE OF
THE    %TlfiH   OF    WCTOPlCS .>'
"V/I   CAH'T   SEE   THE    MOUHTIfiliS
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&UL.
LETTERS
Welfare
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am a spokesman for the
Unemployed Citizens Welfare
Improvement Council, who Sandy
Kass interviewed last week.
As her Tuesday story states, we
are desperately in need of
donations for Christmas to assist
the homeless young people who
are starving — not just the welfare
recipients who are suffering from
hunger.
Christmas means nothing to
human beings with empty
stomachs.
Ignorance and greed are the
cause of most problems in the
world. People have an attitude of
"I'm alright Jack, to heck with
you!" Citizens do not act until
they are themselves affected.
Welfare recipients and other
poor citizens are tired of being
called deadbeats and being
discriminated against. We feel as if
we are locked in a prison and
sooner or later we will break out.
We, the poor, are tired of being
crushed like bugs and being made
the scapegoat for problems caused
by the inefficiency of
governments at the provincial and
federal levels. We don't have any
faith in royal commissions. The
royal commission on poverty was
held a year ago in Vancouver and
nothing has come of it.
We are tired of talking, and
when the poor stop talking, watch
out. Many of us are willing to give
up our lives fighting so that others
in our situation may have a better
life.
It's about time people heard
our side of the story and came
down from their ivory towers.
Everyone who speaks out against
the youth or welfare recipients
should be forced to live the way
we do. In a land with such vast
resources and mass dumping of
food, there isn't any need for
people to go hungry.
Those who are constantly
attacking the youth don't really
understand them. I have always
found it easy to communicate
with young people. They are
polite and are concerned about
each other which is what the older
generations should get back to.
Instead of continually
criticizing the youth, those who
are too quick to judge should
hand out encouragement. Perhaps
if the older generations weren't so
abrupt with the youth they would
be able to communicate with
them; This includes social
workers.
If one takes an enterest in the
young people, they don't feel as if
they are being policed and will
confide in you.
In closing, it's about time the
older generations took a good
look at our "Sick Society" before
it is too late.
IRENE WOLENSKI
My deah boy,
Gee fella, do you have to keep
stabbing all us great guys down at
Krappa Senile in the back?
We're a good bunch of fellas
down here at the house. Like,
there's Johnny Smith. What a
great stunt old John-John pulled,
whipping down his pants and
exposing his bum in front of that
little old lady. Or there's good old
Buzz Jackson. Buzz was really
buzzing last night chugging all
those beer and then throwing up
on that scrag he picked up. What a
devil!
Well, fella, I gotta am-scray
now. Try to give us a break, will
ya.
Yours till Niagara Falls
(just thought I'd throw that
in for a chuckle)
Lance Sterling, KS
Dear Ravies,
Gurgle, slurp, oooh, aahhh.
yours all the way,
The Brock Peeper
Mr. Perverted Davies, Sir:
I am shocked. I came out here -
from middle Salmon Arm this
year to enrol in education. My
Mummsie and Daddsie got me a
nice room in Totem Park'and then
you come along and spoil it all
with your rotten, filthy, swinish
trash, you insidious, scheming,
scurvy reprobate.
Last night while I was taking
off my clothes in the closet, right
down to my bare, pink, .nubile
body, I could not help but think
of how despicable you are.
I could just picture you there
trying to force yourself upon my
luscious breasts and ample thighs.
I know you would want to do
wicked things to my soft,
defenseless body.
I hate you. You sinner.
May you rot in hell,
Poofie.
Davies Ravies,
You've got to stop all this kind
of nonsense. The neighbours are
starting to talk.
Love,  Mom.
P.S.
Dad has disowned you and we
have moved.
P.P.S
Don't try to find us.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wire ■ John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate John Twigg
Ass't News   ... i... . Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo   .. . i  David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
John Gibbered and took Ginny with
a grain of Gait. Jan O'Brien and
Josephine Margolis looked away as
Bruce did a Dubblestyne with Mike
Sasges, followed by a Christine
Krawczyk. Kass got gassed and wrote
another Sandy clause. But as Nettie
Wild pointed out, the main attraction
was Shane McCune, who wrote a witty
column and this masthead. Nathalie
Apouchtine and Elaine Bougie didn't
try to think of a name for the column,
but Elaine (who Tarzwell) did. Steve
(Cool-Hand) Lucas snarled that he had
a name, but Paul gave him some hard
Knox.
Thinking hard, Thorn went Wescott
with Sharon Boylan. Dick Betts
cackled dialectically through a
mouthful of Kathy con Carney. And
Jinny Ladner smiled and softly told
Shane to go to hell.
Darkroom dillies Kevan Perrins and
Jim Gorman duelled with Nikons at
ten paces, but Maureen Gans said they
weren't loaded. Daryl Tan and Brett
Garrett autographed each others
passport photos, while David
Bowerman flubbed his lip excitedly.
Because he couldn't think of a name
for the column, Dave came to a bad
Enns.
In the jockshop, McCloy
congratulated Don Gardner on his
Gnuptials and went back to his
crayons.
Judy McLeod was very nearly left
out of the masthead.
All staffers who don't attend
today's meeting at noon won't be
allowed out after supper all next week. Friday, .November 20,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Boring  routine faces TAs at  UBC
The following was written by a UBC teaching
assistant who, for obvious reasons, has asked to remain
anonymous.
Every TA is two things. He is a source of cheap labor
and he is a cog in the vast educational hierarchy. At the
end of the road there lies the prospect of a maybe
reasonably interesting job, a fat salary and a mandarin's
office in the ivory tower. In the meantime, you live from
paycheque to paycheque and tolerate the boredom.
f've worked as a TA in three universities, in Canada
and overseas, and job interest has varied in relation to a
number of factors. Departmental structures, the
personality of your prof, the amount of job freedom you
are allowed, the nature of your work; a whole complex of
causes interrelates to make your job either a drag or
something reasonably interesting.
If you land an easy-going prof who assigns you to run
a tutorial group and permits you a good deal of freedom
in what you do, then you're in for an okay year. But you
can also end up working under an inflexible prof, assisting
with a large class which is not subdivided into tutorial or
discussion groups and working in some area in which
you're totally uninterested. Probably one of your main
jobs will be grading papers, and you'll be in for a bummer.
The kind of attitude that seems to prevail in the
department I'm working in here is that if you land a
course which coincides with your interests, well and good.
But if it's lousy, that's.your problem: it's a job, you're
being paid for it, and you have to meet your
responsibilities and earn your money. So go to the
lectures, however bad and do the reading however boring.
You'll then be able to carry out your responsibilities -
like grading.
Grading papers is one of the most meaningless jobs I
have ever had to do — inside or outside the university
context. To mark essays and assign a grade is tedious work
at the best of times. It is doubly tedious when you're
doing someone else's slut-work. To have to mark a
hundred or more essays on some arbitrary topic assigned
by someone else makes me feel frustrated, depressed and
resentful.
Attention tends to lapse after reading through, the
first few papers and you find yourself having to read and
reread in order to make some sense of the haze of words
which confronts you. In the end it amounts to a farce:
you begin scanning papers and more or less arbitrarily
assigning a grade (hoping that it will bear some kind of
relationship to the amount of work put into the paper),
making a few random comments and keeping a careful
eye on how grades are distributed. (One professor I
worked for used to check the distributions against a
bell-shaped curve.)
All the time that you're doing this, you're subjected
to pangs of conscience. You're aware that some student
has probably sweated over this paper and-that you're not
doing their efforts justice; you worry that you might be
screwing some students by more or less arbitrarily denying
them the grade they need. But there's a deadline to meet,
a pile of papers staring you in the face and the
bell-shaped curve to remember. Your one overwhelming
desire is to get finished with the whole goddamned
business as soon as possible.
One may be able to make out a case for a formal
grading structure in such technical subjects as medicine,
dentistry or engineering, but in other fields the grading
system is probably one of the most destructive
mechanisms in our educational environment. The grade is
an artificial incentive, designed to keep the student's nose
to a grindstone he would otherwise avoid.
It promotes competitiveness and thus fosters elitism,
it inhibits the sharing of ideas among students, and is one
of the corner-stones of the mystique of expertise so
pervasive in the university milieu. The whole system,
morever, rests on the gigantic assumption that it is
possible to average out insight, analytical rigour,
coherence, imagination, presentation of data, etc., and
arrive   at   some   over-all  quantitative  assessment  of a
student's performance in a paper.
The crudeness and subjectivity of such an approach is
glaringly apparent, and in fact empirical studies of grading
indicate that the performance of the student is of less
importance in determining the grade he will get than is the
part played by the person doing the marking.
In the last analysis, the whole grading system is
basically a device to regulate the flow of people into
various levels of governmental, educational and
corporation bureaucracies, a convenient way of measuring
people and slotting them into the appropriate pigeon-hole.
Right on the bottom of the educational pyramid, doing
the measuring, stands the TA
Why do it? There aren't many alternatives: if you
need money, it's a choice between being a TA, working at
a gas station or some other part-time job (if you can find
one!), and getting a loan. In some countries, all or most
students are on scholarships or bursaries. Here, the notion
that 'education' is some kind of a privilege is more deeply
ingrained.
As a result, we have not only to support ourselves
during the years when we're trying to obtain those
high-grade meal tickets we call degrees: we are also
required to pay huge tuition fees. So we are reduced to
dependence upon our parents, to mortgaging our future
by raising a loan, or to selling ourselves to do the
shit-work for other people.
