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The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1970

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Array PROVOCATEUR GEAR Rudi Reschke appeared for his second fighting engagement
at the internationalists' table in SUB Thursday. Reschke, the big guy above right, is an
ex-B.C. Lions man. But here he's had his shirt torn after an attack from a small female
internationalist who got in her licks.  Reschke is shown pausing before ripping up
—dave enns photo
literature from'the table and thumping out one of its occupants. Some spectators were
also injured in the brawl that pitted 25 Gears against three internationalists. (Were the
Gears worried?)
p. 3 — Rankin and Gibson rap on civic policies
p. 15 — Who are the Internationalists?
p. 20 — An   in-depth   look   at  the   15th   annual  B.C.
Federation of Labor   Conference
Vigilante gears brawl in SUB
Police allegedly told a group of engineers to organize
a vigilante committee to get the internationalists, a Maoist
group, off campus.
Thursday noon, a fight broke out in front of the
internationalists' table on the main foyer of SUB.
During the fight,   engineering undergraduate society
president Chris Green told The Ubyssey, "We asked the
police  to  drive   these  guys  (the   internationalists) off
campus.
"They told us they didn't want to have anything to
do with it and said 'Why don't you guys organize your own
group to toss them out of the building?' "
(The internationalists, who have been passing out
their literature in SUB for several weeks now, are
associated with the Canadian Student Movement.)
Green told student council later Thursday that he had
been talking to a member of the Vancouver detachment
of the RCMP who told him the matter would have to be
handled by students.
A campus RCMP spokesman, however, told The
Ubyssey that any vigilante group action would leave the
Quebec media rap police censors,
will judge the news for themselves
QUEBEC (CUP) — Despite numerous threats and
words of caution from Quebec justice minister Jerome
Choquette, the Quebec media have decided to print
stories they consider newsworthy.
CKLM, the French-language radio station which has
been used by the Liberation Cell of the Front de
Liberation du Quebec to communicate with government
officials, and the Montreal Gazette, have both stated they
will use the information they receive from or about the
FLQ according to its news value.
CKLM news director Pierre Pasceau said Tuesday that
for the past month or more they have been trying to get
along with the police and the justice minister. Pasceau
said, "I've had it ... from now on we decide whether to
use FLQ material."
Pasceau decided he had "had it" after he received an
authentic communique and handed it over to police chief
Maurice St. Pierre who said the police would give him a
copy of it, but did not bother to do so.
"I felt it was an important communique ... it was a
lot like the original manifesto," Pasceau said.
"The next time I'm going to copy it first and to hell
with them. They can have it after we've got a copy."
Pasceau said there have been general warnings to the
station by the minister to "be careful."  It's not direct
, censorship, it's much worse than that, it's indirect," said
Pasceau.
An unnamed Montreal Gazette senior editor agreed
with Pasceau. He said they will make future decisions on
using kidnapping and FLQ news on the basis of its news
value.
Last week the Gazette was threatened with
prosecution by Choquette because it had released the fact
that the police were in possession of a new Liberation Cell
manifesto and a picture of James Cross.
Another Gazette editor said at least one other story
had been killed by the "indirect censorship" of the
Quebec authorities. He said it was a direct result of
government pressure.
The story criticized police work in the kidnapping
case: However the story was not used after a Choquette
aide met with a senior editor to discuss handling of
kidnapping news.
Choquette, who has been stating a "hands-off' policy
to the media for some time now, held an "off-the-record"
meeting with about 40 news editors on Nov. 2. He said he
expected the media not to interfere with police work in
the kidnapping by publishing or airing news irresponsibly.
Choquette asked the newsmen not to publish
anything received from the FLQ.
He also warned them to conform carefully to the War
Measures Act in their coverage of the crisis.
Federal justice minister John Turner, houwever, still
maintains that nothing is preventing the Quebec
newspapers from printing statements from the FLQ.
groups responsible liable to charges under the criminal
code.
Thursday's fight was the second scuffle this week. On
Tuesday noon there was a fight involving primarily the
same people.
On both days, a man identified as Rudi Reschke
see council story,
 page 2	
(former B.C. Lions tackle and fourth year engineering
student) provoked a fist fight with the internationalists.
George Driedieger, Ph Ed 4, said Thursday he heard
Reschke muttering things to the effect that he wanted "to
get at the bastards and kill them."
The man identified as Reschke ripped up literature,
broke a woman internationalist's glasses, and may have
broken one man's nose.
About 25 large engineers were on the scene Thursday,
pushing and shoving.
The three internationalists fought back.
An assault charge has been laid against
internationalist Rick Hundal as a result of Tuesday's
fights.
Former UBC student Erwin Epp was attacked by
Hundal after he had tried to stop a fight between Hundal
and Reschke. Epp laid the charges with campus RCMP
Tuesday afternoon.
The internationalists say they will not lay charges
because they reject the authority of the courts.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator, Hanson Lau said a
vigilante group could be brought before student court.
Abortion teach-in
What is entailed when a woman in Canada gets an
abortion?
The medical, emotional, moral and practical aspects
of receiving an abortion will be discussed by a panel of
speakers in the SUB ballroom at noon today.
The meeting, sponsored by the Alma Mater Society,
will be addressed by Dr. Phillip Alderman, a North
Vancouver general practitioner, (Mrs.) R. D. Makaroff, a
psychiatrist and D. J. O'Donnell, of the Women's Caucus.
Information literature oh abortions, as well as a
postcard addressed to provincial health minister Ralph
Loffmark demanding abortion legislation reform, are
being distributed at several booths on campus. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970
FRAP  tries  to  dissolve  claims  of  FLQ  link
QUEBEC (CUP) - Paul Cliche,
leader of the Montreal municipal
party le Front d'Action Politique
revealed facts and figures about
the recent Montreal civic election
to a press conference here
Wednesday that show mayor Jean
Drapeau    did    not    win    the
overwhelming victory he has been
claiming.
Surveys show that there was a
mass turnout of voters in the over
50 age group but there were
practically no voters in the 18 to
25 age group. (The group which is
suffering from the greatest
unemployment.)
The overall turnout was 50 per
cent of the 700,000 eligible
voters.    FRAP   won   45,000   of
these votes but not one seat on
the 53 member council.
Cliche also told the press
conference that he is demanding
FRAP   pass   an   anti   Front   de
Senate may hold investigation
over Ryerson sale to U.S. firm
Liberation du Quebec resolution
or accept his resignation. The
FRAP executive voted against
such a resolution Nov. 8. In the
past they said they supported the
aims of the FLQ although they
clearly condemned its tactics.
Cliche said FRAP will
disintegrate if it appears to
condone    FLQ   violence.    "Our
non-violent democratic methods,
despite the repeated dishonest
provocations of mayor Drapeau
and M. Marchand," he said.
FRAP is suing Drapeau for
S3.6 million on the grounds thhat
his election eve statements
claiming FRAP was linked to the
FLQ hurt the reputations and job
security    of    the    31     FRAP
TORONTO - Ontario Premier John Robarts
met officials of the United Church of Canada and
McGraw-Hill of Canada Ltd. Tuesday to discuss the
sale of the church-owned Ryerson Press to the
U.S.-controlled publishing company for a reported
$2 million.
But after the 70-minute meeting in Robarts'
office at Queen's Park, the premier and principals
involved declined comment on what had transpired.
"We had very good discussions," Robarts said.
"But I don't propose to tell you what we
discussed."
Robarts said he plans to meet again with the
two parties, but no date was agreed upon.
In Ottawa, the senate will be asked to
investigate the proposed sale - if the Ontario
government hasn't blocked the sale by next
Monday.
Two Liberal senators — Harper Prowse and
Hazen Argue Tuesday urged the federal government
to prevent the United Church from selling Ryerson
to American owned McGraw-Hill.
They said the senate's banking, trade and
commerce committee should hold an immediate
inquiry into the sale and its implications for the
Canadian publishing industry.
AMS rules against vigilante action
by   two-bit fascist goon  squads'
Student council Thursday night passed a
motion condemning and prohibiting extra-legal
vigilante action against political groups.
The motion, which said such vigilante action
should be prosecuted to the limit under the criminal
code, was passed in light of recent violent
confrontations between groups of students and the
internationalist!, a Maoist organization.
Grad student rep Evert Hoogers, in making the
motion, referred to what he called action by
"two-bit fascist goon squads" in the fights between
the internationalist and groups of students, many
of whom have been identified as engineers.
The meeting was told, by Alma Mater Society
president Tony Hodge and others, that there have
been a series of fights between students and the
internationalist,, who set up their literature tables
in the International House, then Buchanan and
SUB.
Hodge said there have been at least six charges
of assault by individuals against the internationalist
members.
Council was told also that the Maoist group
appears to invite and provoke physical violence
against themselves in order to show how corrupt the
existing political system is.
Thursday noon's fracas involved several
engineers in the SUB main foyer where the
internationalist literature table was overturned.
Hoogers asked engineering president Chris
Green whether it was true that the RCMP had told
him a group of students would have to handle any
eviction of the internationalist   from the building.
Replied Green: "I was talking informally with
the RCMP downtown about what we could do
about the internationalists (because of the previous
violence) and they said the students will have to
handle it."
Green said later that the police had told him
they couldn't enter SUB to deal with the Maoist
group, even if the members were assaulting students,
because of an informal agreement under which
police agree not to enter public buildings at the
university unless officially requested by the AMS or
administration.
Council was told the Thursday fight started
when a young girl .internationalist punched a
student in the head during an argument. The
student apparently walked away but was harassed
by other internationalists who finally ousted him
from SUB.
While this was happening, a large crowd of
students gathered and knocked over the literature
table. A fight then ensued, council was told.
Paul Knox, arts 4, told council a group of
people had "approached the table with the intent of
provoking trouble" and what amounted to a
vigilante action was therefore involved.
Green admitted after the meeting that a group
of engineers had been present during the fracas but
said it was a coincidence, that they were there as
individuals during lunch hour.
University of Toronto student paper
censored by its printer over FLQ news
OTTAWA (CUP) - The University of Toronto
student newspaper The Varsity was censored
Sunday night by their printers who refused to print
the latest Font de Liberation du Quebec
communique.
The communique was sent out in the regular
Canadian University Press wire and mail service
Sunday and was printed Tuesday in The Ubyssey.
J. Robert Chittick, manager of Web Offset
Publications said: "We are going to abide by the
laws of the land," in response to questions about his
decision.
Under questioning in parliament Monday,
justice minister John Turner stated several times
that there was no legal justification for the
imposition of. censorship under the War Measures
Act. He was strongly criticized by former prime
minister John Diefenbaker, who said "the most
dangerous form of censorship had been imposed,
the subtle kind."
party   has  always  used  normal,    candidates.
Harger resigns
as SPEC head
UBC assistant prof Dr. Robin Harger resigned Wednesday as the
president of the Society for Pollution and Environmental Control.
A resolution passed at aconstitutional convention for SPEC last
weekend was the main cause for his resignation he said.
The resolution requires the central executive to contact each of
SPEC'S 38 branches before voting on any matter considered outside the
aims of the society.
Harger said such action would "curb the society beyond
recovery." He said that operations would be slowed down to the point
where SPEC would become simply a litter pick-up organization.
The resolution resulted from a decision made by the central
executive to oppose the War Measures Act which had caused dissent
among the members of society, said Harger.
He said the executive took the stand because prime minister
Trudeau had said the problem involved all Canadians and they felt
SPEC could not operate in anything but a free society which the act
prevented.
However some members of the society felt the issue was not
relevant to environmental control and therefore SPEC should not take a
stand.
Harger said the organization has become too intent on
maintaining the structure behind it rather than the principals it
supported.
"While SPEC grew phenomonally well in the last few years with
many new branches throughout the province it hasn't developed a
common ideology. There are many people with different political
leanings resulting in an extremely fragmented organization," he said.
Harger is currently waiting for the results of UBC faculty review
committee inquiry into the reasons for his proposed dismissal.
ODEON
Varsity editor David Frank read about the
censorship in the Toronto Globe and Mail on a
flight back from Halifax. The same paper also
carried a separate story the next day with several
one or two work quotes from the communique that
The Varsity could not print.
In the place of the communique, The Varsity
ran instead a picture of Robert Lemieux, a lawyer
who defended FLQ prisoners and is himself facing
charges of seditious conspiracy. The picture shows
Lemieux with two pieces of tape in an "X" across
his mouth.
Israel slide show today m SUB
A slide travelogue on modem Israel will be
shown in SUB auditorium at noon today by former
Alma Mater Society president Grant Livingston.
Livingston, who was president in 1947-1948, is
touring British Columbia with his show, Shalom
Israel.
Vogue
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New West
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Shows at
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4:40, 6:50 9:05
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7:30, 9:30
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diary of a mad
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Shows at 12:00, 1:35, 3:35, 5:30, 7:25, 9:25
Coronet
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Shows at  7:30,  9:30
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Shows at 7:30, 9:30
BUTCH CflSSIDV AND THE SUNDANCE KID
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OUR  SERIES  OF  CANNES   FESTIVAL
AWARD  WINNERS   PRESENTS
"THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG'
Color
French Dialogue English Sub-titles Friday, November 13, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
City hall: blue blood in the bush league
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
The problems of a modem city — rapid transit,
unemployment, housing and pollution — were the subject
of a civic election debate Thursday noon in SUB
ballroom.
The speakers: Dr. William Gibson, mayoralty
candidate for The Electors Action Movement, Harry
Rankin, aldermanic candidate for the Committee Of
Progressive Electors, and Mary Trew, League for Socialist
Action aldermanic candidate were sponsored by the Drop
in the Bucket committee, a group raising funds for third
world students to help further their education.
"The big issue for Vancouver that concerns a
mayoralty candidate is the quality of life now and in 20
to 30 years," said Gibson.
"We have a rough outline as to the city functions," he
said. "We must free it of gross and major pollution; and
establish parks for people with leisure time those who live
in high rise apartments and low income families. People
must not be made the butt of arrangements but must
control them — this is a humane city," said Gibson.
"I suggest an underground rapid transit system with
bicycle and pedestrian walks on top," he said.
"I even see the prospect of reaching the
sophistication of the Montreal Metro system, where the
transit subserves cultural purposes by facilitating the
transport of school children to museums, Place des Arts
and other cultural centres," said Gibson.
