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The Ubyssey Feb 17, 1970

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Array —kerth dunbar photo
SNARLING GUARD RON THORSEN (23) intimidates SFU's
Don Higham on his way to another two points. Thorsen and the
rest of the  Thunderbirds trampled SFU  103-67, winning the
Buchanan trophy for the first time in three years.
Birds trample Clan;
win Buchanan cup
By TONY GALLAGHER
It's a good thing 6,892 fans witnessed the UBC basketball
Thunderbirds crush the Simon Fraser University Clansmen 103-67
Saturday at the Coliseum,, because few people would believe the
result if they hadn't.
The game was touted as a titanic struggle between two equal
clubs, but the downtown press was picking SFU by about 10 points
with factors such as defense, shooting and rebounding determining
the outcome.
But such was not the case.
The Birds thumped the Clan in every department, dominating
the boards and shooting like there was no tomorrow. From the
opening tip the Birds jumped to a five point lead after only three
minutes of play.
It was at this juncture that the Birds' calmness was a major
factor in the win. At the first time-out called, coach Peter Mullins
told his charges the officials were calling the game extremely tight
and to adjust to this style of officiating.
Unfortunately for the Clan they made no such adjustment as
at the six-minute mark Brian MacKenzie picked up his third foul and
had to be removed in favor of the hurtling Elian Sloustcher. With the
brilliant play of all five starters the Birds stretched their lead to 10
points at the nine minute mark and were never seriously threatened.
To page 2: see BASKETBALL
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 34 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1970
48    228-2305
Usual attendance
at election meet
By JAN O'BRIEN
About 75 students happened to be in SUB
party room Monday noon during speeches by the 11
candidates on the second slate of the Alma Mater
Society elections.
Co-incidentally, this was the same number of
people who were in SUB ballroom last week during
speeches by the first slate of candidates.
The four vice-presidential candidates are:
Kelvin Beckett, arjs. 4; George Gibault, arts 3;
Christine Krawczyk, arts,2; and David Welsh, arts 4.
"It is shocking that only one-tenth of one~per
cent of the students at UBC are native Indians," said
Gibault, a supporter of the Native Youth
Federation. The NYF is presently attempting to
improve the educational standards of native Indians.
A broader range of media at UBC is needed,
said Gibault.
"I also support changes in the structure of the
university; tenure is a licence not to teach," he said.
Communications is a basic problem, said
Krawczyk. "I was frustrated by the lack of student
response to the university and decided to run for
office," she said.
Involvement
The AMS should be involved in community
problems such as poverty and native Indians, she
said. It should act as a link between the students
and the Community Research Centre downtown,
said Krawczyk.
"All students should receive free housing, free
textbooks, free tuition and a living wage," said
Welsh, who is running on a socialist platform.
"I support women's liberation and the right for
women to have control over their bodies by having
free and legal abortions," said Welsh.
Beckett was not at the meeting.
Treasurer candidate Stuart Bruce, commerce 4,
said the job was a very difficult administrative
position.
"I will administer the money fairly, firmly and
efficiently," said Bruce.
Bruce said he will try to increase cafeteria and
lounge space and also will look into student life
insurance, housing and day care centres.
Til Nawatzki, law 1, is running for both
treasurer and internal affairs officer.
Nawatzki is taking advantage of a loophole in
the AMS constitution that allows a person to run
for two positions.
"Managing one-half to one million dollars is a
simple little job and I am the excellent guy to do
it," said Nawatzki.
About the internal affairs position Nawatzki
said: "I'm running as a favor to the other AMS
members; most internal affairs officers are on an ego
trip."
Clayton Vogler, arts 2, and John Zaozirny, law
1, are the two candidates for external affairs.
Vogler said the external affairs officer should
act as a liaison between the students and
organizations such as the AMS and provincial and
federal governments.
"One of the first things I will do if elected is
bring MPs and MLAs out to the campus for face to
face dialogue with students and professors," said
Vogler.
Vogler said he would start a petition to get the
same bus fare discounts for university students as
those granted high school students.
Hostility
He also claimed there was hostility against
university students by the public as reflected in the
drop of private donations to the university.
He said he would implement changes such as
greater student participation on television and radio
public affairs programs to combat this.
Zaozirny said educational reform of the
university was intricately involved in the external
affairs office.
"Student financial aid should not be tied to
academic standing," said Zaozirny.
"An equitable program based on financial
need and a separate scholarship fund should be set
up," he said.
The three internal affairs candidates are: Susan
Kennedy, home ec 2; Alex Murray, arts 2; and
David Schmidt, arts 2.
Communication between individuals on campus
is the main problem, said Schmidt. Also, more
people should be brought into the decision making
process, he said.
University problems should be broadcast to the
CANDIDATES'   STATEMENTS
Pages 6 and 7
students and brought into the classroom to make
classes more relevant, he said.
Kennedy said she would like to see
anti-calendars during registration week.
The AMS council should meet in the main
foyer or the conversation pit in order to involve
more students in AMS activities, she added.
Said Murray: "More money should go to The
Ubyssey and student radio CYVR".
If CYVR receives more money it will have a
better chance of getting an FM licence, he said.
Deserter, 20, seeks woman. Object matrimony.
By JIM DAVIES
(Surnames have been removed from this
story at the request of those involved for
obvious reasons.)
Mike, an Ameiican army deserter
currently in Vancouver, desperately
wants to get married. In fact, his life may
depend on it.
To remain in Canada, an individual
needs a certain amount of points as
determined by the immigration laws.
They are based upon the individual's
education level, professional training,
occupation, age, marital status, as well as
a personal assessment.
It is marital status that is Mike's only
hope for staying in this country. If he can
get married, he will have 20 points, more
than enough to qualify for permanent
residence in Canada.
No triflers please.
Al, a third year arts student at UBC. is
presently housing Mike. He told The
Ubyssey the story of how Mike came to
be in his present situation.
"Mike joined the army to fight for his
country or some other such patriotic
reason when he was 17." he said.
"However, he soon became
disillusioned with the army after reading
of the atrocities in the newspapers and
hearing of what was actually happening
from friends of his that had returned
from Vietnam."
Mike was, at that time, stationed in a
camp in Arizona. After he could take no
more of 'what the army stood for', he
packed his belongings and left one day for
San Francisco - absent without leave.
He lived in Haight-Ashbury for a
while, however, he was unable to get any
work. While living on cats and that sort of
diet, he was picked up by the authorities.
Mike was then returned to his
militrary camp in Arizona and told that
he would soon be sent to Vietnam.
"After two years of polishing boots,
saluting flags, and singing the national
anthem. Mike decided to make a stand.
"He gathered up all of his buttons,
uniform, gear, and assorted crap, walked
into the commanding officer's quarters
and threw it on his desk," Al said.
He was then given a direct order
concerning the date of his being sent to
Vietnam.
"He lefused this order and thus
received a four year sentence in the
military stockade.
"During the 9 or 10 months he was in
that stockade, some men were beaten to
death or shot to death.
"The stockade was closed after the
'incident of the 27', where 27 men were
given sentences of fifteen years and the
like for singing protest songs after one of
the prisoners was shot to death by a
guard for walking away from a work
detail."
Mike was then snipped to another
To page 2: see STOCKADE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
Stockade life unbearable: Mike heads for border
From page 1
camp prison at Fort Lewis near Tacoma
after an escape attempt at Los Angeles
airport failed.
"Mike escaped from there about two
months ago. He told me that they shot at
him but missed," said Al.
"He was shipped over the border by
the draft resistance after they advised him
of all consequences of fleeing to Canada."
Mike was given a place to stay at Al's
house by the committee to Aid War
Objectors.
"Al remembers I was asked to put
someone up for a while. I understand that
Mike is just one of 14,000 American
deserters and draft dodgers in Vancouver.
Mike, using a pseudonym phoned the
immigration    department    and    was
informed that he did not have enough
points to remain in the country.
"He was informed that if he were
married he would have 20 points, more
than enough to stay in Canada."
"If he does not have enough points, he
will be sent back to the U.S. where he
will face the remainder of his four year
sentence, 20 years to life for his escape
from the stockade, and up to 20 years for
disobeying a direct order.
"What it boils down to is that unless
he can find a Canadian girl who is willing
to make an act of human kindness, he
will be spending the rest of his life behind
bars."
(If a marriage is not consummated
physically, it can be annulled at any
time.)
What Mike wants is a marriage in name
only. The girl doesn't have to live with
him and the marriage can be annulled
after a year.
"Three young men were just shipped
back to the states last week so we are
definitely in a hurry," Al said.
Al has placed ads in the Georgia
Straight, placed posters on campus, and
has approached several girls. To date he
has had no success.
"I have found the ordinary straight
girls to be most serious and understanding
of the situation," he said.
"The politically-aware, libertine,
existentialist, hip, women's liberationist
shit chicks treat it as a big joke.
"I feel these girls are parasitic upon
the image they try to convey, as they
certainly don't reflect it in reality.
"The Annette Funicellos and Connie
Francises of yesterday are the women's
liberationists of today. They are all talk."
Mike's family is also suffering from his
actions.
"His family thinks he is a coward." Al
said. "His mother is disappointed in him.
His parents are shunned in their
community. The local bank will not do
business with his family."
"These things Mike knew would
happen even before he deserted. He knew
this and yet he stood up for what he
believed in. This is courage - not talk."
It is this kind of courage that Mike is
asking of some Canadian girl.
Any girl willing to marry Mike in order
to save him from a life in military prison
is asked to submit her name to The
Ubyssey office as soon as possible.
This is no joke.
Dear Speak Easy,
I am in third year arts and hoping to
graduate next year. However, it seems like I may
not even be able to complete the current session.
I am doing all right in all my courses, the
problem is finances.
I am a single parent with one pre-school
child. Welfare will pay my living expenses, but
only if I drop out of university. I am deeply in
debt now and do not want to take out any
further loans since I do not know how I could
every pay them back, especially since interest is
charged on the government student loans six
months after I stop studying.
Is there anything I can do? What can my
creditors do to me if I cannot pay my bills?
STARVING STUDENT
Dear Student,
There are many students, and also working
people who have contacted us in connection
with serious financial trouble. I was advised by a
lawyer that you may be called to court at your
creditors' demand. If this occurs you must make
sure to appear in court, and to explain why you
are unable to pay your bills. You will then be
ordered to pay a nominal amount like $10 per
month until you can afford to pay more.
However if you have any valuable goods your
creditors can seize them, and if you are working
for a salary your wages can be garnisheed by
your creditors.
Persons on B.C. government welfare cannot
legally be bothered by creditors though their
goods may be re-possessed. However, the
Vancouver city social service apparently only
allow welfare to needy non-students, or to needy
students who will be qualified for work at the
end of the session — for example student
teachers in their final year.
The Vancouver welfare department refuses
aid to students on the grounds that funds are
available to them at the university. Interestingly
enough the Burnaby welfare department seems
to give welfare to certain needy students. It's
difficult to know why some students get welfare
and some do not. The available sources of funds
on campus are the government student loans,
available through the banks; bursaries and loans
from president Walter Gage's office; some loans
and bursaries to women students through Dean
McRae's office. Again, it seems somewhat
arbitrary whether or not you get money, and
how much you get, but these are the best (since
they are the only) places to try. Those of us
working at Speak-Easy would appreciate it if you
let us know what happens so we can pass the
information on to other students.
Speak-Easy is open Monday to Friday 12
a.m. to 9 p.m. Phone 228-3706, Room 218.
Basketball Birds win trophy
From page 1
Derik Sankey, playing the
finest game of his life, hit 19
points in the first half, nearly all
on 15 to 20 foot jump shots from
the corner.
Said Sankey after the victory,
"We were all loose, and ready and
we went out and killed them."
By defeating SFU, UBC
wins the Buchanan trophy
awarded annually to the winner of
the UBC^SFU game. It was the
first time UBC had copped the
trophy in the three years it has
been awarded.
The weapon used to annihilate
the Clan was the full court
man-to-man press which caused a
total of 23 Simon Fraser
turnovers as compared to only '
by the Birds. This press, combined
with the Birds' first half shooting
of 57 per cent, put UBC ahead
55-33 at the break.
