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The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1970

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Array Peoples friend returns ed students to lounge
By DAVID CURSONS
Malcolm "Che " McGregor has
struck.
McGregor, head of the classics
department, has something of a
reputation as a crusty and
reactionary academic, which he
takes no pains to deny.
But another side of McGreror
emerged Tuesday as he personally
led about 75 education students
to liberate the student lounge in
the education building.
The students had been
displaced from the lounge at 4:30
p.m.     when     administration
president Walter Gage along with
sundry administration officials
:and guests arrived for a tea party.
The party was to mark the
beginning of construction of a
new trigonometry building.
Rod Gulmans, Education
Undergraduate Society president,
asked students to clear the area,
explaining that the "office
upstairs" (the dean's office) had
booked the lounge for the party.
Asked if the lounge was not for
student use, Gulmans replied:
"Yeah, but it was booked for
4:30 and I don't think anybody's
gonna care, at least not education
students. They're so apathetic
anyways."
In fact, the students did
disperse with scant protest,
moving to the stone floors outside
the lounge.
At     this    point    McGregor
.v-feVftiHSifc
emerged and declared the
administration's occupancy
unjust.
"Were you told you had to
leave?" he asked.
The students sighed and
nodded.
"Well go back inside!," he
shouted. "It's your lounge, isn't
it?"
With that, McGregor removed
the rope barriers and the students
returned to the lounge.
Usually unreliable sources
report that McGregor was
muttering "All power to the
people!" as he strode back to the
tea party.
JERICHO 'READY FOR WORST'
By GINNY GALT
and JOHN GIBBS
Residents of Jericho Hostel are
preparing to dig-in for a
confrontation with the federal
government — although it may
not come today.
A federal government
spokesman said today that the
noon deadline for clearing the
hostel still stands and the more
than 300 residents will be
expected to leave "within a
reasonable time".
But hostel residents decided at
a  meeting  Thursday   evening  at
CITY COLLEGE HOSTEL?
See page 3
Jericho that they would stay until
a permanent hostel is established
in Vancouver.
"We don't know what will
happen but we are preparing for
the worst," said hostel staffer
Rev. Ted Mahood.
"We need all the people we can
get to come down here and
support us in the morning," he
said.
Local justice department
official T. E. Jackson, acting on
behalf of the secretary of state —
who is responsible for the
Canadian summer hostel program
— reaffirmed that the hostel will
definitely be closed.
"And the occupants will be
expected to leave within a
reasonable time," Jackson said.
Asked what constituted a
reasonable length of time, he
replied: "The hostels were set up
to provide for a three-night stay at
the most."
If the residents refuse to leave?
"I don't know. No one has said
exactly what steps will be taken,"
he told The Ubyssey after
telephone conversations with
secretary of state officials in
Ottawa early today.
Meanwhile Jericho residents
spent   the   night   working   out
HEATED DISCUSSION carries
vacate ex-army barracks.
strategy and consolidating their
ranks for what they say may be a
lengthy — but they hope peaceful
— occupation.
"The occupation is going to be
a passive resistance type of thing
but you can never guarantee that
there's not going to be violence,"
one of the residents said.
To help minimize the
possibility of violence, the ad hoc
mobilization     committee
on at Jericho hostel Thursday evening as young transients decide strategy
distributed a leaflet with
instructions for residents' and
supporters' conduct during the
sit-in at hut 47 on the armed
forces base.
It instructed demonstrators not
to "bring dope or alcohol, fight
back physically, run or panic, be
destructive ... or wander
around".
The leaflet advised the
demonstrators    to    stick    close
together at all times.
They appealed to students at
Simon Fraser University and
Vancouver City College, as well as
UBC, to help by providing
supplies or in occupying the
building with the residents.
While no one knows how or
when authorities will confront the
occupation, B.C. Civil Liberties
Association president John
Stanton  warned  that  Vancouver
And what do you think of campus food?
By DAN MULLIGAN
Students will be asked this year to
evaluate food services on campus.
Discriminatory food pricing isffl
continue indefinitely.
Expansion of SUB food facilities wUl
occur within the year.
These decisions were made Thursday by
the revamped food services committee,
members of which were recently appointed
jointly by the administration and the AMS.
The committee includes commerce prof
Bill Stanbury and student Wally Malkinson,
both of whom helped produce the
controversial Bond report - commissioned
by the AMS - which last June roundly
criticized Ruth Blair's food services for
general inefficiency.
The survey evaluating food services —
which was recommended by the Bond report
— will consist of on-campus interviews and
1,000 questionnaires to be mailed to a broad
cross-section of students.
It will be carried out by a graduate
student in business administration, under
direction of commerce prof Stan Oberg.
Student opinion will be sought on
matters ranging from location of food
outlets on campus to the make-up of
menues.
"The last survey of this kind is about
seven years old " Stanbury said. Results of
To page 6 see: CAFETERIA
—dirk visser photo
in face of government order to
City Police are likely to be the
agents of forceful action.
He said the VCP technically
have no authority on the base —
as it is a federal reserve — but "it
is unlikely that federal authorites
will contest their right to arrest if
they do decide to move in.
"People arrested by police will
be prosecuted to the extent that
the city prosecutor sees fit,"
Stanton told The Ubyssey.
Occupation plans — now fairly
definite - were in limbo at one
point Thursday evening.
An organizational rally
scheduled for 5:30 p.m. at Jericho
was cancelled at the last minute
following radio reports that
Mayor Tom Campbell reached an
agreement with the federal
government whereby the city
would take over the hostel
operation and "phase it out" over
a week.
A subsequent report quoted
Campbell as saying his proposal
had been rejected but that the
federal government would take
essentially the same action. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 2,  1970
"ALL WE'VE HEARD so far is bullshit!" That was
beginning of a lecture on sub-cultures by Mrs.
Diane Moore at general meeting Tuesday noon.'
Students vote
to keep out
'green saliva
By JOHN ANDERSEN
"We don't want your goddamn SUB," shouted
a member of Jericho hostel.
But it was hardly necessary.
Four thousand students had just voted more
than 3-1 against allowing transients the use of SUB
as a temporary sleeping quarters.
The vote came at the Alma Mater Society
emergency general meeting Tuesday noon, called to
decide the fate of a student council motion to allow
the transients the use of SUB under strict
supervision when the Jericho hostel closed.
The AMS council had originally decided at a
regular meeting Sept. 25 to open SUB to the
transients.
However, as student opposition to the plan
grew, council decided at a special meeting the next
evening to put the matter to the students.
And it didn't take the students too long to
decide they didn't want the hostel residents in SUB.
They put up with less than an hour of
discussion from several people before voting against
it.
Grad student president David Mole, a sponsor
of the original council motion, said: "This is a
chance to show we are different from the people
who came before. We can say we believe in human
beings."
Said grad student council rep Evert Hoogers:
"The kids aren't the problem. The problem is a
government that can't provide employment.
"These people are human beings, they don't
drool green saliva," he said.
But the meeting voted overwhelmingly against
the proposal when the question was called and
debate stopped.
AMS president Tony Hodge then put an
alternative motion — passed by the AMS executive
at a special meeting the previous evening — to the
general meeting for a vote.
The motion said that "in the event of that no
adequate facilities are provided at the time of the
closing of the hostel, the people of this assembly are
prepared to march en masse to the Jericho hostel
and prevent the closing of that building."
But the students weren't sure they wanted to
do that either.
When, after brief debate, the motion was put to
a vote, Hodge ruled that it had failed.
But grad student Art Smolensky challenged the
chair and after a second vote, Hodge decided it was
close enough to go to referendum.
Hodge announcer! the march issue would go to
a ballot vote next week. But this has been cancelled
since the government announced it was to close the
hostel Friday.
But did they use soap?
"The Alma Mater Society has officially washed its hands of the
Jericho issue."
AMS president Tony Hodge said in an interview Thursday
evening that the AMS is not taking any official stand on the hostel
dispute.
"This does not preclude any members of the AMS, students,
council members or executive, from acting as individuals," he said.
He stressed that they would be acting as members of the
community, and not as sanctioned representatives of the student
government.
"Thursday morning's meetings were ad hoc," and not official
meetings of the AMS, Hodge said.
He said he was disappointed that the noon meeting called to
inform students of the Jericho hostel developments "was not open for
discussion."
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Welcome Students & Families
To UNITED-ANGLICAN CHURCHES
Combined Services This Sunday at 11:00 a.m.
ST. ANSELMS CHURCH-University Blvd.
Breakfast Club Will Hold Evening Meeting
Sunday, 7:30 P.M. at Univ. Hill United Church
Speaker from Elizabeth Fry Society
NEW and USED
BOOKS
• University Text Books • Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books * Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
J
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
SENATE ELECTIONS:
Are you willing to accept the challenge of a position on the
U.B.C. Senate? If so, it will be your duty to participate fully in the
research, discussion, and decisions of the senate and its committees,
taking into account the interest of the student body and the university
community as a whole.
Nominations are now open for the following positions:
I.   Senators-at-large — 2 positions open
II.  Constituency Senators
a) Education —1 position open
b) Applied Science —1 position open
c) Arts —1 position open
d) Graduate Studies —1 position open
Nomination forms can be obtained from Anne Clarkson, AMS
Secretary in S.U.B. 248. The closing date for nominations is Thursday,
October 15th at 12:30 p.m. The election will take place Thursday,
October 29th.
S.U.B. Management Committee:
Two of the 4 vital members-at-large positions are open — vital
because the other 5 positions are filled by Council nominees. This is
your chance to help establish the Student Union Building policy to
protect your SUB furniture and help allocate SUB management funds
which are 50c per student per year. Help handle the money and the
problem. Nominations close Friday, October 9th at 12:30 p.m. Please
apply in writing through the AMS Secretary SUB 248 to Hanson Lau,
Chairman, SUB Management Committee.
PUBLIC NOTICE
All Candidate Meeting
There will be an All Candidates Meeting for the position
of AMS Vice President in the SUB Conversation Pit, Monday,
October 5th at noon. Come and throw lunch bags! Friday, October 2, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
School board to decide on new hostel proposal
—thorn wescott photo
TERRIFYING TOYS are object of fascination for grad student John Frizzell, a member of Thunderbird War Gamers' Club, whose clubs day
exhibit is shown here. Members spend spare time mapping out strategy and overkill using weapons of various centuries.
Faculty citizenship dispute unsettled
By CAROLINE WOODWARD
The dean of arts has refused to
release statistics on the relative
rank of Canadian and foreign
academic staff hired in the English
department.
To differentiate between a
Canadian teaching assistant or
instructor, and a Canadian who is
a full professor is "nit-picking",
Doug Kenny told The Ubyssey
Wednesday.
He was replying to Art
Smolensky, co-author of a
citizenship report on UBC faculty,
who questioned Kenny's figures
for thee English department
Wrings.
Kenny said last week that the
English department appointed one
Briton, one New Zealander, five
Americans and eight Canadians
for the 1970-71 academic year.
(He was, at the time, replying
to the "alleged hiring of eight
Americans and only two
Canadians" in the English
department, as reported by the
Alma Mater Society citizenship
study.)
But Smolensky said the eight
Canadians Kenny referred to may
only be instructors or lecturers
and "are not really considered
faculty".
Kenny disagreed. He said as far
as he is concerned, anybody who
teaches - and who is therefore
appointed by the board of
governors - is faculty.
But he has refused, in any case,
to reveal the rank of the
Canadians   hired   as   opposed   to
that of the foreigners hired.
"The real crux of the matter is
the person who is in front of the
classroom, who is teaching by
board appointment," he said in an
interview.
"Who is to say that a full
professor will influence more
students than a teaching assistant?
In many cases the TA comes in
contact with more students than
does the professor and therefore
the rank issue is not at all
relevant.
"Secondly, to precisely define
or breakdown faculty citizenship
is to put the heat on teachers with
specifics — shades of Nazi
Germany," Kenny said.
The definition of what
constitutes the member of the
UBC    faculty   is    a    nit-picking
issue," he said.
He said excellence of the staff
is the major criteria and, while he
favors the hiring of Canadian
faculty, the educational standards
of UBC must not be sacrificed.
The citizenship report,
compiled by Smolensky and AMS
president Tony Hodge, was
particularly critical of the hiring
trends in the English department.
A proposal to turn old King
Edward annex at 12th and Ash
into a youth hostel will remain up
in the air until the next school
board meeting on Oct. 19.