How can we secure a change in our basic situation?
Remembering that bureaucrats support only
those reforms that have already taken place, I don't
expect any basic changes to be initiated from above.
Those who control the educational structures are
unfamiliar with our problems and aspirations and have a
vested interest in not upsetting the status quo.
If there are going to be any basic changes, it is going
to have to be us who bring them about through our own
collective action.
PEOPLE
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EXPANDING ORGANIZATION. PLEASE ARRANGE AN APPOINTMENT TIME THROUGH THE STUDENT SERVICES OFFICE. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
Sex roles confused in North America
By SHARON BOYLAN
Rarely do I get the chance to follow such a charming
and handsome speaker as Dr. John Dennison, said Barbara
Todd, while women laughed in recognition of the usual
introduction given to women speakers by men.
She was speaking for Vancouver's Women's Caucus to
about 400 students in Room 100 of the Education
building at Wednesday noon.
Dr. Dennison, an educational psychologist, had been
discussing the socialization of women in the Canadian
educational system and in Australia.
Dennison said he didn't want to defend
discrimination against women, but explain it. He said until
recently he felt that sexual politics "had something to do
withGerta Munsinger."
At the age of 12, women are two years more mature
physically than boys, he said.
He also said 75 per cent of behavioural problems were
boys because girls tend toward passivity, which is
acceptable in the school environment.
Dennison said tremendous confusion exists in North
America about sex roles, and talked about growing up in
Australian society where sexual apartheid was practised.
Todd, more concerned with Canadian experience,
said that most women experience discrimination but "are
capable of developing as full human beings".
She said that women are educated to a sex role which
'Pot and chemicals are going out
while heroin popularity rises
By JUDY McLEOD
Marijuana is on its way out and heroin is on the way
in says Dr. Conrad Schwarz of the Uninversity Health
Services.
"It may just be
wishful thinking on
my part, that in
another couple of
years marijuana won't
be around as it is
now,". said Schwarz
Wednesday. "But
there are a great many
indications to, show
that this is the,case."
There     is    less
emotional    reaction,
fewer headlines, fewer
people turning out for
Le Dain   Commission
meetings.   And   only
10% of the university
campus turned out to
vote for the legalizing
of    marijuana,    said
Schwarz.
"This wouldn't have happened a year ago,' he stated.
He listed several possibilities for this new lack of
public concern.
"There could be less use, or perhaps people have
SCHWARZ-jurtk replaces weed
learned how to use it."
But Schwarz feels that the main reason for the
declining use of soft drugs is that they are getting weaker.
Marijuana is being cut with barley or ordinary lawn
grass, hash is cut with camel or horse manure and isn't
worth buying any more, he said.
The Sinale Convention signed in 1961 by 90
countries outlawed the growing of Indian hemp, said
Schwarz.
Therefore if Canada decided to legalize marijuana or
hashish the only way to get any good drugs would be to
engage   in  illegal smuggling.
Schwarz predicted that all source countries will have
all but eliminated the growing of Indian hemp within the
next 25 years.
"Chemical trips have also gone way down," Schwarz
continued. "Not many people are using chemicals, such as
LSD and STP anymore because of the bad stuff they have
been getting."
He said the new and very urgent problem to be dealt
with now, is the ever increasing number of heroin addicts
in the city.
Schwarz said that there were approximately 26,000
known heroin addicts in the 10 years up to 1969. And
until 1969, 120 to 150 new addicts were coming in to the
Narcotics Addiction Foundation each year.
"But in 1969, the number of new cases had gone up
to 250, most of these being young people without records
and the numbers are still going up."
is debilitating to both men and women, that of a "mother
and sex partner to a man," she said.
Todd said women are bombarded by a set of myths
about themselves, those of dependency, inferiority, and
that many women accept this self image.
She said the building of the image begins in infancy
when girls are given dolls and frilly dresses, while boys are
given tools and encouraged to climb trees.
"By puberty a woman's success is seen in terms of
what her husband does and after the age of 25, in terms of
whether she gets a husband or not."
"Magazines like Seventeen and Vogue encourage girls
to see themselves as a saleable package to catch a man,"
said Todd.
Sheila Thomson, Director of Counselling at Douglas
College in New Westminster, stressed two aspects of the
role of women.
First, she said, women in elementary and secondary
schools have better pay than any other profession
dominated by men.
Secondly, she said women tend to look at their
educational obligations as limited to the classroom.
"Often, girls who couldn't do anything else, but were
nice and liked kids, became teachers."
Thomson says, "It isn't a question of male and female
roles, but rather a question of what it is to be a human
being."
Stronger laws
gladly' accepted
CALGARY (CUP) - Canadians are going to find the
doors closing on many of their freedoms in the future,
Edward Palk, president of the Northern Life Assurance
Company, said Wednesday.
He said he believes most Canadians will gladly accept
less personal and financial freedom in return for an end to
lawlessness, in the streets and poverty in the home.
Palk, of London, Ontario, was addressing a meeting
of the Calgary Life Underwriters' Association.
Palk said he feels, and he said public opinion polls
support him, that the average Canadian wants to see
stronger laws to deter violence.
Palk said that to help the poor a guaranteed annual
wage must come — and it must come soon.
"The poor in Canada can look and see over the fence
how the other half lives. If we don't give them a chance in
life they will start tearing that fence down. If we don't do
something now, we will lose everything," he said.
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Lutheran Student Movement Presents:
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Sunday, Nov. 22nd
Supper: 5:30 p.m.
6:45 p.m.: Dr. Mollerup
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Insurance is dull and
so are the people that sell it
This misconception has been circulating for years. It was
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favourite resort in Tahiti from becoming overcrowded.
We've heard somewhere around 168 misconceptions just like this one.
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ON CAMPUS NOVEMBER 30 & Dec. 1, 1970
Sturgeon's Law
'Ninety per cent of anything is crap!"
— Theodore Sturgeoa
Abstract
And as the man said, this could apply to
anything, including, one supposes, literary
magazines. Let it not be said, however, that
we do not go to all ends to bring about a
happy conjunction of ink and paper. Little
did we think, when we ran our request for
manuscripts in the last issue of Synch, that
we would receive such a deluge of mail from
such a great number of ersatz poets and
others.
That brings us back to the masthead
quote. Sadly, or perhaps not, it is a true
thing, this quote, and much of the material
we received was not usable for this very
reason.
But not all of the things we aren't
running this week are crap, and some of
them may appear in future issues. It's just
that a lot of what we received is not really
printable, and we therefore send out our
usual request for more manuscripts to all
you avid readers. Surely somewhere on this
campus is the writer of The Great Canadian
Poem or The Great Canadian Short Story.
So give us The Great Canadian — dear funky
Canada — Smile and send us some more
material.
We'd like to thank all the lovely weirdos
for their kinky requests and letters too.
The poems that did make it appear on
page four or five, while other writings appear
on three and seven. Also please take note of
readings, by two heavies of the literary
world, Basil Bunting, tonight at 8:30 in the
Music Auditorium, and Willis Barnstone,
Nov. 26 in Bu. 106. There are fuller notices
elsewhere in this issue.
-F. CAWSEY
EDITOR
Reading
THE ART OF TRANSLATION
By WILLIS BARNSTONE
Willis Barnstone, distinguished poet, editor, critic
and translator — a kind of literary howitzer — is coming
to UBC as one of the Koerner Lecturers for 1970-71.
On Thursday Nov. 26 in Buchanan 106, he will give
a talk titled The Art of Translation.
He will talk about translation as well as read from
his own work.
Mr. Barnstone is probably best known for his
achievements in the field of translation, having published
numerous books of poetry and fiction from modern
Greek, Spanish and the Classics. He was the general
editor of the authoritative text, Modern European
Poetry. Currently in preparation are Latin Lyric Poetry,
the works of Antonio Machado, and new selections from
Spanish and European poetry. His own books of poetry
have been widely acclaimed, and From This White Island
(1960) was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He is the
editor of a book of concrete poetry.
Some of the magazines and anthologies in which he
has appeared as poet, critic or translator are: Prairie
Schooner, Tulane Drama Review, Antioch Review, The
New Yorker, The New York Times, The Nation, and The
New York Review of Books.
Willis Barnstone was born in 1927. He is presently
teaching at Indiana University after having returned
from extensive travels in Greece and Spain.
All welcome. Admission free. Thursday Nov. 26,
Bu. 106.
aynch 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970 Poetry
Friendship and Candles
A flame
steady, silent.
Assured of itself,
and as confident
as I am of you.
Slender strength,
coated in warmth
and topped by unwavering calm
reflects in your quiet eyes
like latent love.
As you reach out to me
the candle inclines
and the flame pauses
to light another.
dlcx
The Poetry Reading
Darkened room
people
smoking on the floor
are
uncomfortable.
He stands
reading,
shadowed eyes of owls
seeing us and
knowing,
seeing above us and
walking
on a different floor.
Concert hands
direct
the sounds,
river-like
flowing.
But you sit there
claiming
my mind
demanding
my thought
as I watch
you
there.
I look at him
but he cannot
claim me
as you have
drawing from me
a pressing awareness
ofyour
curly-haired presence.
I look at him
but unseeing
and he shimmers
into transparency
as you sit
unconscious
of
me.
oisdc
(Alex Volkoff is a fourth year English Major. She has just
returned from a year-long travelling scholarship around the
world.)