The second half was much the
same story as SFU couldn't get on
track and the Birds calmly strolled
to a 30 point lead and the final
score proved academic.
For the Clan it was a
disheartening evening. Unable to
stop the Birds with their compact
zone defense, they switched to a
man-to-man  defense  with  seven
minutes gone, but to no avail.
Larry Clark couldn't stop the
flaming shootin g of Sankey; Bill
Robinson and Sloustcher were at
pains to contend with guards Alex
Brayden and Ron Thorsen while
Bob Molinski romped around.
The comments after the game
ranged from Peter Mullins' "We
won   it   with   our   defense"   to
manager   Bruce   Jagger's  "We've
waited three years for this."
DINNER   WINNER!
William G. Callaway
(Grad.-Studies) 1668
Kilkenny Road, North
Vancouver. . . won dinner
for two at the Grouse Nest in
the UBC Students Only
Home Oil Contest draw on
February 6th. Have you
entered? See page 8 for
details.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS &? ■
Trip to San Francisco .  . .  Nick Geerdink   ^T
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick Geerdink
612 4tn Avenue
New Westminster, B.C.(Comm-3)
No. 2 Dinner for Two at the
Grouse Nest
William G. Callaway
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
Hy's
George R. Heinmiller
8018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, B.C.(Comm-2)
No. 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Bunn
207, 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.        (Educ-4)
No. 5 Evening for Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Ho watt
4612 West 9th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C. (Comm-6)
No. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126 E 35th
Vancouver 5, B.C. (Comm-3)
No. 7 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Joe D. English
109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.(Sciertce-4)
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS — SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales   $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia        $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For  Full  Information  &  Dates.   Etc.,  Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
400 On* BmiIqII Or., 50$ Burrard, Vancouver 1, B.C.
COMMERCE
LAW... AND
ARTS STUDENTS
The EXCELSIOR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OFFERS SALES
AND SALES MANAGEMENT
TRAINEE POSITIONS
COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES INCLUDING ONE YEAR AT HEAD OFFICE AS AN ESTATE
PLANNER. CONTACT THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES REGARDING INTERVIEWS FEBRUARY 23 AND 24,
1970. Tuesday,  February   17,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Chicago judge
jails the truth'
CHICAGO (CUP) — Several hundred persons demonstrated
outside the Federal Building here Sunday while in a 23rd floor
courtroom Judge Hoffman handed out prison terms for contempt
of court charges to three more defendants and the two defence
attorneys in the "Conspiracy 8" trial.
Hoffman convicted attorney Kunstler on 24 counts of
contempt and sentenced him to four years and 13 days in prison —
fhe longest sentence legal sources can recall ever given an American
lawyer for contempt of court.
The other defence attorney, Leonard Weinglass, was convicted
on 14 counts and sentenced to one year 8 months and 3 days.
The 74-year-old judge also gave contempt terms to three
defendants: Jerry Rubin, 2 years 1 month 23 days on 15 counts;
John Froines, 6 months 15 days on 10 counts, and Lee Weiner, 2
months 18 days on 7 counts.
The defendants were marched out by federal marshalls to
prison where they joined four defendants sentenced for contempt
the previous day — Dave Dellinger, Rennie Davis, Abbie Hoffman
and Tom Hayden. Kunstler and Weinglass had their sentences stayed
until May 4 so they could work on appeals for their clients.
The courtroom, under unusually tight security Sunday, was
free of the furious protests that have marked the trial's history.
The only incident occurred as Hoffman was admonishing
Weinglass for his behavior in the courtroom. Marie Leaner, a black
member of the defence team, jumped up and told the judge: "You
are a racist, a fascist and a pig."
In a prepared statement Sunday, Kunstler said he was not
ashamed of the conduct for which he was being punished.
"I have tried with all of my heart faithfully to represent my
clients in the face of what I considered and still consider repressive
and unjust conduct toward them," he said.
Kunstler said he only hoped his sentence would not deter
other lawyers throughout the country.
"If they are so deterred," he said, "then my punishment will
have effects of such terrifying consequences that I dread to
contemplate the future."
Meanwhile, protesters in the plaza outside were joined by
more than 100 members of a liberal reform group in the
Democratic party, meeting in Chicago.
Everyone splits at mid-term
No, Sam, there won't be a Ubyssey Friday as staffers intend
to celebrate the mid-term break. Aforementioned mid-term break
begins Thursday. Classes are accordingly cancelled until Monday.
You'll see us in a week.
Students gave rapt attention Monday to election candidates.
-dave enns photo
Nothing was delivered at council
The Alma Mater Society
council, waiting for its term of
office to end, accomplished little
at Monday night's meeting.
Discussion ranged from the
possibility of the AMS allocating
$6000 towards putting a cover on
Empire pool, to what action will
be taken to protest the upcoming
bomb test on Armchitka Island.
Nothing waa decided.
The question of the legality of
one person being allowed to run
for more executive positions than
he is allowed to hold was raised.
Nothing was decided.
A person is only allowed to
hols one executive position at a
time.   Til   Nawatzki,   law   1,   is
currently running for treasurer
and internal affairs officer.
"Royalty" was presented in
the form of newly-elected
secretary, Anne Clarkson;
omudsman, Richard Harrison; and
president, Tony Hodge.
"Me, I'm the king," said
Hodge.
A motion stating that the AMS
is in no way responsible for the
untidyness of the SUB eating area
was passed.
"It results from a shortage of
proper eating space and from the
amount of use it gets, and that is
the fault of the administration,
not us," said AMS president
Fraser Hodge.
When asked about the
threatened increase in food prices
by food services to meet the cost
of cleaning the area, Hodge
recommended that any price be
held over until next year.
An informal discussion on
AMS support for a weekly
community issue of The Ubyssey
concluded the meeting. It was
decided that such an issue is
feasible.
A community issue would take
The Ubyssey off campus to the
downtown area, and would help
alleviate pressures incurred by the
Pacific Press publication stoppage.
Lockout indefinite
at newspaper plant
Conflicting signs carried in Saturday's protest.
—marc kenton photo
March calls abortion laws Inhuman
Over 200 demonstrators marched from the
downtown courthouse to Victory Square
Saturday to protest the inhuman abortion laws
of the "Just Society".
At intervals along the route, the marchers
halted and members of the Vancouver Women's
Caucus dramatized in mime the frustrations of
women forced to beg for a legal abortion from
a board of doctors.
Saturday's march was part of a national
campaign sponsored by women's liberation
groups across Canada to remove all mention of
abortion from the Criminal Code.
"The human right of women to control
their own bodies must not be limited in any
way by law," said a pamphlet distributed by
Caucus members.
"To obtain an abortion, a woman is
compelled to degrade herself before the men
who hold her future in their hands: doctors and
psychiatrists who must sign her application,
and, if they agree, the hospital board.
"it is ironic that the most civilized society
in the world, built on the taming of nature, has
not yet allowed reason to triumph over chance
in the procreation of its children," the
pamphlet said.
Many of the women in the march carried
signs declaring: "Illegal abortions cause 12,000
deaths a year" and "I am Furious-(woman)".
About five "anti-abortion" signs were
dotted among the others.
By BRIAN McWATTERS
and NATE SMITH
Some 1100 employees of the
Sun and the Province have been
locked out of their offices by
Pacific Press.
Pacific Press, publishers of
the two daily newspapers, on
Sunday notified executives of the
five newspaper unions that the
company had decided to cease
publication.
The unions are the
Vancouver-New Westminster
Newspaper Guild, the Vancouver
Typographical Union, and the
Pressmen, Stereotypers, and
Mailers unions, who have been
without contracts since Oct. 31.
The company executives have
refused to make any comment on
the duration of the lockout.
The decision of Pacific Press
came only two days after the
company announced that it would
drastically reduce the size of the
two newspapers and would make
corresponding staff reductions in
the mechanical departments.
The composing room staff
was informed they would be
reduced from 260 to 80.
In a statement issued to
Vancouver radio stations Sunday,
Pacific Press general-manager Ed
Benson blamed the change in
company tactics on a statement
by "a leader of one of the unions"
that his union had devised a plan
to sabotage the reduced
production scheme.
Benson was, in fact, referring
to a statement by typographical
union negotiator Len Guy that
the union would foil the plan by
letting all members work partial
weeks rather than allowing a large
number to be laid off completely.
In a statement issued Friday,
before the lockout, the newspaper
guild executive explained the
history of the negotiations of
Pacific Press.
"Negotiations with Pacific
Press began on July 10th with the
Guild placing on the table its
traditional and constitutionally
required model contract
proposals.
"Negotiations continued
smoothly until Sept. 25th, at
which time only 10 or 11
non-economic items remained
unresolved . . . meetings were
scheduled to be held on four
consecutive days to attempt to
resolve those few remaining
non-economic items.
"However, on Sept. 25th
management broke off talks with
us — claiming the union's
economic proposals were
unreasonable, even though not a
single word on economics issues
had come up at the table."
The company applied for the
services of a government
mediation officer.
This move was made by
Pacific Press despite the fact that
To page 13: see GUILD Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 17, 1970
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Editor: Michael Finlay
News      Paul   Knox
City ...  Nate Smith
Managing       Bruce  Curtis
Wire    —    Irene  Wasilewski
Sports  -  Jim Maddin
Senior   John Twigg
Photo     Dave Enns
Ass't News  Maurice Bridge
Ass'l City    John Andersen
Page Friday   Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Twas a day of struggle in Lower
Proletaria. .
Bev Gelfond did tween classes which
made the assistant city editor very
happy. Diane Stott came in from the
Uniter and Stewart Saxe in from CUP.
Fuckup, said Finlay. John Butler and
Helen Ohrt writ and Jan O'Brien wrote
as did Jim Davies and Linda Hossie.
Brian McWatters joined the Red Guard
while Leslie Plommer mourned the
revolution. "I'll be quiet," said Robin
Burgess. Jennifer Jordan wrote good
heds again and Ginny Gait, Linsey
Beech and Bill Harnum blurbed.
Maureen Gans and David (The flash has
blown) Bowerman photoged while
Tony Gallagher, Keith Dunbar, Dick
Button and Scott McCloy did jock
duty.
Perfect fit.
The forest kings reply
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
My attention has been drawn
to your articles of Feb. 10 on
"Forest Kings".
Your articles contain both false
statements and misleading
innuendoes.
First as to the false statements:
1. "The large forest companies
control the raw forest
resources." This statement us
repeated several times in
various forms, and is untrue.
The fact is that 93% of B.C.
forest land is owned by the
Provincial Government. (3% is
Federal parks, etc.) This is the
highest proportion of
government ownership in the
free world and much higher
than the United States and
Sweden, our largest
competitors. Forest companies
large and small operate as
licensees of the government,
paying for their right to cut
whatever the government
chooses to charge, Even on the
4% of forest land that is
privately-owned, strict
government controls are in
effect.
2. "Industry .... controls the
market" and "Companies
commonly band together to fix
prices." These statements are
also repeated in various forms
throughout your article. They
are untrue and form the basis
of false conclusions. British
Columbia exports 80% of its
lumber and 90% of its pulp,
but these quantities, which are
large to us, are respectively
AlA% and 2% of world
consumption. It is patently
absurd that such a small supply
could control the market, and
in view of the fact that lumber
is now at a lower price level
than it was three years ago and
pulp is virtually the same as it
was in 1956, demonstrates that
nobody is in control of pricing.
It is in fact a perfectly free
international market.
"Seaboard Lumber Sales Co. is
a monopoly". . . Not so.
Seaboard markets about
one-half the lumber exported
by deepsea from British
Columbia which is only 1% on
international consumption.
The companies which have
agreed to market through
Seaboard also realize
substantial shipping economies
as a result.
3.
4. "Large forest companies . . .
who control the raw forest
resources in British Columbia
have found they can get better
prices for logs by exporting to
Japan" and this has resulted in
sawmill closures. Provincial and
Federal legislation both
prohibit the export of raw logs
from B.C. if any sawmill wishes
to buy them at going B.C.
prices, which are much lower
than the prices obtainable by
exporting. Log exports in 1969
were 1 Wo of the total cut.
