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The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1970

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 WHO SAYS WE DON'T bury undergrads at UBC? Turf in front of the Main Library
gives way as a start is made on the mass burial plot which will doom thousands of
lower-year students to a bookwormish end. The proposed underground undergrad
—jim duff photo
library is something we can dream of about now with study space at a premium before
Christmas exams. Trouble is, the wheels of academia grind exceeding slow and the
completion of this think tank isn't even in sight. But at least it's a start.
Housing and food for transients
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Vancouver's transients are still in need of food and
housing.
Joshua, a group of people who worked at the Beatty
Street and Jericho hostels, is presently operating a feed-in
and is organizing co-op housing on a more permanent
basis for the transients.
Two co-op house have already been started.
Feed-ins are held every day at 4:30 p.m. at Cool-Aid
at the corner of West Seventh and Burrard.
Approximately 100 people are served each day at a cost
of about $40 per feed-in. All money and food come from
donations as the group receives no support from welfare
groups.
Friendly fishermen recently donated 1,000 pounds of
fish and the group is now looking for a place to store it.
"We make most of our money panhandling at yarious
concerts in the city," said Christine Krawczyk, arts 3, a
Joshua member.
The group is also soliciting donations through public
service announcements on CKLG and CKVN.
"We'll take anything; food, housing, money, furniture
even toys," said Jim Herringer, another Joshua member.
"We'll give the toys to CKVN's toy drive," he added.
Joshua is also organizing co-op housing for the
transients. At present, they have a staff house on West
Fourth and Cypress and another house in New
Westminster.
"We want something permanent, not hostels. Our
main concern is those who'll be here for longer periods of
time," Krawczyk said.
U of T - 'it's the best known
and deserves more money'
TORONTO, fCUP) - The University of Toronto says
it's the best ,.i:ivc;sity in Ontario and deserves more
money from the government than the other provincial
universities.
In a brief presented to the committee on university
affairs, U of T contends it is "the best known Canadian
university ... the only one with the prestige, facilities,
and access to population to make any claim to being a
national university in the sense that Harvard, Oxford and
Tokyo are."
The brief says the prestige and reputation U of T has
earned over the past century will be greatly endangered by
treating the university like the other 13 provincially
financed universities. U of T says if it is not given a higher
level of financial support than the others it "will be no
different from the average."
"But to treat each university within the province as
though they were at a common level is wasteful of the
investment which has been made in the University of
Toronto in the past," the brief goes on.
The brief claims that new "emerging" universities get
extra grants but that the U of T suburban campuses of
Erindale and Scarborough are discriminated against
because they are getting lower grants than the other
"new" universities.
In a separate report, Erindale College principal J. T.
Wilson supported the request for a "favoured" treatment.
He said Ontario's present policy is "clearly wasteful",
because no country can afford to finance all universities at
the highest level.
"We hope to set up a chain reaction. Each house is
affiliated with each other, but they will all be
independent," she said.
A benefit is planned for the near future to raise
money for housing and the feed-in.
Until the co-op houses are in operation, Joshua still
needs more temporary housing.
"We get about 30 people at the staff house every
night after the feed-in and they are all looking for a place
to crash," Krawczyk said.
Joshua has been operating the feed-ins since welfare
quit financing the Inner City feed-ins October 31. In three
weeks of operation there has been a total turnover of the
transients the group has been feeding.
There are still a lot of transients coming into
Vancouver; about 2 or 3 new faces show-up at the feed-in
every day, said another Joshua worker, Valerie Angel.
"We think it should slow down in January and
February but it will pick up again early in March," said
Angel.
If you have anything to donate to Joshua, contact the
staff house at 1952 West 4th beside CKVN offices.
"We still don't have a phone," Herringer said,
"however, you can phone Hazel at 874-9540, or Chris at
732-5276."
Fines for profs
may be in works
The present policy of exempting professors from
overdue book fines is under review said UBC head
librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs Thursday.
Dr. Malcolm McGregor, head of the senate library
committee confirmed this and said, "It infuriates me to
see professors fail to return a book they know is needed.
"However, I would hesitate to fine faculty members."
McGregor said the reason for maintaining the policy
could not be well stated.
Meanwhile students will wait for a needed book,
while a prof takes his time returning it because he is
exempt from fines. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24,  1970
Council hopeful
eyes youth vote
By NATHALIE APOUCHTINE
Another new name will appear
on the ballot for alderman in
Vancouver civic elections in
December — this time, the
candidate is a student.
Peter Rutter, 27, ombudsman
for the student society at
Vancouver City College, will run
as an independent on a platform
which emphasizes increased
pollution control, higher welfare
rates, rent control, installation
of a rapid transit system,
youth-controlled hostels and
youth centres, and improved
police-people relations.
Rutter has not affiliated
himself with any party, because:
"I don't think any of the parties
in the elections are good, but I
support' certain individuals," he
told The Ubyssey Friday.
"The vote against Campbell is
split two ways," said Rutter. "I
think COPE-NDP and TEAM
should get together and eliminate
one mayoral candidate."
Rutter said he is not certain
who should be Campbell's
opponent, but said "it will have to
be someone good, perhaps Tony
Gargrave," COPE-NDP's
mayoralty candidate.
Pollution control, can be
effected in a number of ways,
according to Rutter.
The present law governing
pollution control in industry is a
"strong and good law," said
Rutter, "but it is not enforced."
The law indicates how many
hours an industry can pollute in a
week, but companies break the
law by letting out pollutants at
night, he said.
"If the law is enforced, and
these companies are forced to pay
fines, they would perhaps change
their minds and buy the expensive
machinery which is now on the
market for pollution control,"
said Rutter.
He also said he supports the
construction of more satisfactory
sewage plants, and legislation
which would cut down traffic in
the city.
"I feel we should close down
factories for several days a week if
it is necessary to reduce
pollution," he said.
Other pollution-related planks
in Rutter's platform include: the
installation of a rapid transit
system and legislation which
would cut down traffic in the
city, as well as pressure on the
consumer industries to wrap their
goods in bio-degradable materials.
In the area of rent control,
Rutter criticized the present rent
system which, he said, is based on
"supply and demand."
"Tenants should protest this
rent   system,"   said   Rutter,   "I
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think this would solve part of the
housing problem.
"Also, I don't think the city
should be putting up housing, but
I think it should support anyone
who wants to put up cheap
housing," said Rutter.
Another priority of Rutter's is
increased welfare for Vancouver
residents.
According to him this could be
done by turning over welfare
administration to the city.
"Vancouver is more expensive
to live in than other places in
B.C., so residents should get more
than, say, Kamloops residents,"
said Rutter. "Welfare people have
to be given a chance to live
decently."
Rutter's stand on the role of
the police in the city is that they
must begin "to respect the rights
of civilians — brutality does not
breed respect."
Rutter said that if the police
do this, the people will respond
with respect as well.
"The War Measures Act and
the new legislation which will
replace the WMA should not be
used in any way in Vancouver or
B.C." said Rutter. "The causes for
it just don't exist here."
Rutter said that he would like
to "convince council to accept
abortion on a city level.
"We have little control in
affecting change in the abortion
law because it is under federal
jurisdiction, but if we openly
support it in the city, we will be
placing pressure on the federal
government to have the law
changed," said Rutter.
Rutter said he has a chance to
get elected, if he can get the
"youth vote," which comprises
about 100,000 possible votes.
"Previous winning candidates
generally made it with 40,000 to
60,000 votes," said Rutter. "I
think I can get the youth vote,"
he concluded.
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for the
Age of Ecology.
What the world needs today are containers that re-cycle.
Because every container that isn't recycled becomes a refuse. Or worse still, litter.
That's why the reusable, returnable bottle for Coke is the answer to an ecologist's prayer. On the average, it makes
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Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
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Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd. Tuesday, November 24, 1970
THE       U B Y S..S-E.Y.
Page 3
Harger — 'parks board needs an ecologist'
By SHANE McCUNE
Today at 10 a.m., Robin Harger pedalled down to
city hall to file his parks board nomination papers.
In a press release issued to The Ubyssey, the act of
bicyling to city hall is described as "symbolizing his
ecological concern, just as he usually pedals to work."
In an interview with The Ubyssey Monday, Harger
said he is running for a parks board post "because there
are no ecologists on the parks board, and since they are
responsible for preserving such natural environment as is
allowed to exist in a city, they should know something
about ecology."
Harger said the parks board should be a "preliminary
legislative body" responsible for zoning regulations and
other issues relevant to ecology.
