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The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1970

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Array The Ubyssey has decided to take a holiday Monday and
therefore there will be no paper Tuesday. In taking this totally
unilateral vacation, the Ubyssey urges all students to do the
dame. Incidentally, Monday is Thanksgiving Day.
—david bowerman photo
WINTER RAINS have once again soggied the elysian fields of the campus and the hordes of romantics
have been driven from the green lawns to seek refuge in the sterile but dry architecture. This cozy couple
seems to have finally found a use for the belltower.
AMS endorses
feasibility study
of student loans
The Alma Mater Society may end up in the student loan business.
The AMS External Affairs office has endorsed a feasibility study
of an entirely student-financed loan program which is expected to be
finished next spring. The studywill be carried out by two
commerce students under the supervision of commerce prof Dr.
Whatarangi Winiata.
Both students will receive term credits for the study.
External affairs officer John Zaozirny said the study could result
in a student-run plan, which could help students who didn't qualify
under the Canada Student Loan Plan.
Currently, a student's loan application may be refused if his
parents' income exceeds a certain level. "And it doesn't matter whether
or not your parents will give you money," Zaozirny said.
A student is eligible for a loan, regardless of his parents' income,
only if he has completed four years of post-secondary education, or if
he is at least 21 and has completed one year.
Zaozirny said the feasibility study would attempt to come up with
a plan to alleviate pressures on the students who has little money of his
own, doesn't qualify for a Canada Student Loan, and has parents who
refuse to offer financial aid.
Under such a plan, repayment would be based on the student's
ability to pay after he graduates, rather than a fixed percentage of his
income which the the student may not be able to afford, Zaozirny said.
The CSLP requires that loans be repaid at six percent starting six
months after the student ieaves the university.
Bob Saucier, law 2, acting as a liaison between the researchers and
the AMS said if a student-run plan was approved, it would probably be
financed by AMS funds.
"One way of financing the project would be to assess every
student an additional figure in their AMS fees which would then be
deposited in a bank account expressly for student loans," Saucier said.
"The money would then earn interest, which would be used to
grant the loans. And additional payments that students made in AMS
fees could be returned when they left UBC," Saucier said.
But details of the proposed plan depend entirely on what the two
students learn in their study, Zaozirny said.
FLQ manifesto answers threats with bombs
The following is a translated version of the
manifesto of the Front de Liberation du Quebec.
Written in May, 1970, it was discovered among
captured FLQ documents by police last August.
The publication of the manifesto is one of the
demands made by the kidnappers of British attache
James Cross in return for his safe release.
To our knowledge, this is the first time this
document has been published in full in
English-speaking Canada.
OBJECTIVES
• We want to answer the challenge of the
status quo. We want to answer the challenge of the
businessmen who believe they can maintain the
current political and economic system by sowing the
fear of change among the population.
To the threats of the Royal Trust we oppose real
bombs.
All we are doing is answering their violence with
counter-violence.
We are defending ourselves against the constant
attacks of the anti-worker, anti-Quebec forces that
make up the financial institutions, the big companies,
the   Chamber   of   Commerce,   etc.,   who   are   all
maintained      by
Trudeau-Bourassa.
the       Liberal      party      and
• We are attacking the economic organization
that use puppet politicians who speak French (like
Trudeau-Bourassa-Drapeau) to protect their interests,
and with whom the people periodically have
"■dialogue" in that phony exercise of
democracy—elections.
• We are fighting this clique of exploiters
who make up the capitalist bourgeoisie that is
dominated by Anglo-American financiers, and which
some ambition French-Canadians have been
collaborating.
• We are fighting all forms of exploitation,
the  most blatant being linguistic segregation:   the
necessity to seak two languages because we are
Quebecois. Our colonialist bosses are responsible for
this.
• We are fighting all sorts of racism,
discrimination and segregation. We are in solidarity
with all struggles being waged *y people who are
victims of American imperialism. We support the
struggle led by those first exploited on this continent,
the Indians. We are in solidarity with the American
blacks and Puerto Ricans who are fighting yankee
capitalism.
• We are with all workers who immigrated to
Quebec and with whom we want to fight our
common enemy: Anglo-American capitalism.