In recent years and all through
the history of British Columbia
some sawmills have shut and
others have opened. In general,
sawmill production has increased.
While the mills you mentioned
have closed, other mills have
opened on the Coast with greater
production and employment.
5. "Whoever controls the export
market virtually controls the
industry." Not only is such
control non-existent but the
statement is in direct conflict
with your other statements,
that "the power of the forest
monopolies is their control of
the raw timber resource"
which is an equally false
statement.
Now as to misleading
innuendoes:
1. You go on at length to point
out that some men sit on more
than one Board of Directors
and imply that this is bad. On
the contrary, this is perfectly
legal, proper and has always
been true. Where a man sits on
more than one Board of
Directors he is under legal
obligation to disclose any
conflict of interest; and to
refrain from influencing the
decision if his interests are
involved. There are severe
penalties for any breach of
this. However you are subject
to no penalty for implying
misconduct to these people.
2. Your state that MacMillan
Bloedel is a "company whose
power is based on influence
and privilege with the
government." This statement is
false, and Mr. Williams, who
made it under the legal
protection of the legislature,
has refused to repeat it outside
the legislature where he would
be subject to legal action.
3. Throughout your article you
imply that foreign ownership is
somehow evil. International
ownership exists through every
country and industry,
Canadians are free to do and
do own foreign property and
shares in foreign companies.
You do not demonstrate what
is wrong with this.
4. You imply that conglomerates
are both evil and not subject to
government controls. By
definition conglomerates are
not dominant in any industry,
but occupy only a relatively
small part of each. If size is
bad, as implied in the rest of
your articles, surely the
comglomerate operates as a
counterweight. Do you avoid
Sheraton hotels or Avis
rent-a-car because they are
owned by a conglomerate?
Surely their competitiveness
benefits you as a user of cars
and hotels. Of course,
conglomerates must also obey
the laws of the country where
they operate.
In summary, your articles start
from false premises and proceed
to draw false conslusions.
Yours very truly,
GORDON L. DRAESEKE
President
Council of the Forest*
Industries of British
Columbia.
True, the government is the
nominal owner of most of B.C.'s
forest land, but it is not the
government who cuts trees and
sells them.
The fact remains that the land
is leased or licensed to private
companies, mostly the few large
corporations, who sell the product
at their own prices.
Your statements about the
world market show that you have
totally failed to understand the
article.
It was not my intention to deal
with B.C.'s position in the world
market, but to show how the
handful of large companies
control the industry within B.C.
The fact you quote export figures
even larger than those mentioned
in the article confirms that export
trade does indeed control the B.C.
industry.
Your admit that one-
organization controls half of the
vital export market and do not
deny that another controls most
of the other half. That IS a
monopolistic situation.
Continued on page 10 Tuesday, February  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
WHO THE HELL IS ...
It is always amazing, in a quaint, obscure sort
of way, to see a production of Bernard Shaw now
and again. (Just like it is always interesting to attend
a Playhouse opening night now and again.) What I
mean is: it's almost very hard to believe that, given
the kind of theatrical environment we live in today,
Shaw's kind of stage vision is still potentially alive.
As I said, it's a quaint, a beautifully unreal
experience — to walk into a theatre, fresh from
urgent dedication to such "contemporary issues" as
The Rape of the Environment, Revolution, The
.Expansion of the Mind, Doom, etc. — all of which
of course demand their theatrical/mirror/reflection
on the stage — and then be presented with crystal
clear, no-nonsense straight Shavianism. The
experience is... I am almost tempted to
say ... "totally theatrical". Shaw's world, seen
today, is solely on stage: it unfolds, incredibly, in
completely its own time and space .. . like any self
respecting unreal vision does.
There is no way we can do anything today but
smile understandingly at the Irish Bard's puffy, pin
point social revelations. Especially because, in his
own age, this kind of socially engaged theatre was
considered triumphant in its perceptive genius and
progressive impact. And Shaw's plays are the most
exquisite blossoms of this genre.
For Shaw, you see, man's supreme achievement
— and progressive weapon — was the Word; the
word in all its multi-meaning subtlety and potential
syntactical juxtaposition. FOREVER' Because the
word was the direct extension of the male's ability
to objectify his world by applying the force of his
supreme intellect. (Thus also his strained
relationship to the "emotionally unfortunately
overburdened" "other" sex.) Thus impeccable
articulation and grammatical flair would, almost
Incidentally solve the problems of the world, while
being mainly active in entertaining awake minds.
The beauty of Shaw today is of course, his
unassailable consistency in maintaining — to the
point of total self-irony — this image of the
enlightened man, the snuffy Britisher, stoned in his
own semantic space. "In short", his characters
never, except under extremely extraordinary
circumstances, allow their cerebral "privacy" to be
molested by such banal and unreliable forces as
those exhibited by the phenomenon generally
referred to as "Life". (I am sure that on his
deathbed, Shaw must have erected a phrase that, in
its deceptive substance, totally subverted the entire
reality of death.)
Today, where we have learned to exile language
wherever possible — and just tolerate it on other
levels — I found I was more or less ignoring what
Shaw was actually "meaning" and experiencing
Shavian dialogue entirely in terms of, like, music.
The Playhouse Theatre Company, under the
direction of David Gardner, presented An Evening
With Bernard Shaw and the Ladies last Friday, and
the "Evening" featured one one-act - The Village
Wooing - on the famed "chattel hooks refined
gentleman and utterly domesticises him" theme,
and oone "comedy of letter" - Dear Liar -
dramatized from thirty years of correspondence
between Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
... Bernard Shaw
Adding to the "quaintness" of my experience
that night (in an oblique sort of way) was the fact
that these short plays, populated by only two
characters — in each case a male and a female in
opposition — did not actually fit into the large space
of the Playhouse mainstage at all. So what one
actually experienced was the sense of a small private
sitting-room expanded into absurdly public
proportions. And Alan Scarfe's portrayal of Shaw in
both instances, strangely enough, filled this space
admirably — and with fine support from his wife
Annie Scarfe in the Wooing and Patricia Gage in the
Liar. (It was interesting to see Scarfe playing
opposite two women, respectively, in two plays —
one his actual wife and the other his "staged" love. I
thought his performance in the second play was far
superior.)
So ... with all that I would definitely
recommend people's dipping into Shaw at the
Playhouse — the plays run to March 6th — because
there may be more to laugh at than appears on the
surface of the plays. (At least it will be unreal!)
-NORBERT RUEBSAAT
fijt (pDOp - and Atu$g lih that
c
Announcing that free
noon-hour theatre by students
is alive and well on campus.
The Players Club goes into its
second week of production this
week — at noon yesterday and
today in the Ballroom - with
North of Boston, an original of
Robert Frost poems, directed
by David Bulger.
Last week, the club's first
production of Collision Course
came off very successfully as
many people showed up at all
three noon hours and more
showed a desire to also join the
group.
So    keep    watching    for
theatrical happenings.
* * *
THE EGRET AND THE
HAWK, directed by Moyra
Mulholland. W. B. Yeats'
interest in the classic No
Drama of Japan has for years
been the subject of scholarly
contemplation. About ten
years ago one of his plays was
translated into Japanese and
performed by the head of the
Kita School of No in Toky.
This forthcoming production is
an attempt to relate one of
Yeats' No-influenced plays to
the production of No in Japan.
Yeats had at his disposal only
the No plays translated by
Fenollosa and Pound without
any knowledge of how the
plays were performed. Now, by
bringing the director's
knowledge of No production
and   Yeats'   imaginative   and
beautiful literary concept we
seek to find a form that is
viable as Western theatre.
This experiment will be in
two parts. The first will be a
demonstration of Classic No by
Moyra Mulholland. The second
part will be the presentation of
The Hawk's Well by W. B.
Yeats. The intention will be to
find a vocal style based on the
English language and a
movement style based on
Western dance modes both of
which carry the expressive
quality of No as it is performed
in Japan today. The
performance will be highly
stylized with a musical
accompaniment. Masks will be
worn by some of the
performers.
Performances will be in the
DOROTHY    SOMERSET
STUDIO,  February   17-21   at
8:30   p.m.   For   tickets   call
228-2678, or room 207 of the
Frederic Wood Theatre.
* * *
There's at least two music
events to keep one occupied
this weekend between bouts of
studying or relaxing.
First, on Saturday night, the
Vancouver Opera Association
is putting on its production of
Puccini's La Boheme, one of
the big boss hits of opera along
with Aida, Carmen, and Faust.
Needless to say, it looks like
houses for this production will
be fuller than those of the last,
The Elixir of Love. Assuming
there are any tickets remaining,
they'll be obtainable for the
usual buck rate.
And on Sunday, the
Vancouver Symphony will be
presenting not cellist
Rostopovich (who's sick and
has returned to Russia) but
pianist Bela Siki, who gave a
recital at UBC last weekend
and received raves for his
performance. He'll be playing a
Mozart piano concerto as well
as Ravel's jazz-oriented
Concerto in G.
Written in the mid-3 0s for a
chamber orchestra divided to
produce stereophonic effects,
the peice is in foruur
movements. The first develops
a musical phrase in fugue-like
manner to an overwhelming,
almost orgasmic climax, while
the third explores a world of
exotic sounds including
tympani glassandos andstaccato
xylophone clinks. The second
and fourth movements are fast
and dance-like, revealing folk
music influences. The
virtuosity of all players is
exploited to the fullest in this
work, which combines a
fascinating panorama of sound
with a maximum emotional
effect.
So go and groove on one of
the century's musical
masterpieces. It happens next
Sunday afternoon and Monday
evening in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
PFage Tuesday
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Following long and tremendous
deliberation in the highest circles, head Blorgs announced that all
conceivable forms of art - having been pronounced officially dead
some time ago - would now be the hub of an elaborate funeral
ritual, involving the entirety of the island kingdom's population. (No
further information was available.)
G.S.A.-A.G.M.
S.U.B. Auditorium
NOON
February 25
african
evening
informal
discussions on:
African Humanities
Assimilation or
Acculturation?
N0W -ANEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
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Aparthei d- Vacuu m
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Recollections at
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African Hits by
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Music and
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lEVERYBODY WELCOME
This Fri. at
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE-8:00 p.m.
AMS
2nd SLATE ELECTIONS
ADVANCE POLLS
Today — 11:30 a.m.-3.30 p.m. — SUB
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. — Residences
POLLING STATIONS
Tomorrow — 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Aud. Cafe Henry Angus
Barn Gym
Education Woodward
SUB Ponderosa
Main Library Buchanan
Bus Stop Sedgewick
Civil Engineering
WESTERN  CANADIAN  INTER - COLLEGIATE
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
SEMI-FINAL
BASKETBALL
SERIES
UBC "THUNDERBIRDS"
VS.
Univ. of Victoria "VIKINGS"
FRI. & SAT - 8 P.M.
(FEB. 20 and FEB. 21)
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYM
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
on sale at the ATHLETIC OFFICE
WE REGRET FREE ADMISSION
IS NOT APPLICABLE TO THESE EVENTS Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
CANDIDATES' STATEMENTS
Researcher to speak
VICE-PRESIDENT
KELVIN BECKETT
"It's sacred," she breathed back at him. They
vowed it, gave it out and took it in, drawn, by their
intensity, more closely together. Then, of a sudden,
through this tightened circle, as at the issue of a
narrow strait into the sea beyond, everything broke
up, broke down, gave way, melted and mingled.
Their lips sought their lips, their pressure their
response and their response their pressure .. . They
passionately sealed their pledge." Sigh! — Henry
James from The Golden Bowl.
KELVIN BECKETT
arts 4
This university must prepare itself for a
traumatic yet magnificent event. This event when
accomplished will be no less than a challenge to
reality. Of course I am referring to the election of
Kelvin Beckett. How will his election transform
reality and what will be the ramifications of this
most tremendous event? That's a good question.
History, prepare thyself.
KEVIN CROWE
(No statements received for George Gibault.)