&*&?**■
—brett garrett photo
THE TROUBLE WITH these porno freaks is that they always try to tell you they're just researching a term paper on
modern culture. Man in the Thunderbird Shop in SUB flips through a mag, ignoring the silly exhortation to pay now,
read later. He is making an obvious attempt to ward off the ill effects of November at UBC.
Fifty engineers want out
The petition will be circulated today at noon in the
main   lobbies   of  the   civil   and  electrical  engineering
Fifty second year engineers have thus far signed a
petition requesting their withdrawal from the Engineers
Undergraduate Society.
The complaints raised in the petition against the EUS
center around the misuse of funds for the infamous
engineer stunts that occur every year.
In the past such "stunts" have been either supported
or condoned by the engineering student body.
"If the EUS does not agree to abolish all stunts,
committed in bad taste, that infringe on civil liberties,
then we (the undersigned of the petition) will approach
the UBC Fees Committee and withdraw our $3 fee for
support of the society," said Owen Hertzman, engineering
physics 2, co-author of the petition.
He feels a sizeable minority of engineers aree not
being satisfactorily represented.
Jim Scott, engineering 2, said: "I'm tired of feeling
the obligation to justify my existence when I tell people I
meet I'm an engineer."
Hertzman and Scott feel confident that most
EUS-sponsored activities will not suffer too extensively
with droppage of fee commitments.
buildings.
Colleges form
national union
OTTAWA (CUP) - Delegates from community
colleges across the country voted 159 to 2 Wednesday to
form an association to serve as an information and
research centre and promote liaison among their
institutions.
The vote followed more than two years of
preparatory work by a committee of the Canadian
Association for Adult Education to establish an
organization that would deal primarily with the problems
and the needs of the colleges.
Delegates to the three day meeting which ended
Wednesday rejected the committee's proposal for an
association with the power "to speak to issues and policies
affecting colleges and their mission."
"The False Creek renewal scheme must be a first
priority. It is ridiculous that Vancouver Iron and
Engineering Works located on False Creek should be
granted a ten year lease for property that is an eyesore
and a fire trap," said Gibson.
"In short, because of lack of action in these areas I
challenge the bush-league type of politics that has infested
city hall," said Gibson.
Said COPE candidate Rankin: "We must stop talking
in generalities and talk on the basis of real issues,"
"We need a democratic form of government that
divides Vancouver into a ward system or area
representation that will represent the different views of
life in city council instead of a blue-blooded hierarchy.
The middle class and entrepreneurs would have two
representatives and the workers the other nine under a
ward system,"said Rankin.
Rankin's feelings about Vancouver transportation
exemplified his approach to the city's problems.
"It would cost 400 million for prospective freeways
and 400 million for a rapid transit system, this totals 800
million and with a dash of inflation one billion — a sum
which the provincial account does not have. I say no
freeways, to ensure a transit system," Rankin said.
He warned that if Vancouver follows plans of CP Rail
to develop False Creek, the city will have an area with a
planned density over that of the West End and housing
that is available to the affluent.
LSA aldermanic candidate Mary Trew is running on a
women's liberation platform.
"Vancouver needs a socialist labour city hall that
speaks to the people. We need a broad-based working
people party, and to the extent the NDP is that we
support it," said Trew, a student at Vancouver City
College last year.
Trew discussed capitalism and the alienation that it
creates on all levels — work, schools, politics, abortion.
She emphasized that people cannot vote then go
home and expect a complete transformation of our
system and its priorities.
Vanier women
freed by keys
No longer will the resident clerks at Place Vanier
residence be forced to watch while couples say "good
night" outside the women's residence. No longer will they
have to escort girls who return after midnight to their
house doors to let them in.
The girls at Place Vanier have keys to the outside
doors to their houses.
The keys were issued Wednesday night to residence
girls who wanted them.
Some girls do not want these keys, it was discovered
in the vote conducted at the residence.
91 per cent of the resident girls voted on the issue,
with 94.3 per cent of those voting, or 85.8 per cent of the
resident girls,'in favour of the keys.
A total of 19 girls in Place Vanier residence voted
that they did not 'want the girls to be issued keys.
Male residents have always had keys to the outside
doors of their houses.
Figures released in the vote to extend visiting hours
revealed that 86.5 per cent of the residence boys voted,
with 92.6 per cent of those voting, or 86.5 per cent of
residence boys approved a visiting hours extension.
91.8 per cent of the residence girls at Place Vanier
voted on the visiting hours extension, with 83.7 per cent
of those voting, or 82.8 per cent of the girls, in favour of
the extension.
94 residents, 39 males and 55 females voted that they
did not want the hours extended.
Area hours have been extended from noon to 10 p.m.
during the week and noon to midnight weekends to 10
a.m. to midnight during the week and 10 a.m. to 2:30
a.m. weekends for the area as a whole, with individual
houses setting their limits within those hours.
God invented sex
Sex is the invention of God, intoned the voice of Josh
McDowell, Thursday, in a pre-taped lecture sponsored by
the Campus Crusade for Christ.
About 40 students sat silently in SUB 205 and
listened to McDowell's views on sex and morality.
"Sex is not just a physical act, it is much more," he
said. "Everytime you have sexual intercourse it means you
give of yourself."
"Sex is not free. It costs you what you are as a
person." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
TAKE    A
Ml
hlEWSPAPE-R-
/Uo~@
And R3ld it up.
Friday, November 13, 1970
n"om take a
MATCH.
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ELECTION   SPEECHES.
4)G,.Siy^'-jo
DAVIES RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Our own v.gtlantes       Bfock peeper strjkes
It was probably inevitable in the current political
climate, but now UBC has its very own vigilante
committee.
A group of engineers and a few allies have once
again appointed themselves guardians of truth, beauty,
law and order, motherhood, maple syrup and the
sanctity of SUB.
Their targets, at least for the moment, are the
internationalists (alias the Vancouver Student
movement alias the Canadian Communist Movement —
Marxist-Leninist or whatever else they call themselves
these days).
Apparently, the engineering goon squads decided
they don't like the internationalists, therefore it will be
fun to beat the shit out of them.
Now the internationalists are not exactly our
favorite people (and we're sure the feeling is quite
mutual), but no one should be subjected to that kind of
intimidation.
The current Canadian political ethic, expressed by
people from Pierre Elliott Trudeau down, is that
unpopular opinions should be outlawed and those who
try to express them crushed as quickly as possible.
Taking their cue from the government, the
engineers went in and physically assaulted VSM
members, overturned their literature table and
destroyed pamphlets.
Engineering undergraduate society president Chris
Green claims the RCMP advised this type of activity, the
cops deny.
It doesn't really matter whether it is Green or the
RCMP who is lying, the fact is that a vigilante mentality
exists in a number of people on this campus.,
There are many reasons for opposing the
internationalists, but the engineers have neither the right
reason nor the right method.
The engineers based their attack on the fact that a
supposedly left-wing group (although the internationalists
are scorned by everyone else on the left) was operating a
literature table in SUB. They didn't agree with what the
internationalists were saying, so proceeded to physically
assault them.
Thursday, the amateur Ku Klux Klan attacked the
internationalists, but who will their victims be next
week? Will the self-appointed campus police force go on
a general rampage, removing everyone whose views
certain engineers don't consider fit for our innocent
ears?
From what happened Thursday, we're afraid that is
the next step.
Despite what the Trudeaus and Campbells are
saying, no one, least of all the kind of goon squad seen
Thursday, has the right to determine what political
viewpoints can be expressed.
We are quite capable of deciding for ourselves who
we want to listen to. When we want help from the
vigilantes, we'll throw them a bunch of bananas and let
them go.
The young man smiled as I sat
down.
However, because I was sitting
in a John in the basement of
Brock Hall at the time, I was not
overly appreciative of his rapt
attention.
"Can I help you?" he gushed.
"Really, I'd rather do it
myself," I grunted.
The rosy cheeked young chap
did not seem to realize that I
desired privacy as he inserted his
head through the large hole in the
biffy stall.
"Don't mind me," he said.
"Just go on about your business
as if I wasn't here at all."
The realization suddenly struck
me that this appreciative observer
must be the infamous Brock
Peeper.
Most certainly, if this were
true, the head which was thrust
through the wall was a force to be
reckoned with. I decided to try to
reason with him.
"My dear boy," I commenced,
"Wouldn't you be more
comfortable with your head in
that hole in that stall over there?"
"It's a nice big hole," I
continued, "and it does have
southern exposure."
The lad assured me he was
quite pleased with his situation
and added that he would like to
discuss student movements with
me.
"I'm not going to discuss that
crap with you," I replied to the
ever-present head.
"Look," he warned while
easing his head further through
the hole, "Don't piss me off!"
"Egad," I thought, knowing
that if the cock-sure culprit
moved his. head any further
through the hole, it would be
almost impossible not to piss the
fellow off.
"I know you have friends who
use the 'rumble rooms' in the
library," he added.
He then told me that there
were several other members of the
Hole-in-the-Wall gang there that
could make things rather difficult
for my buddies.
I attempted to calm the head
down. "We can work this out if
you relax for just one second."
My stalling ploy only served to
rile the Peeper.
"Don't give me any of that
shit," he advised.
"Please, let's not let this matter
get out of hand," I implored him.
"There's no use trying to hold
back anything from me," he
sneered, "I've got you where I
want you."
I was becoming ever more
hard-pressed for a way to relieve
the situation.
"Look, why don't you
vandalize that machine over
there? It's a lot safer than
interfering with people," I said,
trying to change the topic.
"It's no use trying to back out
of anything. I have a finger in all
that goes on around here," he
replied.
"Now listen, there's no need to
get all stuck-up about this," I said,
trying to soothe him. "After all,
we have our ups and downs."
"Give it up," he scoffed, "It's
no use, you can't butter me up
that way."
I decided it was time for more
forceful tactics.
"Maybe you think this is all a
gas, but some people have a job to
do," I said in a menacing tone.
I grew incre asingly
apprehensive as the head's
attitude worsened.
Perhaps I could grab my
umbrella and beat him off with it
before he could engage me in
hand-to-hand combat.
I realized then that violence
was not the answer and that any
attempt to flee the scene would
probably be fruitless.
"Listen Peeper," I pleaded,
"You'll be pulling a real boner if
you keep pestering me."
He chortled.
"You don't understand," I
continued. "If you continue to do
this, even your best friends won't
lift a hand to help you get out of
the pokey.
"You'll be left holding the
bag."
He shrieked and his head lolled
lifelessly through the hole.
As I fled the Brock dingle den,
never again to return, I noticed
the Peeper didn't look very
healthy.
He was flushed.
THEVmSSY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
.228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER 13,1970
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Robin Burgess
GThny Gait
Wife    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate John Twigg
Ass't News    ........ Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo  David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday ,Tim Wilson
Maurice's typewriter and the late
John Gibbs agreed that things couldn't
be much messier. Mike Sasges kept
fratting in the corner, so Judy McLeod
stayed away. Not to be outdone,
Sandy Kassed. Inane Shane McCune
did a perfect fascist pig imitation while
Elaine Tarzwell, Thorn Wescott, and
David Schmidt grunted with glee.
Charlie  Boylan labored all day and
produced a biggie, while Ken Lassesen
bored the degenerate hacks with stories
about sex and the single wabbit. Spiffy
Micky Quig-wig got sick and cancelled
his Saturday grosserama.
Sharan Boylan and lens freak Kevan
Perrins tangled with engineers and
maoists, and didn't escape unscathed.
But, intrepid Jan O'brien survived to
tell the story. Nettie Wild had aches
and pains of her own, but she tried
harger.
Jinney Ladner, dashing Don
Gardner, chilly Kathy Carney, and
daffy Dick Betts snickered
uncontrollably at Jim Davies'
passionate pleas for an inspiration.
Steve Lucas geared at Maureen Gans,
Dave Enns and Dave Bowerman who
were up to their usual darkroom dirties
with Jim Gorman's fish-eye lens.
Good ole Josephine Margolis was the
only sane blorg within earshot when
nifty Nate and Nettie the Wild warned
about a staff meeting at noon today. Friday, November 13, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS
Harger
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Robin Harger case has
reaffirmed the impression by the
public that this university is
determined to remain irrelevant
and keep its head buried in the
nineteenth century academic
sand. It is important that
university members dispel that
notion by thought and by deed.
If publication and original
research in one's specialty are
disallowed in support of the
academic credential because they
are associated with a public
service organization, then clearly
we discourage participation in
community affairs. To make
matters worse, we operate on a
double standard if we allow
original research and publication
resulting from collusion with
industry but do not allow the
research and publication from
SPEC to be considered in support
of the academic credential.
Evaluation for the quality and
quantity of Harger's scientific
efforts can be judged only by his
colleagues in zoology. The extent
to which Harger's academic
responsibilities in teaching and
research at the university have
suffered as a result of SPEC
activities is a burden Harger must
assume. It can be argued that his
efforts in SPEC balance any
deficiencies which might have
accrued at the university during
his involvement in SPEC, but that
is a department matter. That
zoology chooses to ignore entirely
the efforts and results in one's
specialty obtained in the public
service is a university matter.
The matters of the university
have an obligation to define
university policy in this regard. I
can only indicate my support that
service to the community in one's
specialty be encouraged by the
university and encourage my
colleagues to join me in that
affirmation.
D. JOSEPH CLARK
Department of Microbiology.
Hotel
are- again   to   lose   out  by   the
presence of the hotel.
I cannot see any gains for the
students or University by having
this hotel, and feel that it is an
extremely poor choice for the use
of the land — the idea of
something like a psychiatric day
centre seeming infinitely more
worthwhile. I think it will be a
pity and an injustice if this grossly
extavagant hotel is allowed to go
ahead.
ROSS HEDLEY Arts 3
Editor, Ihe Ubyssey, Sir:
In an article in the Tuesday
Ubyssey, it was stated that the
construction of the proposed
luxury hotel would undermine
certain student housing projects
by drawing away anticipated
funds. It seems painfully absurd
to allow a project which would
adversely affect anything so badly
needed by the students as
housing.
It should be noted that this
hotel would also destroy any
possibility of the AMS procuring a
pub in SUB, as the hotel would
have priority (if not exclusive
rights) to a permit for a campus
beer parlor. I am sure the
developer would try to obtain
such a permit as there are
obviously profits for the lucky
owner of the pub.
The effect of this would be
that the booze profits would all
go into the pockets of the hotel
owners instead of being re-cycled
into the student services via the
AMS. Thus, in this case as well,
the students and the University
Signs
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We wish to emphasize that the
main point of our criticism of the
newly erected signs on campus,
was not that we thought the trial
run was so expensive, (as your
story suggested) but that the cost
of the whole project, including
the original signs, was so
extremely high as to be absurd
even to the most ignorant.