• While supporting all trade union struggles,
the FLQ hopes unionized workers will throw
themselves vigorously into the,, second front. As soon
possible worker's representatives must replace the
people's phony representatives in parliament. When a.
real workers party is created, the FLQ will no longer
have a reason to exist.
• The FLQ is fighting the owners of the
means of communication (moyen information) who
are trying to make us believe that the current
government serves all of society. The current
government serves only those who finance it.
We are fighting these capitalists who monopolize
all the major means of information, and who are
trying to make it seem that we are the enemies of the
people of Quebec. It is up to the free intellectuals to
denounce this monopoly of information.
To page 16: see FLQ
magmme&ssm Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 9,   1970
Students urged to leave cars at home Wednesday
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
The UBC Environmental Crisis
Operation is urging students to
leave their cars at home on
Wednesday, Survival Day.
UBC organizers of the
Canada-wide event say the object
of a car-free day on campus would
be to demonstrate student
support for the development of an
effective mass-transport system
and for a greater respect of the
environment by all levels of
government.
"This would demonstrate that
we, as individuals, are more
concerned with improving our
environment and our chances of
survival than with personal
convenience — sure it's
inconvenient, but so is dying,"
said an ECO spokesman.
ECO is a club connected with
the Animal Resource Ecology
Institute, a new graduate studies
department at UBC.
ECO secretary Bev Kitching
described her organization as a
research-activist ecology group.
"We don't aim at radicalism,
publicity, or emotionalism, but
rather at working with people
who are concerned with the facts.
"We can't expect people to act
constructively until they know
what they're acting about, so
we're trying to expand the
public's   social   conscience   and
Free U examines media
knowledge," Kitching said.
She said ECO plans to set up a
lecture series at UBC and a
speakers bureau which will visit
schools and other organizations
off campus.
Other plans include on-campus
recycling centres for newspapers,
bottles and cans and student
participation in Save Our Earth
Day on Oct. 17.
"Every ton of paper returned
to the repulping plant earns $8
and the knowledge that a ton of
recycled paper  saves   17 trees,"
Kitching said.
She also said ECO and similar
organizations "must present an
aesthetic system of values."
"When you talk about the
value of something, you can't
speak only in terms of money.
How can you evaluate anything as
intangible as flowers to look at or
birds to listen to?"
The    national    organizer    of
Survival Day, which is part of the
Survival   Week   activities,   is   the
.Canadian    Association    on    the
Human Environment.
The news is what you read in the papers, right?
Right. But the news does not necessarily
represent what really happens.
This, the relationship between what the public
reads in the papers, hears on the radio or sees on
T.V. and what really happens, will be one of the
major areas of discussion in a course on the News
Media being offered by the Vancouver Free
University.
The course will be organized and led by
working journalists from the Sun and Province,
radio, television, the underground press and the
university press.
The     course    is    not    a    writing    program.
Participants will only be expected to monitor the
various news media and be prepared to discuss their
ideas.
Class leaders will supply any needed reading
material and resource people.
People interested in finding out what really
happens behind the scenes — why a story didn't
appear, why a certain picture appeared on page one,
why CBC TV covered this event and not that one —
should write or phone the Free University, 199
West Sixth, 879-5931.
Registration fee is $5. The first class will be
held Tuesday 8 p.m. at the new Free U headquarters
in the old church at Victoria and Venables.
We still keep running into people who
don't know what Speakeasy is.
Many think that it's a saloon, a crash pad, a
front for some nefarious activity, or simply
haven't thought about it. So.this will be a final
attempt to clear up exactly who and what we
are — and why it's important that you should
know.
Speakeasy is a student-run talk and
information centre.
We don't pretend to have all the answers.
But we do have a library of booklets containing
information on legal, medical and social matters
and have researched these areas ourselves.
If we can't answer your questions we can
generally refer you to people (not institutions!)
who can. If you need a good doctor, lawyer,
dentist, plumber or poodle clipper, we could
probably help you find one.
If you have some extra time during the
week and are looking for things to do or ways
of meeting people, come over and see what we
can suggest.
Don't think you have to have a problem to
justify your dropping in. When SUB begins to
come across to you like the PNE fairgrounds,
it's sometimes nice just to sit and rap quietly
with someone.
There is someone in SUB 234 every
weekday between 11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. If
you prefer you can phone us at 228-3700.
Finally, we welcome written comments or
questions. Any questions of general interest
such as tenant rights, birth control or academic
matters will be answered in this column.