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Friday, November 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
synch 3 Feedback
What I Would Like To Do
This is what I would like to do;
to place a note on my door, saying,
"Back in 5 minutes", and then leave,
perhaps having dinner somewhere else,
and, upon returning late that evening
and finding someone sitting outside
my door, say to that person,
"Have you been waiting long?"
~$hanL (Dickin,
o
z
As they walked through the musky
Air,
He coughed and said it's sad.
The war in Atlantis.
Yeah, she coughed the seaweed is all dying
Off.
The fish and the
People
Too.
But I love you and you've got a good job.
And our children will have a good home.
It's below the sea anyway.
Qakin, White.
Conspiracy
Smoke, menthol cool, flusters on her lips
forming the ghostly shapes of her final reply.
The holocaustic legions join her hair,
which she combs, in ephemeral contact
with the dark closing of midnight. Her voice,
distant, precise, grinds out some eternal theme
about all tomorrows, then fades indistinctly
into the swamp of surreal purple lips,
stolen from some magazine.
I watch the ritual, the betrayal, helpless
in all senses; weeping for her innocent forms,
still free somewhere in the garret mirror,
while she summons the beauty cauldrons,
wild with boiling, proclaiming tomorrow's plan.
And I and the moon are silent, shackled prisoners
on some ancient island bed, drunk with protest
and memory of her, once nearly perfect beauty.
While she climbs in the waiting chariot
with some strange body. MURDER, I scream.
(bsmnitu Shown,
The Street
Speaking only with my mouth,
I inquired about her health
And she answered "Fine".
The weather was pleasing, she added.
We parted and I heard the
Same words as I passed another
Couple.
OnqpUtde,
This Man Is Crazy
Last year in the USA
Several tunafish sandwiches ago
There lived a boy under, a lamp
Sailing his funny boat
He braved many waves, some of
which made him sick
Mostly tuned into television
By way of the milkbucket express
He soon had a whole bucketful of
friends
Who told him what to do
The morning ramp opened up
Gene Autry shot himself
The land of cotton was forgotten
And this boy wound up with the
Dean of Women
Now Colonel Speck offers Chubby Chicken
And I'm trying to write good poetry
I've never been east of Chilliwack
Super groups offer diversion
Does planned parenthood ignore perversion?
Alice Cooper vs. Winston Churchill
Morbid destruction of the huladancers
I have observed in my short lifetime
Marion Anderson was not my idea
I take absolutely no blame or credit
For Marion Anderson.
THoifuiAfuk.
(All the words on this page were submitted by people after
the last issue of Synch; including Oegjerde and Motherfish.
The submissions appear exactly as submitted except for
spelling corrections where necessary.)
synch 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970 Feedback
Impressions
Take advantage of me and I'm yours
But don't and I'll laugh at you from a long way off
Take advantage of me and have a ball
But don't and I'll smile sweetly but snicker under my breath
Take advantage of me and tell all your friends
But don't and I'll tell mine
Take advantage of me and live the life
But don't and I'll make you feel low
Take advantage of me and I'm yours
But don't and I'll take advantage of you
Because I'm a woman!
- Th. 5034699
(This poem was written by a guy who doesn't want his
name published.)
City Nowhere
cold steel, hard steel
reaching up
yet the people
still walk on the ground
mountains, water
fairy tale buildings
and holes
for the Alices
air intruded, nature uprooted
natural sights, commercial lights
depression
regression _  .
(Written by a second year arts student who says he/she
writes under the name Courtney.)
Let Me Catch Your Mind
the mutual flow
between mind and mind
with fusion from the separate
to the united - while
drifting through endless time
but it is a second
"Never" is like unknown
"with" is not realized til late
but when "there and gone"
that's the deepest falling depth
to which the mind falls
If your mind is ever falling
let me catch it — for
this depth is not unknown
I've been that path before
if you drift on by I will
try to catch the flow
then minds are one
there is the mutual flow
between mind and mind
we have a fusion from
the depth of hours
to spaces of seconds
within bonded minds
we are outside lookin in
please let it be
(If this has any value to you and you use it, my number is
6015 697 - names mean nothing, so do not sign it)
Dear Synch:
Words cannot express the tender,
passionate feeling I have for you. 'Till now I
have worshipped you from afar, being too
shy to give voice to my undying love. We are
opposites, you and I, but my infinite longing
for you will surpass this. I live for the
moments I hold you in my hands, my eyes
gently caressing your subtle coloring, your
graceful lines, and your smoothness, your
fine texture.
I feared that our romance would
continue 'til eternity as a one-sided, futile
affair. Can you imagine the joy I felt when
you asked; when you begged me to write to
you. Last Friday my world was coming
down around me.
I felt lower than a snake's belly. And
then I found out you cared. Your personal
note, addressed to me in glowing capitals,
lifted my spirits to new, unexplored heights.
You said that you would be mine for a year,
and all I ever dared hoped for was a few
minutes a week, a few minutes that would
release me and send me to the heights that I
love you.
Au revoir
Yours forever
Bob Greenhalgh
No. 1662707
Science I
P.S. Same time, same place next Friday. I
love you.
(Ed Note: Wow, Bob, we're real glad you
like us. This is the first, the very first love
letter we've received, and we will treasure it
always. We could tell you were sincere. But
about those poems you sent with the letter,
Bob, they were ... well not quite up to the
literary standards you set in your letter so
we printed your letter. Thanks, sweetheart.)
Friday, November 20, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
synch 5 YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
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Review
(Love in a Burning Building by Al Purdy, McClelland
& Stewart Toronto 1970), $4.95,88 pp.)
The dust jacket of this book has nipples. They
are lovely. The poems in this book also have nipples.
Some are lovely; some are not. But this isn't a
collection of romantic-erotic love poems. "It isn't just
the euphoric dreams of lovers I want to evoke," says
Purdy in his preface, "it's the ridiculosity inherent in
the whole comic disease."
This would seem to be a long cry from Poems for
All the Annettes, but it isn't. Love' is full of
middle-aged window shoppers, Neacherthals that
snarl happily, impermanent husbands, ex-wives and
wives, girl friends, prostitutes, and jolly old millers
with warts on their noses. But perhaps the most
telling figure among the personae wanders in
supermarkets of "candy bars and wire music." He
sees a middle-aged woman gushing out of her blouse
and leans over his shopping cart to chat something
"doctors have no cure for."
But in many ways, the book is a Purdy
broadcloth. There are several older poems which,
although they've undergone revision, don't seem to
have been tenderized that much. "Poem of One of
the Annettes", "Home-Made Beer", and "Helping My
Wife Get Supper", for example, haven't been touched
at all. But maybe that's good. They're fine Purdy
stand-bys of sentimental, satiric humor. On the other
hand, newer poems like "Dog With Fleas" and
"Letters of Marque" show signs that the Purdy
landscape is getting darker. But the texture of these
poems and of the book in general, is uneven. Purdy's
diction and tone shift so rapidly that it becomes
difficult to reconile "her cunt is frozen gold" in "Side
Effect" with "didst thou then old Owen hear the
robins" of the next poem, "Music on a Tombstone".
Yet this shifting has always existed in Purdy's work,
and although it's no excuse, the confusion is bearable
when you come to lines like these in "After the
Miscarriage":
My dear now
on of your monthly children
the May one
veersJo a different calendar
where all the ghosts of ourselves
impossible lovers
are being born
In the end, it's a book in which men and women
claw their way through the geography of years. Sun
and moon collide, and at times you are left with
"poems that land/ with little jumps in your mind/ the
places where your eyes are like crushed gold foil."
-R. W. STEDINGH
synch 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970 African Proverbs
When the fool is told a
explained to him.
What is said over the dea<
him alive.
Little by little grow the bani
* * *
Cactus is bitter only to him who
A fool looks tor dung where the cow never browsed.
* * *
One who recovers from sickness, forgers aboatiQed.-
* *  * i ■,    ..;-
When the heail overflows, it comejout Uimiigh tfee'mouth.
« * *
If one is not in a hurry, even an egg Wjlt Start walking.
***■•.
A crab does, not beget a bird. fc,-'.
* * * ■ '
One i.din 1 dues not make fun of the other camel's tiwmp.
* * * j
I >>> nut hi. the man who is carrying you that he stinfcs.
* * *
An iii idiligent enemy is better than a stupid friend.   -
* * * '■. ,
A tern ute can dp not hing to stone saw lick it
* * * .■..■
Copvuii «ser} bod> else all-me time, me monkey-too* day
cut jii» throat.
(African Proverbs; Peter fiauper fassvN&w ¥«ric; Sty
Reading
Basil Bunting, author of seven volumes of poetry, and
well-known man of letters will read his poem Briggflatts
tonight in the auditorium of the music building at 8:30.
Bunting has been a visiting lecturer at UBC in the English
Department since September, and tonight's reading is
sponsored by the Koerner Foundation, The Vancouver Poetry
Centre, The Canada Council and the UBC Faculty of Arts.
Bunting has long been a friend of Ezra Pound, and was
also friends in his earlier days, with T. S. Eliot, James Joyce
and Ford Maddox Ford.
Of Bunting's poetry, one critic has said: "His poems are
the most important which have appeared in any form of the
English language since T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land.
ODES 22
Mesh cast for mackerel
by guess and the sheen's tremor,
imperceptible if you haven't the knack —
a difficult job,
hazardous and seasonal;
many shoals all of a sudden,
it would tax the Apostles to take the lot;
then drowse for months,
nets on the shingle,
a pint in the tap.
Likewise the pilchards come unexpectedly,
startle the man on the cliff.