CHRIS KRAWCZYK
I am running for AMS vice-president because I
think it is high time someone did something useful
with the student council. The council should be
made to serve the interests of the students, not of
the councillors. The AMS should get involved in the
problems facing the students on this campus.
Problems such as the lack of relevance in many of
the courses offered, poor teaching, overcrowding,
high prices of texts and food. I will do my best to
ensure that the AMS look into all these problems
and take some steps toward correcting them.
CHRIS KRAWCZYK
arts 2
Those of you who have read my contributions
to The Ubyssey will know that the AMS is not my
all time favorite.
It is not even my second favorite.
I don't like the AMS because I feel that it has
not been relevant to the students.
Nobody knows what the AMS is doing.
Nobody cares.
Christine Krawcyzk wants to change this. If
you want a vice president on AMS who will try to
do something — something you will know about —
Vote Christine Krawcyzk.
JIM DAVIES
arts 4
DAVID WELSH
I want to represent students in the AMS as a
socialist vice-president. That means I support
student-faculty-staff control of this university.
Unversal Accessibility? To me it means that
anybody who sees the need for higher education so
that he can advance in this society should get in.
Students should get books, fees, and housing, plus a
wage they can live on, provided for them while they
are in training.
The value of the AMS will become evident to
everybody when it begins to move on these issues.
DAVID WELSH
arts 4
(No seconder's statement received).
Terry Howars of the B.C. Research Council will speak on
"Biological Effects of Pulp Mill Effluents" Wednesday noon in
Biological Science 2000.
More cars,
more parking,
same fees
Parking fees at UBC will
remain unchanged in the coming
year.
J. F. McLean, chairman of the
student-faculty advisory
committee on traffic and parking,
said that due to sufficient funds
being raised from this year's
parking lot fees it would be
unnecessary to increase the rental
for car stalls.
When asked about the
additional problems which will
arise when approximately 1,000
more enrollees bring their cars to
UBC next fall, McLean said:
"There are a number of parking
spaces under construction at the
present time and at the last
student-faculty meeting it was
reported the lots should be
completed by  next September."
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
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10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
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You go and return as a group on
regularly scheduled flights. And
you can stay as long as a year.
Air Canada affinity 'Group 80'
Economy Class fares apply from
major cities in Canada to dozens
of exciting European cities. Start
your 1970 holiday planning now.
Air Canada can clear up any questions you may have about organizing your group. But do it now
and make your arrangements very
soon to get the benefit of the lowest affinity 'Group 80' fares of the
year.
>fjw:      l^WA. to
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Nov. 1 - Mar. 31/71      Aug. 10 - Oct. 31     June 1 - Aug. 9
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Ask about affinity 'Group 25' and 'Group 40' fares as well. For all the details, call Air Canada.
Fares subject to Government approval.
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Go Group 80'   AIR CANADA ® Tuesday, February 17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
CANDIDATES' STATEMENTS
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
CLAYTON VOGLER
At present, the AMS is too concerned with
generalities and groups on Campus, and apparently
uninterested with the individual.
My campaign is based on communicating with
individuals, and if elected I would base my tenure on the
same principle.
My chief aim is to arrange face-to-face discussion
between students, professors, and politicians on university
matters. Fighting the anti-university stigma developing
among adults, in effective ways, will be another important
job.
VOTE VOGLER!
CLAYTON VOGLER
I have nominated Clayton Vogler because I believe we
need to elect people who will finally shake the student
council out of its lethargic frame of mind.
I feel Clayton is the type of person receiving on this
campus. Therefore I ask you to "VOTE VOGLER", a
fighter of student interests, for the position of External
Affairs Office.
DAVID SAVELIEFF
arts 3
JOHN ZAOZIRNY
Year after year, candidates appear out of the
woodwork to contest AMS executive posts. Just as
predictably, students are tossed and expected to swallow
wild promises of lower bus rates, reduced rates on student
loans, better communications, etc. ad nauseum.
It becomes easy to understand why 3,000 students
voted against compulsory membership. My only pledge is
a close and critical examination of the problems facing us
as students and in time, hopefully a few solutions.
JOHN ZAOZIRNY
law 1
As vice-president of the University of Calgary student
union, president of the Alberta Association of Students
and recipient of the University of Calgary Gold Award,
John has evidence of his enthusiasm and dedication to
student affairs.
Authority comes from respect and those around him
have consistently respected John's judgment. John has
always discharged his responsibities with care and has
dealt in complete fairness with all sectors of the university
community.
BOB JENKINS
the rest of the council. That's good for you because hell
respond to your wishes first. He's loud and pushy. Want a
shy guy to handle a million dollars a year? His commerce
and law background will enable him to find out what's
going on. And he'll tell you.
Senator PETER BROCK
law 1
(No candidate's statement received)
TREASURER     INTERNAL AFFAIRS
I Imli#li4#lrlmklm tii nawatzki
STUART BRUCE
The position of treasurer is an administrative one.
The position demands at least some experience - I have
served as assistant treasurer and member of finance
committee for one year. I promise that the treasurer's
office will be administered efficiently to facilitate the
workings of all groups who are interested in doing
constructive work on campus. Some of my specific
platforms are increased lounge and cafeteria space in SUB,
investigation of life insurance plans, help housing
programs, etc. In general my platform is that the
treasurer's office must administer the student's funds
fairly, firmly and efficiently. Vote on Wednesday.
STUART BRUCE
commerce 4
The treasurer's position is very difficult because it is
his duty to make sure that our AMS membership fees are
used for the benefit of the student body as a whole. With
his experience as assistant treasurer and member of the
finance committee last year, Stuart Bruce has the most
up-to-date understanding of the functions and flaws in the
AMS bureaucracy and in the problems of each
organization affiliated with the AMS. He has shown
himself to handle the people and matters that come to his
attention happily and fairly.
It is for these reasons that I seconded Stuart Bruce's
nomination for treasure and will vote for him on election
day. I hope you will too!
GORDON MULLIGAN
science 4
TIL NAWATZKI
Nawatzki is not a team player. Do you want one for
treasurer? Nawatzki is a freak and he won't get along with
TIL NAWATZKI
Til is generally known as being a sex-pervert, a
criminal, rude, boorish, and worst of all, a hippie.
A vote for him is a vote against motherhood,
apple-pie, and the clean, beaming, middle-class faces you
usually see in the AMS offices. Vote for filth, vote for
Nawatzki.
Senator PETER BROCK
law 1
(No candidate's statement received)
ALEX MURRAY
In running for internal affairs officer I have two
main objectives.
Firstly to try to persuade student council to increase
grants for the Radio Society and The Ubyssey to at least
keep the students informed; for the radio station with the
hope that it will eventually obtain an FM licence, for The
Ubyssey to enable it to again be published thrice weekly.
Secondly, I would like to work for the
re-introduction of anti-calendars on campus.
ALEX MURRAY
arts 2
I have chosen to second Alex Murray's nomination
for internal affairs officer, having known him for many
years to be the type of person one would like to see on
student council.
He has a strong interest in affairs at the university
having spent considerable time working at the campus
radio station this year. His main concerns re insufficient
funds provided for The Ubyssey and CYVR seem to me to
be valid ones.
GEORGE KAMINSKY
science 1
MIX ONE IRRESISTIBLE FORCE
WITH ONE IMMOVABLE OBJECT
ADD THE CHEMISTRY OF LOVE
RESULT -
A Delightfully Entertaining Evening of Wit & Charm
in the
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY'S
production of
AN EVENING WITH BERNARD SHAW AND THE LADIES
Ann Scarfe — Alan Scarfe — Patricia Gage
VILLAGE WOODING and DEAR LIAR
DIRECTED BY DAVID GARDNER
8:30 p.m. Nightly to March  6th—Saturday Matinees 2:30 p.m.
Q.E.  PLAYHOUSE — STUDENTS  NIGHT FEB.  24th
STUDENTS  V2  PRICE  MONDAY TO  THURSDAY
Vancouver Ticket Centre — 683-3255 or after 5:30 p.m.  683-2311
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
REN T A L S
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS, DARK SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
m
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Annual General Meeting
THE A.G.M. of the Graduate Student Association will
take place on Wednesday, February 25, at 12:30 p.m.
in the S.U.B. Auditorium.
Candidates in the forthcoming G.S.A. elections are
expected to be introduced at this meeting.
LUCKY   LARRY
Larry Bryce Donaldson
(Comm.-2) of 126 E. 35th,
Vancouver won Canuck's
tickets for two in the
February 6th draw of the
UBC Students Only Home Oil
Contest. More winners every
week — could be you! Turn
to page 8 for details on how
to enter.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick Geerdink
612 4th Avenue
New Westminster, B.C.(Comm-3)
No. 2 Dinner for Two at the
Grouse Nest
William G. Callaway
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
Hy's
George R. Heinmiller
8018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, B.C.(Comm-2)
No, 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Bunn
207, 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. (Educ-4)
No. 5 Evening for Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Howatt
4612 West 9th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C. (Comm-6)
No. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126E 35th
Vancouver 5. B.C. (Comm-3)
No. 7 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Joe D. English
109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.(Science-4)
HOME
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
400 One Benrall Or., 505 Burrard, Vancouver 1, B.C.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS-
MANY FACES OF FOLK - VOL. Ill
THE
BERKELEY
SQUARE
From London England
Folk with a new outlook — Fresh Sound
TODAY NOON
SUB. AUD. 50c Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews for teaching positions in
the School District No. 36 (Surrey)
may be arranged for March 9th to
11th, inclusive, at the Student Placement Office. Please enter name on
Interview Forms.
HOW WOULD YOU LIKE
TO BE MARTIN SMITH?
MARTIN SMITH ARTS-4 WON A WEEK-END IN SAN
FRANCISCO FOR HIMSELF AND A FRIEND (?) IN THE
HOME OIL U.B.C. STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST C.P. AIR
STEWARDESS LINDA COCHRAN MAKES HIM
COMFORTABLE. THERE IS A WINNER EVERY .WEEK,
(NICK GEERDINK COM. 3 WON FEB. 6 DRAW. DONALD A.
JONES, EDUC.-3 WON FEB. 13 DRAW. THE NEXT ONE
COULD BE YOU!)
EASY TO ENTER! FILL IN COUPON AND GET YOUR
SPECIAL   HOME   CREDIT   CARD*
UBC STUDENTS ONLY
TOP PRIZE: A week-end for two in San Francisco!
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for winner and friend.
PLUS EXCITING EXTRA PRIZES EVERY WEEK:
+ Dinner for two at Hy's Steak House
+ Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
+ Canucks Hockey tickets for two
+ Evening for two at the Daisy
+ Dinner for two at the Grouse Nest
GET YOUR FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
Fourteen wooden beads on a leather thong. Anti-uptight baubles
to get you through daily disasters. Free in the mail when you
apply for your special UBC Home Credit Card.
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
400 One Bentall Or., 505 Burrard, Vancouver 1, B.C.
*lf you now have a regular Home Credit Card, phone our Credit Dept.,
685-9131  — we'll make arrangements to make it eligible.
Complete this application form (please print) and mail it to Home Oil.
We'll rush your special Credit Card to you, plus your free Worry Beads.
SURNAME
CHRISTIAN NAMES
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS (if different from above) Show Street
No., Town, etc.
REGISTRATION NO.
FACULTY YEAR
Chances are yo
get a
There just isn't any need for you, says an unen
picket lines to work.
By Lynn Atkins.
This summer more attention than ever will be
paid to the problem of finding work for students.
In addition to the annual "job-hunt" conducted
by campus placement offices and Canada
Manpower's student placement centre, there will be
at least two other drives to come up with more
summer jobs. Youth Employment Services, the
YMCA sponsored service which last summer put the
pinch on community businessmen and residents to
hire more high school students, will again be setting
up a number of community job centres and
launching an intensive public appeal.
Trying to bring some order to the competition
of different job-organizations, the B.C. Union of
Students has itself entered the field with a task
force on unemployment, one of whose ambitions is
to co-ordinate the work of placement agencies. In
addition the task force intends to blitz B.C.
industries for more jobs, promote apprenticeship
programs, assist student entrepreneurs, and gather
information on student employment.