Our address is Speakeasy, Box 115 SUB. If
you drop it in one of the boxes marked campus
mail you won't need a stamp.
Don't you think that university should be
more than a place to absorb lectures, books and
your lunch?
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Mat. Sat. 1:00 p.m. Friday, October 9,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
rK"»»tSSJSM3ll  ■■■.■*'. ■-   "■■■   "' ■     -*■ ■■' *■      "  -
—keith dunbar photo
ALVIN IN WONDER-LAND breaks down in tears at the confusion of signs at the intersection of University Boulevard and Marine Drive. Maybe it would be better
if university really was a one way street
AMS squashes bail for hostel defenders
By ROBIN BURGESS
Alma Mater Society council
refused to establish a bail fund
Wednesday for Jericho residents
arrested defending the hostel.
Evert Hoogers, grad students'
association representative, asked
the council meeting to establish a
bail fund to a "maximum limit of
$20,000" for residents and
students arrested "defending the
right of the residents of Jericho
hostel to remain in their building
until a permanent hostel is
established."
Council members voted 16 to 9
against the motion.
Before the presentation of the
motion, acting vice-president
Christine Krawczyk had said there
are rumors of a "bust" at Jericho
over the weekend.
Council was told that residents
who refuse to leave may be
arrested for trespassing.
"These people are tired of
being herded around like cattle.
They want to stay," said
Krawczyk.
Said Hoogers:
"Jericho is the only place
they've got and by God they
should be allowed to keep it."
Bruce Curtis, a member of the
audience who was involved in the
attempt to house the Jericho
residents in SUB said that by
setting up a bail fund council
would merely be giving the
residents "the right to a fair trial."
"If they're in jail three months
or three days it doesn't really
matter. It's not a nice place to be
for any length of time," Curtis
said.
In reply to a council member
who said the issue had already
been rejected by students, grad
student president David Mole
said:
"I don't think the opinion of
the great unwashed out there has
got anything to do with the great
Rightness of this motion."
External affairs officer John
Zaozirny said he was "not sure"
helping the Jericho residents
remain together as a community
was good for them.
"I think a lot of these peole
need help as individuals," he said.
The meeting was told that
X-Kalay, a rehabilatitive society
for ex-convicts and their families,
has also become involved in the
Jericho situation.
X-Kalay representative Lou
Molina said the society has been
given "in the neighbourhood of
$10,000     to     take     on     the
responsibility of setting up a
permanent hostel for the Jericho
residents.
"We've been contacted by a
financier who said: 'Here's some
money, find those kids a place to
live.'"
As of Wednesday night
X-Kalay has had no luck finding a
building for a permanent hostel
but the members are confident
they will find a place soon, said
Molina.
When questioned he said, the
hostel will not be "a community
subsidiary of X-Kalay".
The only rules imposed will be
no violence and no intoxicants on
the premises, he said.
Hoogers asked what plans
X-Kalay has made in the event the
Jericho residents are forcibly
evicted this weekend.
"There are plans underway so
these people will not be homeless.
But I can't answer you. They are
not concrete plans," said Molina.
Government playing games
with remaining hostel youth
Students seek mediation
TORONTO (CUP) - About 120 Laurentian University students
demonstrated in front of the provincial legislature here Tuesday as the
week long faculty boycott of the Sudbury campus neared its end.
A three man delegation headed by student council president Vic
Cormier asked education minister William Davis to establish a board of
"impartial people in the educational field" to intervene in the dispute
with the board of governors.
A university senate motion on Sept. 28 called for the suspension
of classes for one week, and the teaching staff began the boycott on
Sept. 30.
The senate has called for "a removal of the executive committee
(of the board of governors) and the appointment of a new executive
committee with limited powers of recommendation with membership
to include faculty and students."
The board has rejected the demands and labels the boycott illegal.
-The feud with the senate developed early last spring over a wage dispute
and senate unhappiness with the firing of administration president
Stanley Mullins.
Cormier said the decision to approach Davis was made beacuse
"we've reached an impasse. There's not much hope of any solution
being reached without help from somewhere."
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Power and water were turned off at Jericho
hostel about 9 a.m. Thursday—then turned back on
shortly after 3 p.m.