If the $127,000 reported cost
is accurate then the average cost
per sign is almost $3,000.
Let us remember that we are
talking about common street
signs. Surely we can have
aesthetically pleasing street signs
at a cost drastically less than this.
After all, $127,000 could go a
long way to covering the Empire
Pool or approximately 250 full
tuition scholarships.
Just how much, as a student
and/or taxpayer, would you be
willing to pay for a street sign.
We strongly feel that persons
capable    of    conceiving    and
approving such exorbitant
projects should not be employed
in institutions which are largely
supported by public funds.
P. A. ALLARD
Law 3
ALLAN R. ROGER
Law 3
'Disgust'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I, and a number of my fellow
students are becoming
increasingly disgusted with the
unreasonable slant found on a
cross-section of Ubyssey columns,
photographs, and reports —
presumably due to editorial
policy.
A particular example is the
series of final page "bulletins"
which are not only becoming
tedious, but also highly
objectionable. They seem to be
inspired mainly by the fact that it
is in vogue to protest. Another
example which should be obvious
to any reader who is even slightly
objective is the bias against the
engineering faculty, which is
admittedly "a wholly owned
subsidiary" of the larger villain,
the establishment."
I find it difficult to believe that
this bias could be caused by a
shortage of people who are willing
to express the other view. During
the Jericho affair a very large part
of the student population took
the side of the "establishment",
but there were virtually no articles
in The Ubyssey in support of that
view.
Whatever  the
paper's   bias,   it
behoove    the
attenuate it.
reason for the
would greatly
editorship,   to
W. D. MUMFORD
engineering 2
Intrigue
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Fortunately, Robin Harger's
case has been somehow brought
up on the scene; and some people
seem to concerned by it. But us
students, do we realize that the
same political intrigues are going
around in most of the UBC
departments? — a politic trying to
eliminate professors with new,
progressive and creative ideas that
do not suit the established
hierarchy.
Why should such a fact remain
hidden from us? Students are
paying high fees, and
consequently they should be
refusing the dictature presently
existing and be demanding their
rights for a better education by
involved people. And only
students have the power to do so
— by supporting competent
professors being maltreated and
by boycotting out-of-date, useless,
program-feeding classes. Refuse
oppression, now!
ANNY RICCI,
Grad Studies
Letters to the editor must be
signed and, if possible, typed.
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for reasons of
brevity, legality, grammar or taste.
EDUCATION WEEK
NOVEMBER 16 to 21
sponsored by
THE EDUCATION UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
MONDAY
NOVEMBER 16
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
9:30-11:30 —   Opening exercises in Faculty of Education Lounge (L)
11:30-12:30-   DR. KAZINSKY of Bio-Science
"SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY & SCIENCE CURRICULUM'
12:30-  1:30 -   DEAN SCARFE address to Education Assembly (L)
1:30- 2:30 -    I.P.E. Representatives on Panel
"THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION"
Events of the entire day focused on Indian Education
(L)
10:30-
12:30- 2:30-
2:30-
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
DR. JOHN ELLIS, Chairman S.F.U. Teacher Training Program (L)
Women's Panel - "WOMEN'S ROLE IN EDUCATION", Room 100.
Slide Presentation & Discussion on the program of the outdoor school
method, "OUTWARD BOUND", Room 100.
11:30-    PROF.    ASHWORTH,    "WHAT    ARE    WE    DOING    FOR    NEW
CANADIANS IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATION" Room 100.
12:30-   Showing of the movie "SUMMERHILL" followed by a discussion of this
school's pros and cons.  A former Summerhill student will be there
during the discussion. Room 100.
2:30-   "SUMMERHILL" replay (optional discussion)
9:30-    PROF.    JORGEN    DAHLIE,   "WHY   STUDY   THE   HISTORY   OF
EDUCATION"
10:30-    JACK   MILES,   "THE   PHILOSOPHY   OF   TEACHING   P.E."   and
discussion (L)
11:30-    PROF. WILLIAM  GRAY, "CREATIVITY: MENTAL HEALTH AND
SELF ACTUALIZATION AND THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL (L)
12:30 -    LORNE BROWN, "OUTDOOR EDUCATION", Room 100
2:30 —    Multi-media presentation.
7:00-Education - P.E. INFORMAL, Banquet and Dance/Tickets $10.00 per
couple, COACH HOUSE INN
Bar 7:00 P.M., Dinner 7:30 P.M., Dance 9 to 1 A.M.
ALL WEEK
RAFFLE TICKETS
THIRST
QUENCHING
PRIZES.
W.Th.F.
TEACHING
MACHINES
WED. NIGHT
OPEN
VOLLEYBALL
GAME
Students vs Profs.
War Memorial Gym
7:00 P.M.
ALL WEEK
SESAME STREET
on TV in (L)
11:00-12:00 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970
CANADIAN STUDENT MOVEMENT literature issuing "a call to youth" lies
crumpled on the floor of SUB foyer Thursday after a Gear vigilante gang raided the
Internationalists' literature table. In the centre photo, the principals shout it out as a
in the
classroom
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Assistant political science prof Mike Wallace bounded
down the stairs in Angus 110 Monday, and the class was
off to a running start.
Two poli-sci 204 students chortled and gave raised
clenched, Power to the People salutes behind Wallace's
departing back as he headed for the front of the room.
The international relations class began with a couple
of Wallace's own humorous thoughts for the day which
got a few laughs from the class.
Then down to business. Wallace dealt first with
changes in technology and the effect of these changes on
the international system.
The myth of technology creating leisure time is a
"popular scenario" these days, Wallace said.
In fact, most developed industrial societies show little
indication of an increase in leisure time. Rather,
technology has been used to create still more material
goods, and the 40-hour week is still standard in most
progressive western nations, he said.
The result has been the creation of artificial consumer
needs and the generation of waste in such nations, Wallace
said.
Relating this to the international system by way of
defence establishments in western nations, Wallace said it
is now very difficult for western nations to cut back on
their defence spending.
Booming defence production has created the need for
highly specialized technical manpower which cannot be
readily transferred to other segments of the economy.
"Many of these people are economically obsolete in
any other context than defence work," Wallace said.
The present defence budget represents an upward
distribution of wealth, and any alteration in this structure
dave enns, daryl tan and kevan perrins photos
crowd gathers, attracted by the scent of a brawl. On the right, two CSM members (the
woman on the left and man in the centre) are poised to rip off a Ubyssey
photographer's camera. Needless to say, they didn't quite make it.
class runs smoothly
("the economic pecking order") would have political
implications, he said.
Wallace proceeded to deal with the effect of
technology on Third World nations
Technology has widened the gap between the
developed and underdeveloped countries, he said.
The developed nations are always a step ahead of the
Third World, he said, and "figures over the past ten years
show that the gap is widening."
In response to a student's question Wallace said he
placed relatively developed socialist countries in the same
bag as their western counterparts.
"They're even buying our computers, if the latest
Scientific American magazine is to be believed," he said.
Another facet of technology is the way in which it is
exhausting physical and environmental world resources.
Economic imperialism as part of overall high resource
consumption, is not necessarily a product of capitalism,
Wallace claimed.
He said it is a way of meeting the economic needs of
any rapidly-expanding country, regardless of its internal
structure.
Wallace cited the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia as
an example. The invasion came about when the USSR was
still trying to consolidate its economic empire among
satellite European nations, Wallace said.
He summed up by saying that modem
super-technology strengthens the present pecking order,
both domestically and on the international level.
He then asked the 150 students present if any of
them could offer further theories on the effects of
technology.
One man suggested that the widened technical gap
between rich and poor nations might have the effect of
raising the consciousness of the Third World, thus making
revolution more likely.
Another student suggested that technology tends to
induce groupings of states in economic alliances, while a
third person contended that technology leads to the
breaking-up of economic unions. An example of such a
break-up might be Quebec and Canada. *
In such a case, unequal distribution of the benefits of
technology would lead one nation to end it's alliance with
another.
Wallace said a down-grading of our technological
system would necessitate a concurrent change in the
system of distribution.
Using a pencil as a conductor would use a baton,
Wallace twirled and gestured his way through a very
interesting hour.
The lecture was well-organized and easy to follow for
the most part. The fact that Wallace sometimes spoke too
rapidly and allowed his voice to drop off at the end of
sentences was not helped by students talking during the
lecture.
Apparently Wallace's constant jumpy pacing and arm
gestures had a hypnotic effect, for two students slept
through Monday's lecture.
Student comment on Wallace generally runs along the
lines of "he was groovy for the first two weeks but it wore
thin after a while."
The average undergrad also complains sometimes that
Wallace is a relatively inaccessible prof outside class hours.
Within the context of the classroom, however,
Wallace is a very good lecturer, with a better-than-average
sense of humor. Most of the students in Monday's class
seemed to get a kick out of the whole production.
Student participation was high compared to most
classes, and Wallace seemed receptive to questions. The
class takes place Mondays and Thursdays at 2:30 in Angus
110.
YEAR-END
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FRIDAY 13th & SATURDAY 14th    1
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7:00 & 9:30                          1
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AND 1 STILL
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Masthead
This week Page Friday was
put together by Grant Dickin,
myself, with Norbert Ruebsaat,
Brian Sheen and Greydon
Moore engineering the
centrespread (newspaper jargon
for two facing pages attached
in the middle). Norbert
Ruebsaat was one of last year's
Page Friday co-editors, and the
centrespread is his thing, it
involves a multimedia
expression of a scientific
theory that ultimately involves
or evolves into a unified field
theory.
Page Friday would again
like to ask students to submit
material. Perhaps some of you
are a little afraid of coming up
to the office and submitting
your soul on paper, but don't
be, there is no reason
whatsoever for this, Page
Friday people are the
friendliest people on campus,
so if you can write something,
then submit it, there must be (I
keep telling myself) more
people on this campus that are
willing to publicly discuss their
views of the arts, the sciences,
anything at all so long as it is
interesting and passably well
written. By the way, we could
use an artist. I don't know if
you have caught on yet, but
there has been a really good
response to Fred Cawsey's
SYNCH a literary section that
comes out every fourth Friday.
I know that many people
criticize this paper on campus,
(understatement), and they
have every right to do so. How
many of you know what it is
really like to put out this
paper? It's not just a matter of
writing, but one of writing,
laying it out so that it doesn't
look like a hill of garbage,
taking it down to College
Printers on Twelfth Avenue,
and helping the printers set it
up for the presses, a process
that takes at least twenty-five
hours a week of an editor's
time.
TIM WILSON, editor
-GRANT DICKIN,
Exec, to the editor
No "Time Out" at
— We Hurry
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PAGE FRIDAY, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970 An Interview with God
on the nature of War
Sandra
God is a well known personality, he has
appeared in virtually every known medium, his
political leanings are unknown, they fluctuate
widely with the time and place of his appearance.
The editor of this paper felt that he would be the
most knowledgeable person to be consulted on
this subject.
Question: You've seen a lot of wars, haven't
you, have any of them made any sense to you?
God: You're right about that, I have seen a
hell of a lot of wars, as to the sense they make,
well it is difficult to tell, but I would say that the
majority of them are indeed quite senseless.
Q.: In what way?
God: Most of them are conducted
atrociously, they have no conception of the
correct use of troops or firepower, they almost
always botch it and the winners only win by pure
luck. This has been my experience anyway.
Q.: Do you take an active hand in any of
these conflicts?
God: Well no. Not really, there's not a hell
of a lot that I can do to help either side, both
sides usually think that Fm with them, and I hate
to play favourites.
Q.: So that means that the wars are the
result of the participants themselves, and they
have nothing to do with you?
God: Well, that's not quite it exactly, I mean
I do have something to do with it, after all, I
created man as a competitive animal, he was a
special project you know.
Q.: Did you intend him to fight with his
own species?
God: No I didn't, at least not in the
beginning, I made a slight mistake, I'm not
perfect you know. Man was supposed to be a
little less prolific than he has turned out to be, as
a matter of fact I really had intended that he
have a much longer gestation period than is the
case.
Q.: How did that come about?
God: Actually, he was really supposed. to
have a gestation period about the length of an
elephant, and the elephant was supposed to have
his, it's three years for an elephant you know.
It's a little hard on them, we could use a few
more elephants, they're very useful. That is in
terms of peacefullness and just general good
nature, they are one of my best I think, very
independent.
Q.: Why didn't you rectify that situation
while there was still time.
God: I hate to admit it, but I got a little
carried  away in  all  the  excitement. Man was
really interesting, the more of them we had in
one place, the more exciting it became, war can
be a pretty exciting thing you know. I suppose I
am guilty of procrastination, but [ have to have a
little fun don't I, after all, it can be a pretty dull
job you know, I have to have some kind of
relaxation. All work and no play makes Jack a
dull boy you know.
Q.: So you make a mistake when you
created him, is there any way mat this can be
changed, we are a little fed up with this sort of
thing.
God: I'm glad you ask that, I have been
thinking about this for quite awhile, I can see a
real problem building up, and although I created
man as one of my special projects, I don't want
him to blow the whole thing. There are a few
things that man could do to alleviate the
situation. First, he could cut down on his
population, there are just too many of you, and
the more of you then the more war: Second,
Tolerance, I never really made enough of a point
of this in previous discussions, but tolerance is
really important. There is really no reason why
you can't all get along together if only you
would tolerate each other, be a little more
patient.
Q.: So birth contol and tolerance are the
main things?
God: Yes, I'd say they are about the most
important, there are other things, but they are all
attached to these two.
Q.: What about the so called New
Generation that is trying to change things a little,
would you say they are alleviating some of the
pressures, especially those that are concerned
with tolerance?
God: Well, they got off to a good start, but
they are beginning to turn into a faction, they
don't really tolerate people, only those that are
like them, long hair whatever, just another
faction until they can tolerate everyone, not just
each other.
Q.: How long do we have before this major
upheaval they you see in store for us?
God: It's hard to say, but about twenty or
thirty years if the levels of tolerance continue to
decrease at their present rate.
Q.: Well, that about wraps it up, is there
anything that you would like to say in parting?
God: Yes, there is something that I want to
say. Sure I made the mistake, but you people
have compounded and exaggerated it beyond
belief, I'm sick of hearing about war and hate,
Yellow Perils and Black perils, what you people
can't see, is that you are all the peril. The Man
Peril.