If you have encountered no difficulty finding a
summer job in past years and expect to meet with
the same success again this summer, you could
easily conclude that the job-placement system that
presently exists is quite adequate. On the other
hand, if you know what it is like to spend the
summer looking for work and find instead that it is
necessary to borrow another thousand dollars to
return to university in the fall, you might have a few
questions you'd like answered.
The Action Committee for Unemployed
Students (TACUS) thinks that there are a lot more*
students in the second category than Canada
Manpower statistics would seem to indicate; we
think the present job-placement system leaves a lot
of questions unanswered. Our committee exists not
to add to the existing facilities for recruiting
summer jobs, but to expose the limitations of these
facilities and to present a more accurate picture of
the state of employment among young people in the
context of prevailing economic trends.
The basic supposition of the present
student-financing system, that every individual has
an equal opportunity to finance his education, via a
summer job, we think is unsupportable.
What in fact results from this system of
financing is that university in particular and higher
education in general is available to the children of
upper income families and not to children from
poor families, is available to young people who are
still supported by their parents and not to whose
who are self-supporting, is more available to men
than it is to women.
This class distinction within the university was
demonstrated by the CUS survey of 1965, and has
ATKINS protests outside B.C. Tel building last
summer.
been upheld by more recent studies. The Canada
Student Loan Act has not changed the situation
substantially because it has failed to keep abreast of
rising educational expenses, rising' living expenses,
and an increasing scarcity of summer work.
Moreover, the financing of university education
through a loan system is itself a mechanism of class
discrimination.
Something, obviously, must be done if Canada's
claim of offering universal accessibility to education
is to be revealed as anything but a farce.
The existing placement agencies help to make
more jobs available to student, but the number of
adequately paying jobs which they can coax out of
business and industry is highly limited. Advertising
the    student    as    a    well-brushed,    enthusiastic
personality does little to persuade a businessmen to
take on more full-time help. His employment policy
is governed by the internal economics of his
company, not by humanitarian instincts.
In their promotional optimism, groups like
Canada Manpower and YES often obscure the
overall economic condition of students. Their
programs may produce a high number of
placements, but how long do these placements last Tuesday, February  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
i wont
)b this summer
byed students' group.  But please don't cross
■' how much do they pay; students may earn well
r a thousand dollars a summer but how much do
/save?
A full time university student can now expect
spend upwards of $1,800 a year if he or she is
lg away from home. Statistics on university
lents, moreover, are not the only criteria to be
sidered when one is trying to assess the
;ssiblity of university education. The students
> could not enrol because of lack of funds must
be taken into account.
U'RE NOBODY SPECIAL
The university summer student and the
/ersity graduate no longer share the privileged
ition on the labor market that they once held.
1 summer student often finds that he is on a par
n the adult non-student in competition for a
dly diminishing number of unskilled jobs, and
graduate, as many an arts graduate can attest to,
equently little more employable than when he
ifed university. In some instances he is even less
jloyable. Women graduates in particular often
I that a six-month secretarial course is of more
in getting a job than four years of sociology or
osophy.
Putting on their working boots and white gloves
brought some students to the radically altered
ipective that they are not immune to the
dwheels of supply and demand. They see the
iat that automation poses to their livelihood, and
more able to appreciate trade union demands for
security.
They   feel    the    intense    resentment    which
king men and women feel towards students who
nely walk across the picket lines which stand as
only  means of protecting their standard of
>9-
Why indeed should the student expect
erential treatment over the working adult with a
ily to support?
Why should the university student get more job
stance than the grade eleven or twelve
ischooler who is saving for his first year tuition
nan the transient youth whose financial state is
ly always critical?
Why should men get paid more than women for
lg the same work?
The picture that emerges from such
siderations is that while there are many groups
i genuine employment problems, some are given
lie recognition and others are dismissed as
adbeats", lazies, and dreamers.
As long as unemployment is treated as a
Diem particular to certain groups there can be
tion. As long as one group regards its problems
special ones it will only serve to hinder the
structive, radical reform that is necessary.
The Action Committee for Unemployed
Students recognizes a national policy of full
employment as the best policy for full student
employment. While the present preferential system
of emplyment continues the unemployment picture
will remain unstable. Like the precarious iceberg,
ready to topple over due to the melting from the
sun's rays, new groups of unemployed will surface
explosively as they begin to demand their fair share
of dignity and opportunity.
NEW APPROACHES
(TACUS) feels it is essential that the present
efforts to find jobs for students be consistent with
the reforms that will ultimately be1 necessary to end
unemployment.
Last summer we outlined six demands which
we felt pointed in the direction that change would
have to come. Our position has not changed
substantially since then. With the prospect of more
and more jobs being eliminated through automation
and persistent inflation, we feel that summer
employment can no longer be considered as an
adequate means of financing continued education.
An alternative system of free education,
enabling anyone to go to school, regardless of
financial need, must be substituted. Short of this
overall reform, emergency measures must be
instituted to ensure that no student is prevented
from continuing his education because of
unemployment.
Some form of unemployment insurance should
be available for unemployed students in the same
way that it is for apprentice workers. The federal
and provincial governments must not allow
anti-inflation policies to force unemployment on
any Canadian, and should provide new
opportunities for employment. In all of these
measures, steps must be taken to provide for equal
opportunities for women.
TACUS is not distinguished by its policies
alone, but by its readiness to take action on them.
Education is a prime concern with us and we will
pursue any effective means to get the work out,
from the news media, to street leafletting and
demonstrations, to formal research and conferences.
We will help young people who have special
employment problems, as we assisted employees of
Clum-Morford last summer in obtaining better
wages.
This summer we are particularly concerned over
the problems of transient youth, who are subject to
severe police and legal harassment. Where other
groups will pass resolutions condemning student
scabs, we will make it hot for them out on the
picket line. To facilitate the service we will be
making available, TACUS will open an office where
any inquiries or complaints regarding employment
can be directed.
See you there.
THE EGRET And The HAWKl
A Programme of Nu & Yeats
Directed   by  MOYRA  MULHOLLAND
FEBRUARY 17-21—8:30 P.M.
in the new SOMERSET STUDIO
Tickets:  Room 207-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
STUDENTS: $1.00 ADULTS: $1.50
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phone 224-7212
TO  TrHi
pRof
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JEWELER,
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COMES oi\ly
W/'uU  EXPERIENCE
You don't become a jeweler overnight. Like medicine, law, engineering, it takes years of practice to become an expert. That's why we say
it makes a world of difference where
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let us show you how a professional
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LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER,  AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
: Granville at Pender Since  1904 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
THE DAYS GET LONGER and countless barefoot students are lured by the sun to the beach — a place
where books, classes and exams can be momentarily forgotten. -dave enns photo
MORE LETTERS
From page 4
As for log exports, it is true
that companies selling logs are
supposed to make three offers to
domestic mills before exporting,
but the sawmill closures and other
evidence presented by the
International Woodworkers of
America over the past two years
clearly indicate this is not being
done.
If you can suggest any other
reason that a sawmill in B.C.
would be unable to find wood, I'd
love to hear it.
Your fifth point again indicates
a serious deficiency in your
reading ability. I said forest
monopolies'    control    of    the
industry rests on control of the
export market AND control of
the raw resources.
I do not just "imply that
foreign ownership is somehow
evil", I state it as a firm belief. It
is a national emergency when
decisions affecting a nation's
economy and interests of its
people are made in foreign
boardrooms. The fact that other
countries face the same situation
is slight comfort.
Finally conglomerates do not
seek "to occupy a relatively small
part of a number of industries"
but seek to control as large a
segment as possible in as many
industries  as possible. They are
not a counterweight to monopoly,
but an added dimension to it.
They may obey the formal
laws of the land, but their very
size means they do not necessarily
respond to extra-legal government
influence,  such as fiscal policy
Like the overwhelming
majority of Canada's population, I
haven't the money or the need to
go to Sheraton or Avis.
However, for those in the
market for such services, avoiding
Sheraton and Avis because they
are owned by foreign
complomerates sounds like an
excellent idea.
IN .iJ.
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
921-9621
(FOR FREE INFORMAi.ON)
STUDENTS
SKI APEX
PENTICTON, B.C.
For your mid-term break Feb. 20-21-22
LIFT RATES - $4.00 during week; $5.00 weekends
EXCELLENT SNOW CONDITIONS
Accommodation Available on  Hill
Apre' Ski Parties — In the Lodge Every Nite
Cm»oi ODEON Thmm J?
PERSONAL
ATTRACTIVE MAN 32, good
job, wishes to meet attractive lady
25 to 35. Please send photo. Box
35.
RETIRED BUSINESSMAN
would like to meet mature
woman. Object companionship.
Box 72.
CHRISTIAN DIVORCEE 35,
athletic type, seeks loaded
man, any age. Object
matrimony. Phone 224-3730
after 7 p.m.
GREAT COUPS OF HISTORY
Filmed   in  Vancouver
Darcus
with
DELPHINE HARVEY
JANICE CASSIE
ELLIS PRYCE-JONES
TED SUTTON
Varsity
224-3730*'
4375 W. 10th
NO ADMITTANCE TO PERSONS UNDER
WARNING
Crude dialogue may offend
B.C. Censor
Shows at 7:30, 9:30
Ends Wed., Feb. 18
ANTHONY QUINN
"THE SECRET OF
SANTA VITTORIA"
Coronet
TECHNICOLOR
       ADULT  ENTERTAINMENT
«51   GRANVILLE        12:00,   2:15,  4:40   7:05 9:30
685-6828 Sunday:   2:15,  4:30,   7:00,  9:20
"THE YEAR'S BEST COMEDY!"
- SATURDAY RrVIEWf
"A MARVELOUS MOVIE!"
-WCBS RADIO
SHOWTIMES:
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TECHNICOLOR
SUNDAY 1:40, 3:30,
5:30, 7:30, 9:30
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
£?  uaaer      inariD
*M \wmw    Beroman
cacTus
FLONver
Shows at 12:15, 2:30,4:30,
6:55, 9:10
Sunday 2:30, 4:40, 6:55, 9:10
Park
— ■IE at Hth
176-2747
DICK        "THE
VANDYKE ccmic"
Shows at 7:30, 9:30
Sunday 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 Tuesday, February  17,  1970 THE      UBYSSEY Page  11
Social Movements in Canada
SPEAKERS
Monday, February 23: Buchanan 100
Jack Scott
Former labour leader.
Now head of the Progressive Workers Movement-
Tuesday, February 24: SUB Ballroom
Matthews and Steele
Presented in conjunction with A.M.S. Speakers Committee
"The Struggle foir the Canadian   University."
Wednesday, February 25: Buchanan 106
Stanley Ryerson
Canadian historian and author of Unequal Union.
On the separatist movement in Quebec.
Thursday, February 26: Buchanan 202
Michel Chartrand
former president of the Montreal C.N.T.U. (Confederation of National Trade Unions)
On the labour movement in Quebec.
Friday, February 27: Buchanan 106
PANEL involving the Week's Speakers on
AMERICAN DOMINATION of Canada
Presented by the Arts Undergraduate Society and
Sponsored by the Faculty ot Arts Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17,  1970
Saigon could force Canada
to deport Vietnamese students
OTTAWA (CUP) - Approximately 200
Vietnamese students now in Canada face possible
deportation for their opposition to the American
presence in Vietnam, if an attempt to gain an appeal
for a Universite Laval student fails next week.
Two Laval students met with MP's here
Thursday to try to appeal the deportation ordered
for Luong Chau Bhouc, a biochemistry student and
anti-war activist in Montreal.
The two, engineering Tran Tu Lebac and Tom
Due, said Luong's deportation orders followed a
visit to Montreal by Le Van Le, an official from the
South Vietnamese embassy in Washington.
The students said Le Van's visit — officially to
look after the 600 Vietnamese students in Montreal
— was to gain action to neutralize the anti-Saigon
activities of some students.
Luong was ordered deported because his visa
and passport had allegedly expired, they said.
The Saigon government can refuse a student
permission to continue studies abroad, cancel his
passport and pressure his family at home, Tran Tu
said.