The proposal came out of an
ad hoc meeting Thursday morning
of persons trying to find alternate
accommodation for transient
youths now living in Jericho
hostel.
School board trustee Fritz
Bowers told the meeting that the
King Edward annex, presently
being used by Vancouver City
College, will be vacant by Oct. 17.
The proposal will go before a
buildings committee meeting Oct.
8 for consideration.
If the committee approves the
proposal it will go before the full
school board.
Bowers said he thought there
was a "strong possibility that the
trustees could be persuaded that
the annex be used as a hostel, on
two conditions."
The first condition was that a
responsible group, "such as Inner
City Service Project", be in charge
of the hostel.
And the second stipulation was
that the hostel would not cost the
school board any money.
Bowers said the annex includes
a three-storey building and several
huts.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Thousands of blymphic blorgs are
congregating in the royal city
today in preparation for the
annual ceremonies of Kankakee,
the ancient hero-god who
immolated himself to protest the
creation of the empendocles.
Student and faculty boycott
continues  at Laurentian
SUDBURY (CUP) - The boycott of
classes by instructional staff at
Laurentian University entered its second
day Thursday with no sign of any
agreement between the board of
governors and the university senate,
representing faculty and students.
The decision of the senate for faculty
to boycott classes is a continuation of a
struggle that developed between the
senate and the board's executive
committee last year over the firing of
administration president Stanley
Mullins.
A senate motion Monday suspended
classes for one week starting Wednesday
"for the purpose of preparing a
statement on Laurentian University, its
government and future, for submission
on Wednesday, Oct. 7."
Both the board and acting
administration president Roland
Cloutier have branded the instructors'
actions   illegal,   but   board   chairman
Receipts help charity
The Engineering Undergraduate Society receipt drive is a hit.
Over $90,000 in bookstore receipts has already been collected by
the mechanical engineers, said engineer Ken McClelland.
In line with the bookstore's rebate policy whereby students
receive a five per cent refund next spring on all their purchases upon
presentation of receipts, the engineers decided last summer to solicit
the receipts from students and then donate the money to charity.
Funds generated by this campaign ($4,500 to date) will be
donated to the Crippled Children's Fund.
Due to the excellent response, a booth has been installed in the
bookstore so that students wishing to contribute during the year may
do so, said McClelland.
William Shea said Tuesday that he felt
they were not.
The boycott is being supported by a
majority of faculty, with only some
science and math instructors still
holding regular classes.
Wednesday, about 1,100 of the
2,100 students jammed into a 700-seat
auditorium to hear the senate explain its
position in the battle.
The senate wants "a removal of the
executive committee (of the board of
governors) and the appointment of a
new executive committee with limited
powers of recommendation with
membership to include faculty and
students."
The board and its executive have
rejected the demands and called for a
return to "normality".
The senate charges that the executive
has "usurped powers pertinent to the
office of the president and had made
unethical use of confidential
information in relation to details of
proposed professors salaries" by
releasing the figures to the press.
A letter released Wednesday by
administration president Cloutier
advising students that "if you want to
destroy the university you will have to
accept to be destroyed with it," has
effectively removed any chances the
president might have had as a negotiator
in the dispute.
Many Laurentian students feel the
university may remain closed until it
adopts on governing board, replacing
the present senate and governors, either
giving greater representation to faculty
and students, or greatly reducing the
powers of the non-academic governors.
—dave enns photo
FORESTER SHOWS use of elbow grease in double
bucking contest this week, part of forestry week activities.
Saps show local art
UBC forestry students have discovered culture, it
seems, and obtained — at vast expense and trouble — 18
paintings recently shown at Expo 70 for display here
during forestry week.
The paintings, by Vancouver artist Sheila Gibons,
will be on display daily in the SUB art gallery until
Friday.
A forestry spokesman said the paintings are just back
from an Expo exhibition in Osaka, Japan. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970
THIWSSH
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 2,1970
The waiting game
It's a hard thing to say about so serious an issue,
but the circumstances surrouriding the Jericho hostel
closure bordered on the absurd Thursday.
There were 350 people in the hostel, waiting for
some kind of a word on whether or not they would be
thrown onto the street, but no one in a position to
know bothered telling them or the news media what was
going on.
They spent the day awaiting any news while
politicians used their lives as scorecards for election
brownie points.
As this is being written (1 a.m. today) the
situation is still a mystery.
The only thing that anyone seems to know is that
the hostel will close at noon today. But the hostel
residents have not been told if they will be given a certain
number of days to vacate or if the army will be there to
evict them at 12:01.
The confusion that surrounded Jericho Thursday
was heightened by mayor Tom Campbell, who made
one major pronouncement after another, reversing his
field every time he began disappearing from the
half-hourly radio newscasts.
Fir:t, Campbell said he had interceded with the
federal government and the city would take over the
hostel in order to phase it out gradually. Then he said
the government had rejected his plan, but would do the
same thing on its own.
As things turned out later, it all appears to have
been so much bullshit — Campbell never had any say in
the matter because the hostel is on federal land.
However, one thing is almost certain. If the
confrontation between the hostel residents and the
government doesn't come today, it will probably come
tomorrow, or Monday or a week from now.
The residents of the hostel have shown their
determination to stay at Jericho until a permanent
hostel is established in Vancouver. They have no
intention of being evicted or phased out.
The city and the federal government have also
shown determination — determination to continue with
their insane policy of trying to sweep the entire issue
under the rug.
They still seem to believe that if they just shut
down the hostel, all the people in it will magically find
the jobs they have been looking for all summer.
Unless there are some rapid changes in whatever
pass for minds in high places and new accommodation is
found, an occupation of Jericho seems inevitable.
Right now, the people at Jericho are preparing for
the worst. It's doubtful if the government will make any
move today, so most of us can only wait.
But perhaps the people who demonstrated their
suport for the hostel residents earlier this week will go
to Jericho and wait with them.
Editor: Nate Smith
News    Maurice Bridge
City     John Gibbs
Wire       John Andersen
Sports    Scott McCloy
Associate     John Twigg
Ass't City    Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Managing        Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Rumors were rank that Maurice's
recently deceased typewriter was seen
pounding its keys across a wilderness
newsroom.
Jinny Ladner, Mike McCaffery and
Ken Lassesen reported seeing the aging
Underwood eating Tom Harrison's
raisin pie. Amarjeet Rattan claimed to
have seen the prolific apparition spit
the crust out on Shane McCune's dead
jokes. "Pig, Pig" profaned the irate
Amarjeet until Judy McLeod
volunteered to clean it up.
McCloy and his cohorts in the jock
shop— Don Gardner and Keith Dunbar
— exhorted multi-flanged mist: "Where
is the lovely Josephine Margolis
today?" While McCloy wept
uncontrollably, Jan O'Brien heard the
muse to mutter: "You think you got
troubles. I haven't seen my leetle
meatball, Robin in a ribbon's age."
Caroline Woodward said the lede
was highly suspect. Steve Lucas
admitted he too was an atheist. It was
too much for the chief rabbi. He sent
Dirk Visser and Dave Bowerman to
wrap the majestic mist around Al
Katowitz's neck and nail them both to
an em ruler. Maureen Gans, Mike
Goodman and Dave Enns volunteered
to get pictures while Sharon Boylan
and John Andersen triffled with the
great schlong's digits.
Dan Mulligan and Johnny Zaozirny
— both devout traditionalists — said
the blorgs would all rot in hell for their
blasphemy. But Paul Knox made
him drink a pot of green salivic glue
and eat of the holy ribbon. Thorn
Wescott took up his left leg and walked
off into a steaming southeast Asian
jungle, never to be seen until Monday.
DAVIES RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Who are these people
Unheard voices in the Jericho hostel issue:
• Two enginecs walking away from the
Tuesday general meeting. Behind them, SUB plaza
strewn with papers, old lunches, and other waste.
"We couldn't let them live in our building -
they'd wreck the place," comments one.
The other agrees. "Can you imagine the mess
they'd have it in?"
They don't notice the condition of the plaza.
The two voted in a block with the rest of the
engineers who turned up en masse at the meeting.
Their presence was not quite as evident as at many
of their activities because they dispersed through
the crowd.
• Spoke to another engineer who voted
against the hostel move to SUB.
"Don't say we voted as a mob," he cautions.
"We voted as individuals."
The "individual" vote by the engineers may
have been influenced at least a bit by anti-hippie
talks given them the previous day (in the
engineering first and second year classes) by Alma
Mater Society president and fellow gear Tony
Hodge.
• Two hitch-hikers from the hostel picked
up Wednesday are asked where they were going to
stay if they were removed from Jericho:
"I didn't even know we were going to get
kicked out," says one.
"Yeah, we're getting the boot on Friday," says
the other to his friend. "But I think I've got a place
to stay."
The young man who hadn't heard of the
government removal order is visibly shaken. "They
call me Ratzo at the hostel," he says. "You know,
like in Midnight Cowboy."
He explains he has something wrong with his
lungs. "Maybe it's T.B." he says. "I guess I'll go to
Florida to die," he jokes, "just like Ratzo did in the
movie." Although he is obviously trying to be
funny, it seems he believes a large part of what he
says.
The two ask to get out in front of a shop on
Fourth. "They put doughnuts out for us every night
when they close for the day," says one. "I hope
they have lots cause I haven't eaten hardly anything
today."
They hunch over the box, picking through it
for some good doughnuts.
• Three young men and a young woman, all
of whom say they live in the Jericho hostel are
asked what they think of the students' vote while
they sit beside the hostel's booth in SUB.
They stare for several seconds, then one of trie
young men says, "It's their building." He leaves it at
that. It appears that none of them expected to be
allowed to move into the building.
• A tall, husky UBC student is arguing with
a long-haired young man from the hostel at the
Thursday meeting.
"I pay my rent. I buy my food. I don't bum off
anybody."
The other disagrees. "We're down, sure.
Everybody needs help sometime.You think I'm
not looking for a job?"
A crowd gathers around the two as they argue.
Like most of those at the meeting they have made a
definite choice as to which side they are on. While
everyone argues, a speaker blares out the Beatles'
song All You Need Is Love.
• A Hare Krishna sect member giving out
incense and pamphlets during the Thursday meeting
says he doesn't know what all the fuss is about.
"We don't have these problems in Hare," he
says. His solutions to the hostel issue: "If everyone
put God into their lives, no one would be in need."
The haze over Vancouver may be more than
just the worst air pollution of 1970.
LETTERS
Dead fish
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As a result of the AMS general
meeting on Tuesday, I find myself
rather depressed about the lack of
concern that many students have
about others and themselves.
I saw many of my fellow
students cop-out on an issue that
has been thrown around by
different levels of government
whom supposedly cannot relate to
the "transient problem". I heard
many intellectual pedantacisms
concerning other minority groups
who find themselves out in the
economic cold. I heard "amens"
and "that's rights" in response to
the rationalizations for
abandoning the "project."
But not once did I hear
constructive ideas that did relate
the university to the community.
The university is a collection of
individuals who someday,
somehow, will enter the
"outside."
Whether we like it or not, the
basic faults in our technocratic
age are opening up once again and
less motivated individuals or
people who cannot physically fit
into the consumer-producer
syndrome (which some of us cling
to so insecurely) are being
heaped up like dead fish on the
shoreline. And all we can do is
hold our noses and complain
about the stink!
Many of us, dear fellow
students,  are   going   to   find
ourselves out in the cold and no
matter what privilege has been our
guardian, we all react to the cold
the same way. We shiver.
We will find our "brothers"
more concerned with accumulated
physical wealth than with his
"brother's" welfare. This
hypocrisy and self-centred apathy
is a disgrace. Let's start relating
somewhere.
Let's start being part of what
we are already implicated in. Let's
get out of our ivory towers and
hitch down to Jericho now, talk
with the people. Think about it a
while, then do it. Love from the
west.
BOB MACKIE,
Arts 4. Friday, October 2,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
Solution
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The general meeting
Wednesday was very illuminating,
in particular the frank admission
that the SUB question was a
dummy issue set up to attract a
quorum for the real issue, the
proposed march on Jericho.
Tony Hodge achieved new
heights of combined candor
and hypocrisy when he read out a
motion urging our support for the
underprivileged "regardless of
creed, colour or ideology" and
immediately went on to urge use
of the "Jericho problem" to force
student demands on provincial
and federal governments.