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Friday, November 13, 1970
THE      U BYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 3 TUiO
This     review     article
(Ubyssey) is the synthesis of a
much     vaster    far    ranging
cosmology in which realities of
astronomy,     astrology,
empirical    sensations,    astral
import     sensations,     and
fundamental   matter  (atomic)
existences are being organized
into    grouping    arrangements
where their insights, principles,
and   concepts,   overlap   each
other.   To  fully devellop  the
sense of what can be conveyed
about   science   by   telepathic
language portrayals of feelings
in poetry, art form, geometry,
layout,     etc.     are     being
incorporated in to the form of
an     emotional     responses
language   to  speak   in   simple
fashion  on many dimensional
levels    of    insight    simultaneously.   The   work   is   slowly
being  assembled into a large
body     of    writing    called
Noname's     Deuteronomy,
whose subsections include: The
Dairy   of   Brother   Mountain,
who is an entity of angel
consciousness (in the human
sense, as manifest through our
physical container forms out
here in reality down on earth)
The following is private
information. At this point I
can't continue alone anymore.
There is no money, no food,
no winter clothes, no
^IWWf|M0R or stationery
suppfleif no ' 'places • t& live
ej«|«i4^,^ day crash
basis, no place ;rffi":'*1*TSrff""
aftyiBOK, Life has becpme.
surrounded by choas and I
peiySiy-"':::5dolft-'-have the
stc$ag|h to monitor the
aI1rMteftlSs'"< 01^ the*'  physics'
aiSSJSR • WjwtiW- There
are "things about the natural
ratjhjjh^eiL.. ®a&molagy -that
science   simply   doesn't know
they   are
there    is    a    vast
r '^Bch'   is    truly'
 ^„ „4lUNE& between.
mail regardless of their state
These things I know to be true,
the Jp£aliz$d.. .fears. ...of
ft aha lucifer and sin
parts of a galaxies wide
spiittial undeistaiidiag in
which love is the realm, and
ttii%% realih, rno«itored by
this universe wide brotherhood
of spirit-mind. It is as real out
there as the xnanifestation of a
dream which comes true in the
esptti realm, or the perceiving
of someone else's thoughts
before they state the words for
it, or the reality of angels
beaming out their love through
the hearts and eyes of many
mortals walking the earth.
ID
tit**.* *fn*iti*t
A~4   UttiK   HMLBS
«AMfi «*»r -
't-fl* *./•**<&
««u«*y - ta*i
to
4A*rt  »■*** J'
3. r?/ * to" <■#*
*« /. Bsr x ro "tst
THIS THEME HAS BEEN T H E D O M IN A NT PU R P OSE OF OUR UNDERSTANDING> £Cf M$^f^^'t&j&$i^lj[M
TELEPATHY ISA BEAUTIFUL INTENSE AWAKENING. SECONDLY, THAT THE COSlf&£&*1f0tf "4 "bCIO^^T^
DIFFERENT STATES OF MATTER SUCH AS SOLAR  SYSEEM AND ATOM AN  O VERALL MASTER MAN 0JFM
THE GRAVITY DANCE
I CAN ANYONE ON EARTH SEE STARS?
.0OOOOOO0O0OOOOO000000O0O0OTi bright photons O00000000000000000000000000.fi.
they are so tiny dim compared to earth energy levels:
pulsars, beatleguese, anandu, andromeda where do your mystics
go for education, and the mind blowing quasars.
THIS IS A STORY JUST FOR FUN
OF STANDING SURROUNDED BY WHIRLING SUNS
BEADS OF DEW
grasp your eyes
there's an inner range
that multiplies your senses
HERE IS A CONCRETE SIMILE
WE ARE ALL YOUR NEIGHBORS
WE STEER THE FERRY WITH AN EYE
TO THE WAVES AND THEIR INTUITION
NOT THE WAY THE GRAPHS SAY
PREDICTED ON THE THERMOMETER
WE DON'T WANT MONEY
at the center of the human psyche
this means at some nearly nonexistentsmall point
somewhere in the center of your brains *> ">
it is hard to imagine on $gt&6 complete scheme of existence
ye) few can say to those who ale sflfl sorting out their neurosis mi day
if the brain is awa« of hades BttpeKapftatejoganoiJieidiiiieaaoB.
and if it is where isit
out in astral space on an energy frequency, or even, gravitational
or in the collective archetypal race mind
container of 20,000 human generations.
who can properly say'
is life inspired by anything more real
than the twentieth century technology
which already threatens to become your past contact with reality.
HOPING THE EXPERIENCE WILL BE MEANINGFULLY HIGH
AS FOR INSTANCE THE FfRST TIME IT IS RAPT
ABOUT THE QUANTUM RATIOS OF 1 HE SKY.
when neptune
radius = T neptune m
oon orbits »=16t   25Ot:
mars deimoS^=1uranus radius   —
jupiter radius
16/5t. saturn radius = 8/3t = n. 2nd ring
earth moon 0 = n x 20/pi.
GR E Y D O  N
when 2/5n = n*
uranus moon 0's = 5n* 8n* im* ,8n* 24n*.
M C
note n* = 2.426 xl09ci
AND NEVER ASK FOR MATERIAL REWARDS      OF THE NATURE MORTALS TRAPPED ON EARTH
MAKE INTO AN IMMORTAL PHILOSOPHY
THERE IS A DEATH OCCURING IN MARY
IT SEEMS CO-INCIDENTAL
TO THIS MOMENT
THIS RESONANT JUNCTURE FISSURE IN THE RHYTHM OF TIME
THAT THERE MIGHT BE A HOMECOMING IN THE SPIRIT OF CHILDREN
IN THE MANNER OF INDWELT THOUGHT ADJUSTERS
USING YOUR EARS AND EYES AND BODIES
AS EXTENSIONS INTO THE GROUND FLOOR WALKING CONDITION
AROUND THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH
AT THE SAME TIME WALKING THE SURFACE OF YOUR MORTAL MINDS.
HIGH KNOWLEDGE TO THE GENERAL MASSES.
POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE NUMBERS ARE LIMITED AS FOLLOWS:
ONE TWO THREE BEGINS AT NOTHING EXPANDING TO INFINITY.
NEGATIVE NUMBERS TRAVEL IN A SIMILAR DIRECTION THREE TWO ONE, OR BETTER, ONE TO ZERO
THEN MINUS ONE CENTIMETERS.
ANOTHER VOICE BEGAN - BY GOD
it is Mr. Human beings own inner voice saying:
1 can tell why many of you can't paint your pictures properly
you can, you know, paint pictures
of wider consciousness
the problem is attitude
the need for security
forge Mjag
intujttotral
flash
MANKIND THE TELEPATHIC DIVINE OR TELEPATHIC ANIMAL
SKAS«BEN DOING IT FOR CENTURIES
ONLY NO ONE GENERALLY KNEW THE TRUTH THEN ...
TELEPATHY
COMMUNICATION IS FEELING.
WE EXCHANGE CONCEPTS
IN EXCHANGBKL
THE FEELING MOOD TO KNOW.
IT FEELS GOOD TO KNOW SOMETHING.
metaphysical concepts of a galactic council
and the eight fold way path leading to nirvana
and higher coceptualizations in a widening gyre to the seventh center of the
seventh universe
known as paradise,
while in the western world the large underworld of hades and devil worship
is at the center of the earth
kind of an einsteinian revelation
in more modern ways
the saga of the world
and the effects of change that are striving at Earth
where man's devine universes should be possible
no one has asked to oe paralyzed by a skeptical reality
our compassion excuses the people who don't exercise telepai
even here we can feel the visions of their inner bodies
receeding far away into their dream world
so far that nothing beyond the
five senses has
meaning.
and the red shift is painfully questionable gainfully
one can not always follow their thoughts ...
... there is only the cold distancing of the day
and the unerringly rhythmical spring summer fall winter
progressions of the cosmic clock into old age
and gloomy parables about their failure to stop the clock, as i
to take them into the afterlife, wherever that might be.
until alternatives can be brought holy into the open
where every mortal can fit them into the 85% of their mind
that isn't being used because it doesn't store information from the ph>
nor consciousness from the ego-logic side of the brain
most of mankind will not make this graduating class
Problems that have to be solved
are so rooted in the cycles
as to be RE *
and ther
not even
These Uesor
and it is pos
through yol
no exper
as to be
But
how to com
time to listen (
as to be paraly
everyday of th
These are the j
who oddly ent
■■ Aimttt*
{■Hi a liny cnlvFiL Imun upon -lie
MiVt
Beings such as I can not ask
for things anymore, only state
our comditions, of monitoring
levej^    and    ojfil   empirical
environment, Jfhich has now
brought myjfervices to you to
jmrnrnmrnmr       . ,
a halt. We cannot persuade you
wi^atsrflisJ* can only
mirror     knowledge,     the
responses are up to you.
The reality is that most of
the basic questions of science
have not yet been answered,
even after three and four
hundred years of search. For
instance, particle charge is still
a mystery, even though some
charges can be talked about in
three-body mechanical
analogies to conditions which
empirically exist as parts of the
solar system.
There is a three body
relativity available for scrutiny
whose operations reveal
frequency     wavelength
characteristics of
electromagnetism as well as
information relating to the
problem of why, in the solar
system, the smaller bodies have
shorter radii of orbit increasing
in mass-orbit to the larger
(Jovian Planets) bodies, which
is reverse in character to the
mass-wavelength ratios of
electomagnetic and Compton
radian phenomena. I can only
let you know that information
HibTuxdofyo
OuttelvVuEvui ejmtpcanliieniliitnn
l^ntr riboiwrnt imiIu
menu & irjsa ilangeloui uttt rtmlMuUarit!
Uunajbt i. jkibuiuw enough
iftfju&kaifciibnm
I lh* rflfomkiinn TO Koa*- wtw truey* ttaj h
([longuM u* llie ftu mad al theeHnWuh*!"1
■ Udtnl ut the ™nrVi in whUi
W- i-
&■£•»'■ W
||fc JMfefe for scrutinv Not hfeii
pimbrtiouav nor  muUv4tul«l
rany mortal- denies there b i
".more reason for me to eo nn
. my   purpose   which   was
'complete the summary for\<
'' when there aft other tiling
^have tQ"do and aren't beii
4'aooe , now   because   of tl
£ energy needed* for the strugj
g£ljtolween ' science    and    t
mmentf jftie   thhw, i
very strliMiMte^W01
PAGE FRIDAY, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970 a
, pilaris i stic* tiy
oMttJ   \je.Lcc<Ty    * \
Colours   ~Poesi jbo;^-
OCCA/lf    /J*J'«'T7VPAi
fbo^s-ti     B..C^O  R«L*ri\Jt
3 E.tij>na»3S
C<m-h     (fir)-1" -3
TV^/u'-vG     7~U/^Ni*>c     ***    7~Ae  up /pf aj/ajg
(*J4T  &*,/**}**   r-»   fcj^ce)
dy*£
2.    P/777X/0     <-M
GET AN   UNM ISTAKABLE  GRASP  THAT
^^0^M0fWMttlfNO TgRMS INFORM A TION  BY  WHICH PEOPLE  CAN
^kff^S $dtAft WYSfBM  IS   RIGIDLY PRECISE IN  ITS MASS,    ORBIT, AND   RADII, AND   THAT BETWEEN   THE
U7#&  VI&ftATtQNS GOVERNS THE WAY   THAT MATTER    BEHAVES.
hidden inside the btm
"3rd ring = 2n. "
ALL of you must live your lives, seemingly. Awareness now,
of the dehuwaaruzrag things forei old by everyone but the politicians
has no a dominant ring in a newly emerging race mind known as the
ttjfeetf sSlage ta tnbal consciousness whatever you might conceive,
tiu$g<gd£$i age race mind of everyday telepathic humans encircles the world
&Eideves the most, as you would catagorize with its implied value judgment
5 — unedacated- cast of people feel by now (1970) that the
politicians who run their countries are in shame.
There JS a growing feeling that the United States is going to implode
into a civil wax between the inter-colored brothers of the human being
and the gestalt clocking consciousness of the human facist machine,
ftgtfon two yearst the tnbal feeling says, if the states don't locate an
alterative to tiie power structure presently being offered without scrutiny.
fa Canada the themes are different, the general race mind tends to stream much
Closer to the levels of tribal talk, even within the politicians, where at the
basic structure of government there is aleader of the opposition who speaks openly
sincere about the oppression of Ihe poor people and working class who include,
of course, the tribal village, but most of all the robbing of the beauty
to ifee machine and threats to the whole earth environment. These tribal feelings
aturn moon «'s = 3n 4n 5n 6n 9n (20n triton, 2Sn 59n
■ tgm. "-
the gravity dance:
these raunchy schemes that are bom into you the moment of  ■»'■ ntgffn ii'likr
over which you have no control
neither the breathing nor the positions of the planets.
The branching ratios of your lives are not so accidental
that very little ultimately happens by chance, "  *}
there are moods and fugues
which blow like winds from ponderously slow melodic lutt pU"-i" a
thro you until the moment you die:
and long after according to some of the channels of exi&rf m1
which seem to have caught your telepathic peoples eyes j! il*
last two and three years
in and around your spatial playpen
ING
tinue
tions
diary
jupiter moon 0's = 3n 7n 11
n (!.»« wnymed.) 31" 1"» ,9*n
ORE
A BRIEF J
COSMOGRAimY
'2 X 20/pi. = earth |(Jnar tf 3 843 x ^
■s
electron wavelength h/m
tend to intensify on the west coast and in Vancouver it is widespreadly believed
that something equivalent to an apocalypse is assuming form in this
richly stoning mystical empirical environment.
Vancouver for many metaphysical (and also magical) ways is going to remain the
sanctuary,
for a period to come. Some incredible new definitions about reality
and life are going to find their way out into the open from here.
the gravity dance:
we know of no independant act of innocence
that is not subliminally submerged in the collective thoughts
in the race mind of those who confine you as in country-city-part-of-the-
world-epoch-racial-cultural-genesis,
and in the genetic RNA stamping rnythm of the dancing cosmic particles
one: existing inside at the heart of every deuteron atom part of you
two: the one whose planet you daily stand on
to watch the sun travel before then behind then before then behind your heads.
Our attitude is so non-professional as to be seen
metaphysically clean we in the soul of man
place our stress on the recognition
of basic intuitions
speaking loward a western metaphysics.
So it is natural that we should visualize for you
symmetries between the dances of the orbits
■*i „ j *••   i « *    -     )u solar system and the
^ l * ile Pi ■      nrt tub atomic particles.