Remember us to the teashop girls.
Say we have seen no legs better than theirs,
we have the sea to stare at,
its treason, copiousness, tedium.
1932
One of the
Most Useful Books on Campus
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Buy Your Copy Today
at THE BOOKSTORE
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AMS PUBLICATIONS & BUS. OFFICE
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And  Introducing Eleanor Rigbey
ii
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LICHT SHOW—LORD MAUDS LEY CIRCUS
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TICKETS $3.00, $4.00, $3.00
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE, 6S3-3255,
ALL EATON'S STORES (CHARGE THEM)
AND ALL BRANCHES. 10 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.
Friday, November 20, 1970
THE      U BYSSEY
synch 7 Books Received
THE AFTERPEOPLE, a patheticon by George
Payerle, a recent M.A. graduate of the UBC
Creative Writing Department. Payerle, 25, lives and
writes in Vancouver.
Afterpeople is Payerle's first novel, a collage
of witty parables of the modern consciousness yet
from a bleak vision of life.
Michael Yates, UBC poet-in-residence,
describes the book as . . . "a new kind of fiction
by a new kind of writer in Canada — dear Canada
whose novelists' and storywriters' forms are still
snoring in the graves of naturalism and realism
with Hauptmann and Zola. This little book, like
truth, should be assigned to your students are
hidden from your children.
(Anansi, paperback $2.50, part of the
spiderline series.)
HOW DO I LOVE THEE
Edited by John Robert Colombo
More fertile ideas from the mind of Canada's
"literary lieutenant." Colombo has contacted 60
poets of Canada (and Quebec) and asked them to
select their favorite poem from their own work,
and introduce it. The results, as one might suspect,
are a gas. Some of the introductions are priceless
little gems in themselves. Others make you wonder
just what kind of guy the poet is. Included are all
the heavies, and a lot of the not-so-heavies. Some
are (in no particular order): Leonard Cohen,
Margarent Atwood, Eli Mandel, Earle Birney,
George Jonas, George Bowering, Dorothy Livesay,
J. Michael Yates, b.p. Nichol, Milton Acorn,
George Woodcock, etc., etc...
(Published by M. G. Hurtig; Edmonton;
$2.95; paperback.)
A wealth of little insights about poets and
their poetry.
SONGS OF THE SEA WITCH
By SUSAN MUSGRAVE
The first book of poems by a very sensitive
young woman from Vancouver Island. It recreates
the passions, the sorrows annd joys of a young
girl's experiences on the rough west coast of the
Island. Available at the UBC Bookstore, Duthies
and the Creative Writing Department in South
Brock.
(Published by The Sono Nis Press; $5.00;
hardbound.)
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Help clean, clear and revitalize your
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Just try Tampax tampons and
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Contest closes December 15. 1970.
Winners will be asked a skill-testing question
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25 locations to serve you
A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Fortes. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will  provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
• SEA OPERATIONS •  AIR OPERATIONS
•  LAND OPERATIONS •  ENGINEERING
•  SUPPORT SERVICES
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
Why not ask one who serves?
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St. - Vancouver
THE CANADIAN
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synch  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20,  1970 Friday, November 20,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
CIVIC ELECTIONS
PART FIVE
Campbell's record bared
By JIM DAVIES
"What can I say, really. Let the record speak
for itself."
The speaker - Tom Campbell. The occasion -
The Non-Partisan Association's nominating
convention of three weeks ago at which Campbell
was once again selected to represent the NPA as its
mayoral candidate.
».       All right Tom, let's look at the record.
Campbell, of the three persons in the mayoralty
race - TEAM's Bill Gibson and NDP's Tony
Gargrave — has the greatest degree of experience in
Vancouver civic politics.
He first ran for office in 1960, seeking the
office of mayor. The issue which prompted him to
challenge the other candidates as an independent
was a personal one — the city wouldn't let him paint
_ his highrise apartment building green.
The city refused his request because they said
the highrise, at the corner of Burrard and Cornwall,
was in too prominent a position for such a paint-job
to be in the city's interests.
So, Campbell decided that the only way he
could fight such short-sightedness would be to fight
from within. However, his election bid was
unsuccessful.
In 1961, he tried again, this time for alderman.
Once again he ran as an independent, but this time
he was successful.
At that time, Campbell was bitter opponent of
the NPA. He termed that organization "a political
machine without parallel in city politics' "and
warned Vancouver citizens to beware its "naked
power in action."
i This marked the beginning of his very
successful, though sometimes stormy, political
career as a Vancouver city councillor.
He attained the mayor's position in 1966,
running as an independent against the NPA's Bill
Rathie. The margin of victory was small, but
Campbell was in.
It was at the next Vancouver civic elections in
1968 that he made an abrupt political about-face,
This term's social notes ...
January, 1969 - Campbell plays a first aid
attendant     in     the     National     Ballet
production, The Nutcracker. His 30-second
part    saw    him    carrying    a    wounded
gingerbread off stage.
"Maybe a whole new career is opening up
for me," he says.
March — Takes Hawaiian holiday to recover
from ulcer.
April - Announces he eats six meals a day.
May — Triggers a one-ton steel ball to complete
demolition of block 52.
June  -  Proves  Vancouver  beaches  are  not
polluted by taking a 15 minute dip at
Kitsilano.
July - Has pay raised to $20,000 by council
vote.
September     -     Offers    $2    to    Canadian
government    for    the    aircraft    carrier
Bonaventure.
December - Inherits over $93,000 following
his father's demise.
January, 1970 — Decides he may not run again.
"Maybe it's time someone else took over
the reins," he concedes.
February - Plays a ship's steward in the Queen
"Elizabeth theatre presentation - A Village
Wooing. Says afterward: "It's not King
Lear but it's a start."
May — Takes civic jaunt to Tokyo, Yokohama,
and points east.
June — Floats around Vancouver harbor
standing atop the mini-sub Pisces II,
speaking all the while. "Hey, there's
nothing to this at all," be beams.
August - Standing atop a 150-foot replica of
Lions Gate Bridge, Campbell flips a switch
lighting up 3,000 bulbs on the bridge to
begin the "Vancouver I Love You"
celebrations.
October — Finds out his income tax returns
were incorrect.
November - Tells NPA members to "look at
the record," Nobody laughs.
running as the NPA mayoral candidate, representing
the civic party he had denounced just two years
before.
His opponent this time was former Burnaby
mayor Allan Emmott who was running on a TEAM
slate as head of that newly-formed civic party.
You are all familiar with the results. Campbell
whipped Emmott, sweeping through on a high crest
of popularity in the east end polls.
After his election in 1968, Campbell was asked
who he would have most feared as an opponent.
"Allan McGavin," was his reply, referring to the
bakery owner and now chancellor of UBC who had
resisted considerable pressure to run.
Campbell, in a subsequent conversation with a
reporter, indicated that he thought there was some
way that he could have been upset by Emmott.
Campbell: "I'll tell you what Emmott should
have done. He should have come in here and said he
would run the Georgia Straight right out of town.
He could have won the election."
Reporter: "Yes Mr. Mayor, but you milked that
hippie thing for all it was worth."
Campbell: "Oh yes, I milked it. That's why I
got in. The little old ladies."
Reporter: "You mean the tennis shoe vote?"
Campbell: "Sure. The tennis shoe vote. That's
what did it."
Here are some of the mayor's thoughts on a few
of the issues which he was considered relevant
during his latest term ...
Rapid Transit — "Get me another level of
government. I can't do it. I don't know where the
money's coming from for the committments we've
got now. I mean, we've got this First Narrows
crossing — I'm sure that's $50 million.
"Rapid transportation? I don't want to touch
it. B.C. Hydro owns the system. We're in a very
fortunate position there. They are a political
creature. When there's sufficient pressure brought to
bear, it will be brought on by them — not by me."
Riot Sticks — "I think the police should have
an edge. If the police are properly equipped it is
unlikely there would be trouble. These are trying
times in very large cities. You can't say it won't
happen in Vancouver."
Beaches — "Would you believe they have set up
tents and clothes lines down there? Let them move
out of town. They will when things get as
uncomfortable as they can get.
"They're not going to be sleeping much — we're
going to clean up in the city."
Hitch-hiking — "It might be a clean-cut kid
you're'picking up but he could have a bicycle chain
in his pocket. A holiday today is a luxury and if you
can't afford bus fare, you can't afford a holiday."
"Young people would be far better off if they
stayed at home and tried to get work there."
Police Wrings — "The crime rate shows we are
short handed. Off duty policemen have to work
overtime to cope with hoodlums. It isn't fair. We are
losing the fight against crime.
"I believe the citizens of Vancouver want an
effective police force and are prepared to pay the
additional cost."
Police wages - A wage increase of $118 a
month over 22 months was termed by Campbell
"an outrageous settlement.
"I'm stunned. It's almost one per cent per
month," he said.
Hostels — Campbell expressed concern that
Vancouver was becoming "a draft dodger, deserter
and hippie haven.
"All I can say to these people is you're not
welcome here, there are no jobs so don't come
looking, and ! any bum that comes to Vancouver
will get the bum's rush.
"The hostels attract these people here, they get
a handout, and then they stay and go on welfare
when there's no work for them."
War Measures Act — "If I can use it... I will
use it.
"I would suggest that draft dodgers had better
start dodging. Get out of here boy, because we're
going to pick you up.
"I will use the power if that goes through. If
these people are in here and aren't prepared to
support their own government or this government I
would pick them up, and if I could I would send
them home, even if they aren't welcome."