As someone pointed out at the
meeting, no suggestion has been
made to open SUB to old-age
pensioners or Gastown derelicts.
The Jericho residents merit AMS
attention because they are in the
17-25 age group, have long hair,
and can be amalgamated into the
general thrust of "student
politics", a phrase which has
replaced "the rights of the workers"
in contemporary political cant.
People screamed about treating
the Jerichos as "human beings,
not cattle". If any of the
considerably more than 350
Jericho supporters at the meeting,
so eager to vote away student
funds, had themselves each taken
a Jericho resident home, these
underprivilegeds could be treated
as charity cases, not political
pawns and the "Jericho problem"
would have been solved.
But of course, that isn't the
point, is it?
A. RUSSELL WODELL
English 3.
Correction
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In order to correct several
items in your Sept. 29 article on
UBC's newest day care centre, I
offer the following.
The campus nursery co-op is
B.C.'s only day care centre for
children of one and a half to three
years of age and is operating by
special permission of the
provincial department of
rehabilitation and social
improvement.
The centre is licensed and has
two qualified staff members as
well as parent assistants. Day care
services are subsidized by the
government on the basis of
individual family need.
We are well equipped indoors.
Toys have been bought and
donated, parents have built
furniture and play equipment.
What we lack is outdoor climbing
equipment and one or two more
tricycles or kiddie cars.
We have paid $250 out of our
own pockets to equip the present
centre and fence the yard.
Apart from governmental
subsidies and rent-free use of the
grad student centre during
summer session, we have received
no financial aid. *
In order to reach our goal of
three adults to care for 12
children, we need volunteers to
donate a regular half-day a week.
Men, especially, are welcome.
Our concern is to provide good
day care for the children now
involved. However, we are
preparedto offer information and
guidance to students interested in
starting a similar group.
For those wishing further
information, we can be contacted
through the university day care
council, Box 122, SUB.
MONICA MITCHELL
Supervisor
Nursery Co-op
We a p o 1 o g i z e for any
misconceptions about the day
care centre that you feel may have
been left by the story.—Ed.
'Good night'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I must express my pride at the
action taken at the recent AMS
meeting by the majority of the
students present in regard to the
"youth hostel" question.
Instead of helping those who
conceivably may not deserve it,
we have helped nobody. Instead
of inconveniencing ourselves a
wee bit to exercise a little (pardon
the expression) Christianity, we
have let things stay as they are.
Successful products of society,
we have gotten the other guy
before he has a chance to get us.
So relax, everybody, no one's
going to mess up our precious
SUB. Close your eyes.
If any of those dirty hippies
sleep under a roof tonight, it
won't be your fault. Go sleep
now, babies. Daddy's proud of
you. You bastards.
DAVID LEE
More praise
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Don't you know I've got a
weak heart? I am 84 years old,
experienced in life in three cities
and naturally interested in UBC.
Two years ago, I lost contact
with The Ubyssey as it
degenerated into a somewhat
vulgar rag. I served in both world
wars and I regard myself as thick
skinned, but I could not read The
Ubyssey of about two years ago.
On Tuesday I visited UBC and
couldn't get over the changes in
recent years - the crowds, the
cosmopolitan atmosphere in SUB
etc.
Then my eyes fell on a pile of
Ubysseys. My nose turned up for
a moment, but then (my nose not
getting any stench) I intuitively
picked up a copy, (no collection
box?).
That evening I read it through
from start to finish. Ye gremlins!
What has happened? Here is really
a university paper — excellent
throughout. Shock! But on
recovery I want to thank you and
your helpers very, very sincerely.
As Elvira Finch puts it, the
paper is "excellent beyond
belief." I'm still scratching my
head — nervous reaction. And aot
only excellent sense all the way
through but exquisite humour at
no extra charge, (page nine).
"With their usual politeness,
students began to pack up their
books before class time had run
out, and while Stocker was still
speaking."
Candid cameras not  allowed!
Again, thanks for a pleasant
surprise.
S. O. HARRIES,
2496 West 8th
Who's next?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to those people
who voted against the housing of
the Jericho people in SUB, it will
be interesting to register their
political opinions five years hence
when they will be unable to find
jobs. The market for engineers is
dwindling these days.
PAUL McDOWELL
Grad Studies 9
(Anthropology)
Deserters
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With all these recent arguments
about de-Canadianization I cannot
help wondering why one very
important aspect is constantly
overlooked.
I am referring to the large
number of draft-dodgers and
deserters entering Canada.
These men must possess a
tremendous amount of courage
and determination to leave the
only life they have ever known
and undertake a project regarded
as cowardice by most people.
They came to Canada to make
a new life.
Why are they forced to waste
away   in   our hostels until even
these are taken away?
BOB JOHNSON
Science 1
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WE'RE SERVICE ORIENTED Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970
Two VP candidates nominated
in AMS by-election next week
Only two candidates will be on the ballot when
students go to the polls for the Alma Mater Society
by-election Oct. 8.
Kelvin Beckett, arts 4, and John Mitchell,
education 4, have been nominated for
vice-president.
Hamish Earle, grad studies English, was the
only nominee for ombudsman and has assumed the
office by acclamation.
Christine Krawczyk, acting vice-president, has
withdrawn her nomination because of an
"unwillingness to represent the students of UBC"
because of the Tuesday general meeting which
decided against the using of SUB for the Jericho,
hostel.
The Oct. 8 ballot will also ask students to
decide whether or not the 60 UBC students who
study industrial arts education in Burnaby would
have to pay the $15 of the $24 AMS fee that goes
to the operation of SUB.
Currently they are required to pay the full fee
although they never use SUB.
The by-elections are necessary because the
ombudsman and vice-president elected last spring
were unable to serve.
The ombudsman couldn't return to campus
because of his academic standing. Krawczyk was
found to be ineligible to serve as vice-president
because she had not been at UBC the mandatory
two years.
For the first time, candidates are required to
post a $10 deposit, which will be refunded in whole
or in part, after the results are tabulated and the
elections committee has investigated any allegation
of violations of the rules.
Krawczyk announced her decision not to stand
for election - although she is now eligible - in a
letter to The Ubyssey.
"I am not interested in serving as the
representative for a group of PEOPLE that don't
care what happens to other PEOPLE," she said in
the letter.
"That majority of students which voted against
allowing the PEOPLE presently living in the Jericho
Hostel to stay in SUB if they could find NO
OTHER place to go, clearly indicated, to me at
least, that they did not care about PEOPLE."
Krawczyk said that if nobody had been
nominated for the position she would have
continued as vice-president in order to finish the
projects she started.
The two vice-presidential candidates will discuss
their platforms Tuesday noon in the SUB
conversation pit.
The four extra Arts Undergraduate Society
council reps, meanwhile, have been elected to office
by acclamation. Introduced to council Wednesday
night were: Brian Sproule, Bob Mackie, Michael
Robinson and Lynn Brown.
Cafeteria space to increase
From page 1
the survey should be available by March,
1971 The decision to continue discriminatory
pricing - by offering periodic discounts in full
meals, paid for by mark up on popular items like
coffee -  runs directly counter to the Bond report.
The five-man committee, under economic prof
Dr. David Bond, recommended, "the mark up on all
goods sold, other than candy and cigarettes, should
be constant and equal."
The food service's committee chairman, Byron
Hender, who is the business consultant to the
administration's   ancillary  services, said, however,
that "promotional pricing features should be
continued only for the time being, until formal
guidelines are set down by the committee."
He said one of the jobs of the survey will be to
evaluate student opinion on this point.
The expansion of eating facilities in SUB will
involve re-organization of the present serving area
which the committee noted is badly congested
during noon hours.
Negotiations will have to be held between the
AMS and the administration to determine whether
food services can acquire sufficient space to make
the expansion worthwhile.
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Contemporary Worship
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Editor   Tim Wilson
Things are happening all over the place. People Stripping in
SUB over the Jericho Hostel thing. Films, Concerts, Clubs,
Undercut, Fraternities, it's all so busy that I just don't know what
to do, I just might go to sleep though, since I haven't had much
lately.
The playhouse starts its season Friday with The Secretary
Bird, The Boys are all in the Band at the Magic theatre, The VSO
gave its first performance Monday night.
Herb Gilbert of the Fine Arts Department is bursting out
with all kinds of activities for you involved Gallery goers, this time,
it's Free Roller Skating in the Fine Arts Gallery at noon Monday,
October 5", bring your own skates to the Basement of the Library —
if you can't, there will be some skates there.
Herb Gilbert also invites you to attend the closing of
PROCESS HYPHEN PRODUCT and ENVIRONMENTAL
HYPHEN COUNTER SPACE in the F.A. Gallery, or you can visit
during the installation processes that start Tuesday, Oct. 6 at 10:00
a.m. This installation will continue until the CLOSING on OCT.
24.
An unprepossessing fellow came into the office today
carrying with him, part of a year and one half study of unified field
theory complete with hordes of calculations and all sorts of
equations. It turns out that he has, or says he has, a qualified
theory for the introduction of a mathematical constant that could
link just about everything to everything, from the number of
moons on Jupiter and Saturn, to an atomic nucleus. His theory
disputes the concept of gravitation as the cementing force of our
solar system. More about that later.
pfage 2wo
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970 The Boys in the Band
Two of the boys
Wheel It's Harold's birthday
party, celebrated, as the host
says with apologies, "six
screaming tired fairy queens and
one anxious queer". Things get
even more anxious as a straight
college friend interrupts the
revelry and the poison of
self-betrayal carries the party to
a sodden but cathartic end.
The Boys in the Band is light
comedy with a bitter aftertaste.
The Actor's Contemporary
Theatre production is
remarkable successful in
capturing the flavor, considering
the touchy issue, the
competition of the film version,
and the difficulty of performing
the comedy of reality. Although
the goal is not always reached,
the quality is still impressive.
The initial interplay is
potentially hysterically funny.
However, this gaiety is mitigated
by a certain heaviness of tone.
The keynote is set by Michael
(Geoff Theobald), the host, who
injects a touch of oratory into
his chit-chat, has a strained
deliberateness to his scathing
flippancies undue even in an
aging faggot. There is a
self-consciousness to his
ass-twirling and strutting which
is more appropriate to Emory,
the fag's fag. Glenn MacDonald
as Emory has wrists that bend
backward in the attempt to be
limp. Even Larry (Tom Carew),
casually and attractively
promiscuous seems overly
intense as he enters with his
fidelity-obsessed lover (Jim
McQueen). With these intensities
the first act in all its wry
ribaldry still retains a rather
nervous atmosphere.
The tenseness, however, fades
with the onset of real
antagonism. Humor passes to
catharsis. Larry and Hank are
reunited in a beautiful statement
of faith. Emory and Bernard
(James Crawford), who is black
and beautiful, help each other
limp away from the frightening
scene of their self-revelation.
The constricted straight (Ty
Haller) leaves as convinced of
the horrors of sin as ever, but
reinstated with his wife. And all
the while Harold (Robert
Graham), occasionally playing
with his birthday gift, a
"midnight cowboy" (Michael La
France), looksion untouched.
Harold is, in fact, stunning.
His entrance, in green velvet suit
and pale red glasses, is totally
devastating in effect. He
proceeds to play the ironic
master of revels, interjecting a
distorted cliche with
feather-light cynicism — "not for
all the tea in Mexico"; "give me
librium or give me meth". He is
beyond being destroyed by the
infantile jabs of his host; he does
it so much better himself that he
needn't bother. Above all it is
Graham as Harold who makes
the play, who throws away his
lines with the neurotic grace that
Harold throws away his life.
The  Boys  in  the Band is a
difficult play, because it deals
with real people who sometimes
make the mistake of putting
themselves into dead
stereotypes. The ACT
production' manages to create
humor and pathos without
sinking into theatrical banality.
Heide
THE SECRETARY BIRD
A middle-aged novelist glances
over his spectacles one evening to
find his marriage on the rocks and
decides to fight back. THE
SECRETARY BIRD, the comedy
still drawing capacity audiences in
London's West End makes its
Canadian premiere as the
Playhouse Theatre Company's
first production of the season.
Tony Van Bridge, (spying through
the door), stars as Hugh Walford
and Patricia Gage, (centre), plays
his wife Liz. Bob Ross plays John
Brownlow, the thrice-married
stockbroker who plans to run off
to Italy with the beautiful Liz.