"The environmental issue is not confined to city
limits. A parks board chair would provide an appropriate
platform for discussion of the quality of life around
Vancouver," he said.
In his press release, Harger lists nine major points in
his campaign:
• Preserve a natural Wreck Beach. No road
covering the beach but effective erosion control. No
parking lots on beaches and no "Coney Island" type
development of the Jericho area.
• Insist on more parks and facilities in the East
End.
• Develop parks and beaches to suit all segments
of society. Creative activities such as arts and crafts should
—jim gorman photo
,IT WAS BILLED as a religious, mystical experience. But it turned out to be just a bore as Arts II students sat around
holding candles Monday. Arts II head Bob Rowan was not amused. We came here to learn, not to fool around, he told
the participants. The lecture accompanying the big unmystical trip was on Mark Twain. Religious mysticism wasn't his
bag either.
be promoted by construction of rustic booths on the beach
above the high water mark in the English Bay area to
discourage boredom and help prevent disturbance.
• Pressure city council to change its zoning and
development priorities. $8 million went to develop Block
42-52 and only $300,000 for the parks board budget. We
need at least $1 million to enable park and beach
development to be accomplished without
commercialization.
• Stop using insecticides except when absolutely
necessary. I won't authorize spray unless insects are
actually killing the plants.
• Speed up program to close open sewers on
Vancouver's beaches.
• Oppose Four Seasons Hotel complex at
entrance to Stanley Park.
• Challenge proposed high density development
around False Creek.
• Protect golf courses from subdivision.
Harger elaborated on some of these policies.
Referring to Wreck Beach, he said: "The only region
slipping away is the area lying roughly between the two
gun towers. In the middle of the cliff there is a storm
water basin drain buttressed by boulders. Behind that
exists a reasonable amount of vegetation.
"This vegetation, combined with a rope net on the
cliff face, and a structure similar to the Stanley Park sea
wall, could prevent further erosion."
Harger proposes to open more parks in the East End
by buying up available property and options on future
property sales.
He said he would not condemn insecticides
completely, but recommended the use of organic-based
sprays, such as pyrethrum or nicotine-based compounds,
to control extreme pest problems, like last summer's
leather-jacket plague.
Asked about the possibility of using natural predators
rather than chemicals, Harger said: "It's a good idea, but
very complicated. The parks board hasn't the facilities to
conduct a program like that, but they sure could raise
funds to support research on the subject."
Harger has been given a one-year terminal contract by
the zoology department and the tenure committee. The
Ubyssey asked him if his release had anything to do with
his running for office.
"Regardless of any action that UBC, that is, the
zoology department has taken, I would still be running for
parks board," he said.
Harger has resigned himself to an election victory by
Tom Campbell.
"I don't think Gibson is going to win," he said, "and
I don't know that I'd vote for TEAM's mayor, anyway."
Replying to other questions from The Ubyssey,
Harger said he would consider expanding recreational
facilities for old people.
And he promised: "Every other Sunday will be a
bicycle Sunday in Stanley Park!"
BCUS director calls for education subsidy cut
The  following is an  analysis of the B.C.   Union  of
Students' report on higher education.
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Last week Norm Wright, director of the British
Columbia Union of Students force on unemployment,
released a report calling for a decrease in government
subsidies to higher education.
The report was released in the name of BCUS,
although none of the organization's members were
consulted prior to its release.
The report was the result of research undertaken by
the task force during the past year. The task force was
designed    to    gather    some    statistics    on    student
employment, both graduate and undergraduate.
The statistics were no surprise to anyone. They
merely confirmed that unemployment is very high among
university graduates.
The report also pointed out that undergraduates were
having trouble finding summer jobs that would enable
them to finance their university education.
If the statistics were not surprising the conclusions
that Wright comes to are astounding.
Wright concludes that since undergraduates are not
finding employment too many of them are being
produced and therefore a solution would be to cut back
on the production.
He goes on to say that subsidies to higher education
should be cut off thus allowing the government to spend
the money on health and welfare where it is more
urgently needed.
Education would thus be entirely financed by those
that benefit from it, the students. This means that instead
of paying $500 tuition the average arts student would be
required to pay closer to $2,000 a year.
An education opportunity bank would be set up that
would enable students to borrow the amount of money
they need to pay for their education.
Upon graduation the student would pay back the
loan as surcharge on their income tax.
It is very difficult to argue with the basic
recommendations of the report. It is very true that not
enough money is being spent on health and welfare in this
province.
There is however no evidence to indicate that any
money taken out of education would in effect go into
health and welfare. The Social Credit government has
clearly indicated where its priorities lie: highways and
dams.
Wright's reasoning that since graduates are being
overproduced they are unemployed and therefore society
should cut back on their production is fallacious.
The unemployment problem in Canada is not
phenomenon found only among university graduates but a
direct result of the Liberal government's anti-inflationary
policies.
A cut back on the number of graduates produced
would not affect the unemployment situation. It would
mean that we'd have more uneducated unemployed.
This condition may be very desirable to those in
power   who   may   fear   a   large   group   of   educated
unemployed and workers.
The most important aspect of Wright's proposal, the
education opportunity bank has however been
conveniently ignored in the downtown press.
If this system came into operation its immediate
result would be to discourage people from middle and
lower income groups from attending universities.
Wright's argument is based on the assumption that
there are only economic benefits to be derived from
education.
The concepts of an education opportunity bank is a
good one. It shouldn't however apply to the entire cost of
a student's education.
Government officials and educators should agree on a
cost sharing formula. Students should then be able to
borrow what ever sum of money they need from an
institution such as the education opportunity bank.
Theological fellowships
The Fund for Theological Education which is
financed by Nelson Rockefeller's relatives, will interview
applicants Wednesday.
Rockefeller Bros, of Princeton, New Jersey sponsor
the program, which offers all-expenses paid fellowships to
enable university graduates to study for one year at an
accredited theological college in the U.S. or Canada.
Interested students must be nominated by either a
faculty member or a Protestant minister, be under 31,
Protestant, expecting to graduate next spring and not
already committed to enter the ministry. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24,  1970
elec'tioA, xi.    A system^
wherein every so often
the electorate is reminded
how stupid it is.
Vq.Sm<&'~7o
Wl UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER 24, 1970
Silent candidates
Whatever happened to Tony Gargrave and Bill
Gibson?
You remember them, the two guys who were
nominated to run for mayor of Vancouver and haven't
been heard from since.
There is a strange attitude that pervades civic
politics in Vancouver. Campaigning is defined as
occassionally speaking to 50 people at an unpublicized
meeting in a church basement.
Following the tradition, Gargrave and Gibson seem
to be going out of their way to make sure no one knows
where they stand on any of the major issues facing the
city.
Where, for example, are concrete statements about
Vancouver's critical housing shortage?
Neither Gargrave nor Gibson has made any
suggestions for much-needed changes in the city's social
services.
Neither of them has indicated a willingness to
stand up to the land developers and other business
interests who have controlled the city for years. (In fact,
Gargrave, the "socialist", has made the naive, incredibly
stupid statement that industry will gladly do whatever
it's told and is only awaiting leadership and direction.)
So far in this campaign, no one has made a full
scale attack on the headline-seeking performance mayor
Tom Campbell has been putting on for the last four
years. (The night he was nominated, Gibson made some
valid comparisons between Campbell's anti-hippie
crusade and the rhetoric of Adolph Hitler. After
receiving some criticism, Gibson backed down and is
now playing the standard gentlemanly political game.)
All we've heard from the two major challengers are
wide-eyed schemes for rapid transit that will wisk us
quickly between home and work (assuming one still has
a job and a decent home) and a lot of meaningless drivel
about making Vancouver a "human, happy city."
Of course, we realize the mayoral campaign was a
charade from the beginning. We know that TEAM and
the NDP conceded the election to Campbell and
respectively nominated Gibson and Gargrave as
sacrificial lambs, but they should be able to put on a
better show than the one they're giving.
As things are going, we may wind up moving our
old AMS election favorite, the spoiled ballot, to the
civic voting booth.
OUT OF TUNE
BY SHANE McCUNE
Christmas time again
I was shocked to realize that this is my last
column before Christmas.
But I suppose it's getting to be that time again.
Already some of my first-year friends have given up
on the bursar's office and started writing letters to
Santa Claus.
One or two people in the Ubyssey office have
started answering them. (I should explain that every
year at this time, The Big Cheese dresses up in a red
suit and dances around, chuckling his hearty "OY!