TOM CAMPBELI	
His Worship the Mayor
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
Popping The Pill is the answer
— sandy kass photo
THE BIRDS AND THE BEES never had it this good agreed those in attendance at Monday's PEOPLE
seminar. Taking time off from their group grope long enough to hear Dr. John Dickinson speak on
contraception, approximately 1,000 students relax on SUB ballroom floor.
nursing four babies at the same "These calculations are usually
time showed on the screen. ma(je over a period of at least six
By SANDY KASS
Monday night's People was
indeed something else. If you had
come expecting another mass
mangle mob or encounter
entanglement you would have
been disappointed.
However, if you had wanted to
study recreation without
procreation, you came to the right
place.
Of the contraception methods
Dr. John Dickinson
describedjactation has the highest
rate of pregnancy with an
effectiveness of 60 pregnancies
per 100 women per year (hundred
women years) using this method.
"The rumor that nursing a
child will idecrease chances of
pregnancy is a mere myth, and
anyone using this method should
be strongly advised not to," said
Dickinson.
Slides
talked.
A    slide
were   presented   as  he
of   Fertile   Myrtle
A douche, or waggery wash out
has an effectiveness of 41
pregnancies per hundred woman
years, but Dickinson described
this method as highly illogical and
purely irrational.
A slide showed Fertile Myrtle
balancing precariously on a tall
upward spray of liquid.
The rhythm method is
probably the most commonly
used, said Dickinson.
"However, it is most
commonly used incorrectly," he
said.
Safe days, he said, are
calculated by finding the
difference between the number of
days in the longest and shortest
menstrual cycles, and adding
eight.
This number marks the end of
the sale period, which begins at
the number of days of the
shortest cycle minus 19, after the
beginning of the menstrual period.
Senate rejects ban
on in-class exams
By JOHN GIBBS
A move to force professors to
make more use of scheduled
Christmas and spring exams was
rejected Wednesday by UBC's
senate.
Instead, the motion that would
have prohibited "official" in-class
and take-home exams in the two
weeks prior to scheduled exam
periods, was referred to individual
faculties, who were instructed to
discuss the proposal with their
respective   student organizations.
Any decisions made by
faculties will not take effect until
the spring examination period, at
the earliest.
The motion was intended to
thwart an ever-increasing number
of professors who avoid the use of
formally scheduled Christmas
exams during the official period —
this year Dec. 14 to 22 - by
giving informal but "official"
end-of-term exams during the last
two weeks of classes.
The increasing frequency of
such exams puts undue pressure
on students, who skip classes to
study and therefore reduces the
effectiveness of the last two weeks
as a lecture period, said phys ed
director R. F. Osborne, who
sponsored the motion.
The motion brought senators
from their chairs for more than a
half hour of spirited debate during
the three-hour meeting.
"There are many ways to
examine a student and this
(proposal) is an unwarranted
intrusion on the freedom of
faculty to examine their classes,"
political science head Walter
Young told senate.
"Freedom works both ways,"
retorted classics head Malcolm
McGregor. "Professors in other
courses holding in-class exams
interfere with my freedom to
continue normal instruction in the
normal way."
Economics professor Gideon
Rosenbluth said that if senate
passed the motion "it's going to
simply be ignored by the
professors.
"Ifstudents absent themselves
from some classes to prepare for
exams, well that's too bad. If you
want to make it compulsory for
students to attend class, that's a
different piece of legislation,"'
Rosenbluth said.
Senate eventually agreed the
edict probably couldn't be
enforced, and decided to inform
professors of the problems created
when in-class exams are
scheduled, but leave it up to the
faculties to decide on any formal
regulations.
months," said Dickinson.
Effectiveness of this method is
cited at 38.5 per hundred woman
years.
Withdrawl or coitus
interruptus, is the last method
Dickinson described which has no
initial cost.
The effectiveness of this
method is 16.8 per hundred
woman years, but the method is
not     deemed     to     be     highly
acceptable to either partner.
A slide showed Fertile Myrtle
sound asleep with her hubby
sitting up in bed beside her -
flaming green.
The diaphram and jelly method
is one of the more expensive,
costing initially $7.50, but,
according to Dickinson, is
probably one of the best.
Its effectiveness is 14.5 per
hundred woman years.
A condom, more confusedly
termed English leather or French
safe was described by one man as
"taking a bath with your socks
on."
Its effectiveness is 14 per
hundred woman years, and costs
initially $3 to $4.
Vaginal foam, Dickinson said,
is one of the best with an
effectivenss of 7.5, and initial cost
of $2.
"The problem is just learning
to use it," Dickinson said.
A slide showed Fertile Myrtle
swimming in a sea of foam.
"The ideal contraceptive is an
intrauterine device," Dickinson
said.
The device, costs about $10
and has an effectivenss of 1.3 per
hundred woman years.
The   last  and  most  effective
(100 per cent if used correctly)
method Dickinson mentioned was
the Pill.
The Pill costs about $2.50 a
month,     and     according    to
Dickinson   is   seven   times  safer.
than pregnancy, and four times
safer than smoking.
He added that it may produce
severe migraines, thyroids,
emotional depression,
pre-menstural bloating, irregular
bleeding and a gain of weight, but
said chances of a woman occurring
any of these reactions is very
slight, and not significant enough
to worry about.
The Pill works by directly
inhibiting ovulation of the egg,
because it simulates pregnancy,
Dickinson said.
He said abortions are becoming
more readily available and cannot
endanger the woman, if
performed correctly by a qualified
physician using proper facilities.
He said basically he did not
approve of sterilization because of
its permanency.
He said the process is readily
available, but generally is not
done when a person is young.
Next Monday night, Sun
columnist Bob Hunter will be
speaking on Womb Envy (huh?) at
7:00 p.m. in the SUB Ballroom.
Especially
for you...
This ring was designed
with young people in
mind.
1/2ct.   $250.00
FIRBANK'S HAS CREATED A SERIES OF CONTEMPORARY y2CT.
DIAMOND RINGS, TO SUIT THE FASHIONS OF TODAY. THEY ARE
PRICED REMARKABLY LOW AND CARRY ROBERT FIRBANK'S
PERSONAL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.
^v'rirbanks
University location at 4517 West 10th Ave.
DOWNTOWN - PARK ROYAL - BRENTWOOD Friday, November 20,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Meditation fulfilling
says jazz genius
By KEN LASSESEN
Trancendental Meditation can
fulfil a person said Paul.Horn, a
"Jazz Genius from L.A." to a
doubting crowd of 400 people in
SUB ballroom, Thursday noon.
The silver tongued speaker
delivered a talk on trancendental
meditation with such
commanding force that it was
hard not to accept what he said
whole-hog.-
Horn said, "Bitterness and
anger arises through man's lack of
fulfilment.
"This bitterness transfers from
the man to his family, to his town
to his province, to his country and
then the whole world."
He then said transcendental
mieditation could fulfil a person.
A member of the audience
stood up and said, "I found
nothing."
"I just sat there and found
myself repeating this meaningless
word over and over again. I got
extremely bored."
Earlier, Horn said simple, naive
people were the most susceptible
to Transcendental Meditation.
**dM
HORN ... naive most susceptible
there was an increase in price.
"Five years ago a friend of
mine was initiated for the cost of
$5, many people were initiated
for free. Three years ago another
friend of mine was initiated for a
cost of $15, today the cost is $25.
"Would you mind explaining
why there has been a price
increase?"
Another   person   asked   why        After  carefully  side  stepping
the question, Horn said, "We
cracked down on those who are
initiated for free, there was just
too many, after all the centre
needs money to survive.
"But forget about the money,
the thing we are interested in is
spiritual, so let's drop the
subject."
The same person asked a
second question," I went back to
them and they said my trouble
was that I needed a new word.
"They said they would
re-initiate me for $25. Could you
explain this in relation to your
statement that there is no cost
after the original initiation fee."
Horn said, "I don't know
about this, I will have to talk to
the people here first before
answering."
"Transcendental meditation
grew from 6 people to over
40,000 people in the US in just
under four years," said Horn.
Another person then said, "I
and 73 other friends have dropped
meditation. I would like to know
what percentage of the 40,000
dropped meditation."
No answer was forthcoming,
only rhetoric.
Police  immune to criticism
because of internal structure'
Police and courts serve the
ruling and propertied people of
Vancouver.
This was the opinion of UBC
law school graduate Stuart Rush
and Dave Mossop, a young
Vancouver lawyer. They spoke to
about 75 students Wednesday in
SUB ballroom.
Rush, who is articling for the
Rankin, Dean and Robertson law
firm, spoke from his experience in
dealing with police in Vancouver.
"Police are mainly involved in
defending private property," the
said.
"Unlawful assemblies are
declared on the fear that private
property may be damaged."
Rush also said the structure of
the police force leaves it immune
to public attack.
"There are no mechanisms of
civil control over the police.
"There is only internal control
over police discipline but I doubt
that this means much in actual
practice."
Rush said he was in favor of
community control over the
police.
^ Mossop spoke about the courts
in B.C. citing the three court
levels and using specific judges as
examples.
"The judiciary is also
associated with the power
structure," he said.
"On the first level is
magistrates court. Les Bewley is
one of the judges on this body.
"Bewley probably got his
position by Socred contacts of
which he has many," Mossop said
"In the B.C. supreme court,
the next level, one of the most
prominent justices is Chief Justice
Thomas Dohm who had land in
Shaughnessy."