THE SECRETARY BIRD, by
William Douglas Home, opens at
the Playhouse this Friday under
the direction of Paxton
Whitehead. Again this year, the
Playhouse offers a student night.
Students can see six plays for
$10.00 on one Tuesday during
every performance of the six
plays. There are only 150 of these
tickets still available, so if you dig
theatre, call the Vancouver Ticket
Centre.
Scene from the Secretary Bird
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
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Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
CATCH 22
IS THE MOST MOVING, MOST
|INTELLIGENT, THE MOST HU-
MANE-OH.TO HELL WITH IT!
-IT'S THE BEST AMERICAN
FILM I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!
it
—Vincent C»nbf. N.V. Tim»$
"IT'S ONE HELL OF A FILM! A
COLD SAVAGE AND CHILLING
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of American directors. Alan
Arkin's finest screen performance to date. 'CATCH-22' would
be an important event in any
movie year."-Bruce w/ii^mson. playboy
"'CATCH-22' says many things
that need to be said again and
again! Alan Arkin's performance as Yossarian is great!"
-Joseph Morgensfern. NftVSWffK
PAMMOIIHTMCIUWSCDBPOMI10HINISSODHTIOK WllH HIMWIS INC PBISINIS
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALANARKIN
\#~      USEDOIIMIMie
&
BY
mm JOSEPH HELLER
MARTIN BALSAM, RICHARD BENJAMIN, ARTHUR GARFUNKEL, JACK GILFORD; BUCK HENRY; BOB NEWHART,
ANTHONY PERKINS; PAULA PRENTISS, MARTIN SHEEN, JON MIGHT 8 ORSON WELLES *S DREEDLE
SCREENPLAY BY BOCK HENRY PRODOCED BY JOHN GALLEY 8 MARTIN RANSOHOFF DIRECTED BY MIKE NICHOLS
mOWniM DfSKKII KOMBD STLBERT TECHMCaiDR " mMVISHm - * PARAMOUNT fICTURf  R   MO(IU/N]«IRfSMRI«10MD»lllM[IIMI
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER IB
"Warning — Scenes of
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violence"
R. W. McDonald—
B.C. Director
STANLEY
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Evenings 7:20, 9:30. Matinee Saturday & Sunday 2:00
Friday, October 2,  1970
THE       U BYSSEY
pfage 3hree Obituary
Hendrix, Jimi
Jim Hendrix died a couple of weeks ago
as a result of an overdose of barbituates. He
was 27, and his talent was growing. His last
album, Band of Gypsies (RS 5195), was his
best despite being a collaborative effort with
Buddy Miles, who is a rotten singer and only
a passable drummer. The music is wilder, yet
better structured than on earlier Hendrix
recordings. This is partially a result of the
ponderous, slow-footed drumming, which
Hendrix seems to use as a sensual base.
This record, though not in some ways as
innovative as earlier ones, is the best
showcase for Hendrix's mastery of the
guitar. His playing had become more
controlled, and as a result, his ability on the
straight runs and fingering is more apparent.
His pyrotechnical ingenuity is, as always,
very much in evidence.
Hendrix was a complex figure. Perhaps
in spite of himself, he represented deep,
primitive undercurrents in human society in
general and modern American society in
particular. His music was sensual, violent,
beyond morality. His performance of the
Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock, in
which he recreated the Vietnam War in
sound with his guitar, and the somewhat
similar effect he achieves on "Machine Gun"
on Band of Gypsies, show that he was not
unaware of this element in his music, that he
felt the potential of his guitar as a sonic
weapon. His concerts and recordings evoked
atmospheres of animal anarchy, and were
often reminiscent of voodoo rites. Hendrix
life was like a jungle animal, free, sinuous,
smoulderingly powerful. Yet he privately
eschewed violence, rejecting Black Panther
philosophies. His violence was a natrual
animal expression, a reaction against the
worst of the artificial barriers which have
caged the animal within us.
One of the great ironies of Hendrix's
life, seen in this light, is that his career fits so
well into the pattern of the society in which
he obviously felt himself a renegade. He rose
from rags to riches, from boyhood in a
Seattle ghetto to the peak of pop music
popularity. He was an ideal product of
American capitalism, and as a result he
became a tinsel-wrapped plaything of the
star-spangled Rolling Stone culture rather
than a person. Yet Hendrix's art constantly
asserts his individuality and his sense of
being a part of life and humanity.
Whatever one may think of his music,
and he had many detractors, one is forced to
recognize one thing: Jimi was unique. It
seems unlikely that anyone else will ever
reach again the new worlds of sound and
sense that Hendrix found in his explorations
of the potential of the electric guitar.
Bill Storey
Jimi Hendrix
Meredith Davies
By MARK JACQUES
Local symphony-goers can breathe a bit easier this
year, since the Vancouver Symphony's Subscription
Concert programmes have improved noticeably. Just
under half of the upcoming season's pieces announced
so far — twenty out of forty-one works — were written
after 1900.
Although only a few of these twentieth-century
works will offend symphonic little old ladies of both
sexes, the balance between old and new works is an
improvement over last year when the number of
post-1900 pieces was an uneven fourteen out of a total
thirty-seven.
The number of Canadian works has also been
increased in keeping with new Canada Council rulings.
And the best news of all is that next spring there is a
possible series of concerts devoted to contemporary
music. One of the tentative pieces to be played would
be a spatial-electronic work created for the VSO last
year (but never performed) by SFU composer Murray
Schafer.
Just for the record, here's a listing of some of the
modern works to be performed at the subscription
concerts: Lutoslawski's Concerto for Orchestra (Oct. 4
& 5); Prokofieffs Violin Concerto (Oct. 18 & 19);
Pentland's Symphony for 10 parts, Henze's First
Symphony and Ravel's G Major Piano Concerto (Nov.
1 & 2); Otto Joachim's Contrastes (Nov. 15 & 16);
Walton's First Symphony (Jan. 10 & 11 next year);
Schafer's Son of Heldenbleen and Bartok's Third Piano
Concerto (Feb. 7 and 8).
Take note that there are also some works by those
radical composers Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz,
Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Brahms, and Elgar, so be
prepared . . .
As has happened in the past, UBC students can see
the symphony ultra-cheaply, assuming there are any
unsold seats left before the concerts. Just go down to
the Queen Eliz. Theatre, wait patiently in line, flash
your students' card and a buck, and a ticket will be
yours.
Be warned, however, that due to a glut of season
ticket holders, there are only about 700 unsold seats
for both the Sunday afternoon and Monday evening
concerts. As a result, a few sell-outs are inevitable,
perhaps even at this weekend's opening concerts. But
even if you have to get a seat in the normal way, you
can still get 20% off the price by again flashing your
card.
pfage 4our
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970 Concert
Ian and Sylvia
Dale and Kathy
An enthusiastic audience listened to IAN
AND SYLVIA with their four-piece band on
Tuesday, but for this listener, they just didn't
come off. Sylvia was so tight, and so little used,
she looked as if ready to cry. Her voice, although
pleasing, was rough. Ian didn't make it either,
with his poor attempt at imitating Tom
Jones, microphone in mouth and all.
It's bad, because in the past, Ian and Sylvia
used to sing together. Neither Ian nor Sylvia
possess the range of voice or the power to be
heard, let alone stand out above their four-piece
band. The Nashville-oriented band separates Ian
and Sylvia physically and possibly emotionally.
What emerges is in many respects amateurish. The
Great Speckled Bird played well, especially
Buddy Cage on pedal steel, but with Ian and
Sylvia they just didn't come off as a group.
Like Bob Dylan, Ian and Sylvia have lost
much of their individuality by immersing
themselves in the "Nashville Sound", but I
suppose that it sells a lot of records for them.
Two singers that surely outshone Ian and
Sylvia were Dale Wilson and Kathy Payne. These
local folksingers had a firm grip on their material,
including some of their own excellent
compositions.
Dale and Kathy were reminiscent of the old
Ian and Sylvia, Tuesday they sang well, even
joyfully.
Together for only a year, they have attained
a harmonic individuality that Ian and Sylvia have
lost.
T.W.
Ian and Sylvia
Dale and Kathy
-Photos by Dave Bowerman
Film
WOMEN IN LOVE
The   film   Women   in   Love
appears at first to be the new
medium equivalent of the classics
comic book. On second thought,
however, it appears as an entirely
different kind of art.
Women in Love concerns itself
with the sensual conflicts and
resolutions of two couples; Ursula
and Rupert, and Gerald and
Gudrun.
In Ken Russell's film version,
character depth is lacking. Ursula
appears as a rather typical
domesticated woman with a desire
to subdue Rupert into hearth and
home. Rupert's infatuation with
her is inexplicable, therefore,
since he appears as a brooding
intellectual, determined to be free
and adventurous. Gudrun is
shown to be a rather pretentious
artist type, domineering and even
cruel in her power. Gerald, her
lover,    is     a      conservative
industrialist who cannot break
from the cocoon of traditional
ethics. His attraction for Gudrun
and his willingness to be
destroyed by her is difficult to
understand, given his character.
The characters, then are drawn
with firm and heavy lines, but the
outline obscures the complexity
of their interrelationships and
struggles. Their inner battles with
their own sensuality and their
tradition are mitigated in effect
by the simplicity of their
portrayal.
On the other hand, the
triumph of this film is in the
totality of the scene, the beauty
of the moment. The scene of
Rupert and Gerald wrestling in the
study is a masterpiece of light and
motion. The perverted aristocrat
Hermione's dance is exquisite in
its decadence. Gerald's slow walk
into the snow of the Alps is a
magnificent visual finality.
In this sense, then, the film
succeeds; its visual portrayal is
palpable, deep, and beautiful. It
fails  in  making  these  moments
understandable and related to
each other by its lack of depth in
its primary characters. While
exploiting to the full the
advantage of the film medium, it
neglects to provide motivation, to
substantiate and justify those
advantages. It succeeds in
impressionism but fails to make
the impressions into a coherent,
total masterpiece.
MY NIGHT AT MAUDS
Most people at least try to
disguise the fact that their lives
are bounded by banality. Eric
Rohmer apparently feels that this
convention is unnecessary, and
that his discovery of banality is in
some way novel. He has created,
with the help of his potato-faced
hero Jean-Louis Trintigant, a
black and grey essay in tedium.
My Night at Maud's is actually
the story of two nights of a
mundane little corporation man.
Trudging home from Michelin's
one evening, he encounters an old
school chum, brittle, witty and
aging. Through this unengaging
pied piper, Jean Louis meets
Maud , an aging bitch goddess
who pries into his religious
conflicts while luring him
(unsuccessfully) to bed.
In his escape he meets a sweet
Catholic college girl, who puts
him up through a snow storm but
virtually rejects his advances. Of
course he's enchanted — but it
turns out that she too has her
little secrets. Neither an
irresolvable nor particularly
interesting secret, one discovers,
in fact, very much like the only
slightly soiled linen we're all too
familiar with.
Interspersed between the
eternal confrontation (on two
fronts) are some interminable,
stale philosophical discussions —
Life, Love, Religion.
As a slice of very ordinary life,
My Night at Maud's is a success.
Technique and acting combine to
reach a new mediocrity.
The cinematic technique is a
hackneyed montage of French
cinema in the last fifteen years,
complete with harshly realistic
background noise, the heavy
traffic, the drive down the
pointless road. But this time to no
point. It is effect without cause.
The actors vie for dullness.
Trintignant is, in fact, , so
completely uninteresting that any
motive is sucked from the action.
(But perhaps "action" is too
strong a word.) He is
well-matched by the women,
although Maud holds an initial
fascination for her poise and
vampish beauty.
This film appears be be even
less concerned with scruples than
its characters are. They at least are
in a normal state of ethical
confusion. My Night at Maud's
commits that worst of sins — to
bore without even the excuse of
sincerity.
Heide
Friday, October 2, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 5ive Sinclair-Dickin Report
The Dickin Report on Sinclair
Sinclair is the enemy of the people.
Yesterday, when I was buying 108 square feet of plastic, who knows what
he was doing? Not I.
He wasn't writing the Sinclair-Dickin Report.
For a long period of time, the exact nature of Sinclair's subversion has not
been clear.
It is now obvious, however, that he has been insidiously undermining the
progress of the revolution. Just yesterday, he was observed not buying a "Power
to the People" button. At the same time, he purchased a bottle of Coke.