OY! OY!" and shaking like a bowlful of mushy
matzo.)
I'm very sentimental about Christmas, so this
column falls into the reminiscence category.
Gather 'round, young'uns, and I'll spin you
some yarns of the days when I was just a wee tad
who believed in Santa Claus. (I still do. Walter Gage,
no. Santa Claus, yes.)
When I was a kid, we used to go out at nights
and sing Christmas carols. Outside the synagogue.
When I was a kid, we had good clean snowball
fights and never threw ice. Except at cops.
When I was a kid, I went to church at Christmas
with my parents. And came home alone.
When I was a kid, my parents always gave me
neat presents. Like skis without safety harnesses.
And  roadmaps.
We used to go window-shopping downtown at
night. Once I got four windows.
We all used to ride Santa's train in Eaton's
Toyland. Except Larry, who wet his pants if the
trains went too fast.
Sometimes Larry's mom would let him sit on
Santa's lap, just for a laugh.
If you had enough money, you could exchange
gifts with a pal. "I'll give you a Sting Ray kit if
you'll give me a Sting Ray kit.")
And after we'd opened our presents (they
weren't gifts, they were presents), we'd all go over
to somebody's house.
And we would take along our favorite toys.
One guy would bring a lot of Dinky Toys.
Another guy would bring a Mattel Thunderburp
submachine gun or a Strombecker racing set.
Larry brought his Barbie dolls.
By the time Boxing Day was over, we had
broken most of our toys, along with a few arms and
legs, and eaten all our candy.
Then we'd all get sick.
Whatever happened to those golden days?
Now we never sing Christmas carols unless
we've gone through at least a case each.
My parents give me underwear for Christmas.
And roadmaps.
My friends send each other books by Kahlil
Gibran and tubes of Clearasil.
Gad, we even put rocks in our snowballs!
When we get together on Christmas day,
everybody brings the same thing. A Bromo.
But this year it's going to be different. I'm
going to organize the entire staff of The Ubyssey
into a carol choir.
And I'm going to read my Dickens and my
Bible and send books by Walt Whitman and sit up
watching Alastair Sim as Scrooge and ....
LETTERS
Criticism
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Ubyssey would not exist
apart from the fact that it is
getting money for nothing. Ask
yourself this: "who would buy
The Ubyssey?"
Jim Davies is your worst
writer. I probably shouldn't
gratify his ego by mentioning his
name, since he seems to thrive on
being such an inane fool.
However, you have given him so
much space that I feel obliged to
say something.
On Friday, he used his column
to slander engineers, frat types,
homosexuals, parents and the
ordinary student. Are all engineers
big, dumb greasers? Are all
homosexuals "fairies" who get
their kicks from spying on his
likes? Are all parents that
middle-class? All his column
accomplished was to alienate
these groups that much more.
As far as his full page article on
Tom Campbell goes, I didn't think
much of it. Everyone knows
Campbell is a fascist. Maybe
Davies and Campbell should get
together and form a bigots club.
Campbell could talk about how he
hates hippies, Davies could read
his column.
Ken Lassesen's article on
transcendental meditation made
me even madder. I meditate and
find it to be most satisfying. I
know of quite a few other people
who feel the same way.
Nate Smith's editorials haven't
exactly swept me off my feet
either. After repeating what
everyone else says about premier
Bennett, he gets down to what he
is best at—gossip. Guess what
people? John Mitchell has copped
out      and     is     working     for
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gsli
Wire     .,. John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate • John Twigg
Ass't News    ........ Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo  .David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
A typical newsday fraught with
sharp suspense, high tension,
excitement and glamor, yawned David
Schmidt, Judy Mcl.eod and Kaye
Barnett. Hardnosed reporters Sandy
Kass, Shane McCune, Mike Sasges and
Woodwards. I just wonder how
many members of the Ubyssey
staff aren't or won't be doing the
same thing.
With all due respect, I do enjoy
some of the articles.
I enjoyed the poetry
supplement, the stories on the
"People" encounter groups and
the article on the plight of
teaching assistants.
Remove a little of the dead
weight and I might even be
prepared to pay money for the
paper.
BILL MARLES
Arts 3
Christine Krawczyk deserted the thrill
of the newsroom to frolic and gambol
in the virgin (?) snow.
"Mush, mush," shouted assistant
city editor Jan O'Brien to her faithful
dog team, of Josephine Margolis, Thorn
Wescott, Jim Davies and Kathy Stewart
as they were buffeted by icy winds
from newsdesk.
"Thank heaven's! A St. Bernard to
the rescue," bellowed Nathalie
Apouchtine weakly from the midst of
a colossal drift of copy paper. But it
was only a white Wabbit.
Kevan Perrins, Jim Gorman, Dave
Enns and Jim Cluff all agreed that
taking neato shots of snow was almost
as fun as their favorite pastime —
photographing fog. Scott McCloy and
Keith Dunbar were last seen being
devoured by a rabid snowman. Tuesday, November 24, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Women's complaint centre
UBC's women's liberation
group has started an indignity
center, to deal with complaints of
male chauvinism, said a women's
lib member Monday.
"The center will handle
complaints from students, staff
and faculty on things like people
making degrading comments to or
about women and women not being
admitted to a faculty or receiving
a certain mark because they are
women," said Sharon Boylan,
While most complaints will
probably center in the classroom,
the group hopes staff, such as
food  services  workers who run
into discrimination, will bring
their complaints to them, said
Boylan.
She said they have set up three
squads to deal with the gripes.
"The first is a rationality squad
of two or three women from
women's lib, who will talk to the
person involved in an attempt to
convince him of the errors of his
ways," Boylan said.
"If he remains unreformed an
entertainment squad of two
women will go to his class and
discuss the women's liberation
struggle or offer an alternate
approach to  the  subject if the
complaint is about content.
"Finally if he is still
unreformed, a, barrage which
involves sending the chauvinist
women's lib material will be
initiated.
"By doing this he will have
some idea what it is like to be
constantly inundated with
offensive material."
Boylan said these tactics were
used successfully at Simon Fraser
University.
"We hope that most people
will be reformed at the first
stage."
Complaints can be dropped off
at the Speakeasy office, SUB 234.
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART NINE
We were there.
The cargo doors of the plane opened and we
got our first look at Viet Nam. We scrambled down
the ramp and grabbed our seabags, then stood there
waiting for instructions.
After half a year of being told when and how to
do everything but breathe, we were suddenly
ignored. At that moment we would have
appreciated any indication of what we were
supposed to do.
We finally decided that nobody around the
plane was interested in us at all, and so we wandered
off to see what we could find.
The runway was surrounded on every side by
hangars and all sorts of buildings. We wandered
along the side of the runway until we noticed one
building that was noticeably worse off than the
others. We guessed, correctly, that this building was
the Marine air terminal.
Inside it was just as bad as the outside.
Unpainted walls, a dirt floor and enough benches
for about a third of the people waiting.
One wall had a bunch of counters in it with all
sorts of military abbreviations above each one,
TDY, PCS, TAD schools and so on. The only thing
we could do was walk up to the nearest counter and
say, in a very small voice, "We just got here."
The guy behind the counter grinned so wide I
thought the top of his head was going to separate
from the bottom. He waved down the row of
counters, "Right down to the end."
We mumbled a thanks and started down to the
other end. We were half way there when he leaned
out his window and yelled after us, "And good
luck!"
At our window they did some marvelously
official things with our papers and then gave them
back.
"You're going to Seventh Marines, wait 'til we
announce your truck's waiting out front."
We dragged our bags outside and sat down
against the wall in what little shade there was. Just
to prove that the idea of being in a war didn't
bother us, we pulled out our knives and resharpened
them, strapping them on the upper part of our
leather boots.
The conversation with other men around the
terminal fell into a definite pattern.
"Where you headed . . . Seventh Marines?
You'll have a couple of days to. wait around here
then. They're in it so deep they can only get new
people in about once a week."
Our truck didn't come that afternoon, and at
six they announced that anybody left waiting was
to go out front and get on the cattle wagon that
would take us to where we were going to sleep that
night.
When we got there we found that the billeting
area consisted of a row of raw cedar barracks, each
with its own sandbagged rocket shelter. We locked
our seabags to a bunk and since no one was there to
tell us not to, took off in search of a club.
The base at Da Nang consists of a strange
mixture of construction sites, restricted areas and
Vietnamese villages. After falling into numerous
ditches, getting caught in two different restricted
areas and overhearing some Vietnamese chatting in
their hut in a very sinister manner, we decided to
find the club some other night.