Mossop said that he is doubtful
if Dohm could have any
appreciation of the minority
groups because of his social
background.
"In the court of appeal, the
highest court, we have Justice
Nathan Nemetz who arbitrated
the IWA (International
Woodworkers of America) dispute
this summer," Mossop pointed
out.
"Nemetz is former president of
the UBC board of governors,
trustee of the Sherwood-Lett
foundation and president of the
Canadian Jewish Congress.
"These are fine qualifications
for someone who represents
management, but not for someone
who could possibly identify with
workers' struggles," said Mossop.
The discussion was part of the
Community Education Research
Centre program on campus.
UNIVERSITY
SHELL SERVICE
PETER LISSACK
(__________*)
FIAT
Repairs and Service
Specialists
. Specializing in
Electronic Tune-Ups
Disc Brakes — Exhaust Control
/ 1 Years in This Location
4314 W. 10 Ave.        224-0828
8 a.m. classes?
Do you like the idea of 8 a.m. classes? Would you like a say
in the curriculum of your courses? Do you have any
overwhelming academic problems or even any little itchy ones?
Then hustle your bod down to the student senators' office
in SUB 100B and voice your gripes and visions. You are part
owner along with 22,000 other students of twelve hard working
senators who are anxious to help you.
Drop in and talk, or phone 228-4385 between 8:30 and
12:00 or 2:00 to 4:30. Messages welcome anytime.
New student charters
to  Europe for Xmas
By THOM WESCOTT
Tired of Vancouver?
If you want to leave you can save money by leaving on a Western
Student Services charter flight.
WSS has been formed by the student governments of the four
western provinces to arrange charter flights for university students.
Until last yeaf the charter flights for UBC students has been
arranged by the UBC Alma Mater Society. By joining the other twelve
universities in WSS they can offer a greater variety of destinations and
flight dates.
Of the 25 flights planned this year 13 leave from Vancouver and
the others from Edmonton, Calgary and Winnipeg. UBC students can
leave from any of these airports.
Most of the flights are to London, but during June there will be
flights to Tokyo, Hong Kong and Sydney.
There are three other flights with other destinations, during the
Christmas break. The most reasonable is fifteen days in Toronto for
$139. The others are Hawaii for $215 and Amsterdam for $269.
There is still time to book onto any of these flights.
For those of you who would like to spend more than a couple
months away from Vancouver, there are seven one way charters to
Europe.
If you're afraid you would have nothing to do in Europe, WSS
can sell you any one of many package tours from several companies or
a convenient unlimited travel rail pass.
If you'd rather work, they can put you in touch with
employment agencies, or at least tell you where to look for one at
International House.
WSS has its UBC office in room 237-B of SUB and is open every
afternoon from 1:30 to 4:30. Room 237-B is hidden with CYVR in a
little corridor in the upper eastern corner of SUB.
Tfcnsar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4th. avenue
WHERE ALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
* OIL CAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
EVOL
* THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 2.0's
DANCE to the updated music
of THE BROTHERHOOD
* DIRTY SAL'S
Contemporary elegance for a
quiet mood . . . with
ELMER GILL
* Early Evening Entertainment
4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Admission C 4 ,00
Mnns. thru Thorn,
ONLY	
I"
752 THURL0W ST. 683-7306
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD:
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. - Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
the collector
the collector
the collector
from John Fowles' novel
with
Terence Stamp
Samantha Eggar
TONIGHT and SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:30
SUB FILM SOC
presentation
the collector sunday n°v- 22
7 PM
the collector
SUB AUDITORIUM
AMS - 5<X
Others - 75* Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
FRIDAY
HILLEL
Meeting at noon in Hillel House.
CATHOLIC   NEWMAN   CENTRE
Practise for folk Mass at noon in St.
Mark's College.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Meeting with Prof and Student from
Social Work at noon in SUB 105B.
AIESEC
Meeting at noon in SUB 105A.
voc
Meeting in SUB 14 at noon.
'tween
classes
FOLK DANCE
Dancing at noon in SUB Ballroom.
SIMS
Group   Meditation   at  noon  in   Angus
410.
SKY   DIVING
Party in SUB  207-209 at  8:30.
VCF
Nigel Goodwin on 'Beatles Revisited"'
at noon in SUB Art.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Film in Chem 250 at noon.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Meeting    at    noon    in    International
House.
SATURDAY
NOTRE DAME ALUMNI
Booze up   at   Austin   Hotel   Pub   at   3
P.m.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Party in Party Room at 8:30.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Folk Mass at 11:30 a.m. in St. Mark's
Chapel.
MONDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Spanish Singing  at  noon in  Rm.   402
International House.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
NOW!
* D.B. Tuxedos
* Notched S.B. Tuxedos
* Shawl Tuxedos
* D.B. Blazers
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
FOR GOOD FOOD
At Prices
You Can Afford
-o-weavo
THE DINER
4556 West 10th
Phone 224-1912
Ends Sunday Nite
Marx Bros. Go West
STARTS MON.
The Original (1932)
TARZAN THE APEMAN
Johnny Weismuller
Maureen O'Sullivan
MON. NITE
FREE ADMISSION
with article of food for charity
UBC   PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION  GROUP
Meeting   at   8   p.m.   in   extension   of
Biological Sciences Bldg. 2449.
TUESDAY
LUCIFER'S  AND   FELLOW   DEVILS
Meeting at 13 p.m. in Hades 666.
PRE-MED
Meeting at noon in Wesbrook 100.
SAILING   CLUB
Meeting in Bu.  104 at noon.
UBC THEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting in SUB 211  at noon;  all interested persons welcomed.
E ft B RESTAURANT
4423 W. 10th Ave.
OPEN 24 HOURS
FULL SERVICES
SPECIAL
For All UBC Students
15c Off On The $
THE MALT BAR '
GOOD FOOD AT STUDENT
PRICES
Soup, Malt, Sandwiches
Good Coffee—10c
•
A Free Cup of Coffee
With This Coupon
2920 W. Broadway
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
m^^mzmm
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
NOW...
choose
CONTACT
LENSES
in 27 colors
A better choice than ever
... 3 shades of blue or green
even intriguing new lavender
er olso cot's eye brown, blue,
ezure,  grey  or  pink.
• PRECISION MADE
• EXPERTLY FITTED
• 27 COLORS
ONE PRICE ONLY
$49
50
tome in. No Appointment Needed
BRING
YOUR
OPTICAL
PRESCRIPTION
TO
US
OPTICAL DEPT.
»   6*7   GRANVILLE
681-6174
• 675 COLUMBIA, NEW WEST.
LA   1-0751
• 1835  LONSDALE,  N. VAN.
987-2264
• 2987 GRANVILLE at 14th
736-7347
• 4068 E. HASTINGS. N. BUR.
(Across from Wosk's)
291-8491
• 5618 CAMBIE ST.
327-9451
• 1320 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA,
B.C.    386-7578
•   165 STATION ST., DUNCAN, B.C.
746-4322
•HttMB
•■ '-mm
(fat*, 1 <l«n/ $1.0% 2 4/mft $1,7$..
IriJife ttteMomtt titm 3<kf .4 4tayi»frik* «l 41,
ft..
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
NOV. 20 9-1 IN SUB BALLROOM
to  Sunshine  11.25  per person.
DIG SANTANA BS&T CHICAGO!
hear Stronghold; Sat. Nov 21 SUB
Ballroom 8:30-12:30. Another CVC
production.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST: ONE IMITATION - SPOKE
hubcap for '70 Camaro, possibly
on 16th extension. Phone 876-
9417.    	
LADIES TIMEX ELECTRIC
Watch. lO.k gold case. Black
suede band. Reward. Telephone
321-1137.	
JEFFREY'S HAND-MADE MAGIC
Book missing from SUB Gallery
Nov.   15.  Please  Return.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
STUDENT    ENCOUNTER    GROUP
forming. Phone 228-8164.
SKI INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mfn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included. See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14, Grnd. fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., Wed. and
Fri. noon.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
Valuy Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat, till 7 p.m.
TIRED OF TACTFUL T-GROUPS.
Tired of subtle pressures to be
polite, rude or 'real' ? Come and
enjoy a short weekend of uninhibited spontaneity. For further
information call 736-5751 before
noon.
THE MOON: MEN DATING MEN
Association. Wide choice of dates.
Fully confidential. Legally approved. Tel. 733-8754 or Box 3835, Van.
B.C.	
LEARN  TO  SKI  AT
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transpor-
taion; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver  9.  Tel.  738-3128.	
THIS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE.
William Wyler's "THE COLLECTOR." Almost a love story. Fri.
& Sat., 7:00, 9:30, Sun., 7:00. AMS
50c,   Non-AMS   75c.   Nov.   20-22:	
CELEBRATE WITH US AT THE
opening of Altamira, Leather
Craft & Gallery, 3611 W. Broad-
way.   Saturday,   Nov.   21st.	
DISCOVERY NIGHT AT GESTALT
House Tonite. 2260 Wesbrook.
Sensitivity,      Awareness,      Music,
 FrieTids.  8 p.m.  Call 224-9665.
APPLE AND STONE FOLK AND
Blues Festival. Tonight in SUB
Party Rom at 8:00 p.m. Only $1.
Admission guarantees you a great
evening.	
FIRESIDE: THE INNER CITY
Project will be discussed. David
Adair from the project is the
source person. 8:00 p.m. Reception
Room,   Union   College.	