Extensive in-depth reporting has revealed that Sinclair holds stock in
American Telephone   and   Telegraph,   and has worked for such companies as
Crown Zellerbach, Dow Chemical, Lockheed and Standard Oil. He was
instrumental in delaying the development of F-310 by at least four years.
Sinclair's involvement with the Military-Industrial Complex dates back to
his early childhood. At the age of six, he received a military scholarship from the
Pentagon for his "outstanding
Sinclair has arrived.
It is 1:07.
Sinclair has slept in.
The Sinclair Report on Dickin
I've known Dickin for much too long. He's getting on my nerves. Every
time I turn around he's doing something behind my back. He's simply an
untrustworthy person.
Although I have, as I said, known him for some time, I was never truly
aware of the lower 4/5 of the ice-cube. Today I walked into the Ubyssey office,
and there he was — sitting at the typewriter writing ugly things about me. Me! I'm
the one that gave him his big chance, back in 1945. I introduced him to Daryl
Zanuck and told Daryl, a close personal friend, that Dickin was a "natural", and
would go far. How cruelly I was deceived! Dickin is a natural all right, a natural
slob. He's a traitor, and a back-biter to boot. -Dickin hasn't the slightest iota of
talent. Not the slightest quantum.
When I first met Dickin he seemed like an okay guy. The dog! The
hyprocritical dog! That was just a ploy of his. He wanted to use me as a stepping
stone, just like he's used every one else all his life. His 3rd ex-wife, who was heir
to a vast fortune, told me he took her every penny and when the money was gone
ran off with another heiress. The treads of Dickin's running shoes are all over my
back.
At first the idea of a Sinclair-Dickin report seemed like a good one. I made
the mistake of assuming Dickin had the talent he boasted of. I was cruelly
deceived! Look at the trash he turned out this week, and then look at the fine
well-turned prose I myself caressed into existence. The facts of the case are
obvious. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I rest my case.
The Dickin Report on the
Sinclair Report on
Dickin
As I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted by the arrival of Sinclair,
my partner in literary crime received a scholarship from the Pentagon for, (and
here I quote from the news release), "outstanding devotion to the advancement of
hand-to-hand combat, and outstanding performances in the Glee Club." While his
musical ability has rapidly declined, (as is obvious from listening to his latest
album), his desire to do personal violence to others has increased. (As may be seen
by reading his latest writing.)
His personal accusations, slanderings, and libel against me are too ridiculous
to comment upon. I will, however, say one thing about them. They are, for the
most part, totally untrue. They are lies.
My third ex-wife will testify to the fact that I never wear running shoes.
Sinclair's Rebuttal!!
If Dickin thinks he ruffles my equanimity, he's sadly mistaken. My
equanimity is unruffable. I will not be baited into losing my cool by the totally
preposterous, patently imbecilic, thoroughly false, ridiculous, horribly obscene
attacks on my impeccable honesty. The facts are that the scholarship he mentions
was not granted to be for any of the reasons listed in the news release. I was
granted the scholarship because of my unusual athletic prowess. I was then, and I
am now, an athlete with a talent that astounds coaches all over the country. My
feat at the recent Winter Olympics is an example. I did the giant slalom uphill!
I may add that my musical ability is as good as ever. (Get my new album,
Sinclair Live at Thunderbird Stadium).
Dickin on the other hand is positively a vacuum of talent. He was denied
entrance to kindergarten because he failed the battery of aptitude tests. He has
never, as far as I know, held a job for longer than a few days. As soon as his
employer has a chance of seeing him actually at work(most of his first few daysare
spent in coffee break) he is promptly fired. But enough of this idle praise. There is
no hope Dickin can be rehabilitated. He is totally inept.
I want to state categorically that I have tried to help him. God knows I've
tried! But he is incorrigible. He is determined not to leave the slime, and there,
until Judgment Day, is where he will stay.
Other than that I kind of like him.
THE LAUNDERMAT
By JIM O'LEARY
The laundermat is a nice
place to visit, but I wouldn't
want to live there. Walking in
the other night, I was merely
overwhelmed by it all, and not
the least by the fact that the
first thing I noticed was a washer
sudsing over. It was making a
small gurgling noise as the suds
came pouring over the top. Now
that's funny, I thought
innocently, why doesn't
somebody do something?
Nobody seemed to even notice
it, and you know there's not
that many distractions in a
laundermat.
However, I soon melted into
the sway of things. Luckily there
was a dryer open. (I had cleverly
washed my clothes beforehand
and not so cleverly had thus
carried twenty five extra pounds
of water down with me. Of
course, I should have taken the
water out before coming.) 1
knew that there was a certain
rhythm to working in the
laundermat and that you don't
just barge in and dry your
clothes, so I was just standing
there, swaying and unpacking
my clothes on the counter when
this little guy with glasses
tempoed over to me. "Groovy,"
said I. "Right on," he replied,
and stole my dryer. What could I
do? It's not exactly justifiable
homicide. That's the trouble
with laundermats. They always
have five dryers for a floating
populace of eleven people. You
have to line up in front of a
dryer and discreetly rabbit
punch the guys on either side of
you and look nonchalant as they
slump about your feet. I lined
up and looked over my
competition. Why is it that the
women in laundermats all look
like professional wrestlers?
They're the kind that stand right
in the middle, their hair in a nice
little butch, their sweaters rolled
up to show off their biceps, and
look over all the dryers, ready to
grab the first one that's empty.
Did you ever see the signs
around a laundermat? FILL
WITH 1/5 WASHER LOAD
AND IN PROPORTION TO
BOTH. Cro ss your heart and hope
to die?I didn't know what to do so
I stuffed in the whole twenty
pounds. It was hard to fit it all
in, but I finally made it. I
dropped in the coin. Grrrrimph
said my dryer rolling over, and
died. I quickly opened the dryer
next  to  me  and pretended  to
busy myself, expecting whistles,
sirens, and flashing lights to
descend on my clothes. The
owner walked by both dryers
and said nothing, but she did
look at my funny. "Just drying
my clothes," I said, and noticed
I was fingering a white lace
brassiere. "I use them as ear
muffs," I called after her, but
she was gone.
What do all those counters do
in the laundermat, besides take
up space? Are they for folding
clothes? I think no. I've seen
people folding clothes in
washers, dryers, baskets, on the
floor, in the air, and on top of
the soap machine, but never on
the counters. Do you know
why? Because there's always
three full ashtrays, a box of
soap, and that morning's
newspaper scattered over them. I
think there must be a
subconscious urge in a human
being to lean over a laundermat
counter reading, because a lot of
people seem to do it. It is pretty
cool, after all, and it's the only
place you can do it. At home
somebody's bound to walkk up
to you and ask why don't you
sit in a chair. In a laundermat, of
course, there are no chairs, so
you lean on the counter, and if
you're questioned, you say,
"Just drying my clothes,
officer", smile, and turn the
page.
I noticed a machine hidden in
the corner that nobody was
using, while I was there. THE
EXTRACTER, it said, and it
spins out excess water. SAVES
MONEY, it said. Now that's a
bit much. I ask myself why
would they want to save us
money? If they really wanted to
do that why don't they make
the damned things free? It's ten
cents for seven minutes in the
dryer. Hey, fellows, do you
know how long it takes to dry a
pair of socks? It's cheaper to
wear them wet and buy liniment
for your athlete's feet. And then
this sign has the nerve to say
SAVES MONEY. I can imagine
the board meeting, and one guy
saying, "Fred, I really think we
should install that extracter.
Saves money, you know."
"I don't know, Sid. I gave a
couple of thou to the Salvation
Army last month, and I think
I'm doing my share."
"Come Fred, those devils
have it pretty rough, you know.
They deserve a break."
" A www wwwwwwwww w.''
"Fred, you old softie." Fred
blushes and blows his nose.
pfage 6ix
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970 I Records
McCartney
The breakup of the Beatles
seems likely to turn out to be a
disaster. If Paul McCartney's first
solo recording is any indication,
the creative power generated by
the four together will probably be
largely lacking in their separate
efforts. The music on McCartney
(STAO 3363) is pleasant enough;
in quality, however, it is painfully
,mediocre stuff from the man who
wrote "Hey Jude". There is one
excellent   song  ("Every   Night")
^and one ni.ce tune ("Junk").
Apart   from   this,   there   are   a
couple of so-so songs and a
number of tunes that sound as if
they were tossed off in five
minutes and immediately
recorded. Most of these are not
songs at all, but shreds of song.
McCartney's simplicity is
sometimes refreshing; after a time,
however, it becomes tedious, and
his repetitious catch-phrases
"baby" and "momma" only add
to the discomfort.
The album is totally
self-centred. All the songs, all the
photos on the cover are of or
about the great man and his
family. There is, for example, a
snapshot of his boat, which is
named (what else) Paul. On top of
More Film
The Life and Times of
Chester-Angus Ramsgood
Don Wilson and Dave Curnick
are    two    young   former   UBC
students who have turned to film
-making. Their first enterprise is a
\lA hour comic production called
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
CHESTER-ANGUS RAMSGOOD.
The film techniques are
exceptional for a first film,
however the acting is quite rough.
The actors in the film, many of
them UBC students, worked
without pay, atid some of them,
particularly the girl who plays the
object     of    Chester-Angus
"Ramsgood's affection, are
outstanding in the light of the
virginity of the film makers.
The film will be shown in SUB
Theatre Monday to Friday next
week. Shows will be at 12:30 and
Last Note (or Hendrix
THE GOLDSTEIN ORGANIZATION, INC.
200 West 57th Street
New York, New York 10019
'    CONTACT: Pat Costello
HENDRIX RENTS HISTORIC HOME
Pop music star Jimi Hendrix has moved into a house
occupied at one time by composer Georg Friedrich Handel.
Of his new house in the exclusive Mayfair district of London,
Hendrix said, "I didn't know this was Handel's pad, man, until
after I got in. To tell the God's honest truth, I haven't heard much
-   of the fella's stuff. But I dig a bit of Bach now and again."
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
all this, McCartney plays all the
instruments, and seldom rises
above mediocrity on most of
them. His guitar work is fairly
good, his drumming predictably
abysmal. All this could be
accepted if it were not for the
feeling the listener- gets that
McCartney has not tried, that he
is so overconfident of his own
abilities that he feels he can toss
off a great album with no effort.
The sad truth seems to be that
McCartney thinks he is more
talented than he actually is, and,
on this record, the discrepancy
becomes obvious. CO   Bill Storey
3:30 every day, with additional
shows at 7:30 and 9:30 on
October 6, 7, and 8.
VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY
D. H. Lawrence's Virgin is
played by Jonnna Shimkus, the
Gypsy by Franco Nero. The film
is relaxing, even refreshing, it is
not a complex story, but rather, a
portrait of a few days in the life
of Yvette, the stifled daughter of
a clergyman, and her experiences
with a stereotyped flashing-eyed
Gypsy.
The film could have been
shorter, without any adverse
effects. It is not, like WOMEN IN
LOVE, enough to warrant a
continued inspection. Still, as the
simple plot interacts with its
environment, some of Lawrence's
poetic qualities enter the
dimension of film.
T.W.
VARSITY GRILL
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Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
THE SWINGING
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GRAD PORTRAITS
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Choice of 6 Color Proofs — inclusive sitting
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We have all Gowns, Hoods, Shirts, Ties, Blouses etc. on hand
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^ DEV0HC
2714 West Broadway
Tel. 736-0468
Friday, October 2,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
pfage 7even The Following Projects WHj Be
^ SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED
Through The
Vice-President's Office...
1) COURSE CONTENT SURVEY. We are planning to conduct a
comprehensive survey of all the courses presently offered at UBC
to determine how much local content is in the courses, and
whether students are satisfied with it or not. This will of course be
applicable to all courses.
After the survey has been completed we will move to try and get
more local content if that is what the survey indicates is needed.
Other functions the survey will serve will be pointing out
relationships between the citizenship of the instructor and the text
books used, and the amount of local content in the course. Lots of
manpower is needed if the survey is to be effective.
2) TUTORIAL SCHEME. We are planning to institute a tutorial
scheme on campus. The idea is to run the program on a pilot basis
for this year in order to establish a need. We want to devise as
simple a mechanism as possible that will bring together people
who need help and those that want to offer it. Lots of manpower
is needed if the scheme is to be a good one.
3) COURSE EVALUATION. We have set up a committee made
up of both students and faculty to work on the publication of a
comprehensive course evaluation booklet for the 1971-72
Academic year. Lots of manpower is needed if the booklet is to be
informative.