We were hauled back to the terminal at six the
next morning, and we spent most of the day doing
the same things and listening to the same remarks
that had occupied the first afternoon.
Finally we were informed that our truck would
be coming any minute and we moved around to the
front of the building. The two hours we spent
waiting for the truck were a revelation.
We were joined by a combat veteran who was
waiting for transportation back to his unit. His
clothes were filthy, his teeth were half rotted away
and his rifle was so rusty you could scratch the rust
off with your fingernail.
He had been in Da Nang for some dental work
and he started off the conversation by announcing
that he was trying to get a second extension of his
tour in Viet Nam.
He didn't want to go back to the States until
his divorce came through. He said his wife had shot
him twice and the Cong had only got him once, and
his wife was a better shot.
When we asked him what there was to do in our
spare time he said that you could usually go down
to the club every night and get drunk, but he didn't
do it too often because it wasn't too much fun.
"Most of the time, I got this friend who's a
crazy corpsman, see, and we got this bunker all
fixed up with posters and lights and stuff, see, and
most of the time we just sit around and smoke."
I really thought he meant cigarettes. I had a lot
to learn. '
a Rim By FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT
"STOLEN KISSES"
a SUB Film Soc presentation
FRI. 27 & SAT. 28 - 7:00 & 9:00
SUNDAY 29 -7:00
Students 50c — Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
$1,500-9 months
Educational Summer Employment Arranged
To students wishing to enter the first or
subsequent professional year of a degree
course in Mining Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation
1600 - 44 King Street West, Toronto
or
The Dean of Engineering/Applied Science
CLOSING DATE 12 FEBRUARY, 1971
WHAT IS
PERFECTION?
A Big Scoop Burger! Drop in to the Big Scoop
Sundae Palace today and try one of our eight delicious combinations. Clip the special offer coupon
and enter our Big Burger Bonanza. You could win a
year's supply of burgers — yes, 365 great, Big Scoop
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Fill in your name, address and phone number and enter our
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PHONE
Contest closes December 15.   1970.
Winners will be asked a skill-testing question
in order to qualify for prize.
25 locations to serve you
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
The Noranda Group of Companies offers a wide range of
opportunities to university graduates with ability and initiative.
Broad diversification promises successful applicants unusual scope to
develop skills and gain experience in their fields of specialization.
The policy of the Group to select personnel from within our
companies to fill key positions as they open up, makes it possible for
a trainee to travel widely and, over the years, to get exposure to a
great variety of job situations which will help prepare him for
supervisory and administrative duties.
A Noranda Group representative will be on campus here (Nov. 30th)
to interview applicants from among prospective graduates.
Appointments can be made in advance through the
University Placement Office. Phone 228-3811.
noranda
extending the horizons of Canada-through natural resources Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24,  1970
fire
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al Hailal
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I he annual Christmas toy hype for children got underway in good time
this year, and as usual, there were no flies on Mattel.
Following weeks of television commercials aimed at cornering the child
market, Mattel leaped into action to produce its Christmas Fun Book which
arrived with the Nov. 14 edition of the Sun..
For the uninitiated, the Fun Book is a full-color 16-page booklet with
photographs and text describing Mattel's wonderful plastic world of toys.
It was no surprise to find the same old distinctions between toys for
girls and those for boys appearing in the pages of Mattel goodies.
In a touching Fun Book introduction American Mattel Inc. - via its
subsidiary Mattel Canada Ltd. — tells parents that it wants the best in toys for
their precious children. (You know, "if it's Mattel, it's swell.")
"Most important of all, you want toys that will help your child to be
happy and creative. And so do we," says Mattel.
For Mattel, "happy and creative" means being just like mommy and
daddy.
"From our Educational and Child Guidance experts we've learned that
children want to emulate their parents.
"Toys such as Hot Wheels and Barbie and Baby Tender Love allow
them to do this in a natural and healthy way," Mattel declares, and hastens to
assure parents that it's not mere profit — heavens no! — that gives Mattel this
admirable concern for children.
"Why does Mattel take so much time and care and thought in
developing products for the world of the young?
"The answer: At Mattel, we're parents too."
This parental concern seems to have worked well for Mattel.
The December issue of Maclean's cites Mattel's claim of being the
biggest toy company in Canada based on sales volume.
In the article, a toy buyer for Eaton's guesses that if Mattel is not the
largest, it is at least second, with Irwin toys placing first.
But the Fun Book doesn't talk of crass profit. Secure in the knowledge
that benevolent Mattel isn't just out to make a fast buck from the nation's
child market, parents can flip through the colorful pages of the Fun Book
looking for the toys that will aid their children in copying mom and dad.
For the boys, it's Hot Wheels, model sets and Major Matt Mason, the
space-age man.
For the girls, it's — you guessed it — dolls.
Let's see, first how the boys will exercise their "natural and healthy"
creativity and emulation of parents through Mattel.
"Boys need to test their courage. With Major Matt Mason, they can put
themselves in the exciting World of Space," says Mattel. Of course, girls don't
have this need at all.
What follows is a description of Major Matt's gamma ray-gard, his
uni-tred and space bubble and his star seeker.
The boys can play out their astronaut dreams in concrete form by
deflecting dangerous solar gamma-rays in space, talking to the "talking Major
Matt," and having the memory guidance system follow their every command.
When the U.S. finally gets through taking over Canada and moves to
colonizing the planets, there should be no lack of new-generation Major Matts
who think it's about the nearest project going. (The USSR had better start
working on its toy production too.)
Canadian boys playing with these toys can ponder Canada's secondary
role by observing that all the Major Matt toys are stamped with USA or the
American flag.
We might also ask why there isn't a Commander Connie Crump in the
Space age toy set.
But then, I suppose we'll have to wait 'til Cape Kennedy takes this giant
step for womankind before we can expect Mattel to break down the sexual
role definitions.
Vou say your daddy's an over-grown teenager with sexual frustrations
and car fetish, kid? Step right up. Mattel has just the thing to help you in
your "natural and healthy" emulation of the old man: Hot Wheels.
"Rev down the strip . .. hand shift power booster means you're in
control. .. send the cars hurtling down the track super-fast," says Mattel, and
then asks, "HOW FAST CAN YOU GO BEFORE A WIPE-OUT?" (emphasis
ours.)
It's sure nice to know that the concerned parents at Mattel are teaching
North American children about the virtues of safe driving.
In this case, perhaps we should be grateful that Mattel is maintaining
the role division between male and female children by billing this as a boy's
toy. At least the female half of the new generation of drivers may come out
alive in the end.
In the realm of models, it's a boys' world again with various vehicles to
put together.
For the speed set, there's another series of drag cars like the Boss
Mustang, Dune Rat or Screamin' Vette.
At this point it might be worth asking whether General Motors is giving
an annual grant to Mattel for helping to mould another generation of North
American car freaks.
Now for the girls. As we said, it's dolls almost all the way.
First, of course, is that great American plastic institution, Barbie. But
she isn't alone. There's plastic Ken, (Barbie's boy friend), plastic Skipper,
(Barbie's little sister), and plastic Francie, (Barbie's friend presumably).
And let's not forget Barbie's and Ken's friends — Christie and Brad,
who are black. Naturally, the dynamic foursome is seen in the Fun Book
photo as two distinct couples, one black and one white.
"New costumes for Barbie, Ken and their friends," reads the caption.
But what a privilege, after all for Christie and Brad to even be called the
friends of America's white dream doll couple!
If fast cars and Major Matt condition the boys in their role as
courageous dare-devils and explorers, Barbie and company keep the girls in
line.
Barbie doesn't come with a miniature of the Encyclopedia Britannica, a
chemistry set or a symphony conductor's baton. You can bet she won't be a
scientist, doctor or lawyer.
Instead, she comes as "the most popular fashion doll in the world,"
says Mattel.
Disi
Mai
It's Tuesday, November 24, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
wed words like bullets bark as human gods aim for their mark
nything from toy guns that spark to flesh-colored Christs that glow in the dark
to see without looking too far that not much is really sacred
-Bob Dylan, It's Alright Ma
Fashion doll. That's what Barbie is. She is not a real person - but she's
supposed to be something that little girls should admire and copy.
The most important things in Barbie's life are her clothes, her wigs and
her perfect body.
If a little girl were to compare her body to Barbie's, she would notice
some pretty basic differences. Except for facial features, Barbie's body has no
markings or Organs.
Such a denial that certains parts of the body exist at all would surely
induce a form of schizophrenia in a little girl whose body is obviously not the
ideal body seen concretely in Barbie.