^ 3Rf* p *«.    fit i    " i #>■ I is the poem, the purpose. The
$_?\w i h    d» i P41 Ji rf ■    Mums On why these symmetries exist,
*H t»l 1 */Qi    p "« u   j     jf nsirr odynamic structures we perceive
JSfl.TfHYl   iT     J*r   »*\,  TsiVfd
i\»     '*! 1 ■ «*     *i t Tu -nish the end.
Jje     n lik     • «ji 1 ni*uc mirrors of matter lies a visual understanding.
Tli i" l *■ Kti deeper than earn plane existential errors
Ml   I   *    aud * I    41 Inn* he whole question rests on which is arbitrary —
«fl   ll L  I V
Th pK-WrniTfRi  11*
jut*, iidy In pfiLj*
E0f#iJ«f) in wd   ihtk If ht   nfUy apparent -
the u-iB-piyiua! nir v *<"al iichotomey
cxeari 9 rwu ilillri 11 rdse*   i ihe same feather of reality
in AO dii Km *n
00
<
m
a
ev c = 2.426 x loTsm k f/a
i;....Wi5   *■
a graduating class every 29,000 years? ■ f
what is the solar system doing rotating around the galaxy " ", "...
does the law of planet orbits and periods connect you to this fantulssntfcU^ lfe||p '.
both inside and outside the atoms of your living. ■     -■   *    "'
m-.-lfm*
particles of your emotions differ from year to year *
and man to man
and cycles observe themselves in your recent history :     ■
and we are just now analysing the restlessness and general il-lbfik -
with frequent mood changes of some of your signs ,
over the last seven years due to strange vibrating drums frorn *kliift>
coming upon earth with ridiculously subliminal
electron-like cries '
October through march of these years
until now, 1970, the final year of the conjunction,
next year a gradual settling down of the disturbed inner few 01 ni
which inhabit you.
Cosmic Eye = MC2:
much cold entropy of thought waves
comes to us from America. We can feel it
in our psychic gauges, a vibration •
which pits man to man
and causes atomic
wastes to be
dumped in the ocean,
something long
standing in terms of ego
brings down the telepaths
in your land.
COSMIC EYE EQUALS MC SQUARED
,„.. .-V--.■*■*■ *v t-
.V. »■ -yJC
"     l\ %j£ ■;■-■■    *
%■
y-i'
i ■■■?■ ■
■.-. J-wi ■
■ *■:
. »■ * ■»■
T
4,000 years ago
and 2,000 years ago
some called god said
I am both alpha and omega
I am both the beginning and the end.
:^b Hi* a Nurioiuly ill state right
„' rt«rwj    both    in    terms    of
;en*ironmeiital   poiioning  and
, "flw poisonous thoughts, which
" are still wrong in the hearts and
minds of this specie*  1HI2RE
IS VERY LITTLE TIME  Die
iliaiigjes in scienoik thought
.ire urgent enough that there
isn't even enough time to go
through     the     academic
evaluation of whether change is
Decenary, and if it r>, hm
much. It means that many of
you will have to give up your
most cherished ideas of
ambitions and drives for
pursuit along pre-established
paths. Academic recognition is
hardly a reward when the life
you are left with has no joy
because the air is black and the
people around you have
become insane in the brain
damaging clatter of mechanical
noise   from   selfishly  grabbed
profits. These are the
fundamentals of our beliefs,
that each mortals personal
ambitions are not valid if their
efforts are to better their own
realm rather then free the
mortal species from the
spiritual bondage of the false
information in the cultures
(species) race mind which we
are now helping you clear out.
It's like giving birth to a new
age in which all of the people
are as one mind in perceiving
the same truth that is the dual
god mirrored in the vibrations
that bring together and create
all matter, and fie spiritual
thoughts) that are | shared
telepathically ii| the
consciousness of all mind. This
is possible for) humans, enough
has changed in your lives about
you already to make you aware
of that, dbd Bless.
KALAGIYA\L.«„„»™_„„«.„„
For this poem cataloguing
has   already   been   done   of
occurences     such     as
electromagnetic    red,   yellow,
green,     crystal,     blue,
violet-ultraviolet   beaming   of
light from the eyes of people,
dogs, cats, other entities. These
have been recorded in such a
way   that a grasping of the
mechanisms   by   which   such
startling    (in    terms    of   the
empirical priests of the logic
colleges     viewpoint     that
clairvoyancy is a myth from
those who are superstitiously
deluded peopb;).a phenomena
can be really happening has led
loward a partial understanding
ot the mechanisms of hon- such
occurrences may be mirrored
back to science in a ^fSwhich,
satisfies that (scienc^e^^riosity
to   KNOW why JtffYJ
happens. So far, to'-^
this point a hit. syntftesi
of    thi-M-     rval     life
exprrienci's has produced some
symbolical    understanding   in
the   gestalt   ol   our  small  in
number     wide    spread    in
influence    community     of
■people'   in   Vancouver,   that
brain cells mayoKtualK fire esp
signals   to  each'-oilier.   (The
mechanism ma{ b& somewhat
like vibrations, tniutated along
a space geometr> gravitational
resomuice grid or network such
as   that perceived  as .gravitic,
\ibntions in the ordering of
plane In and moons in the solar
System, with1 the signal being
, 'transmitted frqiii.!gravity node
inciple like
-''sound   signals  n]
side to another!
Yssumiiig   that
oeeur   in   the   atom]
getting back to the
beams of light from
eyes,   such   as   hur
signals   may  be amplified by
. electromagnetic resonances in
" the brain, to come back <*ut, s
tiir example, through reyfersely
excited rods and cones of the
retina in manner not lrjflke the
way   sound   signals   f»n   gef;l
translated*    tifrougS     the!
loudspeaker   itseff  ba£k   into
electromagnetic    Signals *
which are beamed bade out the!
aerial of a radio. tk% signalsr
incidently    are  'ewerienceit
mainly as feean^.aa| images!
rather than thoughts from the*
logic area of the brain, there is
your thought voice, which trips
away almost as if in daydreams
way     inside     your    brain.
Perceiving it brings you close
to   the   chatter   channels   by
which many people are already
talking    to   each   other   via
telepathy   in   Vancouver.  It's
amazing just as a phenomena
how many people now! perceive
eye flashing and know that it is
ncft     inymi>re  jjustj   simple
refections   jof   jight | off   the
retina of humans and animals,
since  i many     people     have
withnessed such  light coming
frefm   |)ARJCENfeD   kreas   of
rooms )for example, inhere no
lig|it   could I be reflected. It's
amazing   how   many   people
DON'Tj perceive I eye {flashing.
Which jis   the   fcruxj of   the
twentieth  century apocalypse
..J^blenLit wpjfljll seetn - the
inability of many humans to
truthfully perceive reality.
Friday, November 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
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A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Fortes. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will  provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
• SEA OPERATIONS • AIR OPERATIONS
•   LAND OPERATIONS •  ENGINEERING
•  SUPPORT SERVICES
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
Why not ask one who serves?
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St. - Vancouver
THE CANADIAN
ARMED FORCES
KURT
VONNEGUT
Kurt Vonnegut and Daughter
Heide is a UBC grad student in Indian History and her fanaticism
for Kurt Vonnegut is well known, as a matter of fact, it is
rumoured that Heide is Kilgore Trout.
Vonnegut, in his continuing story of the ridiculous and
touching struggle for meaning in chaos, beauty from lies, love out
of cruelty, is at the heart of this generation.
His books are bitter, living, vivid, and unstructured. He is
the man in the middle of polarities. He exists in that tension
between the need for meaning and the certainty of chaos, and he
broods about his inadequacy. He hopes in the knowledge of
hopelessness, loves in the face of despair.
Player Piano, his earliest novel, creates a post-World War III
America where the machines have taken over the routine thinking
jobs. The Second Industrial Revolution has left a well-ordered
world with no place for men who aren't engineers. A disaffected
elite attempts a machine-wrecking revolution, only to find that
the wreckers are devoted to their machines.
Mother Night is the statement of Howard W. Campbell, Jr.,
American spy and Nazi propogandist, written in an Israel prison.
It is the story, Vonnegut tells us, of a man who became what he
pretended to be; when you're a double agent, that's
schizophrenia.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater creates Mr. Rosewater the
mad scion of an American capitalist clan who puts charity and
love into practice, frightening capitalists and competely baffling
the beneficiaries.
Sirens of Titan is titular science fiction, in which a Martian
war designed to be doomed is manipulated by a man whose
presence is scattered in waves throughout the universe; in which
The Church of God the Utterly Indifferent is created; and in
which it is discovered that an obscure race of machines called the
Tralfamadonans control the fate of man.
Cat's Cradle, presently the most popular of his books,
describes with desperate humor the end of the world by the
combination of technological genius and natural human
ineptitude.
Slaughterhouse Five, his last novel, is a breaking point.
There is more of Vonnegut's own horrors in it than in any of his
previous novels. It pierces the mystery of Vonnegut's frozen
hysteria by exorcising his war experiences, particularly the
fire-bombing of Dresden. One accepts his own judgment: "People
aren't supposed to look back. I'm certainly not going to do it
anymore. "I've finished my war book now . . .. This one is a
failure, and had to be, since it was written by a pillar of salt." Its
hero is named Pilly Pilgrim, and its subtitle is "The Children's
Crusade."
The last of his books to appear in paperback has been
Welcome to the Monkeyhouse, an anthology of short stories
Vonnegut wrote for magazines. It incorporates his famous
"Report on the Barnhouse Effect".
Certain obsessions — places, people, ideas — appear and
reappear in Vonnegut's writing, making it a pleasurable necessity
to read all of him. No one book can be considered representative.
PAGE FRIDAY, 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970 But then, having read one book is a sure guarantee that the others
will follow. It's a sort of literary crackerjacks.
The unreality of time appears most clearly in Sirens of
Titan and Slaughterhouse. In the first, Winston Niles Rumfoord
(a patrician capitalist) and his dog Kazak are thrown into the
fourth dimension. He likens human life to a roller coaster, of
which he has a bird's eye view. Some view — his misfortune is to
see the pointlessness of the ending.
In Slaughterhouse, Billy Pilgrim gets a free ride to
Tralfamadore and gets unhinged in time. He absorbs the
Tralfamadorian philosophy, on a world beyond the limits of
sequential time. There is no reason for existing, they tell him, but
there is a mode of making it pleasant: stop and look, in your
travles, at "the pleasant moments. Some philosophy.
It's a lukewarm consolation, but that's part of the charm.
Vonnegut offers no panaceas, no salvation, no answers. He
recognizes the ludicrosity of the human condition and colors it
with insight and sorrow. The images are suited to the
overwhelming concreteness of the issue; the characters are
creative cartoonery; the problems are Everyman's.
He also sees man outwitted and destroyed by his own
ingenuity. In Player Piano, men and their machinery are
inescapable and comically interlocked. Again in Cat's Crade,
"ice-nine" destroys the world after it has been bartered for a few
moments of happiness. The Church of God the Utterly
Indifferent, with its system for handicapping everyone in the
world to make them all equal and humble, is a properly ridiculous
answer to the urge to power. So is the answer to the population
explosion in "Welcome to the Monkeyhouse", which is a pill
making people numb from the waist down. And the answer to
defense escalation: "We would be a lot safer if the Government
would take its money out of science and put it into astrology and
the reading of palms. I used to think that science would save us.
But only in superstition is there hope."
Sometimes one wonders whether Vonnegut ever means
anything he writes. For instance, when he suggests that we
rebuild the universe on the basis of science fiction. And then it is
apparent that he knows there are no answers, that a laugh in the
face of death is the only way to go.
Beyond laughter, there is love. To his credit, Vonnegut
never holds out love as hope but only as necessity. Malachi
Constant, soldier of bad fortune and victim of Tralfamadorian
fate, says it best. "A purpose of human life, no matter who is
controlling it, is to love whoever is around to be loved." Not
someone in particular, mind you, just whoever's around.
That is precisely what Elliot Rosewater does, and a salient
feature of his efforts is another irony: Elliot's clients are so
incredibly unlovable. The unforgettable case is Diana Moon
Glampers, an aging hypochrondiac spinster verging on idiocy.
Vonnegut is so blatant — anyone who can name his
protagonist, his seeker "Billy Pilgrim" is incorrigbly blatant. His
characters are delightful for being imaginative cartoons. They
embody the essence of folly, the hope of kindness in a world of
cruelty, the striving after understanding in a void. They are tragic
for the same twist of humanity. The letter Malachi Constant
receives posthumously from his father says it: "Is there anything
special going on or is it all just as crazy as it looked to me? ... I
decided I would die without ever seeing any sense to it and
maybe you could be the one who would all of a sudden see
everything clear as a bell. I tell you even a half-dead man hates to
be alive and not be able to see any sense to it."
The message is so real, so pleading, so agonized, and so
magnificently funny. Vonnegut's humor is the only kind left to
laugh with in a world which crumbles before us and inside us.
The remarkable thing is, that Vonnegut is not a fantastic
writer. A character who turns up in every book is Kilgore Trout,
the author of at least 75 science fiction novels. He has
tremendous ideas, but he's a terrible writer. It's not far fetched to
imagine Trout is Vonnegut's self-caricature .
Trout is not the only one to reappear. Internalizing
Vonnegut is a delightful pastime, partly because of these
repetitions. One of the delights of opening a new novel is looking
for the old friends. But there doesn't seem to be much concern
about consistency. The Tralfamadorians in one book are little
green creatures on spindles; in the next they're machines with
suction cups on the bottom. But then in a world with as little
rationality as ours who is to quibble?
When the intricacies of character change are mastered, one
has the challenge of mastering the Vonnegution vocabulary. In
Cat's Cradle, the religion, or non religion, of Bokonon is describe.
Foma are harmless untruths, and the essence of all religion. A
karass is a handy concept. It is a group of people bound to each
other in mystical interelationships ignoring national institutional,
occupational, and other boundaries. Its opposite is a granfalloon.
Examples of a granfalloon are "the Communist party, the
Daughters of the American Revolution, the General Electric
Company, the International Order of Odd Fellows — and any
nation, anytime, anywhere". Phrases like "So it goes" and the
real pronunciation of Pisquonquit are also part of the fun.
Vonnegut is each of his characters. He is Elliot Rosewater,
who shoots four innocent firemen at Dresden and then lies
paralyzed in front of a truck. He is Malachi Constant, the space
wanderer who believes that "somebody up there likes me" until
he gets There and finds out. He is Billy Pilgrim, mortifyingly
unstuck in time. And so are we.