4) MARIJUANA REFERENDUM. October 15th has been
selected as the day for a national referendum to find out students'
attitudes toward the legalization of Cannabis. The referendum will
be co-ordinated from UBC so lots of manpower is needed if it is
to be successful.
5) TENURE. We want to set up a committee to look into the
whole concept of tenure and make recommendations as to
whether it should be kept, if so how should it be determined. If
not, what should be used as a substitute. Lots of manpower is
needed if these investigations are to be comprehensive.
6) COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT. We are working on a scheme
whereby students will be able to study actual problems in
Vancouver, propose solutions to these, and get credit for it
through their courses. This all ties in with making courses more
relevant and getting the university out of its "ivory tower". Lots
of manpower is needed if this project is going to get off the
ground.
7) SPEAKERS PROGRAM. We want to bring good speakers on
campus who will make the students more aware of their
surroundings. Lots of manpower is needed if there is to be a
stimulating speakers program.
You Decide
To Make Them Successful
If YOU think any of these programs are worth completing
come and see me—CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK—in the AMS Offices
pfage  8ight
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970 Friday, October 2, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
in the
ciassroom
Only  8   students  in  class
but still   it  was  a  lecture
MEET ME AT
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
By LESLIE PLOMMER
* Political science is the topic today — in
particular a course labelled contemporary
Japanese international politics.
Professor   Frank  Langdon   teaches  this
, two-hour every Thursday at 1:30 p.m. in Bu.
230.
This week he outlined Japan's World War
• II status, the wartime conferences and
agreements pertaining to Japan and the aims
of Allied authorities occupying Japan after its
defeat.
There were eight students in the room —
an ideal number for a seminar. However, this
is a lecture-format class.
Langdon seemed friendly and open to
questions    but    few    questions    were
forthcoming, although the lecture left much
- room for clarification and elaboration.
Since a prof can only cover so much
material, however, raising additional questions
is up to students.
Under Allied occupation aims, for
example, Langdon listed disarmament,
punishment, democratization and economic
recovery.
' On the punishment of so-called Japanese
war criminals, Langdon said that over 700 of
these people were given the death penalty
after the defeat of Japan.
Eleven countries, including Canada, were
involved in trying the 'criminals' and each
nation sent its own judges.
It seems obvious that Canadian students
at a Canadian university would be interested
in knowing more about Canada's role in
judging and sentencing these people.
Langdon did not deal with this. Nor did
any student raise the question of Canada's
role. Neither was the structure of occupation
authority dealt with, and again, students
didn't raise the question.
In 1947, Langdon said, Japan was worse
' off than at any period during the war. He
speaks  with experience because he was in
Japan at the time.
He said he recalls people wandering the
streets in Japan dressed in incredible clothing
combinations — because of the shortage of
cloth at the time.
Unfortunately, Langdon did not talk
much about his personal observations on
Japan from that time. His remembrances came
mostly in the form of slight digressions, and
class business was returned to shortly.
The poor condition of Japan in 1947 was
partly a result of Allied desires for large
chunks of Japanese territory as war
reparation, Langdon said.
Another Allied occupation aim — on
Langdon's simple, four-point list just like the
one you learned in high school about the four
causes of World War II - was that of
democratization.
Run for Rhodes
Want to travel and get a bona fide ticket
to the Good Life - an Oxford degree?
You can get paid for spending two or
three years at Oxford if you happen to win
the one Rhodes Scholarship available to B.C.
students. Applications are open to Oct. 25.
But you have to be a guy, a Canadian,
single, between 18 and 24 years of age, and
preferably in third or fourth year university.
Application forms and particulars are
available from Michael J. Brown, 804 Rogers
Building, 470 Granville Street.
Japan's current ^party-parliamentary
system — similar to Canada's — is a direct
result of constitutional proposals forwarded
by the Allied occupation forces, Langdon
said.
He cited a provision in the Japanese
constitution stating that Japan would not
resort to the use of violence in solving
international disputes. In short, that Japan
would not declare war on or attack another
nation.
The provision, Langdon said, was insisted
on by American general Douglas MacArther in
line with the Allies' aim of "making Japan
peaceful."
Perhaps the element of imperialism is
obvious in such moves by the Allies, but
Langdon did not discuss it.
It seems certain that MacArthur's desire
was not only to ensure that the U.S. would
not be attacked physically by Japan, but also
that the Coca-Cola franchise in Japan would
be protected forever more.
These deficiencies in dealing with the
topic could easily have been remedied by
questioning from the eight students in
Langdon's class, for it seems clear that the
professor is interested in his subject matter
and is open to questions.
There was a conscious and stated
intention on Langdon't part to relate World
War II developments hinging on Japan to
current conditions in Japan.
His chief shortcoming perhaps, was in not
introducing enough evaluation of events,
facts and statements.
Langdon tends to relate the facts without
assessing them particularly. About as far as he
will go is to tell the class that such and such a
treaty was 'important.'
Beyond that, there is little evaluation.
Once again, students can play an important
role in introducing this element into the class.
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Tampax tampons are modern
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of uncomfortable pads and belts.
Tampax tampons are great. They
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970
The Community Educational and Research Center, under the sponsorship of the AMS, presents - with street
theatre, music, slides and speaking voice - a program on who rules, how we are ruled and how we do resist
The death of Mr. Fred Boyd Brown was
reported in the August 24 edition of the
Vancouver Sun and Province. The active and
honorary pallbearers as listed in the press were:
P. G. Birks Dr. J. A. McLean L L. G. Bentley
H. N. Burgess       H. M. Gale J. S. Keate
G. C. P. Gray       G. C. King A. B. Christopher
V. F. McLean      C. N. Effinger  .   Dr. R. E. McKechnie
C. H. McLean       N. R. Whittal       H. R. Butler
G. B. McKeen      J. A. McMahon    C. D. Anderson
E, C. Mainwaring J. A. McLallen
Who are these men; Who was Fred Brown;
And how are they connected?
F. B. Brown held senior executive positions
and directorships in 14 companies with total
assets of over 6 billion dollars..
With V. F. McLean he shared the operation
of the largest Vancouver food-distributing chain,
Kelly Douglas Company. Victor McLean worked
his way up to President of this company in only
ten years after joining the firm in 1947. It may
be more than coincidental to his rapid rise to
success that his mother was Hazel Ellen Kelly
and his grandfather the founder of the firm.
Like his late friend Fred Boyd Brown, Victor
McLean is an Anglo-Saxon, a Protestant and a
member of the Vancouver Club.
George McKeen also knows Victor McLean
through the Vancouver Club. Relaxing from
discussions of Grouped Income Shares Ltd., of
which both are directors, they can reminisce
about their wartime experiences as RCAF pilot
officers. Victor McLean and George McKeen are
both in their middle forties, about the same age
as Fred Brown's son-in-law Ronald Laird Cliff.
Ronald Cliff and George McKeen are both
commerce graduates from the University of B.C.
But as the directors of 19 companies and the
chairmen and presidents of still more, they have
little time to spend on their profession. Like
Ronald's older brother, Arnold Bickell Cliff,
who gave up his law practice after six years to
devote full time to his many businesses.
As for George McKeen and Fred Brown,
they were most directly connected through
Straits Towing Ltd. where George is president
and treasurer and Fred was chairman.
What of Fred Brown and Cyrus Hale
McLean? B.C. Telephone is Cyrus McLean's
responsibility, along with telephone companies
in the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Cyrus
McLean is chairman of the B.C. Tel Board and
Fred Brown was vice-chairman. The two also got
together at meetings of the Board of the Bank of
Nova Scotia. Of course there was always the
Vancouver Club; and for sports and business,
directors meetings of the Vancouver Hockey
Club.
Merchandising, transportation,
communications, finance — the friends who
gathered at the funeral of Fred Boyd Brown are
key directors of these sectors of the Vancouver
and B.C. economy. But not only these sectors.
They direct natural resource exploitation and
the knowledge industry. John McMahon and
Reginald   Whittal  are  president and  chairman
respectively of Inland Natural Gas. Leopold
Lionel Garrick Bentley is senior vice-president of
Canadian Forest Products Ltd. His
brother-in-law,   John   Gerald   Prentice   is   the
president.
And the son of L. L. G. Bentley and the
son-in-law of John Prentice are directors and
executives in the various subsidiaries of
Canadian Forest Products. Perhaps one of them
will earn the presidency of the company as John
Prentice did when his father died in 1950. John
Prentice also is president of the Canada Council.
Here he meets James Stuart Keate, director of
Pacific Press (Fred Brown was chairman of the
Board), a Publisher of The Sun and a former
member of the UBC board of governors. Stuart
Keate undoubtedly compares fortunes with
Cyrus McLean, a member of the board of
governors of Simon Fraser University, when the
two meet at the Vancouver Club.
One person who is not a member of the
Vancouver Club is the surgeon and medical
director of the Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward
Foundation, Dr. R. E. McKechnie. However, Dr.
McKechnie can meet many of his corporation
friends at the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club.
In addition to corporation, club and college
there is charity and patronage. George McKeen
is governor of the Sunny Hill Hospital for
children. Cyrus McLean is on the advisory board
of the National Theatre School of Canada.
Harold Meredith Gale is president of the B.C.
Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation.
Mr. Gale is also vice-president of National Trust,
which is definitely a business and not a charity.
We can recognize when someone's speaking
a foreign language. English, Italian, German,
Chinese, Russian, French. With effort we can
learn to speak a foreign language. But do all the
people who speak the same language, English,
for example, understand each other?
"Hell, we should have stayed out a few
more weeks. Now that I'm back to work I see
how much we really hurt them (bosses)" — said
an oil-wroker. "Wherever there are industrial
enterprises, there is a quasi-group of the
incumbents of roles of domination, the latent
interests of which are in conflict with those of a
corresponding quasi-group of incumbents of
roles of subjection" — said a university
professor. We can call this the barrier of a
common language and we recognize it
immediately even if we can't eliminate it easily.
But there are other barriers to
communication that are more important,
barriers that we don't automatically recognize.
Think of some street names in Vancouver:
Dunsmuir, Powell, Beatty, Hamilton, Abbott.
The words sound familiar, but that's precisely
the deception. We have come to accept as
familiar names that represent interests that are
alien and antagonistic to our own and that
separate us from our own history.
For example, Dunsmuir. Robert Dunsmuir,
after .whom the street is named, was the first
mining baron of B.C. He received a grant of coal
rights to 1,000 acres of land from a subsidiary of
the Hudson's Bay Company as gratitude for his
loyalty — he had refused to go on strike with his
fellow miners. When operating his own mines,
Dunsmuir stopped food supplies, closed
company stores, imported scabs and used
government troops against miners rather than
negotiate with them.
When native people in Vancouver use
Powell and Abbott as street markers they keep
alive the memory of Dr. I. W. Powell, the first
superintendent of Indian Affairs in B.C., and H.
B. Abbott, the general superintendent of the
CPR who aided in the transport of government
troops to suppress the Riel rebellion. When
unemployed youth in Vancouver talk of Beatty
Street they commemorate A. M. Beatty, a
Vancouver real estate agent and land auctioneer.
In fact many of the streets of present day
Vancouver were first surveyed and named by the
largest landowner, the CPR. In memory of L. A.
Hamilton, the land commissioner of the CPR
who did the survey and naming, we have
Hamilton Street.
In our own lifetime we see how names can
divert attention from the actual way in which
property and wealth is accumulated and thereby
turn our legitimate anger into submissive
gratitude. The Vancouver aquarium and the
Vancouver planetarium both have plaques
dedicated to H. H. MacMillan, a man who is
enormously wealthy not because he was born
under a lucky star but because he paid low
wages to fishermen and loggers to risk their lives
for products that he could sell at high profit.
And his partner, Prentice Bloedel, who also
destroys the forests of B.C. for his own profit,
wants us and our children to remember him as
the man who built the elaborate hothouse to
preserve and grow tropical trees and plants on
top of Queen Elizabeth Park.
Dunsmuir, Hamilton, Beatty, MacMillan,
Bloedel — these are members of the ruling class
and their names perpetuate the history of that
class. But there are no streets or buildings in
memory of Arthur Evans who organized and led
unemployed workers in Vancouver and the relief
camps of B.C. during the depression. There are
no streets or buildings in memory of Albert
Goodwin, an organizer of mine, mill and smelter
workers who was shot in the back and murdered
by police, an act that provoked the first general
strike in Canada. There is no Gutteridge street
for Helena Gutteridge, a suffragette and
organizer of B.C. working women. Evans,
Goodwin, Gutteridge — these are members of
the working class and their names perpetuate the
history of that class.