This view of the body can only serve to reinforce the view of sex as
dirty and mysterious so often conveyed by parental and societal attitudes.
If anyone doubts that little girls are supposed to identify with Barbie,
listen to Mattel:
"Only Barbie is so life-like and full of action just like you. Only Barbie
has so many beautiful clothes, with wigs and hairpieces to fit her every
mood." (Let's not forget what flighty, temperamental, materialistic creatures
women are, after all.)
"Only Barbie has her own fan club and magazine to keep you
up-to-date with all the new and glamorous events in her life.
"Now Barbie's alive and moving just like you.
"You can pose her any way you want just like you."(Good practice for
later on.)
1
llthough Barbie doesn't hang around vacuuming and washing dishes,
she's going to have to get married and do just that because she doesn't seem
to be equipped to do much else.
She is a painted and dyed plastic clothes horse, and she raises
expectations of a romantic, glamorous life ahead that will materialize for very
few little girls.
Ken is a nice plastic stereotype of a little girl's dream man too. You
don't see Ken wandering around in his undershirt, drinking beer like dad.
No sir. Ken is the dream boy. He is impeccably groomed and dressed.
His hair is short and neatly cropped and his face characterless and
uninteresting.
What a shock is in store for Barbie when she marries this dream. And
what a shock for Ken when he marries Barbie.
They're going to end up playing dominoes on their wedding night
because of their lack of sexual organs.
What a shock for a little girl who grows up with Barbie and Ken only to
discover that men have genitals. She'll also have to learn that Ken doesn't
exist. Her husband will leave his dirty underwear all over the bedroom floor,
and you can bet Ken never did that.
Baby Tender Love is another Mattel doll. She is one of Mattel's
"enchanting dolls for enchanting little girls." She's also one of Mattel's dolls
for future mothers of America.
Most boys would hoot at being given Baby Tender Love, but little girls
are supposed to accept her with open arms.
"She feels so much like a real baby. She makes a little girl feel like a
real mommy," Mattel says, setting out once again the theory of its "experts"
that children want to emulate their parents.
"She's made of a new material that feels like a real baby's skin.
"She drinks and wets, like a real baby. And, you can bathe her, change
her, dress her and comb her hair like a real baby.
"Until you hold her, you'll never believe a doll could be so real."
Now far be it from us to come out against Motherhood, but this is
ridiculous.
Are there really North American parents who will buy this product so
that girls can vent their emulative urge to change diapers at the age of four?
Are there really North American parents who will buy Hot Wheels so
the boys can have fun playing at wiping-out?
And are there really people who believe so firmly in such sexual role
stereotypes in children?
Of course there are. Mattel is still in business and doing pretty well at
helping parents condition kids for the sexual roles they're supposed to play,
and the sexual roles they're supposed to like.
The notion of biological determinism goes something like this:
women are the reproducers of the species and men the providers — both of
sperm and'the necessities of life.
This basic biological difference means that, by extension, men and
women are naturally suited to certain areas of activity.
Because women bear children, they stay at home. Because men are
unfettered, they are the hunters and are free to go out into the world as
courageous explorers and innovators — and insurance salesmen.
Women are passive and men, aggressive. These are the basic sexual
distinctions that are made to extend into the whole pattern of human activity
within our society.
Mattel isn't the only toy manufacturer and Mattel didn't invent the
sexual role distinctions.
But what Mattel does do is exploit the existing role divisions between
the sexes in the child market by playing on the preconceptions of the buyers
— parents.
Thus Mattel helps initiate early socialization among the young by
reflecting the current myth that males and females inherently have a capacity
to perform certain differentiated functions as a natural distinction of their
biology.
Mattel not only exploits and reflects this myth, it actively helps prolong
its existence.
Parents did not invent the myth either, but like Mattel they serve to
perpetuate it, with the encouraging framework of social institutions behind
them all the way.
Parents too inherited the current pattern of sexual role distinctions, and
are engaged in handing it on to their children.
What a wonderful gift: restrictive sexual roles wrapped up in a fast toy
car and a doll with a dyed blonde wig.
Toys are only part of the story of course, but every little bit helps the
life of this sexual myth.
Another year, another Merry Christmas. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24,  1970
'Music of the Beatles
is search for God'
#:
m
By KEN LASSESEN
The music of the Beatles has
protrayed the searching of young
people for a universal reference
point and that reference point is
God, said Nigel Goodwin, a BBC
actor, on Friday.
His presentation was made
with great feeling and expression
before an entranced audience of
over 300 in the SUB art gallery.
Goodwin traced the last few
years of the young generation's
search for God by examining the
development of popular music.
His body twisted and turned in
time to recorded rock music as he
portrayed the struggling of man
and his failure, his soaring into the
sky and his falling hard upon the
brown earth.
"Back in the early sixties the
Beatles finished singing She Loves
You and started to sing Nowhere
Man. The Beatles were saying that
it was time that man woke up
from being a "nowhere man in a
nowhere time in a nowhere
place," said Goodwin. "But when
man woke up he could not face
the machinery of life. The Beatles
cried, 'Help! I need somebody to
love me!' "
Man attempted to find
something down here below what
the philosophers call, the line of
despair, but failed so he
attempted to cross above it, said
"When man got above this line
into a dream world he didn't want
to wake up, but each morning he
woke up and realized that they
were still here.
"Man couldn't be sure of
anything and came to the
conclusion that there was no
Universal, no reference point. Man
said, 'Kill the pigs' and that was
what happened."
"Mankind says that it wants
the answer, but if anyone suggests
an answer they say, 'How dare
you! How dogmatic. How dare
you give us an answer!," said
Goodwin.
The mood of the audience
almost turned to weeping as he
played, Let It Be. He talked
mournfully of people self-inflicted
ignorance of the Universal
reference point.
"People want something to
cement them together. I feel that
the Beatles will never again record
a record until they find this
cementing force, the Universal,"
he said.
"I feel that I have found the
Universal and I dare to given an
answer.
"It's a three letter word,
G-O-D. I don't mean the old man
with the white beard, or the
hang-up you had as a child, but an
infinite personal God.
Goodwin.
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CLOSING DATE 12 FEBRUARY, 1971
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
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DOWNTOWN - PARK ROYAL - BRENTWOOD Tuesday, November 24, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Clubs, student
part of school
Ready, set, go. High school visitation is just
about on its way.
Out of over 100 visitation applicants, 90 will be
sent along with 90 from B.C. Institute of
Technology to various cities throughout the
province.
The visitation committee is working under the
auspices of the Alma Mater Society external affairs
office.
Fifteen reps from UBC and 15 from BCIT will
go on each trip, visiting secondary schools in each
city.
The committee is presently planning visits to
schools in Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Salmon Arm,
Vernon, Trail, Nelson, Kelowna, Penticton,
Kelowna, Quesnel and Prince George.
The visits will be made in six separate trips
throughout January and Februrary.
The idea of the visitations was at first a
politically charged issue, according to visitations
committee treasurer Peter Insley.
"It was a question of financial priorities. The
AMS found they could not designate the $3,600 to
the program as they had originally planned," he
said.
The committee budget had allowed almost
$2,000 for transportation costs to the various cities.
Now, BCIT plans to supply two busses for the
trips and donate $500 to the committee as well.
The AMS has alloted $1,500 to the project, and
the Alumni Assorication has donated $ 1,000.
Kamloops Senior Secondary, which was
originally scheduled for a visitation, has asked to be
situation —
visitations
withdrawn from the project.
In a letter to former external affairs officer
John Zaozirny, school principal J. E. Tait said, "Our
experience last year was that your representatives,
although they were charming people, had little to
present to the students."
"This kind of reaction is what we're trying our
utmost to avoid," said Insley.
In a possible attempt to conscript new students
the faculty of forestry, together with the forestry
undergraduate society, has prepared 1,150
pamphlets explaining employment possibilities and
describing the faculty to be distributed by the
committee.
Where formerly high school visitationers went
to local schools and told students only of admission
policy, various faculties, and our glorious
administrations, they will now be telling of clubs,
committees, and the student situation, as well.
Rock awards 71
A Canadian pop and folk music competition
will be held for college students in 1971.
There will be four regional competitions, in
Quebec, Ontario, a Western and an Eastern
province.
The competitions will concentrate exclusively
on pop/rock and folk music, with emphasis on the
student's talent in composition and arrangement, as
well as their vocal and instrumental talent.