Vonnegut's novels are Everyman in a dazzling variety of
mad disguises. Each disguise holds a fresh revelation of the old
paradox of man and his hopes. Heide
X
Find out what it's
all about. Pick up our
brochure at your
placement office.
Interviews
18,19,20
Nov.
24,25,26
g
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The First Canadian Bank
This is the bottle
for the
Age of Ecology.
What the world needs today are containers that re-cycle.
k^'([M
Because every container that isn't recycled becomes a refuse. Or worse still, litter.
That's why the reusable, returnable bottle for Coke is the answer to an ecologist's prayer. On the average, it makes
about fifty round trips before it's through. And that means fifty less chances to add to the world's litter problem.
So buy Coca-Cola in returnable bottles. It's best for the environment—and your best value.
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-C-
Friday, November 13, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 7 s
.»-»■
—brett garrett photo
Amethyst plays in SUB Gallery last Monday.
Subspace  Works
What is an Art Gallery for?
Mike Malcolm and
Drummond Burge are using if
for thpeople, gone is the
static paintings on the wall,
oh aren't they marvelous
approach, instead you have
bands, nude models, a
working environment set up
for artists, and for people
who want to know a little
about artists.
Subspace is still on in the
SUB Gallery, if you haven't
been in there, you are missing
something, a chance to see
more than just a painting or a
poem, but a chance to talk to
people who are very involved
in their particular medium.
It's a process of bringing
art back to the people and
away from the glittering
oversensitive hype job that
has developed around it.
—kevan perrins
People also eat their lunches  and read fine academic
journals there, too.
Parting Poem
Give Mountford is a second year science student at UBC.
KALiilDOSCOPK     -    MY    PCBM.
Confused and shrouded images;
vague ideals
malting in my ink,
reforming In th? drifting smoke of crowded bars
8nd greasy ceilinged cafsj
Jangling lights
snaking thru crowds of sweaty kids,
who,
for a tiny interval,
forget their piraples;
the nylon world of a Jilted dolly,
rebuilt tomorrow
on a tumbled bed;
a phallic pulse in the cold night
hard lips
and soapy makeup.
Suddenly,
clarity'
Myself in bright relief
as the clouds part
and frosty stars appear:
alone in a droplet of time.
The road,
3 a. ra.,
foulness in my mouth;
diesel fumes and sweaty cold,
stiff,  and:
•Wonder who I'll meet tomorrow?*.
Clive Mountford,
SWING NIGHTLY AT THE
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November 13 - 25
Directed by John Brockington
SPECIAL MATINEES STUDENT TICKETS $1:00
Tuesday, November 17 — 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 19 — 12:30 p.m.
(available for all performances)
Tickets: The Frederic   Wood Theatre, Rm. 207
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PAGE FRIDAY, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970 Friday, November 13, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Internationalists a response
to Canadian political decay
By SHARON BOYLAN
and DICK BETTS
The political and economic situation in Canada is growing more
and more desperate.
So are reactions to it. The left is splintered and fragmented with
many responses emerging from the growing sense of hopelessness and
futility towards social change.
The Americanization of our industry and culture, the growing
rate of unemployment, the existence of an oppressed national minority
within the confines of a corrupt outmoded federal system, the
continuing oppression of women, the exploitation and de-culturation. of
native people and continuing domination of a capitalist class have
prompted the growth of revolutionary organization in Canada.
UBC students and students at other universities across Canada
have created many forms of left-wing activity. One of these groups, the
"internationalists", or the Canadian Communist Party (Marxist-Leninist) have been active for a number of years.
They are a response to the present social system. Their tactics,
while alienating many people, come from a social situation which is
even more alienating. A system which can sell out human and natural
resources on the one hand and call in repressive legislation to deal with
attacks on a "free society" on the other is the ultimate form of human
degradation.
Canada is such a society. Resource sellouts such as the Roberts
Bank complex, the Kaiser Coal and Columbia River deals, American
"land grabs in the east and the total colonization of Quebec all have
negative effects on the Canadian people.
Now we have permanent legislation to deal with organized
opposition. The new bill replacing the War Measures Act provides for
this.
These are violent manifestations of state power and state interests
which are the interests of the powerful, the owners of property and
production.
This violence has provoked oppositional violence in Quebec and
sporadic violence by the CCP (M-L) in parts of English-Canada.
UBC saw some violence and repression Thursday when a brawl
ensued between an engineering student and a member of the CCP.
The CCP member was reacting to the system's repression by
attempting to make people understand the dangers of repression.
His reaction is sectarian and simplistic, for few people are
convinced by the presence of a fist, or by unexplained slogans.
However, the engineering student's reaction is more dangerous.
His response is to attack anything which implies we are not living in the
best of all possible worlds. That response is really fascist, as it is closed
to reason, and utilizes open force as persuasion.
The engineering student was clearly out to beat up "Commies".
He had done this before earlier in the week. When these kinds of
situations occur, the real enemy, a repressive social order which
propagates violence itself, is let off the hook. The population fights
among itself.
Neither of the two people in question could ever have reached
agreement in the given situation.
There seems to be a move afoot among some students to organize
vigilante committees to police SUB. Turning the people against each
other creates fuel for more state legislative repression. Trudeau tried to
turn Canada against Quebec as a justification for new legislation.
This is the climate of repression. The alternative to the
internationalists and goon squads is new structures to confront the
current social order.
Radical political work on the campus is most effective through
discussion, political education, and confrontation of the administration
on social problems.
Students who want to maintain and build a democratic campus
and society, have as their first responsibility "the duty to prevent the
growth of vigilante justice. Our job is to assert and practice the right of
free speech in our own lives. 	
""mm
PATIO
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Women's lib Ed week topic
The topic of women's liberation in the teaching
profession is one of the highlights of Education
Week, Nov. 16 to 20.
A panel discussion titled Are Women Second
Class Citizens in Education? will be held Wednesday
noon in Ed. 100.
Dr. H. Kasinsky, biological sciences professor,
will speak on Social Responsibility and the Science
Curriculum Monday at 11:30 in the Education
lounge.
Indian Education will be the theme all day
Tuesday.
Thursday a film on Summerhill, A. S. Neil's
"free" school in England, will be shown at 12:30
and 2:30 p.m. in Ed. 100.
A former Summerhill student, education
professors and students who have visited
Summerhill will lead discussions after the film.
The week's activities are sponsored by the
education undergraduate  society.
JAZZ GENIUS
PAUL   HORN
speaks   on
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
12:30
Thurs., Nov. 19th
SUB BALLROOM
Further info:
266-0862
tonight
mini pop festival
at the ponderosa
9:00-12:30 p.m.
STARTING MONDAY. NOV. 16
By Popular Demand
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a SUB FILM SOC presentation
FRIDAY 13th & SATURDAY 14th    1
Students 50c - Others 75c
7:00 & 9:30                          1
SUB AUDITORIUM
Sunday, Nov. 15 — 7:00   1 Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970
Of
—jim gorman photo
WOLFE HOWLS as singers Wolfe and Dick rocked for charity in
the ballroom Tuesday noon, helping students to appease guilty
consciences by donating to "Just a Drop in the Bucket." As fhey
say, it was all for a good cause.
Alienation attacked
by dean of women
UBC knows how to take care of its students.
When they want an education, UBC gives students lectures and
reading lists. When they want books, it gives them a library and a
bookstore.
When students have cars, UBC gives them parking lots.
And if they become alienated by it all, UBC will help them work
it out.
The university this year hired a specially trained group social
worker to fight student alienation by setting up small therapy groups of
students with similar interests and problems.
Sharon Anderson, with a masters degree in social work and
experience in psychiatric hospitals and community therapy groups, was
hired as an assistant to the dean of women, Helen McCrae, to establish
the groups.
Alienation — the inability to relate to other people and to a role
— usually gets its hold on students in the first year, when they first
recognize the impersonal monolith that is the university, Anderson said.
Loneliness and frustration result.
It is likely to continue, she said, until the student finds a smaller
group within the university he can become identified and involved with.
The smaller group can be a faculty, or campus organization or
club.
But many of the clubs on campus are failing the new students,
Anderson told The Ubyssey in an interview.
"I'm told by so many students that they feel the clubs are like
cliques. They have difficulty moving into them," she said.
An example?
"I walked into The Ubyssey office last week just to drop off a
'tween classes notice and I felt really uncomfortable.
"I can imagine how terrible a student must feel who goes in and
wants to join the paper."
She said clubs and organizations should concentrate more on
making prospective members welcome by taking the initiative and
helping the new students penetrate the group by making friends and
becoming involved.
And the dean of women's office will be doing its part by
organizing the weekly discussion groups.
Anderson said she will put the groups together with students who
have some mutual interests or problems.
"The idea is to leam how to relate to one another talking openly
and honestly about what's bothering them. That way they can
hopefully help each other," she said.
The groups are still in the organizational stage, Anderson said.
She said everybody who is alienated is welcome to contact her to
join a group.
"But I tend to stay away from politics. This has nothing to do
with politics, this is just people being people.
"If I get some person in a group who is trying to convert people
to a political ideology, then he wouldn't be compatible to what I'm
trying to do. He wouldn't fit in," she said.
AK»
iy^ w©rSk»P
3:3© *M  SUNOtf* OMLCCE.
PEOPLE
An Experience in Human Relations and,
Human Sexuality
Mon., November 16- 7p.m. Sharp
"C0NTRACEPTI0N"-Dr. J. Dickinson
SUB BALLROOM
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UNIVERSITY TEXACO
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Owners- Operators
Wish To Thank All U.B.C. Students and
Staff For Their Patronage
To SHOW OUR APPRECIATION we will
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CHARTERS 71
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If You Are Travelling on a
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Next Year
Apply for your Passport
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FOR COMPLETE TRAVEL INFORMATION
AND BROCHURES—CALL
ON CAMPUS        5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-4391
VANCOUVER'S LEADING TRAVEL ORGANIZATION Friday, November 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Cobwebs hauled from closets
in People encounter session
By SANDY KASS
It all seemed like an exercise in futility.
That was one student's reaction after over
1,000 people crowded themselves into SUB
ballroom Monday night for another session of
People, an encounter in group relations.
The evening's speaker was Dr. Ferdinand
Knobloch of UBC's psychiatric hospital.
"I've had lots of experience with group
therapy," Knobloch said.
"But 1,000 people? That's something else."
The topic of Monday's session was
Communication Neurosis.
Knobloch said later that he felt Monday night's
People group was less responsive than other smaller
groups he has worked with.
He started the evening by commenting on the
success of last week's program.
"You had a good time last week," he said. "But
this week we're going to go a ste]) further."
He asked participants to get up and walk
around introducing themselves by shaking hands as
they had done last week.
After about five minutes of hand shaking
(sorry, kiddies, no ear shaking this time), he asked
the group if anyone still felt inhibited shaking
hands.
No one did — a big change from last week.
At a question-answer period following, group
members revealed many of their inner inhibitions.
Most agreed they are too sensitive and easily
hurt, highly changeable of mood, tired for no
apparent reason, self-conscious, depressed often for
no apparent reason, suffering from palipitations of
the heart, expecting disaster, and sexually
frustrated.
A few said they suffer from sleeplessness and
hypochondria.
"I know I'm insane, so why worry about it?"
said one student.
"There are many people who blame others and
destiny for what happens to them," Knobloch said.
"They cannot be made to realize how they've
created their own environment and have to be
responsible for that creation."
He said that most sexual frustrations stem from
psychological rather than  physiological problems.
"One major cause of sexual frustration in
women is when their dependancy and maternal
instincts get mixed up," he said.
He then told a story about one young married
couple.that had come to him for help.
"The wife had lost her orgasm, or rather, her
ability to reach it during sex. As a result, both
partners studied up on physiology and sexual
techniques until they became experts on the
subject.   •
But it was all to no avail, said Knobloch. The
wife still could not regain orgasrm.
"The couple went to three gynecologists who
introduced the theory that a case of flu the wife had
just before she lost her ability to reach orgasm had
left some mysterious damage.
"However, after talking with the couple several
times, it appears she lost her orgasm at precisely the
time her mother-in-law moved into the house," he
said.
"The mother-in-law's appearance indicated to
the wife that she had lost all usefulness in the eyes
ofsher husband, and therefore could not respond to
his sexual advances," he said.
While the group was seated on the ballroom
floor, Knobloch asked them to close their eyes and
imagine they were sitting all alone in a thickly
wooded forest. As soon as they had attained a
feeling of isolation he instructed them to, walk
about the forest being careful not to bump into the
many trees scattered around.
Still keeping their eyes closed, participants were
asked to find a partner who felt good to them, and
slowly merge into fours and then eights.
Laughter abounded when eyes were finally
opened.
"It's amazing what can feel good with your
eyes closed," one student said.
Groups then sat down on the floor, and
Knobloch called one group to sit on the stage set up
in the middle of the ballroom floor.
He turned to the group and asked them to tell
him, individually, what they thought was good
about themselves.
Group members stared at each other in total
amazement.
One girl stood up and said she like people, was
continually trying to improve herself, was unselfish,
and above all, modest.
When asked if she was nervous saying these
things in front of everyone else, she replied:
"No, I'm not the least bit nervous. I left my
contact lenses at home, and I can't see a thing."
Other groups then did the same, .with each
member telling others the good in themselves and
their bodies.
The discussion dissolved after a few minutes
into an on-stage debate on whether a person's looks
are deceptive of his personality.
The debate ended in a draw and most
participants claimed they weren't given nearly
enough time to talk or to understand what others
were saying.
Groups dispersed and went into pre-arranged
discussion groups, but most participants said they
were too depressed to continue with any sort or
reasoned discussion.
"I don't know exactly why, but its like we just
got started on something, and then we had to leave,
and we don't seem to be getting anywhere," one
student said.
"Theoretically, we are supposed to cut through
our superficiality and get down to the nitty gritty of
things, but it seems like all we've reached is another
level of superficiality," said another.
Several other exercises followed before
participants dispersed into their separate discussion
groups in smaller rooms.
One exercise was to stare at an empty chair on
stage and imagine someone to be sitting on it that
you are in conflict with.
One girl got up on stage and said she imagined
the person to be her father.
"You don't understand my values," she told
her imaginary dad, "or those of my generation."
"But he's not answering back," she told
Knobloch.
"Oh, he will," he replied.