Captain W. N. Granger, spokesman for the
armed forces said he received a written request from
T. E. Jackson, the federal government representative
in Vancouver, to turn off the power and water.
"Later in the day we received another request
from Mr. Jackson to turn them back on, and we did
so around 3 o'clock," he said.
Jackson was unavailable for comment.
While power and water were off some of the
hostel staff called a general meeting to inform those
staying at the hostel of what was happening as far as
they knew.
Residents were asked not to use the
washrooms, but instead to build out-houses.
They were also told at this time that milk
would be rationed and that they would each receive
half a cup.
Staff members asked the residents to "stay
cool" and not to "hassle" either the people from
the press who were roaming through the building,
nor the army personnel staying on base next to
them.
Within an hour of the general meeting an
out-house was built, and the youths were telling
each other to stay away from the "cans", and to
"play it cool".
In the afternoon, Denny Robideau, one of the
hostel directors, called the health department to
complain about the health hazard created by
turning off the water in a building that had 300
people staying in it.
Both the power and water were shortly turned
back on.
"When Denny phoned the health department
and told them what was happening they got pretty
upset," said Gordie Mullins, another director.
"I guess they must thave put the pressure on
Jackson to turn the power and water back on," said
Mullins.
"They are just playing games with us. They
aren't telling us anything that they are doing," said
Mullins referring to the government officials.
At last count there were approximately 300
residents still at the hostel, Mullins said.
No one knows what will happen next.
"We are living this thing from day to day. It's
all that we can do," said a young hostel resident.
Mitchell in
John Mitchell, education 4, has been elected
new Alma Mater Society vice-president.
Mitchell received 995 votes in Thursday's
election. His only opponent, Kelvin Beckett, arts 4,
received 422 votes.
A total of 1,511 students turned out to cast
their ballots. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9,  1970
WS UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 9, 1970
AMS keeps running
Accomplishments of this year's Alma Mater
Society council have been few and far between, but
they have rewritten and added new dimension to one
hackneyed old maxim.
Where the AMS is concerned, the phrase "once
bitten, twice shy" now reads "once bitten, run like
hell".
Two weeks ago, the AMS ran into some
unexpected opposition to its SUB hostel proposal and
immediately shattered all existing records for freestyle
waffling.
Since then, council has been working as hard as
possible to pretend that Jericho hostel and the people in
it don't exist.
The highlights of council's clever ostrich imitation
came Wednesday night, when they rejected a motion to
establish a bail fund for Jericho residents who may be
arrested if and when he hostel is forcibly cleared.
Unlike the commendable but ill-fated proposal to
house transients in SUB, an AMS bail fund would have
inconvenienced no one. It would have not resulted in
any large expenditure of student funds — the money
would have been returned to the AMS when the people
arrested were tried.
It would not even have implied strong AMS
support for the people in Jericho — even a wife beater,
mother-stabber or father-raper is given the right of bail.
The proposal for a bail fund would only have
helped guarantee what is supposed to be a fundamental
legal right.
If arrests are made at Jericho, many of the victims
will have to wait three months or more before they
finally come to trail.
If they don't have bail money, they will have to
spend that time in jail, deprived of the opportunity to
obtain adequate legal help and prepare a proper defence.
If no other agency comes forward with a bail fund,
the AMS will then be able to make the proud claim that
it helped deny a group of people access to a fair trial.
Does the AMS care? Not likely.
All the AMS cares about is the fact it has
successfully avoided taking a stand, as uncomplicated a
stand as it may have been.
Like almost every council in recent years, this one
was elected amid fine sounding promises of relevance
and involvement. Like all those other councils, h has
now decided that it is much easier to concern itself with
petty internal politics, fritter away its time on yet
another set of esoteric constitutional revisions and keep
the day to day bureaucratic wheels turning.
Well boys and girls, don't let us keep you from
having fun at your little sandpile game, but please don't
try selling us any more crap about your being a student
government.
Editor: Nate Smith
News    Maurice Bridge
City     John Gibbs
Wire        John Andersen
Sports    Scott McCloy
Ass't City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Managing          Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Maurice's dead typewriter wrote
this masthead. Everybody else was
drunk. I Just came down from on high—
where I've been since I was murdered
— to help celebrate Nate's 21st
birthday. I brought some wine, rum
and a little rye to help celebrate.
But the blorgs drank it all and I
had to put the paper out.