Posters giving the details for entering the
competitions will be put up at various locations
throughout the campus.
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988-6220 Parking at Rear
10% Discount to all UBC Students with Cards
BERNARD'S
BARGAIN STORE
3217 W. BROADWAY
CASUAL WEAR
SLACKS
For Casual Wear in style and
comfort. Stripes. From pin stripes
to bands of color — All
Perma-Press. Sizes 30-36. $10.50.
JEANS
In differential denim 13% oz. flairs.
Hip huggers. Sizes 30-36. $8.25
SWEATERS
Bulky Knit or medium weight,
mock turtle, crew or V-neck —
Diamond pattern and rib knit —all
are washable — Assorted colors.
Sizes: S-M-L-XL. $5.75 to 9.95.
SHIRTS
In deep tones, pink, bornw, green,
blue, gold. Perma-Press Sizes
14X-16K. $3.75.
WORK SHIRTS
or Sports shirts, regular cotton, in
green and brown — light and heavy
weight doe skin, $1.89 to $3.35.
INSTRUCTOR
SKI JACKETS
Nylon - Light-weight and warm,
hidden hood — blue, brown, green,
gold. Sizes S-M-L-XL. $13.50
YOUR QUESTIONS ON
ABORTION
1. How quickly can arrangements be
started?
2. How promptly can surgery be
scheduled?
3. What are the qualifications of
the surgeons?
4. Where will the abortion be performed?
5. Will it be painful?
6. What abortion procedures are
commonly used at different
stages of pregnancy?
7. How much will it cost?
8. Are there residency requirements?
9. What is New York's legal age for
abortion?
10. When would I need parental consent?
11. Is a professional abortion service
taboo or does it perform legitimate services?
12. How much does a referral  cost?
CAN ONLY BE FULLY
ANSWERED BY
PROFESSIONALS
First three answers: 1. Immediately 2. Within 24 hours 3. Qualified gynecologists or specially
trained surgeons. For more answers, speak to a nurse, social
worker or psychologist at Professional Scheduling Service.
(212)490-3600
24 HOURS/365 DAYS
PROFESSIONAL
SCHEDULING SERVICE.Inc.
545 Fifth Avenue, New York City 10017
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat I n - Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.        224-6121
GOBLIN
If that Halloween mask
happens to reflect the way you
feel, the reason might be as
simple as the wrong sanitary
protection. Maybe you're just
suffering from a case of an uncomfortable sanitary pad and
belt.
The remedy is a simple one:
internally worn Tampax tampons. They can't give you that
ugly feeling because, very
simply, you can't feel
you're wearing them.
And they don't show.
In fact, there's nothing
to cause you discomfort or embarrassment. No matter what
your costume is.
Tampax tampons are easy
to carry in your pocket or purse.
Easy to use. Easy to dispose of.
And very easy to get used to.
I
DEVELOPED BY  A  DOCTOR
NOW  USED BY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24,  1970
TUESDAY
UBC THEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
SAILING  CLUB
Lecture in Bu.   104 at noon.
SONGFEST COMMITTEE
Meeting in SUB 113 at noon.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
Meeting in Angus M at noon.
FINE ART GALLERY
Poetry  reading  by   Ray   Kiyaoska   at
noon in Fine Art Gallery.
CIASP
Film in Upper Lounge in International
House at noon and 8:30 p.m.
GERMAN   CLUB
Meeting    at    noon    in    International
House 102.
'tween
classes
CANOE   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting in Bu.  104 at noon.
PRE-MED
Meeting in Wesbrook 100 at noon.
CLASP
Conversation   Class   at   4:30   in   Aud.
Annex 145.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting at noon in St. Mark's College.
AIESEC
Meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
pa™
EAT IN 'TAKE OUT* DELIVERY"
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
UBC  TEAM CLUB
Meeting with future mayor Gibson at
noon in SUB 207-209.
ARCHEOLOGY  SOCIETY
Meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
LIFE SCIENCES
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
ONTOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
Meeting in Bu. 232 at noon.
LIBERTARIAN   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 130 at noon.
THURSDAY
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Film "Les Cliouans" at noon and 7:30
p.m. in Bu. 104.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Film at noon in SUB 205.
PRE-DENTAL
Meeting   in   Lounge   of   Dental   Bldg.
at noon.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting in SUB 207-209 at noon.
T-BIRD
Meeting in SUB 119 at noon.
MARKETING  CLUB
Meeting in HA 215 at noon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED   MINISTRIES
"Celebration"   at   noon   in   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CUSO
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
PRE-MED
Meeting in front of Wesbrook 100 at
noon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED   CAMPUS
MINISTRY
"Creative Power" at 5:30 in Lutheran
Campus Centre.
FRIDAY
VARSITY  DEMOLAY
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
VCF
Meeting in SUB party room at noon.
Full Facilities
RED APPLE
RESTAURANT
41st & E. Blvd.
aW Wdcome
To be our guest ot
AN ORIENTATION MEETING
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
TUES., NOV. 24th _ 8 P.M.
HOLIDAY INN-1110 HOWE ST.
rrr     • The amazing power of a trainPd memory.
jrr "   • How tu €tiii<'klr develop more pitise and
**■"*•• s<-lf-)M>niidrmc
• How to set along even better with people.
• How to communicate more effectively.
BOTH   MEN   AND   WOMEN   INVITED—NO   COST   OR
OBLIGATION
Presented by
T. W. THORFINNSON AND ASSOCIATES
535  Weft Georgia St. Telephone 688-8277
#4
POPULAR MISCONCEPTION
Insurance is dull and
so are the people that sell it
This misconception has been circulating tor years.   It was
probably started by a life insurance agent who wanted to keep his
favourite resort in Tahiti from becoming overcrowded.
We've heard somewhere around 168 misconceptions just like this one.
Why don't you drop into the placement office and ask about
Crown Life's Graduate Career Programme.
We'd like to talk about some misconceptions.
CROWN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY - TORONTO, CANADA
B.C. MAINLAND AGENCY
1550 West Georgia St., Vancouver 5, B.C., Tel. 682-6511
CROWN LIFE REPRESENTATIVE
ON CAMPUS NOVEMBER 30 & Dec. 1, 1970
The computer industry will pay
good money for your brain.
Billions  of dollars are spent on computer operations
every year.
By 1975, there'll be twice as many computers as there
are today.
Plus,    there'll    be   thousands   of   programmers   and
computer operators needed.
One of them could be you.
All it takes is making a decision and the right training.
McKay Technical'; Computer Education  Program   is
open   to  exceptional   high   school  graduates,  people
with some college experience and university graduates.
It offers a  complete education   in  the  principles of
electronic data processing. To prepare you for a career
as a computer programmer.
This tuition is very intensified and very complete.
Everv instructor is a veteran computer pro. And you'll
get      hands-on-training     with      the     latest     Univac
computers.
If you want to learn the ins and outs of computers
from   the   people   who   know   them, just  return   the
coupon. Classes are forming now.
204-510 W. Hastings,
Vancouver, 684-3361
McKAY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
NAME AGE
ADDRESS    CITY	
CLASSIFIED
Roto* Student Faculty t Ctob-3 line*, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified Ada are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION 8LDQ., Univ. ot B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
CfcMtai Deadline is 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
WOULD PERSON REMOVING
brief case Fri. night T.-Bird Shop
turn notes in Lost and Found.
REWARD. $15. BROWN LEATHER
saddle purse. All identification
inside. Phone Margie McEachern,
943-5533.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
SKI INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mtn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included. See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14, Grnd. fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., Wed. and
Fri. noon.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
Valu). Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat, till 7 p.m.
THE MOON: GAYS DATING ASSN.
Wide   choice   of  dates.   Fully  confidential.    Legally   approved.    Tel.
733-8754 or Box 3835,  Van., B.C.
LEARN  TO SKI  AT
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 ^includes return bus transpor-
taion; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver  9.  Tel.  738-3128.	
SPECIAL MARKET SUNDAY NOV.
29. 2-5 p.m. 2054 Trafalgar (off
4th). Ph. 738-7809. Old fur coats,
bean-bag chairs, rugs, boutique
clothes for Men & Chicks. Antique
clothes — Wine will be served.
WOMEN'S LIBERATION AL-
Uance Founding Conference on
November 29, 12 Noon. SUB Party
Rooni. Interesting Discussions. All
welcome.
THIS' WEEKEND SUB THEATRE.
Traffaut's explosively funny film,
"Stolen Kisses". Fri. & Sat., 7:00,
ff:30; Sun., 7:00. Nov. 27-29. AMS
50c.   Non-AMS  75c.	