One discussion group met in Wesbrook 237.
Four new members were present and most
former members complained that the new members
broke, down the close relationship they had taken
over a month to develop.
"Its like we're back where we first started,"
said one girl.
However, members started to relax after one
walked in late with a roast salmon and liquid
refreshments.
Another group met in SUB 213 and the
situation was somewhat different.
"I think Knobloch was trying to bring out a
point," said one student at the close of the session.
"I'm just not sure what it is."
Most members complained that the lecture was
too heavy, and that Knobloch spent too much time
trying to sneak cobwebs out of people's closets.
When asked about the success of the program,
one student replied: "When we (referring to the
discussion group) first came here four weeks ago we
were total strangers, thrown together strictly by
chance. Now we can accept each other as individuals
and have reached the point where we can discuss
anything openly and truthfully."
"There's just no reason to lie."
One member who is not a UBC student is
businessman Martin Lank who says he is taking the
course because he doesn't get a chance to talk with
people in any depth in the business world.
" At work all there is to talk about is the latest
product, profits made, and who is the boss's latest
mistress. It's like being wedged between a personal
and a very impersonal world," Lank said. "And
People is a very personal experience."
COLONIAL
MAGIC THEATRE
603 Granville
Presents Classic Films
Now Showing
The Original
CHARLIE CHAN
2 Features Nightly
8:00 & 10:00 P.M.
L
FREE Fortune Cookies
ADMISSION $1.00
golden lotus
2936 W 4th Ave.
authentic
Indian Curries
vegetarian
cuisine.
open noon to 10 p.m.
ATTENTION . . .
STUDENTS — work PART-TIME now
to qualify for FULL-TIME summer employ
ment—work    days, eves., or weekends
ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA PUBLICATIONS LTD.
Phone 684-2823 - between 10:00 a.m. & 4:00 p.m.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
To All Students Entering Law
All students who intend to apply for entrance into the U.B.C.
Faculty of Law must submit with their application a score
from the Law School Admission Test. Although most
students apply between April and June, the Law School
Admission Test must be written well before this. It will be
given at U.B.C. on December 19th, February 13th, and April
17th, and at U. Vic. on the December and February dates. It
does not matter which date you choose, but you must
register for the test at least a month in advance. This means
that you must have registered for the test by about the
middle of March at the latest, if you plan to enter the
Faculty of Law in September 1971.
For an information sheet on the test, please write to the Law
Faculty or drop in at the Law Building. Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
FRIDAY
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
SPEC
Committee's   meeting  in   SUB   213   at
'tween
_ctasses^	
VCF
Meeting in SUB 207, 209 at noon, "Age
of Aquarius".
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting    at    noon    in    International
House.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Folk   Mass   practise    at   noon   in    St.
Marks.
AMS  SPECIAL   EVENTS
"Shalom Israel" in SUB.  Autditorium
at noon.
WOMEN'S  INTRAMURALS
Manager's   meeting   at- noon   in   SUB
215.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Dance at 9 p.m. in International House.
SIMS
Group   Meditation   in   Angus   410   at
noon.
voc
Roller   skating   party   at   Stardust   at
9 p.m.
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Party in SUB Party Room at 8:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
CUSO
Meeting in International House  at 10
a.m.
SFFEN
Details    of    next   party   available   in
SUB 216E.
PRE-MED
Wine    and    Cheese    Party    in    Club's
lounge   at   8   p.m.
UNIVERSITY   PHARMACY
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL SCHOOL SUPPLIES
TIME FOR THOSE
OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS CARDS
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION OF
CHRISTMAS CARDS AND GIFTS
5754 University Blvd.
224-3202
UNUSUa/
men's & women's boutique
the bad boys ragge shoppe
315 Seymour St.
683-3734
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
Beauty Spoken Here!
Some Extras We Offer
* Permanent Lash & Brow Coloring
* Unwanted Hair Removal, All Over!
* Free Daytime & Corrective Makeup Demo!
* Bodifier & Hair Care Products, All Pro.
* Custom Designed Dresses by Irene of Sweden
* Unique Quality Imported Fabrics & Clogs
* Mary Quant - Dermatics & Hoi. Magic Cos.
* Synthetics & Human Hair Wigs - Falls, etc.
Open Mondays - Thursday & Friday Eves.
Tramcois Cqhturbito&(TBoiitique
1461 Marine Drive North Van.
987-6633   -   987-7017
Friday, November 13, 1970
SUNDAY
AFRICAN   STUDENTS  ASSOCIATION
Meeting in SUB 211 at 7 p.m.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Folkmass at 11:30  a.m.   in St.  Mark's
Chapel.
ARCHEOLOGY   SOCIETY
Katz field trip meets at Arch, lab at
8 a.m.
SAILING   CLUB
Racing  at Kitsilano  Yacht Club  at  10
a.m.
MONDAY
UBC  PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOCIETY
Folk dances at 7:30 p.m., International
House.
EL  CIRCULO
Discussion   of   CUSO   volunteers   from
Chile at noon in International House.
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Student*, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days prico of 3.
Classified ads an not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Cloaini Deadline ia 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SOIREE DANSANTE AT INTER-
national House tonite 9 to 1. Live
Band and Refreshments. Admission $1.00 foT members; $1.50 for
non-members. Sponsored by L'Alliance Francaise. Come and bring
your Good  Luck Charm.
Greetings
12
THERE ARE 2400 HOMOSEXUAL
students on campus! Graduate
student 22 sends, free 36-page essay on how to meet them. 683-486*
Box 8969, Station"H", Vancouver
i>,  B.C.  Skeptical1? Ask Speakeasy.
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
STUDENTS NEEDING RIDE FROM
- Port Coquitlam for daily 8:30-3:30
 classes,   please   phone   942-4281.
RIDE-WANTED" FROM MARINE
and Hamilton, New Westminster,
M-F, 8:30-4:30. Please phone Joyce
at 526-8762.
Special Notices
15
STUDENT    ENCOUNTER    GROUP
forming. Phone 228-8184.
LATIN AMERICA: DEVELOP-
ment or Revolution? Sat. Nov. 14,
10 a.m. - 3 p.m. International
House.  Speakers and slides.	
DRUMMER WANTS TO MEET
and to play music with other
musicians,  call Nell 224-0291.
THIS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE.
Can Heironymus Merkin Ever
Forget Mercy Humppe And Find
True Happiness? Fri. & Sat., 7:00,
9:30; Sun., 7:00. AMS 50c, Non-
AMS 75c.
SKI INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mtn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included. See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14, Grnd. fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., Wed. and
Fri. noon.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN SER-
vlng on the Brock Hall Art Committee are asked to leave their
name with the Pine Arts Dept.,
rm. 401A, Lassere, phone 228-2757.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
ValuV Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat, till 7 p.m.
KAIROS: DISCOVER YOURSELF
with us. Sundays 7:30 p.m. West
Point Grey United Church, 8th ana
Tolmle.
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinatlons, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2856 or 224-0087. 108-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
SNOW VALLEY SKI TRIP ALL
inclusive price, December 26th to
January 3rd. Details Athletic Office, Memorial Gym. Deadline,
November 19th.   	
STUDENTS 7~_. EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
information ( air mail ) Anglo -
American Assn., BOA Pyle St.,
Newport I.W., England.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: ONE USED BEER AND
Johnson Physics 155 Text. Phone
Dale,  874-7462 after 6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'59 VAUXHALL, 29,000 GENUINE
miles. $250?. Call Mary. Days—
228-2404, evenings—985-5311, local
288.	
'59 STUDEBAKER, REBUILT EN-
gine, transmission, new tires,
shocks, brakes, wiring, city-tested,
absolutely reliable. $375. Pam 738-
_5927.	
NEED TRANSPORTATION? 1957
Dodge Custom-Royal, full running
order. $150. or close offer. Phone
929-4026.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
BRAND NEW MGB SOFT TOP, »80.
731-2669.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Day Care & Baby Sitting     32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
DON'T BE ALONE — WALK TO A
phone — P.Y.C. Dating Club —
434-2636.
SUB THEATRE THIS WEEKEND,
Heironymus Merkin tries to forget
Mercy Hummpe. Is it possible?
Come and see. Fri. & Sat., 7:00,
9:30; Sun., 7:00. AMS 50c, Non-
AMS 75c.
SHOP THE WORLD
PIER I IMPORTS
100  POWELL
IN  GREATER GASTOWN
682-6681
CORKY'S MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
Go First Class all the Way! Go
Corky's, 3644 W. 4th. Alma on 4th.
Appointments, 731-4717.
Sewing ft Alterations 38
Typewriters II Repairs
39
Typing
40
FAST   ACCURATE   ELECTRIC
typing.   Theses,   essays,   papers,   35c
page,  call  Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
FAST,     ACCURATE    TYPING,
electric typewriter; shorthand. 326-
2934.	
ESSAYS, THESES, DOCUMENTS
typed quickly and accurately. 35c
per page.  266-4264.	
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERV-
Ice. Theses, Essays, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,   437-1355.	
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays.
Thesis. Reasonbale rates. North
Van.  985-0154.	
ESSAYS, THESIS TYPED QUICK-
ly and accurately, 25c per page.
Carol Tourgis, 733-3197.	
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates. 738-6829
after 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.        	
TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, Engineering, Social Science,
Psychological Terminology, High
Quality,  Low  Charge.   733-4708.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced typist, electric typewriter.   Call  731-8096.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
B.C. MOLYBDENUM LTD. WILL
interview students interested in
Mining, Maintenance, and Concentrator Operations on Campus,
November 17th and November
18th, 1970. 1971 Grads (Mining,
Met., Mech.). 1972-73 Grads as
above. Appointments will be made
at the Placement Office.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
WILL    TUTOR    1ST    YR.    MATH
comp.   sci.—trade   for   guitar   ler
sons.   Claire   2(1-3843,   leave   me
sage.	
EVERYONE HAS TROUBLE WITT-
at least one of their courses. Register at UBC Tutoring Centre and
find help in the course that's
dragging you down. SUB 100B, 12-
2 p.m., weekdays. 228-4583.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student Telephone Directory
NOW  AVAILABLE $1.00
at the Bookstore and
AMS Publications Office
Pre-Sale tickets redeemed only at
Publications Office
DUAL 1210 TURNTABLE FOR
sale. Nearly new. Dust cover &
base.   Call  Byron,   738-1957 aft.   6.
ZIESS ICAREX 35CS ULTRON
1.8/50 lens — Pentax Spotmatic
1.4/50 lens — Phone 732-7820.
10 - SPEED BICYCLE & CARRIER
& Light. $65. Call Mike McGreevy,
228-4488  or  224-9986.	
"HEAD" SKIS — MASTERS MAR-
ker Bindings. All for $90. 190 cm.
Raichle Boots, Size 6, $40. "Dyna-
star" Skiis, GTS, New, $100. 200
cm. Phone 731-4073 after 6:00 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM TO SHARE WITH 4TH
Year Student. Private entrance,
toilet,  shower, kettle and toaster.
224-6757.	
BED STUDY ROOM, KITCHEN
privileges. Washer and Dryer. Girt
student or business - woman. Call
224-6757.	
ROOM   FOR   RENT   ON   CAMPUS,
$50.  Phone Bill,  224-4530.	
FREE BED-STUDY ROOM, PPJV-
ate bathroom in Lovely South
Granville Home for responsible
male    student,    on    bus   line.    No
cooking.   224-6090.	
BRIGHT ATTRACTIVE ROOM IN
young household. Kitchen privs.,
phone, washer. Near U.B.C. $50
p.m. plus some baby sitting. Girl
only.  228-9597.	
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
SENIOR STUDENT (FEMALE) TO
share three - bedroom suite with
two others. $55. Near Fourth and
Macdonald.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
BUY — SELL — INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Friday, November 13, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
HINDSIGHT 70
FOOTBALL
Frank mid-season
Coach Frank Gnup was
standing there swinging a golf club
when I wandered over and asked
him what went wrong with his
football team this year.
"Do you always have to ask
that?" he said. "Ahh, geez, I don't
know."
As we moved down to his
office, I mentioned to him that
the Birds looked like they had a
fairly good team before the season
started.
"Yeah, well, maybe we
overrated our talent a bit. Some
people didn't play as well as we
hoped they would have," he said.
But the basic thing is a lack of
speed. That's been our big
problem for the last five years."
"Do you want to see
something funny? Well, it ain't
funny, but it is, sort of. They're
the times for the 40 (yard dash)."
"Look at that. We just ain't got
no speed. People say they're not
in shape, but hell, they can't run.
Bird hockey
this weekend
This weekend the Thunderbird
Hockey team will take on
Chilliwack at 8:00 Saturday night
and Sunday afternoon will host
the Schmyr Flyers with both in
the Thunderbird Arena.
The Birds will be flying in
preparation for their season
openers next weekend against
Saskatchewan and Brandon at the
Thunderbird Arena
"One guy here ran it in 6.3. My
wife can run faster than that.
Even you could."
The topic then switched to
quarterbacks. "How many passes
did our quarterbacks complete
this year? Thirty per cent? That's
not gonna hurt anybody."
I asked him why we've been
giving up so much yardage on
screens.
"We've been practicing against
it,   but   these   kids  just   forget
everything they do on the practice
■ field.
"But I don't want to blame the
kids, because then everyone will
just say, 'He's making excuses'
and I don't want to make excuses.
"You can't blame the kids.
Somebody says get him outa
there. But show me who else we
can put it. He's the best we got.
But I don't know if that's the best
talent on this campus."
"We had a lot of people quit
this year and a couple looked like
they were pretty good kids. I
think most of these kids want to
be guaranteed of a job. But we
can't do that."
"You know, we had a couple
of kids that wanted to come up
from the States and play for us.
But they couldn't get in."
"We got a problem here with
eligibility. I think we need some
new application form that asks
you     things     like     your
Rugger Birds
alone
in
down
first
Caps
place
By BOB WICKS
In an Armistice Day meeting of
the two top teams in First
Division rugby action, UBC
Thunderbirds played superbly to
a 14-5 margin of victory over
Capilanos.
The match began with both
sides wary of the other's
reputation and both cautious of
the wet, slippery conditions.
At the ten minute mark,
winger John Mitchell opened the
scoring with a try which Ray
Banks failed to convert. Two
minutes later, with UBC showing
some control of the action, Banks
notched a penalty goal for a 6-0
lead.
Capilanos, with the only
sustained demonstration of a team
with a five win, no loss record,
charged back scoring a good try
under the posts. The convert was
good; half-time score 6-5.