He said approximately 200 Vietnamese
students in Montreal are opposed to the American
war, although only 40 are members of the
Association of Vietnamese Patriots, a group
dedicated to peace, independence and a neutral
government in South Vietnam.
Six Vietnamese studying in Japan and West
Germany were sentenced to six years hard labor in
absentia, the students said, for refusing to cooperate
with the Saigon government and cut out their
anti-war activities.
The six were also denied the rights of
citizenship for 20 years — a status which effectively
bars them from employment.
The two students said Canadian law does not
permit a person to be deported to a country of his
choice. However, they were told by one MP they
could not be deported to a country where there was
substantial grounds to believe they would be
punished.
There are approximately 800 Vietnamese
students in Canada, virtually all middle class from
Saigon-controlled land.
Arbitration plan ends boycott
THUNDER BAY (CUP) - Lakehead University
students Friday suspended their university-wide
class boycott after two days, in favor of attempting
arbitration with their administration over the firing
of sociology professor Victor Wightman.
At a meeting Thursday night, approximately 60
organizers agreed to end the student protest, and
announced they would attempt to meet with the
Lakehead administration by no later than Feb. 20
to discuss an arbitration board to handle
Wightman's case.
So far, the Lakehead administration has not
commented on the student action.
The organizers handed over details of the
arbitration proposal to a five-man student
committee: no details have been released of
proposals for the composition and terms of
reference of the arbitration committee.
The sociology professor was dismissed by the
university administration on the recommendation of
Sociology and Anthropology chairman Cecil
French, who declared that most faculty in his
department agreed with the action.
Later investigation proved that faculty had not
been consulted in firing decision, and that a
majority would have extended Wightman's contract
at the university.
You talk a lot
about the problems
of this world.
Do you really want
to help solve
some of them?
You're a high school student.
Sooner or later you're going to have to stop just talking about
the problems of the world and start doing something about them.
Are you ready to? Are you ready to accept a meaningful
position? Earn your own income? Be responsible for your own
future security?
If you are, you're ready to see us about our Regular Officer
Training Plan. It leads to an officer's commission and a degree in
Arts, Sciences or Engineering.
For more information contact your local military career
counsellor.
■*'.
■M
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST., VANOUVER
GRADUATING CLASS
OF 1970
don't forget the
GENERAL MEETING
ON THURSDAY, FEB. 26 at 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
On the agenda is the presentation and ratification of the class budget, election of honorary class
president and vice president, class valedictorian,
poet, prophet, will writer and historian.
Class gift ideas must be submitted to the grad council,
Box 41, SUB by February 19 in order to be considered at
the general meeting. Final decision on the gift will be will
be reached at the meeting.
STEAK   BREAK!
Winner of the weekly dinner
for two at Hy's Steak House
is George Heinmiller
(Comm.-2) of 8018 Cambie
Street, Vancouver. You could
be next! Enter the big Home
Oil UBC Students Only
Contest' Details on page 8.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick GeerdinK
612 4th Avenue
New Westminster, B.C.(Comm-3)
'  No. 2 Dinner (or Two at the
Grouse Nest
William G. Callaway
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
Hy's
George R. Heinmiller
6018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, B.C.(Comm-2)
No. 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Sunn
207. 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. (Educ-4)
No. 5 Evening for Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Howatt
4612 West 9th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C. {Comm-6)
No. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126 E 35th
Vancouver 5, B.C. (Comm-3)
No. 7 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Joe D. English
109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.{Sclence-4)
HOME
HOME Oil DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
400 On* Bentall Ctr., 505 Burrard, Vancouver 1, B.C.
It's the re;
Coke.
TradeMsrfi Reg.
Berth Coca-Cola and Coke are registered ttatte marks which Iderrtily only the protfuet of Coca-Cola Ud,
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO   (B.C.)   LIMITED Tuesday, February 17, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Guild will act responsibly
in Pacific Press bargaining
-david bowerman photo
HEAD LIBRARIAN Basil Stuart-Stubbs inspects newest
acquisition to the special book collection — a 15th century digest
of the bible.
From page 3
up till that time, there had been
no conflict whatever.
Up to that time, Guild
negotiators had hoped that
bargaining would be peaceful and
confined to only those parties
directly involved — the unions and
the company.
Government mediator Clark
Gilmour was called by the
company and negotiations
reopened October 14.
At that time, the company
demanded the pension issue be
resolved before they would discuss
any others issues.
When the pension issue was
not resolved after three days of
negotiating, it was put off till
Nov. 10 and other issues were
discussed.
Efforts to resolve other issues
began October 28 with little
success.
November 13 and 14 the
guild voted 332 to 3 to take a
strike vote after the union
negotiators had staged a 24 hour
sit-in in the bargaining room to
symbolize the unions'
determination to reach a
negotiated settlement.
At that time Benson is
reported to have told a union
delegation "go ahead and strike -
we have more strike insurance
than ever before".
Says the Guild: "This
statement, plus the anger and
alienation that accompanied the
1967 strike, reaffirmed our
conviction that the unions would
have to do everything humanly
Look fellas...like I told ya a million times. It was
just a gag. I hand the Campusbank teller the note.
She's supposed to laugh. Like ha ha.
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
Visit your Campusbank
&
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
Student Union Building Branch — T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch — G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr.
possible — and beyond — to avoid
strike action this time around.
Even if they were not going to
behave responsibly — we would."
On Nov. 18, company
officials said the Guild contract
offer had been rejected. The Guild
says the offer had never been
submitted to the Board of
Directors.
The Guild wage offer called
for weekly salary increases of $ 11
in the first year and a further
$9.50 in the second year for those
employees earning under $110. It
included a maximum of first year
increases of 10 per cent in the
first year followed by an
additional 8 per cent for those
employees earning more than
$177.50.
Later that week, the
Company made what is now its
final, considerably smaller
economic proposal.
On November 28 and 29
most of the outstanding
non-economic issues were resolved
but the company refused to
negotiate wages any further.
The company repeated its
refusal to negotiate wages at a
meeting with the provincial
mediator Dec. 1.
"During the early Dec. period
of tension and anger, management
replied to our request for
meetings by saying they would
meet if production problems were
CAMPUS LAUDR0MAT
1968
Coin-Op  Wash   &   Dry  Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting  Atmosphere
Attendant Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354 W.   10th 224-9809
"THE BRIDE & I"
In  Mandarin  with  English  and
Chinese   subtitle
SHOWN ON
Feb. 17 & 18 - 7:30 p.m.
AT
0LYMPIA THEATRE
2381 E. Hastings
Student $1.00
OVERSEAS
AUTO PARTS
Sports Car Accessories
Abarth - Cosmis - Dunlop
Amco - Kowl - Weber
Cibie - Marchal - Peco
Etc. Etc
i 10% DISCOUNT '
I  WITH THIS CLIPPING        '
,        OR AMS CARD '
736-9804
2780 Alma (at 12th Ave.)
eased," said the Guild statement.
"Attempts by union leaders
to alleviate the production
problems were partially successful
but the company still refused to
bargain."
The outstanding issues which
the union has said are all
negotiable are: wages, duration of
the agreement, added vacation
time for senior staff members,
increase in night differential
(bonus paid to night shift
workers) from 5 to 6 per cent,
classification adjustments, and the
pension plan.
A major new item in dispute
is the law suit launched by the
company against three of the
mechanical unions after recent
production difficulties.
After the company
announced the lockout Sunday,
the joint council of newspaper
unions offered five days free work
by their members in order to help
the company recoup financial
losses it claims to have suffered.
This offer was rejected by the
company.
The Guild Monday passed a
motion to call in a mediator in an
effort to resume talks with Pacific
Press but union officials said they
could not estimate how long the
lockout may last.
PATIO
EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY*
3261 W.'Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE SERVE GOOD CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
For Take-Out Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
1
HEHB LAI !
aaisu!
5TH. • FIR, VANCOUVER, B.C W~W   I
f
SWING IN
PSYCHEDELIC
f
JSOPHISTICATION j
Featuring the !
Great Sounds of I
LYNN BROOKS    j
and
The Friendly Cactus
j
j
!
!Mon. to Fri., 8:30 to 2 a.m.!
Sat.
8 p.m. to 1 a.m.   j
15th Ave. at Fir - 736-4304 j
j THIS COUPON GOOD FOR !
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
$1.00
OFF REGULAR ADMISSION
WITH  STUDENT CARD i
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY I
No Admission to Person* Under 21 j
f Page   14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  17,  1970
TUESDAY
AYN   RAND  SOCIETY
Ethics    of    Emergencies,    noon,    SUB
130.
UBC    PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVE
CLUB
Meeting   to   arrange   trip,   noon,   SUB
211.
CIASP
Training program meeting,  7:30 p.m.,
4630 W.  5th.
GERMAN    CLUB
Film,   noon,   l.H.
UBC   SKYDIVERS
General    meeting,    7:30    p.m.,    Clubs
Lounge.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Berkeley   Square,   noon,   SUB   Aud.
FACULTIES   OF   MUSIC   AND
EDUCATION
Peraussion    recital    workshop,    8:30*
10:30 p.m.,   Recital  Hall,   Music  Bldg.
SCM
BUI   Willmott  discussion,   SUB   117.
long
story
It began more than 30 years ago
when a doctor developed the first
commercial tampon. The first
hygienic internal sanitary protection, Tampax tampons. Since that
time, Tampax Incorporated has
devoted all its research and technology to making that tampon the
best, safest and easiest to use. We
don't make sanitary napkins or
facial tissues, just Tampax tampons.
The best possible tampons.
Today, millions of women in 1 18
countries around the world trust
Tampax tampons. They rely on
their comfort and convenience. No
other brand can make a similar
claim.
Fads, fashions and fancies come
and go. Scores of other tampons
have seen the light of day and
faded. Tampax tampons are here
and now. And still just beginning a
long story of comfort and freedom
for modern women throughout the
world.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
HOW USED BY MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE  MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD.,
BARRIE.   ONTARIO
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
VOC
Meeting,   Chem.    205.
DEPARTMENT    OP   MUSIC
Purcell  String  Quartet,   noon,  Recital
Hall,   Music   Bldg.
ECO
Terry Howard speaks,  noon,  Bio.  Sci.
2000.
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Lecture  on   racing,   noon,   Bu.   203.
THUNDERBIRD    MOTORCYCLE    CLUB
Meeting,   noon,   SUB   130.
LEGAL   AID
Campus legal  aid panels, every Mon.,
Wed.    and   Fri.,    noon,   SUB   237   and
237A.
NDP    CLUB
Model    parliament     caucus     meeting,
noon,   SUB   213.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE   ORGANIZATION
Meeting,   noon,   Bu.   3201.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
African evening,  8 p.m., l.H.
THURSDAY
CLASSICS   CLUB
Meeting scheduled for 20th now on
26th, 8 p.m., at home of Prof, and
Mrs.   Eliot,   2012  Acadia  Road.
SATURDAY
COSA
China night,   8 p.m.,   SUB  Ballroom.
ALISTAIR COOKE
One of the world's leading journalists, Alistair Cooke, will speak on the
University of B.C. campus on Wednesday, February 25, at 12:30 p.m. In
the Frederic Wood Theatre under the auspices of the Vancouver Sun. Mr.
Cooke is internationally known for his "Letter from America" series of
radio broadcasts over the B.B.C. and as the chief American correspondent
for the Manchester Guardian, one of Britain's leading newspapers. His
topic will be
"HOW DOES THE REST OF THE WORLD SEE AMERICA?"
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE - 12:30 P.M. - WED., FEB. 25
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students,  Faculty & Club—3   lines,   1   day  750,  3 days  $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.  the  day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG.,  Univ.  of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE OP THE YEAR. SAT.
Feb. 21. Point Grey Demolay's
Bayshore Extravaganza. Gastown
Revue. Semi-Formal. Only $4.00
Couple.   RE  3-8897.
Greetings
12
THE FILM EVENT HAPPENS
Feb. 25! "The Rose" and other
film goodies. Queen E. 8 p.m.