PIZZA WEEK NOV. 23-27. SIZZ-
ling hot, deluxe, delicious pizza.
11:30-2:30 Monday - Friday. SUB
South Foyer.
16
Travel Opportunities
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2855 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dungmuir St. Mon. - Sat., 9-».
STUDENTS . . . EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
information ( air mail) Anglo -
American Assn., 60A Pyle St.,
Newport I.W.,  England.
Wanted—Information
17
URGENT: ANYONE KNOWING
how or -person who can locate
stolen dog. Phone 433-3668 after 5.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
GIRL WANTS TO SING WITH
Folk or Folk - Rock Group. Can
play some guitar and tambourine.
Phone Alice, 876-8642 after 6 or
weekends.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
NEED TRANSPORTATION? 1957
Dodge Custom-Royal, full running
order. $150. or close offer. Phone
929-4026.	
'59 VW, EXCELLENT MECHANI-
cal condition. $225 or nearest of-
fer. 926-5055.	
MORRIS MINOR 1968 HARD TOP",
26,000, good condition. Phone 261-
3728.	
1966 CHEVELLE MALIBU SS-
Hdtp., PS - PB, Radio, Bucket
Seats, etc. $1300 or offer? Must
sell by Dec. 15. Between 5 and 7
p.m,   Larry,   224-4765.     	
'60 VOLKS — NEW BRAKES, RE-
built engine, new tires front. $223.
or  best  offer.   731-0059.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts 23
STUDDED SEMPERIT SNOW
Tires. 725 x 13. Excellent condition.
$50.   733-3009.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
Fidelity Graphs, Maps, Charts,
Text-Book Illustrations and Formulations. Advertising. Telephone
980-2928.	
Day Care & Baby Sitting     32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
HAVE YOU EVER SEEN AN AL-
most love story? It not, come and
see William Wyler's "The Collector." Fri. & Sat., 7:00, 9:30; Sun.,
7:00. AMS 50c, Non-AMS 75c. Nov.
20-22.	
DIRECT FROM OIL CAN'S: HEAR
Stronghold playing Santana 3-
dog nite BS&T Sat. Nov. 21. SUB
Ballrooom,  8:30-12:30.	
WHAT'S A CAMPUS MINISTER?
Find out by rapping with one
every day in SUB 228; Today —
Peter Fribley.	
CORKY'S MEN'S HAIRSTYLING.
Corky has better ideas. 3644 W.
4th. Alma on 4th. Appointments.
731-4717.
Sewing k Alterations
38
Typewriters fc Repairs
39
Typing
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates. 738-6829
after 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays.
Thesis. Reasonbale rates. North
Van.  985-0154.	
TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal. Engineering, Social Science,
Psychological Terminology, High
Quality, Low Charge.  733-4708.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
Electric Typewriter, Shorthand.
325-2934.	
STUDENTS. TERM PAPERS TYP-
ed at a reasonable rate. Call
Yvonne  at  738-6874.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
Neatly, "Quickly and Efficiently.
30e per page. Phone 224-0385 after
 5 p.m.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced typist„ electric typewriter.   Call  731-8096.
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
per page. Essays 30c per page —
5c / copy. Fast, efficient service.
Phone 274-3010. Residence Rich-
mond.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Anne  Treacy,  738-8794.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
— COMMISSION   SALES —
Looking for opportunity to dea'
with corporation principles? Song
In Your Heart Publishing Ltd.
has the ideal Christmas Gift Item.
321-9512.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL   TUTOR   MATH
day,   evening,   or  Sat.
rates.   Phone  733-3644-
3   p.m.
100   *   101,
Reasonable
-10 a.m.  to
TWO STUDENTS FROM PARIS
will help you to learn French.
Call Denis or Daniel, 224-0145;
cheap.	
SPANISH CONVERSATION. THE
shortest way to speak. Prof.
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UBC) will teach, $3 hr. individual,
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paid in advance. 1405 Cypress
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IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, November 20, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
This weekend the undefeated Thunderbird rugby team will take
' on the Georgians Club to decide the winner of the Miller Cup in
the Vancouver Rugby Union. If UBC can show the same
determination in this contest as in this match (above in the dark
shirts) against the UVic Vikings they should take the trophy.
Thirds open schedule
UBC opens its collegiate
hockey schedule at home this
weekend when the Thundeibiids
host the Biandon Univeisity
Bobcats on Saturday and the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies on Friday.
Both games start at 8:00 p.m.
in the Thunderbird Arena on campus
The Saturday game has added
significance as the Bobcats and
the Birds battle for the John
Owen Memorial Trophy which
UBC defended successfully against
Brandon last year.
Last season UBC split with
Brandon (5-4, 4-6) and also with
Saskatchewan (4-5, 7-1).
JUNIOR HOCKEY
SUNDAY 2:00
Vancouver Centennials
vs.
PENTICTON BRONCOS
kerrlsdaLe ARENA
Advance Tickets Available
at Thunderbird Shop
Students $1.00
Fri., Dec. 4, 8:30 vs Victoria
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
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in the Village
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Wrestling squad preps
for the UBC Invitational
The Thunderbird wrestling
team will start the season with
what is considered to be the
toughest meet of the year - the
UBC Invitational.
In previous years this meet has
been dominated by American
entries such as Seattle Pacific
College and the University of
Washington Huskies.
Wrestling for the Huskies will
be Larry Owings. He captured
first place in the National NCAA
Championships. His bout was
televised on a national network
and there was an article on him in
Basketballers
on road trip
Coach Peter Mullins'
Thunderbirds open their collegiate
season with a tough road trip this
weekend.
They play the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies on Friday,
Brandon Bobcats on Saturday and
the University of Saskatchewan
(Regina Campus) Cougars on
Monday.
Brandon is a new entry in the
WCIAA basketball league this
year, and their opening game will
mark the first ever meeting
between the Birds and Bobcats.
Although he has lost two
veterans in Alex Brayden and Bob
Molinski, Coach Mullins feels he
has a strong nucleus of
experienced players, and some
good rookie talent for bench
support.
With all of the conference
teams showing marked
improvement in calibre the Birds
will have a tough time going
through the season undefeated in
league play as they did last year
(16-0)-	
A report on the UBC skydiving
club, which held a meet at
Abbotsford last weekend will go
in Tuesday's issue.
Sports Illustrated magazine.
The coach of the
Thunderbirds, Paul Nemeth, has
trained an exceptional team this
year and is confident of good
results.
He is relying on experienced
wrestlers such as Les Burgenger,
Ken Mariash and Taras Hryb.
Both Mariash and Hryb are
former Canadian Intercollegiate
champions and Burgenger placed
first at the Western Wrestling
Conference two years ago.
Also supporting the team are a
group of wrestlers who belie the
fact that they are in their rookie
year at the intercollegiate level.
Outstanding among this group are
Bill MacDonald and Rick Tyson.
The tournament will be held at
the Memorial Gymnasium this
Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00
p.m.
Thirds face Georgians
in must match of season
Vancouver rugby fans are
looking forward to the key clash
of UBC Thunderbirds and
Georgians in First Division Rugby
play this Saturday.
The winner in this one likely
will finish first in the league and
carry off the Miller Cup. UBC's
record to date is 7 wins and 0
losses in league play. Georgians
have only one loss over the season
and their impressive 25-0 victory
over Capilanos last Saturday
indicates their improvement.
Traditionally, UBC-Georgian
matches have been clean,
hard-fought, wide-open games.
There is little reason to doubt a
change of form in tomorrow's
clash.
UBC has added strength to key
positions on the 1970 squad.
Wing-forwards Andrew Beane and
Garth Hendrikson have given the
Birds solid performances to date.
Prop    Peter    Bliss    has    added
experience to the front row where
last year's frosh hooker Drew
Rose is playing well. Prop John
Squeo has fully recovered from a
serious injury last year and second
row Rob Burns is complementing
BC rep second row Bob Jackson.
Eric McAvity, at number eight,
finishes off as fine as scrum as
UBC has fielded in recent years.
Scrum-half and team captain
Rod Holloway in working well
with Ray Banks at stand-off. New
addition Eric Lilly and B.C. rep
Doug Shick are combining well at
centres. Wingers McTavish and
Mitchell and fullback Legh,
moved from centre last season,
round off a fine backfield.
All fans of rugby here at UBC
are guaranteed fine rugby
entertainment 2:30 Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium. The
Thunderbirds undefeated record is
deserving of your support and all
are urged to attend to cheer a fine
UBC team.
Weekend Action Box
Soccer
Wrestling
Rugby
Basketball
(Women)
Hockey
Hockey
UBC vs Columbus Nov. 22, 2:00 p.m. Empire Stadium
UBC Invitational Nov. 21,8:00 a.m. Memorial Gym
UBC vs Georgians Nov. 21,1:15 p.m. UBC
UBC vs Victoria Nov. 21, 8:00 p.m. Memorial Gym
UBC vs Sask.
UBC vs Brandon
Nov. 20,8:00 p.m.   UBC
Nov. 21,8:00 p.m.   UBC
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 20, 1970
The Aliquippa Assassin
is unmasked:
Or how UBC football coach
Frank Gnup became a star
and learned to love UBC
A few years ago, Sports Illustrated ran a story on
Mike Ditka, an All-Pro tight end with the Chicago Bears.
In that story they labelled Mike Ditka as the second
toughest player to ever come out of Aliquippa.