UBC provided good
second-half rugby entertainment
for the 600 fans at Thunderbird
Stadium quickly taking control of
the play. With as good a
performance of tight play as one
is likely to see in the Vancouver
League the UBC forwards asserted
themselves. The pack showed
good training in dominating a
taller side in line-out play.
The UBC backs showed their
ability to compliment the hard
working forwards. They often
applauded accurate kicks of
stand-off Banks contributed to
the team effort.
Winger Spence McTavish set up
the deciding scoring play, finished
off by number eight Eric
MacAvity. MacAvity's well
deserved try was converted by
Banks who later added a long goal
for a solid afternoon of kicking.
The final score was 14-5 in favor
of UBC and showed they are
definitely the class of the
Vancouver league.
UBC Braves also stand alone on
top of the Second Division
standings by downing Caps 5-3 in
a muddy preliminary match. Once
again the forwards controlled the
game and the Braves overcame a
3-0 deficit at the half on a good
movement by the three-quarter
line.
Rugby action continues
tomorrow against an improving
Seattle Rugby Club. Game time
1:15 and 2:30 at UBC.
Intramurals
PARTICIPATION   TO  NOV.   10,   1970
Turkey trot  -    71
Cycle drag   -    34
Swimming    41
Football     MS
Tennis    -    45
Soccer     249
Curling       84
Tug of War  117
Some of these figures are not aa ft
complete.
The Badminton tournament draw is
now up. You must play your matches on
or before the times listed. It is possible
that we may run a doubles competition
after Christmas if there is enough interest, sign the sheet outside the intramural office if you are interested.
MEN'S   INTRAMURAL
POINT STANDINGS
><   O.CL        O
H I
o ^    *
O.CL
1. Engineers     50 481
2. Beta  Theta   Pi    50 383
3. Forestry   5(r"44*
4. Commerce   ....  50 2°1
5. Physical  Educ.  50 271
6. Fort Camp   50 427
7. Dentistry     SO    94
8. St.   Andrews   .. 50 233
». Arts     50    65
10. Phi Cam Delta 50
11. Delta   Upsilon
12. Delta   Kap   Ep 50    68       50 255
4
O
OS   u-     H-
50 620 1201
50 580 1063
50 365    914
50 490
50 180
50    —
50 319
50 140
50 275
79 DNA 305
50 192 DNA 185
881
551
527
504
475
440
434
427
423
13. Agriculture   .... 50 110       50 170
14. Alpha   Del   Phi 50 133 DNA 170
15. Education 50 110 DNA 290
16. Union    College —    90 DNA 260
17. Grad   Studies .. — 255 DNA    95
18. Sig Alpha Mu.. 50   —       50 240
19. Pharmacy    50   —       50 145
20. Science     50 115 DNA    75
21. Sigma Chi    50    —  DNA 160
22. Kappa Sigma .. 50   —      50   85
FINAL RESULTS OF
TOUCH  FOOTBALL  PLAYOFFS
DIVISION I
1. Betas
2. Dentistry
3. Commerce
4. Sigma   Alpha
5.) Flglj
5.) Engineers
353
351
350
350
340
245
240
210
185
4.) Kappa Sigma
4.) Arts
4.) Engineers
4.) Betas ll-D
Frank post-season
extra-curricular activities. That
way we'd know whether or not
you're a football player."
"We used to have a helluva
football team here — until about
five years ago. Then they started
going to these other places."
"Where'd they go?" I asked,
knowing full well that he was
referring to Simon Fraser.
Noticing the smile on my face,
he said, "You know goddam well
where they went. And we used to
get our share of them."
A couple of players had
complained to me that the Birds
don't work hard enough. When I
mentioned this to him, he said,
"We can't scrimmage because we
haven't got enough people. We
can't afford to let them get
injured."
Talking about UBC's football
failures was starting to get me
down, so I said, "Well, coach, wait
'til next year."
Rowers ready
The UBC rowing team will
compete against the University of
. Washington Huskies in a
pre-season regatta this Sunday,
November 15, at Seattle's Green
Lake.
Due to a good turnout this
season UBC will enter eight-man
crews in varsity, jayvee and frosh
events as well as single.
The crews have been training
since September and rowing every
morning for the past two weeks to
assure a good showing against the
perennially strong Washington
crews.
Mu
DIVISION  II
1. Betas   ll-C
2. Hillel Club
3.) Pharmacy
3.) Commerce
One of the
Most Useful Books on Campus
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Buy Your Copy Today
at THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS & BUS. OFFICE
Everything For the Skier
SKIS - HARNESS - POLES
STRETCH PANTS,
SOCKS, GLOVES,
PARKAS, GOGGLES,
BOOTS, ETC.
FULL LINE OF SKATING    I
AND HOCKEY EQUIPMENT  \
SPECIAL OFFER
SKI OUTFIT
JET SKIS—Step-in Harness
Steel Poles - Complete
48
.50
PEDIGREE JACKETS - Pioneered Down-Filled
JACKETS - "Ski" Ski Jackets
WARM-UP PANTS - Gloves
Val D'Or Boots - Elam & Graves Skis
Northwestern Sporting Goods
10th & ALMA (open Fri. 'til 9 p.m.    224-5040 Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13, 1970
Think labor: then think action
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
The Bayshore Inn is a long way from the noise,
speed-up and hazard of the green chains on the Fraser
River Sawmills.
A long way too from the unemployment insurance
and welfare offices where 12 to 15 per cent of the B.C.
work force collects their subsistence dole.
But it was at the Bayshore Inn where 500 delegates
and officers of the B.C. Federation of Labor met last
week in its fifteenth annual convention to talk out their
problems.
For students the setting might re-inforce media
stereo-types of labor as selfish fat-cat $ 18,000-a-year men,
striking the economy to make things tough for old age
pensioners.
For men and women who punch a clock every day in
an office or a mill, a construction site or a hospital, the
issues discussed at the Bayshore have to do with the kind
,r*     of lives they live.
Issue number one: compulsory arbitration (B.C. Bill
33). Item: last summer's tow boat strike by the skippers,
mates and engineers.
For three years their union, the 2,200 member
Canadian Service Merchant Guild, has been yelling about
safety. Between January 1958 and March 1967,50
towboats had been lost, 27 of them steel hulled.
Twenty-four men drowned. In addition, hundreds of
"days   lost"   accidents   caused   by   poor   equipment,
\>
JACK PHILLIPS ... C.U.P.E. delegate
exhaustion    (men    work    16-20   hours    a   day),
under-manning, etc.
In 1969, a department of transport committee,
chaired by Ngrman Sigsworth, discovered what every
towboat man knew: towboats have the second highest
industrial accident rate in B.C. and intolerable living
conditions (bunks 12 inches wide, noise at constant
ear-damaging levels, exhaust pipes running through
sleeping quarters, emergency "safety" doors jammed shut,
etc.) Three years of talk, a royal commission-type
investigation and still no action from the companies. So
the guild struck. The strike lasted from May 3 to June 13
and tied up the whole B.C. coast wood industry.
Because industrial workers organized the I.W.A.,
the Pulp and Paper Workers of Canada, and the
International Pulp^Sulphite Workers refused to cross guild
picket lines, the B.C. government decided to break the
strike with Bill 33.
All in the name of public interest of course. The
public in this case goes by the alias MacMillan-Bloedel,
Crown Zellerbach, B.C. Forest Products, and others. (The
same public which runs UBC's Board of Governors.)
So far the guild has been fined a total of $85,000.
The court costs run another $35,000 and there are claims
still outstanding. One guild spokesman says the big
corporations involved in the case can claim additional
court costs at any time. A nice mechanism to keep your
friendly towboat captain in line.
In spite of Bill 33, however, a number of rank and file
members of the normally conservative guild rallied around
Capt. Arnie Davis to keep up their strike.
The courts finally took a whack at him too.
Yet the Department of Transport, several months
after the strike, has brought in a number of proposals to
update the safety conditions on B.C. towboats providing
some taste of victory for the guild's fight.
What   was   the   reaction   to  all   this  at  Bayshore
**       convention time?
Capt. Cecil Rhodes, guild president, felt the
convention was complacent.
'Historical trade union victory'
The officers labelled the strike "an historical trade
union victory" and pledged to fight against compulsory
arbitration "to the end".
But as Bruce Elphinstone, a young, militant delegate
from the IWA pointed out: "Bill 33 is still on the books,
and the union movement is still divided at the top." He
Charlie Boylan, M.A. graduate from
UBC, was a delegate from the Canadian
Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and
General Workers Union (local 400) to the
fifteenth annual convention of the B.C.
Federation of Labor last week.
Boylan was UBC Alma Mater Society
vice-president in 1966-67.
argued that unity is no problem for rank and file workers
in the wood industry, but too many full-time bureaucrats
blocked unity from positions of power.
No real plans of action to combat Bill 33 were
debated at the convention. Some of the officers, posed
two extremes — to either do nothing or wage general
strike — as the only alternatives. In order for the working
class to achieve the militant maturity necessary to beat
Bill 33, there are a whole range of tactical activities
necessary first. None of those necessary first steps were
projected.
But then Bill 33 is still on the books, and workers on
the job are sick of being hassled by employers and
government.
A typical case of hassling workers that might touch
off a major confrontation some summer afternoon, is the
instance of private hospital workers in Victoria on strike
for union recognition, and implementation of the legal
minimum wage of $ 1.50 an hour.
The   National   Nursing   Homes   Inc.,   owner   of-
Sanderingham Hospital, told its employees: "We have to
sit here (in negotiations) because it's the law. But we
don't ever have to sign an agreement."
(National Nursing Homes Inc. increased its profits by
40 per cent last year. Sixty-two out of 300 shareholders .
are   doctors.   They   avoid  paying  the   $1.50  an  hour
minimum wage rate by cutting hours of work.)
Rank and file ready to move
If the federation officers don't provide leadership, the
rank and file might just provide some militant leadership
oLtheir own to end Bill 33.
Compulsory arbitration, issue number one. Issue
number two, unemployment.
Delegates didn't need to be lectured in "facts". They
know the working class is paying for continentalism, the
Vietnam war, a consumeristic, profit - motivated
economy. They know it by their Unemployment
Insurance Commission cheques.
A number of union local resolutions called on the
Fed to lead demonstrative action for socially necessary
programs (increased health, education, cultured leisure
facilites, pollution control, city planning project, and
others) to provide B.C. workers (and university graduates)
with decent paying jobs.
Other resolutions called for demonstrative action
against provincial welfare minister Phil Gaglardi The
Corrupt.
The convention itself marched up to the
unemployment insurance office to protest
unemployment. The federation executive promised to
form and co-ordinate local union unemployment action
committees with a full-time officer.
Once again Vancouver is likely to see unemployed
workers taking to the streets. And if the resolutions are
implemented, the resignation of Gaglardi The Corrupt
could be^the first tangible political victory of the labor
movement in a long time.
Issue number three at the convention was the entry
of the United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union into
the B.C. Federation of Labor.
B.C. trade unionists know the fishermen's union, led
by militant Homer Stevens, is probably the most
principled and active union in the province.
Unionists fighting pollution
In addition to winning better wages and conditions
for their 7,000 members, they are fighting pollution,
organizing their native members in struggles against
racism, and when under pressure of a pending $100,000
fine (Bill 33 again), they launched a major organization
drive in the Mari times.
It's the fishermen's record of struggle more than
anything else which scares the labor bureaucracy in the
Canadian Labor Congress, but wins the warm support of
B.C. unionists.
The CLC excuse, of course, is the old red herring —
the UFAWU is communist-dominated. No one in B.C. is
buying that one anymore.
Fed officers tried to appease pro-UFAWU sentiment
in the convention by bringing in a special resolution to
"demand permission" of the CLC to let the fishermen
into the federation.
Delegates wanted to know how a federation
"demands permission", especially when the CLC president
tells you point blank: "no".
The bureaucrats want the fishermen to merge with an
international union. The fishermen won't have anything
to do with it. They argue they're the only industrial
organization of fishermen in North America, and refuse to
sell out their membership in some kind of merger deal.
Federation officers had a mandate to bring them in
last year, and didn't. They didn't even speak up for the
fishermen at the last CLC convention. Delegates want
them in this year, no strings attached.
Related to the problem of re-admitting the fishermen
into the federation is the fact that 78 per cent of affiliates
to the federation are "international" unions. A number of
resolutions called for Canadian conventions to elect
Canadian officers.
The difficulty is that many of the top brass of the
federation, including both out-going president Al Staley,
and incoming" president Arnold Johnson, are officials
appointed to their own unions from the United States.
Many of the delegates too are "road men" for the U.S.
union headquarters. This is particularly so in the building
trades unions.
The argument that workers have to band together to
defeat international corporations didn't go over with
delegates who have experienced domination from theif
"international office" precisely when local workers were
engaged in militant struggles against their employers.
In addition to the questions of arbitration,
unemployment, the fishermen and Canadian sovereignty,
delegates passed resolutions on everything from safety to
demonstrative action in support of the Vietnamese people
against the U.S. The test of leadership, however, isn't the
wording of resolutions. It's competency in leading people
in action.
The newly-selected executive of the federation is not
long on militant action. Secretary Ray Haynes, is known
as "cool hand Haynes" because of his nervous advice to
striking workers to "cool it".
President George Johnson spoke at the CLC
convention against admitting the fishermen. His union,
the meatcutters, wants the fishermen to amalgamate with
them.
A handful of traditionally left delegates were elected
to the executive council. Nothing much there to rock the
boat, however.
No recognition of student-worker liaison
For students interested in social change, perhaps the
most significant shortcoming in the federation convention
was the complete absence of any recognition of the need
for the labor movement to ally with students.
Such an alliance of action is clearly necessary if ideas
about Canadian independence, ecological sanity, industrial
democracy, student power, and socialism are ever to
become a reality.
Federation officers did nothing to open a dialogue
BILL STEWART ... marine workers union
with the youth-student community. Stereotype images of
worker versus students perpetuated by the movie Joe
might help keep the Tom Campbells of the world in
power. It won't bring peace to Vietnam, or independence
and jobs to Canadians.
Meantime, far from the plastic decor of the Bayshore
Inn, prices and unemployment continue to rise. So does
the impatience of students and workers who want social
change.
Whether the label "old fogeys" pinned on the
federation officers by a delegate during the fishermen
debate will stick depends on what the federation does in
the next year to transform that impatience into action.

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