$1.50.   Wow,
Lost & Found
14
LOST FEB. 11 BUCHANAN
Building. One Male Wedding Ring.
Worked Gold. Reward Offered.
Phono   738-3563   Evenings.	
FOUR TEXTS, THREE NOTE
Books. Last seen outside Third
Level Stacks in zippered case.
Phone   263-3073.	
COME AND CLAIM BELONGINGS
by Feb. 24. Items are being dis-
posed ot.     	
LOST: 1 GOLD LOOP ERRING.
Ph.   Tat  278-2481.   Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
HIDE WANTED TO AND FROM
Nelson for mid-term break. Call
Chris,   987-1668.
Special Notices
16
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN  YOUTH
HOSTEL OPENS
Special weekend packages available
for ONLY |8.00 — includes two
nights accommodation and a 11
meals. Open 7 days a week, beautiful location on Alta Lake—skiing
snow shoeing, ice skating, fishing,
etc.
Reservations   and   further   information  can  be  obtained  at  the
Canadian   Youth Hostels
Association,
1406  West  Broadway,
Vancouver  9.  738-3128.	
SKI AT WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
4 weeks ski instruction with return bus transportation only $22.
For further information contact:
Canadian Youth Hostels Associa-
tion.  Tel.:  738-3128.	
INVITATION, THE STUDENT
Discount Book, is now selling for
under half price in the Bookstore
and at SUB Information. Two for
the price of one at Odeon, Concerts, Plays, Nightclubs, Restaurants, etc. All this for only 75c.
Don't   Miss  It! __
VICK'S   T.V.   &.   RADIO   CO.
513 West Pender — 685-8622
Guaranteed   Repairs   TVs.   radios,
tape   recorders—10%   discount   to
students.	
AFRICAN EVENING AT l.H. FRI.
Feb. 20, 8 p.m. Join us in informal
discussions on: African Humanities; Assimilation or Acculturala-
tion?; Apartheid - Vacuum Filler;
Town & Country in Africa; African; Hits by Prex Porbeni & Co.;
Recollections at Large. Entertainment, Music and Refreshments.
EVERYBODY WELCOME!
BECOME A LEGALLY ORDAINED
minister. $2.00 donation appreciated. World Life Church, Inc.
P.O.  Box 717. Ceres, Cal.  95307.
BEYOND THE GREEN DOOR!
Tickets on sale every Noon 4th
Floor  Angus.	
AQUA SOC. BEER DRINKERS
Unite! SUB 215 Wed. Feb. 25 4-8
p.m.   Added   attraction—hot   doys!
100% BIODEGRADABLE DETER-
gent does the best job for less
$$. See Richard Hollins, 351 Sal-
ish.   224-9755. __
RIDE FOR TWO NEEDED MID-
term break. Kimberley area. Can
leave Wednesday 18th. Phone
Lynne  224-4674.	
YALE U. FILM FESTIVAL SAID
"Wow! This film wins first prize."
Exclusive screening Feb. 25. Queen
E.   Theatre.
Special  Notices  (Cont.)
16
SCUBA COURSE
* N.A.U.I. Certification
* Professional instruction
* All equipment supplied
* 35 hour—6 wk. course
* Internationally recognized
For further   information,  course
brochure   or   registration
685-6017 (24 hrs.)
SUB - AQUA
International  Diving  School
Travel Opportunities
17
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS    ON    A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406   West   Broadway
Vancouver  9,   B.C. Tel.   738-3128
EUROPE   FOR   SWINGING
SINGLES   AGE   17-30.
meals,    accommodation,    tours    &
transportation.
3  weeks   $225.00
6   weeks   $330.00
DINERS   FUGAZY   TRAVEL  —
688-2545.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1958 PLYMOUTH SAVOY — RE-
liable transportation. Best Offer.
Phone   Carl   738-6385   after   6   p.m.
68 DATSUN 2000—135 HP, 5 SPD.,
etc. with or without hardtop. Best
offer.   261-2439.	
1957 VOLKS WINDOW VAN—GAS
heater—radio $275. 879-1837. Also
Chev.    chromies   and   Ford   mags.
AUSTIN A-55 1957. GOOD RUN-
ning order. Call 224-1754 6 p.m.-
9 p.m.	
1961 RENAULT. GOOD CONDI -
tion. $260 or offer. Very economical and reliable. Phone 224-9720.
Paul   Rm.   428.	
FOR SALE 1965 VOLVO $800.
Phone 922-1053  after  6  p.m.	
1960 VAUXHALL. GOOD, CHEAP,
transportation. Best offer. Phone
224-9742.  Ask for Tom,  Rm.  687.
1959 VAUXHALL STATION WAG-
on. Very good condition. Economical transportation. 278-6532
after  6  p.m.	
'59 PONTIAC. GOOD CONDITION.
New brakes, recent tune - up.
Phone  224-5351.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED:  MGA IN GOOD CONDI -
tion.   Phone  736-6273.
Motorcycles
25
'67 250 HUSTLER, 7000 MILES,
new transmission, excellent condi-
tion.   Ph.   733-6203.	
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPEC-
ialists in graphs, maps, textbook
illustrations, complex formulae.
Scientific displays advertising.
Phone   733-4506.
Duplicating & Copying
32
VEDECKA GRAFIKA — SPECIAL-
iste na grafy, mapy, ilustrace do
ucebnic, slozite vzorce, vedecke
vystavy,   inzeraty.   Tel.   733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
ARTWORK   PHOTOGRAPHY   posters call me and see if I can't do
it.   John   Kula   224-4146.
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
UNREELING NEXT WEDNESDAY
of prize winning films! Possibly
controversial. Queen E. Theatre
at 8. Come.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates; 738-
6829  after  nine  a.m.   to  nine   p.m.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST, Essays, theses, etc. 50c per page.
Mrs.   Duncan   228-9597.	
FAST ACCURATE TYPING MY
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Phone
325-2934.	
TYPIST  —   ELECTRIC
 Please  call   224-6129	
TYPING SERVICE — MRS. GAIL
Symons, 224-6435. 3885 W. 12th
Avenue.	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver home.   988-7228.	
EXPERIENCED FRENCH — ENG-
lish typist. Thesis-Essays-Translations-Publications, any other
work. Contact: Miss Danielle Cou-
nord, office hours: 682-1878; even.
hours:   879-3568.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing — essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone   321-2102.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
WE REQUIRE PART - TIME
salesmen to handle a fast moving product at top commission.
Phone 684-5010 for an appointment.
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Language  Instruction
61A
Music
62
DULCIMERS — FINEST HAND-
crafted. Try one at the Med Shop,
4339   W.   10th   Ave.   228-9061.
Tutoring
64
EXPERIENCED TEACHER (Ph.D.)
shall teach physics and mathe-
matics.   Call   228-9840.	
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats, by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00 per hr. Phone 733-6037 evenings. 	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KASTINGER GOLDEN SKI BOOTS
F8 used only once $60, Dave,
872-5864. ____
MATTRESSES FOR SALE, TWO
double $15 each, one single $7,
hardly   used.   732-9897.	
ELECTRIC GUITAR PLUS AMPLI-
fier, excellent condition, $60. Ph.
224-1649   after   6   p.m.	
SCUBA TANK AND REGULATOR
(single hose) $80. Phone Len at
224-9054.	
4 TR. STEREO TAPE RECORDER
with bi-direct. Record/play. 3 pr.
speakers   +   80   w.   amp.   224-5194.
GET YOUR NEW SPRING WARD-
robe at rummage sale, Sat. Feb.
21,   11-2   p.m.,   2611   W.   4th  Ave.
ONE PAIR HEAD 360's WITH
harness, poles, canvas covers; 210
centimeters. Phone 261-0394 after
6:00  p.m.	
NYLON FIBER SHORT'N CURLY
wig. Light blonde, pre-cut and
styled. Head included. $30.00.
Chris   224-3380.	
FOR SALE — FRENCH 10 SPD.
Racing    Bike.    Phone    253-7886   or
298-8237.	
"HEAD" GIANT SLALOM SKIIS
200 cm. Two years new. $95.00.
Phone Shirley 224-9982, Rm. 208
after Feb. 15/70 and after 8:30
p.m.	
"BLIZZARD" SUPER EPOXI SKIIS
205 cm. Good condition. $90.00.
Phone Joy 224-9879 after Feb. 15/
70.
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
STIU AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS Publications Office
and Thunderbird Shop
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MALES:       NEWLY      FURNISHED
carpeted   double   room;   TV   room;
share  kitchen;   warm,   near  UBC.
228-8040.	
21st  & ARBUTUS.. NICE ROOM IN
house   with   family,   $40.   732-8448.
TWO SINGLE ROOMS FOR MALE
students in new house. Point Grey
area. Separate entrance and bathroom. Available March 1st. Phone
224-9319.
Room & Board
82
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL     TO    SHARE    TWO     BDRM.
furn.   apt.   with   two   other   girls.
$60  per  month.   731-3929.	
GIRL TO SHARE MOD. FURNISH-
ed    West   End    apt.    in   Highrise.
MU  1-7707.
Unf. Houses & Apts.
84
ASSISTANT PROF., MALE,
single, seeks reasonable sized
accommodation, preferably Kitsilano  area,   Mar.   1.  688-6897.
FOR BEST RESULTS USE YOUR UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February  17,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Birds score heavily,
UVic goes down, out
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team finally burst the dam
Saturday afternoon and poured out 18 goals to appropriately end a
perfect ridiculous season for the University of Victoria.
The final 18-4 score, gave Victoria zero wins and 14 losses in
14 league games. It was also the most goals that have been scored on
the Vikings this year.
The deluge started early in the game, at the two minute mark    -
to  be   exact,  when   Wayne   Schaab   stole   the   puck   from   an
unsuspecting Viking and flipped it past a rather sleepy goaltender,
who later succumbed to the effects of the unchecked slaughter.
A fake shot by Wayne Schaab on a breakaway looked real
enough that he dove for the elusive puck and pulled a leg muscle.
Schaab put the puck in the net for his third goal, and the first hat
trick of the game.
However, this transpired at the start of the third period. In
between, the Birds had been busy pumping shots into the Victoria
nets, and the Vikings had even managed to slide two sneaky shots
past Rick Bardal, the Birds netminder.
With the score at 13-2 at the end of the second period, the
Birds requested that the teams change ends halfway through the third
period, as the ice was being excessively worn at the Victoria end.
The third period saw four Birds pick up hat tricks. First
Schaab at two minutes, then Williamson, Wilson, and finally Biagoni,
who with less than two minutes left in the game, deflected a shot
from the point by Steve Flera to score the first hat trick of his
college career.
Barry Wilcox picked up six assists, but managed to keep from
scoring any goals, no mean feat, in the game.
Perhaps this flood of 35 points for the Birds scorers is a good
cause for keeping a door mat in the league.
Wayne Schaab also picked up six assists to go with his three
goals, to give him nine points for the day and, as far as anyone
knows, the league scoring championship. This will not be official
until the league statistical department sees fit to release the scoring
stats, something they have been most reluctant about all year.
Pertinent statistics from the season for the Birds are: won 8,
lost 4; 91 goals for, 59 goals against; goalkeepers average, 4.21
goals/game. Scoring leaders: Wayne Schaab, 41 points; Barry Wilcox,
31 points; Tom Williamson, 23 points.
The Birds travel to Calgary next weekend for the semi-finals of
the WCIAA. Games will be played Friday, Saturday, and Monday if
necessary.
Pool committee announces
plans for financing cover
expenditure of $75,000 which the
committee hopes to borrow from
the board of governors..
Petitions for people to sign
may be picked up or dropped off
at the SUB information desk.
McHugh said that he now had
2500 names, but hopes that he
will get another 7500 before he
has to go to the board of
governors early in March.
The university recreation
committee has announced initial
plans for financing the cover they
are raising money for.
According to chairman Sean
McHugh the idea is to charge
interested students a flat rate of
under five dollars a year with
higher charges for faculty, staff
and family passes. This money
would go into repaying the capital
Volleyballers lose tourney
The UBC men's volleyball team
gave an excellent account of
themselves over the weekend as
they finished second behind the
University of Manitoba in a field
of eight teams for the University
of Manitoba Alumni trophy.