HAVE A BEAUTIFUL BIRTHDAY
Sheila and Some Sweet Life-
dreams. Sunshine Friends and
Happiness. G.
16
Travel Opportunities
CHARTERS U.K.. CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2S55 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
17
Wanted—Information
WOULD ANYONE IN~T O T E M
Park area Saturday night (Nov.
21) who may have seen anyone
near the Motorcycle Parking Area
please phone 224-9813 — Brian,
Room 273. My bike was stolen —
Reward.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
NEED TRANSPORTATION? 1957
Dodge Custom-Royal, full running
order. $150. or close offer. Phone
929-4026.	
MORRIS MINOR 1968 HARD TOP,
26,000, good condition. Phone 261-
3728.	
1966 CHEVELLE MALIBU SS-
Hdtp., PS - PB, Radio, Bucket
Seats, etc. $1300 or offer? Must
sell by Dec. 15. Between 5 and 7
p.m.   Larry,   224-4765.
Autos For Sale—Cont.
21
'66     CORVAIR,     34,000     MILES.
Automatic. Ph. R. Gross, 224-9820.
1966 CHEV. WINDOW VAN. GOOD
engine, -tires,  brakes.  Offers? 1803
W. 12th.  jjZ. 736-9359.	
1962 FORD FALCON 6 CYLINDER.
Auto,  trans.  Good  condition.  Grey
Call 738-7577.  Good Buy.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
FOR SALE FIVE 735x14 STUDDED
Snow Tires. Phone Doug, 263-7436
4  to  7 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Day Care 8t Baby Sitting     32A
ACADIA DAYCARE CENTER HAS
vacancies. Preference for four-
year-old girls. 224-6255 evenings.
Photography
34
Scandals
37
SEE THE MOST EXOTIC, NON-
sex, but seductive scene ever in
Truffaut's film "Stolen Kisses".
Fri. & Sat., 7:00, 9:30; Sun., 7:00.
Nov. 27-29. AMS 50c. Non - AMS
75c.   SUB  THEATRE.	
CORKY'S MEN'S HAIRSTYLING.
Haircuts For People Who Know
The Difference! 3644 W. 4th. Alma
on  4th.  Appointments.   731-4717.
Sewing Sc Alterations
38
Typewriters  fc  Repairs
39
Typing
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates. 738-6829
after 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.	
TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, Engineering, Social Science,
Psychological Terminology, High
Quality,  Low Charge.  733-4708.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
Electric Typewriter, Shorthand.
325-2934.	
STUDENTS. TERM PAPERS TYP-
ed at a reasonable rate. Call
Yvonne  at 738-6874.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
Neatly, Quickly and Efficiently.
30c per page. Phone 224-0385 after
5 p.m.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
per page. Essays 30c per page —
5c / copy. Fast, efficient service.
Phone 274-3010. Residence Rich-
mond.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Anne  Treacy,  738-8794.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934. ___
"TYPING". 35c A PAGE. PETRA
Wrench,  732-9488."	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
SPANISH CONVERSATION. THE
shortest way to speak. Prof.
Pareja (Colombia, Argentina &
UBC) will teach, $3 hr. individual,
no group, M to S. 10 to 9. 12 hr.
paid in advance. 1405 Cypress
(nr. Cornwall). Ph. 738-5692.
Tutoring—Cont.
64
WILL RECEIVE STUDENTS FOR
Study of Peking Language (Man-
darin).   Near U.B.C.   224-6524.	
TROUBLE WITH COURSES? UBC
Tutoring Centre has qualified
tutors in almost all university
subjects. Register now and pass
that Christmas exam. SUB 100B,
228-4583, 12-2 p.m. weekdays.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student Telephone Directory
NOW AVAILABLE $1.00
at the  Bookstore  and
AMS  Publications  Office
Pre-Sale tickets  redeemed only at
Publications Office
1 DOWN FILLED SKI JACKET
Size 40-42, $30; 1 pr. (new) Tyrol
Climbing boots, size 7, $45. Phone
224-0942.	
NOW — 200 USED FUR COATS,
Jackets, Capes etc. $15 - $100. We
buy, sell or trade. Also custom-
made Canadian Fur Rugs and Fur
Bedspreads at Guaranteed Savings. Open only: Fri. 7 p.m. to
10 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Pappas Bros. Sell. 459 Hamilton
St. at Victory Square. Bus. phone
681-6840; Res. 224-4597.	
SMALL WHITE SHEEPSKIN
Coat  from  Greece.   266-8070.	
REMINGTON STANDARD TYPE-
writer in excellent condition. $70.
or best offer. Phone 224-1400 even-
ings.	
STERED FOR SALE — 5 COM-
ponents. Monarch Amplifier, 12"
EMI Speakers, Sony Cassette
Tape Deck, Elac Changer, Timer
&   Accessories.   Offers.   732-9806.
SELLING MISC. BOOKS, HOUSE-
hold items, Beds, Chairs, Tables.
Very Cheap. 732-9806. Also Stereo,
12"  T.V.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
 81
BRIGHT ATTRACTIVE ROOM IN
young household. Kitchen privs.,
phone, washer. Near U.B.C. $50
p.m. plus some baby sitting. Girl
only.  228-9597.	
QUIET ROOM FOR QUIET STU-
dent. Private entrance. Lt. cook-
ing.  Near Gates.  $50.   224-6795.
WINTER IS HERE! LIVE ON
campus and avoid cold morning
commuting. Rooms with kitchen
privileges on campus. Clean linen
weekly. $50/mo. Ph. Bill, 224-4530.
5760   Toronto   Rd.	
LARGE DOUBLE ROOM. COOK-
ing facilities. Close to UBC and
transportation. House privileges.
$40  each.  738-1895.	
FOR RENT NEAR UBC GATES.
LHK room for male student. Non-
smoker. Available Jan. 1.  224-9125.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR GIRL.
Bathroom, separate entrance. Nr.
U.B.C.  Available Dec.  1.  224-0650.
Room & Board
82
2 - 3 WELL DISPOSED GIRLS TO
share large room in large house.
Phone 266-2863 5 to 7.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apts.
84
WANTED — PERMANENT UN-
furnished accommodation on/near
Campus. Mature student, with
shower. 228-8282.
Halls For Rent
85
INTIMATE DOWNTOWN NIGHT-
Club available — Parties etc. Call
683-9937.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Tuesday, November 24, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Grapplers finish
in fourth place
The Thunderbirds finished
fourth out of twelve in the team
standings at the UBC Invitational
wrestling meet Saturday.
Seattle Pacific College placed
first, the University of Washington
Huskies second, Central
Washington third, UBC fourth,
Western Washington fifth,
Portland State sixth and SFU
squeaked into ninth place.
In the individual weight classes,
UBC's Larry Graves placed fourth
in the 118 pound class. In the 142
pound class Bruce Grist and Rick
Gartell came third and fifth
respectively. Les Burgenger placed
third in the 167 pound class. And
in the 177 and 190 pound classes,
Taras Hryb came second while Bill
MacDonald placed fourth.
In most of the other weight
classes the American wrestlers
saturated the top positions. Bruce
Grist's final bout ended with a
loss by points to Central
Washington. Had Bruce's
condition been better he could
have held off his opponent with
the lead he obtained in the first
round and have placed second.
Gartrell pulled off an upset by
pinning Seattle Pacific College's
representative in 22 seconds.
Considering this is Rick's first
year of wrestling his future looks
very promising.
Les Burgenger defeated Seattle
Pacific College and lost by a
decision to the Huskies in a hard
fought match. There was a repeat
performance of last year in the
177 pound weight class when
Hryb lost a 1-0 decision to Ken
Hager of Seattle Pacific after a
nine minute bout.
Bill MacDonald easily defeated
Central Washington but failed to
Skydivers down to earth
place fairly well in meet
Last Saturday and Sunday the
Western Intercollegiate Parachute
Competition was held at
Abbostford, B.C.
Hosted by the UBC Skydiving
club the university teams came
from western Canada,
Washington, and the Vancouver
area.
Junior, intermediate and senior
events were scored on two
accuracy jumps while novice
competitors were judged on style
in the air, on landing and canopy
control.
The team event was on
accuracy jump from 3300 feet, all
four members exiting the aircraft
on the same pass and landing at
spaced intervals.
An out in the senior event was
classed as 10 meters while an out
in the other events was classed as
100 meters.
In the senior class UBC did not
place in the top three at all.