They neglected to mention who was the toughest, but.
the people of that Pennsylvanian coal mining town didn't
have to be told. There, any football fan will tell you that
the toughest player to ever come out of Aliquippa is
UBC's very own Frank Gnup.
And they are not kidding when they say that. In
these parts, UBC has had so many losing seasons that
Frank Gnup has become a bit of a Polish joke. But in his
old hometown, he has become a football legend.
Three years ago the people of Aliquippa gave Gnup
an all-expenses paid trip back to his birthplace so that he
could speak at a football banquet.
The newspapers were filled with stories on the return
of Frank Gnup and upon his arrival, he was presented
with a gold watch. It has been over 30 years since Gnup
left Aliquippa, but the folks back there hadn't forgotten
him.
Began during Depression
Gnup began his football career during the Depression.
In those days, kids took off their shirts and shoes when
they wanted to play football. That way their shirts
wouldn't get ripped and their shoes wouldn't get worn
out.
As Coach Gnup recalls, "We were so stupid we used
to play tackle football on the pavement. People would:
line up on both sides of the street and we'd go at it like a
bunch of goddam madmen. I remember one time I got
knocked cold and everyone took off because they thought
I was dead."
Fortunately, one kid helped him home and as Gnup
puts it, "it was only a concussion."
As early as the ninth grade, Gnup made the Aliquippa
high school team as a 114-pound blocking back. By his
senior year, he had filled out to 5'9", 145 pounds. He
played both ways, as defensive back and blocking back,
and never once came off the field.
Nick Barr, an old teammate, remembers Gnup as
"one of the slowest players on the field. But he still
managed to gain 10 to 15 yards a carry."
Gnup claims his greatest high school thrill came when
he intercepted a pass and ran it back 50 yards through the
whole opposition for a touchdown, only to have it called
back for interference with the receiver.
But there was another event that stood out in the
minds of Aliquippa fans. In this game, the opposing team
was led by their 230-pound fullback named Ken Stilley,
who was later to become an Ail-American tackle at Notre
Dame.
On one play Stilley came barrelling through the line,
where he was met head on by a 114-pound defensive back
named Frank Gnup. The resulting collision knocked Gnup
about 25 feet back as Stilley ran in for a touchdown.
Gnup started crying but was so mad he ran up to
Stilley and shouted "I'll get you, you bastard!"
Stilley just laughed. But the next time he carried the
ball, Gnup grabbed him around the ankles and sent him
reeling to the ground. As the game progressed, Stilley
carried on almost every play. And every time he got the
ball Gnup was waiting for him. Gnup hit him every time,
although sometimes it wasn't enough to bring him down.
Although Aliquippa lost 42-0, Rank Gnup had
forever won the admiration of the Aliquippa fans.
Gnup finished off his high school career by being
named to the western Pennsyvania all-star team, the first
Aliquippian to ever have done that in over 30 years of
football.
Football scholarships offered
Upon his graduation he received scholarship offers
from various parts of the country, including Duke
University and the University of Wisconsin. He even
enrolled in Wisconsin for a week but returned home
because "I didn't get along with Coach Harry Stuhldehrer
— talked too much, I guess."
He eventually decided to attend Manhattan
University, an all-boys Catholic school with an enrollment
of around 1,400, where he was coached by Herb Kopf.
Manhattan may be unheard of now, but in those days
it was college football power. In 1937, Gnup's freshman
year, they played schools like Texas A and M, Michigan
State, Kentucky and Tulsa.
Coach Kopf took one look at Gnup and decided to
make him a centre. In his junior year, Gnup began to
alternate between centre and quarterback, which in the
By DON GARDNER
days of the single wing formation made him the signal
caller, and blocking back.
Gnup also handled Manhattan's place kicking and
punting, which caused Kopf to comment, "He is probably
the only triple threat centre in the world. He can block,
kick, pass and call signals, as well as back up the Une on
defense and play centre."
At the end of the 1939 season Gnup was voted
captain by his teammates for the following year. During
hisJiigh school days he had also been a star basketball and
baseball player.
He continued his baseball career at Manhattan U,
playing catcher and right field while batting cleanup.
The 1940 Manhattan pressbook, published during'
Gnup's senior year, had this to say, "Standing 5'9" tall
and weighing 172 pounds, Frank is as hard and rugged as
his native Pennsylvania hills, and he plays a peppery,
driving game that is as much a spur to his teammates as his
hoarse, pleading voice.
, , . .:■ • . '.>■■ ■ii. .*.
.'-   *■;-'*». •-'■■■   ,.    --<5;p.'-i-
GNUP ... brains of the team
"Whether directing the eleven from his quarterback
spot, or catching, shorstopping, or playing the outfield on
the baseball diamond, the Gnupper is always the brains on
the team and always the team man and the sparkplug."
At this stage of his career, Gnup had already acquired
quite a reputation for his wit and humor. The New York
News began a contest for the best Frank Gnup limerick
and had 687 entries. (Unfortunately, the winning limerick
isn't worth printing. It must have been drawn from a hat.)
In the first game of the season, Manhattan clobbered
St. Bonaventure 45-0 and the newspapers began calling
Gnup the Aliquippa Assassin.
Robert Howard of the New York Journal-American
wrote that "Gnup is not a great football player, but he is
a good one and he fills an important job on the Jasper
eleven. On defence he is outstanding and any coach could
use him.
"He seems to have that sixth football sense that tells
him where the ball carrier is going before the play actually
begins, and little Frank more often than not is there to
grab the carrier."
In the sixth game of the season, against Marquette,
Gnup suffered a broken radius in his right arm.
At the time it looked like he was out for the season,
but Gnup insisted that the bone could be braced and
padded without danger, which enabled him to play the*
full 60 minutes in the next week's game against Villanova.
Gnup must have been inspired by the words of one
sportswriter who said, "Gnup is the sort of player who
would go into a game on crutches if his, coach would let
him."
Although Manhattan finished the season with a
record of 3-5, Gnup was chosen quarterback on the
all-New York City team. Ha was also voted the best
athlete of the year by the Manhattan students.
After his college graduation, he joined the services
and played service football, first for Fort Monmouth, New
Jersey and then at the 3rd Air Force base in Charlotte,
North Carolina.
At Fort Monmouth he was named the league's most
valuable player and at the 3rd Air Force base he played in
the same backfield as Charlie Trippi, a former
AU-American halfback at Georgia. Trippi later starred
with the old Chicago Cardinals and was recently inducted
into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
In 1946, Gnup took over as the playing coach of the
Hamilton Wildcats. In the previous season the Wildcats
had finished last in the seven-team Ontario Rugby and
Football Union.
Made 'hustling, fighting club'
By by this stage of his career Gnup had become a
proficient passer and under his leadership they quickly
became a contender. At mid-season one Hamilton
sportswriter wrote "the talk of this town is the way Frank
Gnup has taken his bunch of no names and turned them
into a hustling, fighting football club."
But the other cities in the league weren't quite so
fond of Gnup, who had gained a reputation as a brash
American. In one game against Sarnia, Hamilton had the
ball first and ten and Sarnia was called for offside.
The officials marched off the penalty and on the next
play Sarnia went offside again. Once more the officials
marched off the penalty and the referee turned to the
Hamilton huddle and said "First down and a halLyard to
go."
"What the hell do you mean a half yard to go?",
yelled Gnup.
"You just called two offsides and where I come from
five and five make ten."
"Well not on this side of the border, buddy," said the
referee. "I measured it out and you didn't quite make it."
In spite of this adversity, Hamilton went on to win
the league championship. Gnup was named all-star
quarterback and was selected as the league's most valuable
player.
After that 1946 season the fate of the Wildcats began
shifting downwards.
After four years at Hamilton, Gnup played a year
with Toronto Argonauts and after retiring as a player he
resumed coaching, first at Peterborough and then at
Brantford.
In 1955, he came to UBC to take over as football
coach. He succeeded Don Coryell, who is now head coach
at San Diego State. (Incidentally, San Diego State has lost
only once in their last 55 games.)
But Gnup quickly learned that football in British
Columbia is not the same football played in the mining
_towns of western Pennsylvania.
In his first year only 17 players showed up for
practice. As Gnup recalls, "At first I stood there yelling
'Kill! Kill!' until finally one kid looked at me and said
"Gee coach, we just like to play for fun." "
Gnup also rejected his old psychological ploys. In one
of his first games as UBC coach, Gnup made an effort to
bring.in a victory by chewing out the squad at halftime of
a game they were losing 6-0 to Eastern Washington.
The result was a 56-6 loss.
'Coach, I gotta pee'
One of the most famous Gnup stories took place a
couple of years ago and as Gnup tells it, "We're on
defense and all a sudden, I find Tokawa standing beside
me. I asked him why he wasn't on the field and, so help
me, he says, 'Coach, I gotta go to the John.' "
"Well, in all my years of football, that never
happened. I couldn't believe it. In fact, I was so skeptical
that by the time I let him go, it was nip and tuck whether
he was going to get there in time."
I couldn't resist the obvious question. "Did he make
it?" I asked.
"If I told you the truth you'd probably be stupid
enough to print it," Gnup replied. "So let's just say it was
close."
Over the years, Frank Gnup has mellowed his attitude
toward football. With a team like the UBC Thunderbirds a
coach better have a sense of humor or.he'd go insane.
Coach Gnup's present attitude can best be summed
up in a statement he made before his squad took the field
against a far superior University of Hawaii team.
When asked about his chances, the Aliquippa Assassin
just shook his head and said, "We just hope no one gets
killed."

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