In the first round played
Friday night the T'Birds took on
Regina and dropped them 15-2
and 15-7.
Later that evening the winning
Manitoba team handed the Birds
their only defeat of the
tournament 15-2, 9-15, 15-4.
The next morning UBC was
paired with Calgary and bested
them 12-15, 15-9, 15-8.
Next on the list were the
Winnipeg Wesmen who bowed
rather easily to UBC 15-9, 15-7.
The University of Lethbridge
.seemed an irritation to the Birds
as they drubbed them 15-4 twice.
Except for Manitoba, Alberta
gave the Bipds their best
competition of the series, however
in a losing cause, as they were
defeated 15-12,15-13.
UBC's   final   record   for   the
tournament, six wins and one loss.
PJLflOi
•EAT IN -TAKE OUT • DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. &Sat. 3 a.rrt.
DIVERS, ARCHE0LOGISTS
everyone . . .
Dr. J. Cassels of the Perm.
State Archeological Expedition in the Aegean Sea
speaks in SUB 209
Wed. Feb. 25 at 7:30
- FREE -
Agony and ecstasy
By TONY GALLAGHER
Had Michaelangelo been present at the north
end of the Pacific Coliseum on Saturday evening,
he would have gained access to fine subjects for a
prospective painting labelled "The Agony and
the Ecstasy".
As the beloved painter departed some years
ago, one must be satisfied with written
description.
The painting might have shown two adjacent
dressing rooms, each illustrating a polarization of
emotions.
The agony was adequately represented by a
group of athletes in the SFU quarters; typified
by a tortured coach John Kootnekoff. While he
spoke in a pleasant and composed fashion, his
face betrayed the anguish he was suffering after
his club had disappointed themselves in falling to
the UBC Thunderbirds.
The mannerly leader of the gathered
depressives described the performance of the
victors in almost jealous terms.
"We lost to a real good defensive ball club -
It was a humiliating loss but they have real poise
and they shot extremely well."
Further lamentations were forthcoming as
Kootnekoff spoke of his shattered game plan.
"We would liked to have controlled the
game more than we did, but we got behind early
and that was it."
While the Clansmen were exchanging
condolences, the ecstasy was in progress in the
temporary abode of the Thunderbirds. The proof
of the happiness present was to be found in the
glowing rays exuding from the frame of Bird
coach Peter Mullins. The tall cool Aussie was
accepting congratulations from everyone on
location including congratulations from players,
friends, scribes and even the occasional stray
janitor.
Mullins, in orating on the efforts of his club
said, "We played a great game defensively as we
got many of our points off the defense; and that
(Derek) Sankey just played a helluva great
game."
But Mullins was not the only partisan
indulging in bundles of joy. The cheerleaders
briefly joined the players in the dressing room
and communicated their congratulations and
possible some much more meaningful
information.
The participants just referred to were
similarly in a jubilant mood and their feelings
were probably best summmed up by the dripping
wet four year veteran Bob Molinski.
"Each year we've come into this game loose
and both times we've been raped, but this year
we had it, we had it all the way."
Rugby chaps take rough  battle
The Thunderbirds rugby team
recorded their second straight win
Saturday drubbing Oregon State
29-13.
It is an added tribute that they
lasted the game at all.
"It was the roughest university
game I've ever seen played in
Canada," said coach Donn
Spence.
Oregon tried to slow the game
down early by using late tackles,
straight-arms, and general shady
play.
"We beat them by playing
rugby and not sinking to their
level," said the coach.
The refereeing was also very
loose encouraging Oregon to
continue their rough style. "It's
good to know that your team can
be tough enough to take it,"
Spence said.
The Birds overpowered Oregon
State by passing well and being in
the right place at the right time.
When the ball seemed stalled there
was always some one to receive
the pass.
These last two wins will stand
the Birds in good stead as they
now will be tackling possibly the
two toughest university teams on
the Pacific coast.
They are journeying
Wednesday to Los Angeles to play
UCLA for the World Cup. It is a
two game total point series, the
first to be played Thursday and
the second Saturday.
Monday the team will move up
the coast to play Stanford who
have already beaten UCLA.
UCLA has much the same
squad as the one that beat UBC
last year but Spence assures
us that his team is stronger and
tougher than last year's.
Mt. Royal College Cougars
here for weekend hockey
The UBC arena will play host
to the Mount Royal Junior
College Cougars from Calgary, for
a three game exhibition stint this
weekend.
Friday night at 8:00, they
tangle with the UBC Law Chiefs,
of the Richmond Intermediate
League; Saturday night they talk
on the Vancouver Centennials of
the Junior A league, again at 8:00;
and Sunday at 7:15 they play the
Simon Fraser Clansmen of the
Pacific Intercollegiate League.
This competition represents a
wide cross section of calibre for
the Cougars, and will give a good
indication of what level of hockey
they fit into by Vancouver
standards.
Soccer Thursday
The UBC Tomahawk soccer
team will play the Simon Fraser
University Clansmen Thursday
noon in Thunderbird Stadium.
Students will be admitted free.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
FEB. 27, 28; MARCH 1
[
MARCH 13, 14, 15
CM ROilE
MARCH 20, 21, 22
APRIL 3, 4, 5
SUB
AUDITORIUM
50c Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  17,  1970
Fee increases, racism spark U.S.
protests
By Bill Sievert, College Press Service
THE AMERICAN CAMPUS (CPS)
Student unrest continues to spread to
new campuses in the United States,
including Ohio University, the Santa
Barbara campus of the University of
California, Colorada State, and
Philadelphia's Drexel Institute of
Technology.
At Ohio University in Athens, more
than 500 students were involved in brick
throwing incidents at the main
administration building Jan. 30 after 150
students occupied the building Jan. 29 to
protest increased tuition.
Several students and police received
minor injuries in what the student
newspaper The Post termed a riot when
police moved in to guard the building
during the Jan. 30 demonstration.
Ohio national guardsmen were put on
alert as students protested both the
tuition increase and administration
president Claude Sowle's refusal to meet
with the student protest group, Coalition
of Concerned Students, during the
building occupation.
Forty-six students were arrested,
which touched off further incidents
aimed at police handling of the situation.
The campus police office was tear gassed,
forcing it and a dormitory in the same
building to be evacuated.
There also have been numerous bomb
threats, including one at the campus radio
station while Sowle was holding an
on-thc-air question session with students.
Simultaneous fire alarms have been set
off across campus also.
A city injunction was granted against
nine specific students to prevent them
and 100 John Does from assembling on
or    near    university    property.    This
essentially made all student assemblies
illegal.
Tuition at Ohio University has risen
drastically in the past two years, and the
state legislature has failed to increase its
appropriation to higher education enough
to prevent the continued fee hikes.
Students complain that the
administration is not lobbying hard
enough to prevent the continuous fee
hikes which are making a college
education impossible for an increasing
number of students.
At Santa Barbara, the UC campus
which has been described as the most
apathetic in the system has been severely
disrupted in recent weeks.
Students have been protesting the
firing of William Allen, an assistant
professor of anthropology.
A petition was circulated on campus
to obtain an open hearing on Allen's
dismissal after the department chairman
announced he would not be rehired for
next year. 7,776 students out of 13,000
on the campus signed the petition.
When a group of students took their
case to the administration building Jan.
30, acting chancellor Russell Buchanan
called in the Santa Barbara county
sheriffs office. Before the day had ended,
police from nearby counties, a small
group of National Guardsmen and
campus police from other UC campuses
were present.
Students continued to demonstrate
despite police orders to disperse, and
nineteen students were arrested stemming
from their alleged leadership of
demonstrations. Most of the 19 have been
charged with trespassing on a state
university campus, a misdemeanor, but
their bail has been set unusually high at
$2,500. 5,000 students participated in
the rally which resulted in the handful of
trespassing arrests.
Students claim Allen is being fired
because of his anti-establishment
viewpoint. Allen has been very vocal in
voicing concern over American
exploitation of South American
countries. Students say Allen has had
several works published, has brought in
the most research grants in the
department, and teaches one of the most
popular courses at UCSB.
On February 2, 4,000 students rallied
for Allen, and some temporarily occupied
the anthropology department building.
Police who have patrolled the campus
constantly since the first demonstration
prevented the takeover from lasting long.
But the following day 900 students
occupied the faculty lounge building,
cleaning out the food and bar. The
students later left the building on their
own.
A student strike has been considered,
and students at Berkeley and UCLA may
hold support protests or strikes. Berkeley
students may also be striking over the
instituion of tuition on the UC campuses,
so a strike there seems likely. Allen has
urged that Santa Barbara students strike
until the administration is willing to
negotiate.
Allen and his family have had their
lives threatened. So far he has not been
granted an open hearing.
At Colorado State University February
5, the most violent anti-Brigham Young
University protests to date took place as a
melee broke out during half-time of the
two schools' basketball meeting.
At least six persons were arrested
when about 50 black students and 50
white supporters (including some Denver
Weathermen) tangled with the
40-member Brigham Young pep squad,
CSU floor sweepers, and finally, 25
helmeted Fort Collins, Colorado police
who were called to clear the floor. Several
students and a photographer were injured
by the club-swinging police.
The student protest was another in a
long series in the past six months against
Brigham Young's affiliation with the
Mormon Church, which forbids Blacks to
enter certain levels of the priesthood
because of their color.
At Drexel Institute of Technology in
Philadelphia, students have joined with
area residents to protest the construction
of a womem's dormitory against the
wishes of community residents. The
primary issue is community control over
further structural development in the
community of Drexel.
Two sit-ins have taken place in the
school's administration building, one
lasting two days, after negotiation
sessions failed to come up with a
community development plan acceptable
to thee administration.
And at Northeastern University, in
Boston, students and police clashed Jan.
29 during a demonstration over the
appearance of S.I. Hayakawa, president
of San Francisco State College.
Approximately 200 demonstrators tried
to gain admission to Hayakawa's speech,
but were driven back by police.
About 30 persons were arrested on
charges of assault and disorderly conduct.
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) - After
conferring for several hours with top political,
military, economic and public relations
advisors, president Richard Nixon today
ordered the immediate withdrawal of all
American troops from Vietnam.
In a startling move of obscure political
brilliance the president said, "It's not really our
war, anyway."" Presidential advisers cited
growing political dissention at home and a need
to "cement our divided society and allow us to
prepare for the hard pull ahead."
The troops will begin leaving some time
next week, as soon as the non-commissioned
officers clubs can recoup their losses. The
pullout will amount to some 497,000 military
and civilian personnel. When asked if the new
C5-A transports will be used, a military
spokesman explained that the South
Vietnamese government prohibits aircraft
whose engines produce over 140 decibels of
sound.
The South Vietnamese embassy was closed
and the ambassador unavailable for comment.
Rumours circulating this afternoon said the
ambassador had fled the country fearing threats
to his life. (A state department spokesman
denied that South Vietnam was preparing to
sever relations with the US before the troops
could be redeployed.)
Leading economists predict that the shift
NIXON
PULLS
TROOPS
OUT!
from wartime to peacetime economy could
prove disastrous to the stability of the dollar
and fear a plunge into the depths of depression.
"What will we do with the six months backlog
of war materials we have stockpiled?" asked
Milton Friedman.
The president is scheduled to go on
nation-wide television tomorrow night to make
his position perfectly clear. At today's special
press conference he refused to go beyond the
following general statement:
"I want my position to be perfectly clear.
This nation is going to fight communism
wherever it springs up. Now, my fellow
Americans, I realize the tremendous strain on
our economy the end of the war in Vietnam
could be, and I have provided for it.
"Our neighbor to the north has long been
frought with internal strife. From the
protection Canada has been giving our young
draft dodgers it becomes apparent that Canada
has been taken over by the communists. We
cannot allow this threat so close to our own
soil,
"After much deliberation, I have ordered
the saturation bombing of eastern Canada, and
our troop's are already securing the principal
ports, airports, and border crossings. If we pull
together in this fight, Canada will soon be a safe
place to live for all peace-loving people."

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