However, in the intermediate class
H. Penner, S. Blechingberg and A.
Smith, all of UBC placed first,
second and third respectively.
In the junior event only one
jumper from UBC placed and that
was L. Smith who tied with
Western Washington's D. Jagger
for third place.
In the novice event UBC again
placed third in the person of G.
Jensen.
Finally, in the team series UBC
placed second behind the
University of Alberta and ahead
of Western Washington.
DR. BILL GIBSON
TEAM CANDIDATE FOR MAYOR
SPEAKS WED. NOV. 25
SUB 207-209
12:30
One of the
Most Useful Books on Campus
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Buy Your Copy Today
at THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS & BUS. OFFICE
S
Rugby team best
win 8 th in row
*tf-
iv •
do the same with some of the
other wrestlers. The end result
was Bill MacDonald in fourth
place and Central Washington
occupying second.
The Thunderbirds will be
having a dual meet with Western
Washington December third at 2
p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium.
As space will not permit
extensive write-ups on hockey and
basketball in this issue they will
appear in Friday's paper.
UBC Rugby Thunderbirds
notched win number eight in
league play Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Seven hundred rugby fans
enjoyed a better game than the
30-9 final score indicated.
UBC opened the scoring early
with Ray Banks kicking three
penalty goals, two from
considerable distances. After a
slow start Georgians began to
show some interest in the match'
and added two penalty goals.
Second row Bob Jackson, a
stand-out in line-out play
throughout the match, asserted
UBC dominance shortly before
the half capping off a strong team
drive. The score at the half: 12-6.
Georgians played stronger in
the second half but UBC's kicking
strategy repeatedly tested a weak
defence.
The Birds winger Spence
McTavish scored on a blocked
clearing kick and Banks' convert
made the score 17-6.
The match remained a contest
on a penalty goal by Georgians
but UBC charged back and winger
John Mitchell was awarded a
penalty try when brought down
from behind as he chased the ball
into the end zone.
Good defense prevented more
scoring by UBC as they began to
run at will late in the match. Robx
Burns contributed a try as a result*
of good rucking by the Bird pack.
It was unconverted.
Mitchell added his second trys
of   the   afternoon   on   a   goo#*
individual    move    in    the    last
minutes.
The    Birds    are   favored   toA
capture   the   championship   but;
have      two      tough      matches^
remaining    against    Ex-Britannia
and an improved Meralomas Club.
UBC Braves strengthened their
hold on the Second Division lead
with a convincing decision over
Georgian II's. As usual the Braves
pack was the margin of victory.
The backs played strong
defensively and showed occasions
of offence. Highlight of the match
was a 50 yard penalty goal, by
prop Don Crompton, which
bounced in off the cross-bar. The
final score was 15-3 in favour of
UBC.
take the worry
out of buying
equipment
Don't Do This!
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SKIS by
*  FISCHER     *  HEAD     *  ROSSIGNOL     *  KASTLE
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IVOR WILLIAMS
SPORTING GOODS     SKI     DEN
2120 W 41st     Open Daily 9-6 Thur. — Fri. 9-9       261-601 1 Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1970
CIVIC ELECTIONS
PART SIX •
Gargrave hesitant to run
By JIM DAVIES
"This is the most exciting thing
I've ever done in politics."
That's Tony Gargrave's
impression on running for mayor
in the city of Vancouver.
Gargrave, heading the half-slate
of candidates representing the
NDP, is enthusiastic about the
forthcoming civic elections and
about his chances in them.
"I think the vote will be split
three ways between the
candidates.It's going to be close."
"The person who gets in will
win by some 2,000 votes."
Gargrave told The Ubyssey
Monday that he was rather
hesitant to enter the mayoralty
race.
"I was asked by my party to
run. However, I was reluctant to
enter the public life again."
(Gargrave was the NDP MLA
for MacKenzie from 1952 through
1966.)
"I told them no, no, a
thousand times no, but they
thought I meant yes."
21 years in politics
But, Gargrave says, the party
finally was able to convince him
to overcome his reluctance and
enter the race.
Asked why he felt he was
qualified to be mayor of the city,
Gargrave replied, "I understand
politics and what's more
important. I understand
Vancouver."
His political understanding, he
says, is based on the fact that he
has been involved in politics, for
the most part on the provincial
scale, for the last 21 years. In that
time he has been either a
candidate for office or a campaign
manager for another candidate.
He says "every community is
run by a power structure" and he
maintains he is familiar with the
one which controls this city.
Gargrave had a few words to
say about his opposition in the
election.
Bill Gibson, the TEAM
candidate, was criticized earlier by
Gargrave because of his (Gibson's)
political inexperience.
"He's a nice psychiatrist,"
Gargrave said Monday.
'Campbell not well'
His words for Campbell were
far less complimentary.
"I don't think he is well,"
Gargrave said.
The mayor's handling of youth
was heavily criticized by Gargrave.
"Unemployment of youth in
Vancouver has reached enormous
proportions. Last month the
unemployed persons under 24
years of age was 11.4 per cent.
"This figure may go as high as
20 per cent in February."
"The jobs are not there, there
is an alienation of youth, you
have a city hall that doesn't
understand youth or is hostile to
youth, and there are several
professional revolutionaries in the
city.
"Add to this a mayor who
exploits the youth issue and you
get one of the most explosive
situations that this city has ever
known."
Vancouver a friendly city
Gargrave describes the current
youth situation in Vancouver as
"a powder keg" and says he
expects a major incident to come
in January or February of next
year unless attitudes change.
"The city is going to need a
stable, steady hand this winter."
Gargrave added that this
situation could have been easily
averted.
"Vancouver is a friendly city.
The mayor should have told the
city's citizens that there was an
emergency, that the young people
had no jobs, no adequate housing,
and were being alienated.
"He could have appealed to the
churches and civic clubs for help.
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TONY GARGRAVE . ..
'I know politics'
I am sure the city would have
responded warmly."
"Vancouver is not a city of
rioters, it's a city of warm
people."
"We must remember that
leadership is cheap but police
protection is expensive."
Gargrave critical
Gargrave was critical of
Campbell's handling of the War
Measures Act. "Mr. Campbell is a
lawyer, but after that it's hard to
believe."
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Civic pride is the entity which
Gargrave feels is most important
to Vancouver.
"We should all walk the streets
with dignity - rich or poor.
Civic pride is important
"Civic pride is more important
than bridges, tall buildings and
monuments."
"The city of Vancouver should
be a beautiful, safe and just city in
which people are proud of their
city and of their mayor even if
they disagree with him."
Gargrave says: "We've never
had a mayor who has really
understood his duties."
"The trouble with our present
council is quite simply a desperate
mediocrity, an incredible
mediocrity."
Specific issues
Gargrave expressed thoughts
on the following issues:
Pollution: "The city can
enforce its own bylaws. We can
start by treating our own sewage."
"Local industry wants
leadership. It wants to know what
the ground rules are."
Parks: "Stanley park is in
serious danger of over-utilization
what with the pollution, traffic,
and whale pools."
"Cars and pedestrians do not
mix. City parks have been
designed by engineers for
engineers. Soccer and baseball are
fun     but     there     should     be
somewhere where people can go
to sit and talk."
Trees: "I am opposed to tlu
removing of trees and widening of
streets in the West End."
"What is needed there are
places other than beer parlors
where people can go and talk."
"The concept of community
centres being only for persons
who enjoy pottery or ping pong
should be chucked out. They
should be extensions to our own
living rooms."
Tax on gas
Rapid Transit: "This will cost
the city $300 million and will
have a completion date, of 1990
with some operation in 1985."
"It will be paid for by an
additional one cent gas tax and
one cent diesel tax."
False Creek: "This should be a
mix of parks and residential areas.
"The housing would also be a
mix, ranging from subsidized to
non-subsidized to luxury types.
Any high rises should be kept on
the hill away from the waterfront
view."
Housing "Housing is our most
difficult internal problem in
Canada."
"If   elected, I    would    put
pressure       on the       federal
government   for more   mortgage
funds."
The Election: "I think I have a
good chance to be Vancouver's
next mayor."
STUDENTS FOR
DR. HARGER
Need Your Help
to Get a Man on
PARKS BOARD
Who Gives a Damn
Volunteers
684-1755 or 224-3975
a Rim By FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT
"STOLEN KISSES"
a SUB Film Soc presentation
FRI. 27 & SAT. 28 - 7:00 & 9:00
SUNDAY 29-7:00
Students 50c — Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM

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