Yesterday and today the power to own is
the power to name, part of the on-going colonial
administration of the mind. The power to
rename is part of the fundamental struggle for
liberation, the struggle of people everywhere to
exercise full control over their own lives for the
benefit of all and no longer for the profit of a
few. Friday, October 2,  1970
THE       U BYSSEY
Page 17
where to get it
The main presentation will be in the SUB ballroom from 12:30 to
1:30 p.m. On the same clay starting at 7 p.m. in the SUB Clubs' Lounge
there will be a continuation of the afternoon presentation and
discussion. As the Ubyssey will carry a feature story once a week
outlining the main argument of each up-coming presentation, those
who miss the live noon-hour performance can still participate fully in
the evening discussion.
* *  *
This is not a lecture series. Street theatre, music, slides and
speaking voice will be used. You won't mistake either the medium or
the message for what you get in lectures.
# *  *
This program is sponsored by the AMS and produced by the
Community Educational and Research Centre (CERC).
Part I: Power Structure of B.C.
October 7 Educational system
October 14 Media
October 21 Political system
October 28 Economy
Part II: Vancouver City
November 3    Real estate & retail interests
November 4   Courts and police
November 11 Tenants' struggles
Nov. 18     Welfare & unemployed struggles
November 25   Youth struggles
Part III: Racism (January)
Part IV: Labour Movement (Feb.)
# * #
Normally those who do research consider themselves 'experts'
and they look down on ordinary people who they consider to be
'ignorant'. These experts are hired by the rich and powerful to solve
problems for the rich and powerful. Ordinary people are denied
research and educational facilities that are concerned with their
problems. The goal of CERC is to create such facilities for the people of
Vancouver and B.C. This involves speaking and writing in clear and
understandable language. This involves attacking the myth that only
'experts' can solve problems and building instead respect for genuine
skills by showing how people themselves can master these skills. Above
all, in research and discussion, as in action, CERC strives to involve
directly the people concerned — for only in this way can they truly gain
control over all aspects of their lives.
#  *  *
Community Educational and Research Centre is at 509 Carrall St.
Phone: 683-2630.
Hours: Mon. to Fri.: 1-5 and 7-9. Page   18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
French    speaking    meeting    in    International   House   at   noon.
PRE SOCIAL   WORK   CLUB
All  welcome  to first meeting  in   SUB
105B at  12:30.
FLYING   CLUB
General meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
'tween
classes
v.c.F.
Gordon Stewart's "The Christian
Student and the University" at noon
in  SUB 207-209.
COMPUTER   SOCIETY
V'ern Dettmiler speaks on "The UBC
Duplex 360/67 System" at noon in
Chem. 250.
FILMSOC
Burt  Lancaster   in   "Castle   Keep"   tonight and Sat.  at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and
Sun.   at  7  p.m.   SUB  theatre.
UBC NDP
Interested people welcome to general
meeting  in   SUB  211   at   noon.
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and  Dinner Jackets
Black  and Colored
Flare  or  Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
■^VCJ&Z *mij£    /.on dosi    YT/71 fs
/*■*•
I/o
.JC
^r
FULL GOSPEL
and
CHARISMATIC
TYPE STUDENTS
are invited to a
GET-ACQUAINTED
EVENING
Mon. 7:00 P.M. Oct. 5
5611 HEATHER ST.
(Oak ridge)
Yes, Bring a Friend
For Information
Ken (UBC) 433-1788
Dave (SFU) 291-3180
321-1833
Bernice Gerard
266-9275 Chaplain
English 200
Mtvns to
THE GEORGIA
OCT. 19th
PHRATERES
All    Phi   and    Pledge   sign-up.    Buch.
104 at noon.
JUDO  CLUB
All welcome to general meeting in
SUB 213 at noon.
SATURDAY
SKYDIVING   CLUB
All interested are invited to a dance
in SUB party room from  9 till  1.
v.o.c.
Long hike party to Hollyhurn Mtn.
Buses leave STUB loop at 7:45 a.m.
Tickets in V.O.C. cluhroom Friday
noon.
MONDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Orientation meeting and film "Holiday
in Latin America" at 12:30 in Int.
House.
Anthropology 200
Moves to
THE GEORGIA
OCT. 19th
FIRST OR SECOND YEAR ???
Opportunities exist to become
an OFFICER in, the Vancouver
NAVAL   RESERVE
in the ROUTP programme in
HMCS Discovery.   For more
information, come to HMCS
Discovery, Stanley Park,    on
Tuesday from 7:30 to 9:00pm.
v,,veV°u' F     «•*■ quitter-      •
4
2136 Western Park Way     224-70'
UNIVERSITY
SHELL SERVICE
PETER LISSACK
(VOJLVO)
WHAT
Repairs and Service
Specialists
Specializing in
Electronic Tune-Ups
Disc Brakes — Exhaust Control
/ 7 Years in This Location
4314 W. 10 Ave. 224-0828
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
Now, we also have Delivery Service
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
CUSO
Returned    volunteers   will   be    at   an
open coffee party in the upper lounge
of  the  Int.   House  from   7:30  to   10:30
p.m.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Meeting   to   organize   training   classes.
All members  meet  in  SUB 207-209 at
noon.
HELLENIC    CULTURAL    SOCIETY
General  meeting  at   7:30  p.m.   in   Int.
House.   Dance   follows.
UBC   KARATE   CLUB
New   people   welcome   to   meeting   in
SUB  ballroom  at 7:00 p.m.
VARSITY   DeMOLAY
Meeting  in  SUB   215  at  noon
ENGLISH    DEPARTMENT
Professor   Hermann   Palsson   lectures
on  "Aspects  of   the   Icelandic   Sagas"
in Buch. 104 at noon.
TUESDAY
UBC    LIBERAL   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 209 at noon.
GERMAN   CLUB
Free coffee and doughnuts for everyone in Int. House  400 at  noon.
UBC    ANTI-WAR   COMMITTEE
Zane Boyd speaks on "The Canadian
Anti-War Movement" in SUB 211 at
noon.
SAILING   CLUB
General   meeting   and   slide   show   at
noon in Buch.   104.
UBC   PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE    CLUB
Meeting in SUB 207.
URBAN   LAND   ECONOMICS   CLUB
Ken   Brim   from    the   Pacific   Center
Development in SUB 211  at 8:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
UBC   TEAM   CLUB
The Electors Action Movement. New
members are welcome to hear Aid*
Walter Hardwick at 12:30 in SUB 215.
MISCELLANEOUS
THUNDERBIRD   SKI    CLUB
Dryland ski conditioning program for
all skiers. Every Tues. and Thurs. at
6:30 and Sat. at 1 p.m. in the apparatus gym in the bottom floor of
Memorial Gym.
LEGAL   AID
Every Mon.. Wed., and Fri. at noon
in SUB 228 and 232.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 Lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Office. STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
D A N C E AT INTERNATIONAL
House, U.B.C. Sat. Oct. 3 — Live
Rock  band.  Refreshments.
Greetings
12
TO SHARE A PERSONAL. INSPIR-
ation or problem tune in Radio
CJOR 600, Sundays 0:15-10:00 a.m.
and 11:30 p.m.-1:00. Or drop in and
chat with Sunday Line Moderator
Chaplain Bernice Gerard Wednesdays at the Lutheran Student
Center, Tuesdays — Chaplain's Office, S.U.B. For appointment call
266-9275.
Lost & Found
13
LOST RING OP KEYS CAR, UBC
House Keys. Reward. Contact
Prank Chen, Eng. Building No. 13.
POUND — WILL THE STUDENT
who sharpened pencils in the Bindery Dept. — Library last Friday
pick  up  the  book  left  behind.
Rides & Car Pools
14
HAVE YOU EVER DRIVEN A
piano? Experienced gentle driver
needed to take small van to Toronto October 6 — Expenses paid.
Contact Burke Taylor,  687-4201.
RIDERS WANTED ANYWHERE
close to and along Broadway ask
for Florence.   254-3883.
ROOM FOR PASS. PROM KERR1S-
dale for 8:30 classes, leave 3:30
every day 'cept Thursday. Phone
Sue,   261-8476.
Special Notices
15
THIS WEEKEND, A GOOD FILM
in a good theatre "Castle Keep"
with Burt Lancaster Fri. & Sat.
7:00, !):30; Sun. 7:00. AMS 50c.
Non-AMS   75c.   SUB  Theatre.
REDUCED PRICES ON HAIR-
shaping and jetstyling at U.B.C.
Barbers  (in  the   Village).
JOIN A BAND!!! SENIOR BAND
has openings for interested players. Meets Sundays 2 hrs. Marpole
Center. For more info, phone Mary
738-0063.
A N Y t) N E      WITNESSING     THE
Tues.   morning   accident   between
green    Beaumont    and   small   blue
car at lOtli and Alma, please con-
 tact  Woody or  Ron  at  224-9691.
IN 80 COUNTRIES" — 7,000,000
speakers. Join them. Loarn Esperanto for peace. Box 32 SUB.
CAROLYN:   CALL  US.  FRED  AND
Nina.   876-7695
ST. ANSF.LM'S THRIFT SALE —
Sat., Oct. 3, 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.,
University Hill United Church,
5375  University  Blvd.
REMINDER— CANADA STUDENT
Loans. To maintain interest free
status on previous loans, Confirmation of Enrolment. Schedule
2 must be completed and delivered
to the Bank prior to 30th November 1970. Not required if you
have already obtained a new loan.
Courtesy, Rank of Montreal, SUB.
Travel  Opportunities 16
LONDON    RETURN    $199
also   other   destinations   —   1-ways.
687-1244   —   224-0087
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, (187-2855 or 224-0087. 106-70!)
Dunsmuir  St.   Mon. - Sat.,   9-9.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
T.V. SET WANTED (CHEAP). PH.
733-57S6 — also — Stereo tape deck
for car  (S or 12  track).
Automobiles For Sale
21
1961 VW". TESTED. GOOD SHAPE.
85,000 miles, new clutch, muffler,
battery.   Call   Dave   278-2770
1962   AT'STTN  MINT.   GOOD   MECH-
anically S250 or offer. Jim. 73S-3966
1957 VOLKSWAGON IN GOOD
condition, $200. 60,000 mi. Phone
988-8388,   evenings.
MUST   GO   TO   HIGHEST   OFFER:
'60   Alpine   '63.   motor  trans,   w.w.
 O/D.   Excel,   cond.   John,   299-2976
'65 RAMBLER 220, STEREO~TAPE
deck. New trans., good tires, plus
snow  tiros.   JS50.   Ph.   263-9609
'«1 VW 22.000 MI. ON REBUILT
engine. Good mech. condition, $325.
433-6771
'67 AUSTTN S50, 41,000 MILES. Al
condition thru-out. Phone 277-6192
after five.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED:   FIAT   124 SPYDER  OR
late model Triumph (TR 6-250) in
good condition. Will pay cash. Ph.
731-3706
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS
TO
VOLVO, MERCEDES
PORCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
Factory trained mechanics
Fully Guaranteed Work
Reasonable Rates
Motorcycles
25
1968 YAMAHA TWIN SCRAMBLER
180 cc's with two helmets, $395.
Ph. 731-7971. Sony 250A Stereo
Tap* deck,  $110.  Ph.   731-7371
SUZUKI 80 FOR SALE — EXCEL-
lent condition. Helmet. Ph. Ann,
228-3089  during  the  day,   $120.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
CREATIVE PRP: - SCHOOLERS'
day care. Play, paint areas, outings, Kitsilano primary teacher.
Phone 733-2184.
CREATIVE GRAPHICS — UNIQUE
poster and display artwork; precision publication and scientific
graphics: photography. John, 224-
4146. 	
Scandals 37^
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND
guys: free 9000 word essay on Vancouver gay life from graduate student 22, Box 8969, Station H, Vancouver 5. Phone 683-4864. Over 750
copies sent already.
CAN BURT LANCASTER KEEP
the Castle? Find out in "Castle
Keep" Fri., Sat., Sun. in SUB
Theatre. Still the cheapest, always
the best!
38
Sewing & Alterations
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
PAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter, my home.
325-2934.
ON - CAMPUS TYPING, PAST,
Accurate, All types of theses, texts,
essays.   IBM  Electric,   224-9183.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home: essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche  — 437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
51
Help Wanted	
GUITARIST WANTED: ELECTRIC,
own equipment and willing to
work at joining present group.
Lee or Al,  872-7301
FRIENDLY OUTGOING GIRLS TO
sell flowers evenings. Can choose
hours. Commission. $10.00 to $20.00
for evening. Phone now, 684-2618.
Car is asset but not necessary.
TIME IN — TIME OUT NEEDS
volunteers. Help run a free community children's program, 7-9
p.m. Alternate Fridays. Begins
October 2. Come with ideas to 1811
West 16th or telephone evenings,
261-1867.
S W STUDENT NEEDS BABY-
sitter foi> one infant Mon., Wedn.
and  Thurs.   Urgent,   738-1587.
TOPLESS  DANCERS  NEEDED
Two   References   Required
One on  Each   Side
GULP CLUB
48  E. Hastings
Interviews from 10:30 p.m.     684-3838
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
LESSONS   IN   PIANO,   CLARINET,
Recorder, Helena Sandler (B.Mus.)
McGill in your home. Call 684-3587.
Special Classes
63
CHINESE   MARTIAL   ARTS
(Kung Foo)  — Self-defence  lessons.
Ancient   meditation   for   tension   relief.   Chinese   studies/languages.
For   inquiries    phone   872-1106
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
PRE-SALE TICKETS - 75c
at the Bookstore and
AMS   Publications   Office
TRAYNOR   HEAD   AND   CABINET -
with  two 15"   speakers.  Also  elec.
guitar,   $50;   Shure   mikes,   cheap.
Jacques,   228-9325.
MENS SUITS AND JACKETS
sizes 40 to 41. Top quality, inexpensive. 736-9387.
SONY 350 3-HD TAPE DECK $140;
AM/FM component stereo phono
& speakers,   $140.   738-0994.
PRAKTICA   NOVA    CAMERA   FOR
sale. Just ovehauled Kits Cameras.
Lens 2.8, Auto Tessar $75. 224-0670 ,.
9-11 p.m.
SKIS: 1 PAIR ALLAIS MAJOR 215
cm Nevada binding 1 yr. old. $130;
1 pair Fischer metals 195 cm Solomon binding $75; Men's double
breasted leather coat. Size 38. $60.
224-0942 or 926-4789.
E FLAT CLARINET $5Q.. SKI
boots, press size 11. $55. Ski poles,
$10. All excellent quality and condition. See at old Extension Annex.
Room B3.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
VERY SPACIOUS SUNNY ROOM
on main UBC bus route. All house
facilities.  738-1376 or 224-1705.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS, $50. KIT-
chen privileges, large lounge and
TV room. Linen changed weekly.
Ample parking. Phone Bill Dins-
more, 224-4530, or 224-9660, or
come  to  5760  Toronto Road.
UPSTAIRS SLEEPING ROOM.
Private bathroom, 224-7471. D.
Morris,  4307  W.   13th Ave.
ROOM FOR RENT AT U.B.C.
gates. Pleasant and clean. Phone
224-0196.
Room &  Board
82
W ANTED ROOM, BOARD —
Mother, two year old. Exchange
for babysiting evenings plus $30.00.
Preferably near Byng School.
Have babysitter. 261-7603 after 6.
Ask for Marsha.
MEN
Room  &  Board  avail,  at  the D.U.
House! Convenient, reasonable,
and the best food on Campus!
Phone the house manager at
224-9841 or drop by at 5780 Toronto Rd.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MEN ON
Campus. 2270 Wesbrook Cresc.
224-9866.
Furnished Apts.
83
FIRST YEAR TEACHER WANTS
3rd or 4th year girl to share
apartment. Furnished. $65 month.
Phone  731-1540.
FURN. SUITE WITH KITCHEN-
ette for male student — 3157 W.
7 Ave. 733-8942. $75. Clean and
quiet.
Unfurnished Apts.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
_11
86
3-REDRM. HOI'SE WITH COT-
tage on Mj-acre in Ladner. Room
and Board $75/month or share expenses. Need two people. Oct. 15.
946-6371. Friday, October 2, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
SPORTS
Athletic Notices
^^.'^km^a^^i^S^'iS' -keith dunbar photo
RUNNING FOR THEIR LIVES was an activity that many of the Birds engaged in at Thunderbird
Stadium yesterday. The final score showed that the Manitoba Bisons had crucified the Birds 46-2.
Here, UBC quarterback Chris Balzer (22) casts a weary look at Manitoba's Jim Fildey while Fred Maier
(61) looks on.
Birds remain in cellar
By DON GARDNER
UBC football coach, Frank
Gnup said before the Manitoba
game that if his team didn't play
well they'd be beaten by 40
points.
He proved to be more
successful as a prophet than as a
football coach, as the University
of Manitoba Bisons completely
dominated his team in rolling up a
46-2 victory.
This loss allowed the Birds to
maintain their strengthening hold
on last place in the conference.
A crowd of about 2,000
witnessed the contest, (perhaps it
would be more accurate to 1,000,
as almost everyone left at halftime
with Manitoba holding a 28-0
edge).
Manitoba displayed an
overpowering offence in rambling
for a total of 400 yards. They
were led by their very capable
quarterback, Bob Kraemer, who
completed 17 of 32 passes for 232
yards and three touchdowns. His
favorite receiver was Henry
Lodewyks who caught five passes
for 133 yards and two
touchdowns.
Lodewyks was also the favorite
receiver of the Birds quarterbacks,
as he intercepted two passes for
eight yards.
UBC's offence reached an
all-time low as even their defence
managed to outscore them. The
team's only points came when a
bad snap from the Manitoba
center allowed their punter to be
caught for a safety touch.
It was the same old story for
the Birds. They couldn't pass, and
they couldn't run inside or
outside as they ran into a virtual
nine-man line.
They managed only seven first
downs and a total offence of 120
yards: 78 running, and 42 passing
Chris Balzer started at
quarterback and was relieved by
Glen Hara and then Al Larson.
None of them was very sucessful,
but the quarterbacks are only part
of the game.
The Birds' cornerbacks got
burned on numerous occasions.
Three times halfback-option
passes by Dennis Hrycaiko were
completed over their heads, two
for touchdowns.
The Birds next game is October
10 when they host the University
of Saskatchewan.
Grapple rs
Students that desire to learn
the sport of Olympic Free Style
wrestling are invited to turn out to
the T'Birds Wrestling Team
workouts held at Thunderbird
Football Stadium Wrestling Room
on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays from 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.
There is a dire need of
Heavyweights over 190 lbs. and
up to 300 lbs.
First meet of this season will
be held on Nov. 21.
Rugger men
post 1st win
The Thunderbird rugby team
started the season off on a
winning note last Saturday
defeating the Vancouver Red lions
in a lopsided score, 51-8.
Scrummers Drew Rose, Bob
Jackson, and Garth Hendrickson
combined for six tries. From the
three-quarter line, Doug Shick,
John Mitchell, Barry Leigh, and
Spence McTavish added seven
more.
Mitchell kicked a goal and Ray
Banks added two more goals and
one convert.
This weekend will provide a
truer test for this year's team. The
Thunderbirds and the Braves play
at Brockton Oval, Stanley Park at
1:15 and 2:15, respectively.
Get
Squashed!
There is a new plan in the
works to promote the game of
squash for junior boys. The plan
involves a series of teaching,
coaching and playing sessions
which will take place at the UBC
Sports Centre.
Any boy under the age of 19
can register for the course at the
Vancouver Racquets Club, 33rd
and Ontario, Saturday October
3rd at 11:00 a.m.
For further information, phone
Ed Berwick, 926-4164 after 6:00
p.m.
Intramurals
The event is UBC's FIRST
ANNUAL TURKEY TROT,
or otherwise known as the
cross country race. Two
turkeys are being given away
for first and second place. To
facilitate the turkey trot the
date of competition has been
moved up to the Thursday
before Thanksgiving, Oct.
8th. Please take note that the
registration deadline has been
moved up to Oct. 7th.
JUNIOR HOCKEY
TONIGHT 8:30
Vancouver Centennials
vs.
Victoria Cougars
at
KERRISDALE ARENA
Advance Tickets Available
at Thunderbird Arena
Students $1.00
Mon., Oct. 5, 8:00 vs Chiiliwack
SKI
Instructors' Training Course
at
GARIBALDI'S WHISTLER MTN.
Sats. and/or Sundays    Oct. 10th — Nov. 15th
Any parallel skier can Join - Instructors jobs available
for information phone:
JIM McCONKEY, General Del., Alta Lake B.C.
932-5422 or 926-1034
Could you take charge in
one of oup operations?
After you've earned your commission on
the Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP),
we think you could. We'll give you a tactical
military training. And ROTP will give you a
University education leading to a degree
in Engineering. Sciences. Or Arts. So when
you graduate you'll be ready to step into a
position of responsibility. Ready to take
charge.
Contact your Military Career Counsellor
about ROTP.
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
t        545 Seymour St., Vancouver
^   THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
Fill in and return this coupon or phone today. No obligation. No salesman will call.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
MAIL THIS   COUPON   FOR  OUR  LOW  RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Residence
Address   ....
(Please Print)
Occupation     — — -
Phone: Home   Office 	
City      Prov.
Age  :    Male n   Female □
Married O    Single Q
Date first licensed to drive       	
Give number and dates of accident in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, t/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)'
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in   last   5   years.
Car No. 1
Car No. 2
Yes □ NO □
Yes Q No P
Are you now insured? 	
Date current policy expires
This   coupon   is   designed   solely   to   enable   non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% ol Use
#1
#2
%
%
%
%
%
%
FBR UBC7
INSURANCE   COMPANY
n
□
o
a
c\
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2,  1970
SSifc, *S 4fiap.
SEA OF STUDENTS listens Tuesday noon to former grad student president Art Smolensky speak against use of SUB as youth hostel.
X-Kalay course on therapy to be taught here
-dave enns photo
By AMARJEET RATTAN
X-Kalay is bringing its message to the UBC campus.
The X-Kalay Society will offer a full-scale, non-credit
course   —   taught   by   X-Kalay   members   themselves  —
through the UBC centre for continung education.
"X-Kay is pretty much isolated from the general
community and this course will provide an interaction
between X-Kalay members and the public," said Henry
Rosenthal, head of the social sciences division of the
centre.
The eight-week course will be taught by X-Kalay
executive     director    David    Berner    and    education
department head Luis Molina. The course begins Oct. 13
at a cost of $10 for students and $15 for non-students.
Called "X-Kalay: "The Dynamic of Change in Life",
the course will consist of one lecture a week and is
designed to give students an insight to the therapy
program used at X-Kalay.
There are 38 X-Kalay members now living in a frat
house on campus and in order to continue living here they
must be qualified students, Rosenthal said. They must be
enrolled in some type of educational course.
"This course will fulfill the legal requirements of
X-Kalay members on campus," Rosenthal said "but it is
more than an administrative device to get around this rule.
"It will be of great educational value to X-Kalay
members and also to students who take it."
X-Kalay was started in 1967 when some Indian
inmates at the B.C. Penitentiary started a half-way house
for ex-convicts. Today the membership ranges from
ex-cons, hippies, businessmen, residential students to
housewives, Molina said.
"X-Kalay forms an educational community with
emphasis on growth and co-operation of members, not
competition," said Molina.
"In offering this course, our purpose is not to turn
our members into university students because that's a lot
of crap. We want more participation of the student body
with us."
ORIGINAL
BRITISH
DUFFLE
COATS
by GREENGATE
Suppliers to British Navy
Men's Sizes - S, M, L, XL
Women's Sizes - 10-12-14
Wright Mariner
SUPPLY LTD.
1869 W. Georgia
MU 2-3788
1 Block East at Stanley Park
WORLD
WIDE
TRAVEL
YOUR OFFICIAL TRAVEL AGENTS
ON THE CAMPUS
FOR ALL
YOUR TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS
AMERICAN EXPRESS REPRESENTATIVE
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
CHESTER-ANGUS RAMSG00D
A Van-Made 16mm Color Feature
Starts Mon. thru Fri
Tues. Wed., Thurs.
12:30-3:30
7:30-9:00
Rush Tickets-$1 M-SUB Aud.

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