Cavorting about on the floor
were:
Jan O'Brien, Sandy Kass, Nettie
Wild, Dick Betts, Christine Krawczyk,
John Twigg, Alvin Maxwell, Bruce
Dubblestyne, Thorn Wescott, Leslie
Plommer, Ken Lassesen, Robin
Burgess, Ginny Gait and Kathy Carney.
Blubbering in the sports
department were Keith Dunbar, Don
Gardner, Bob Wicks and Josephine
Margolis.
Burping in the dark room were:
Dave Enns, Dave Bowerman, Brett
Garrett, Maureen Gans, Kevan Perrins
and Jim Gorman.
But despite all the debauchery,
lechery and general all-purpose
depravity, some things remained
eternal. Bowerman directed, produced
and starred in his classic travelling
animal show, molesting the Irish coleen
Kathleen (or is it the Irish kathleen
coleen?) The only things missing were
a few jokes exhumed from the
hereafter by Shane McCune, who was a
good boy all day (he didn't show up).
TUNV&UN'  DO\NN....
DAVIES' RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Dr. Davies gives exam
At UBC, student opinion is very important.
Therefore, it's time for the first 1970 Ubyssey
questionnaire. You are to answer the questions
truthfully and accurately, sending the results in
triplicate, along with $25 for processing, to myself,
in care of the Ubyssey office in SUB.
1. Check the one of the following which
represents the greatest intelligence:
(a) , the board of governors
(b) the Alma Mater Society
(c) the UBC senate
(d) a tin of salmon larvae
2. Which one is the most progressive figure on
campus:
(a) Malcolm McGregor
(b) Food services' Ruth Blair
(c) Housing head Les Rohringer
(d) Smokey the Bear.
3. Which is the best known at UBC:
(a) Walter Gage
(b) JoeBltzfk
(c) Harvey Keck
(d) none of the above,
4. Rate the following one to four on the
leadership scale, (one equals "I would follow him to
the ends of the earth". Two equals "he could lead
me to the promised land". Three equals "he could
take me around the world in 80 days". Four equals
"he can't even find his own way to the men's
john.")
(a) Spiro T. Hodge
(b) Spiro T. Campbell
(c) Spiro W. Gage
(d) Atilla the Hun
5. What's the best thing on campus:
(a) The Ubyssey
(b) all of the above
6. The AMS, senate, and board of governors
are:
(a) totally irrelevant
(b) absolutely ridiculous
a great argument for mercy killing
somewhat  less  significant than a cheese'
blintz
all of the above
All engineers, frat men, sorority women, and
(c)
(d)
(e)
7.
other deviants should be
(a) taken out and shot
(b) drawn and quartered
(c) tarred, feathered, and run out of town on a
rail
(d) all of the above
8. This column is:
(a) great
(b) great
(c) great
(d) other
LETTERS
Food
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In an article in your paper in
Oct. entitled "And what do you
think of campus food?" by Dan
Mulligan, it is asserted that the
report made by the committee
which I chaired "roundly
criticized Ruth Blair's food
services for general inefficiency".
I wish to take issue with that
statement.
It was the considered opinion
of the committee that we lacked
the expertise in food preparation
and management to criticize the
degree of efficiency with which
Food Services undertook to fulfil
its function. We recommended
that the Food Services committee
employ a professional consultant
to examine this problem and
make a report to that committee.
Byron Hender now has available to
him a list of such consultants and
it is my understanding that one
will shortly be hired to undertake
such a study.
I would hope that in the future
the quality of accuracy and the
reporting by The Ubyssey will
show marked improvement.
David E. Bond
Associate Professor
Economics
I acknowledge that the term
"inefficiency" was poorly chosen
to describe ALL the criticisms in
your report, although the report
did state, for example, that "the
efficiency of food services would
be greatly increased if all candy
was sold via vending machines."
In other examples the word
"inefficiency" was not used, but
was strongly implied.
Also, my apologies to Ruth
Blair, director of food services, for
inclusion of her name in the
statement you quoted. I am now
aware that the director is not
largely responsible for at least two
aspects of food services dealt with
by your committee—long-term
financing  and  accounting.—D.M.
Blood
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On Oct. 6 I picked up the
Ubyssey "n" times. On "n"
separate occasions my visual
organs were beaten insensible by
an intense crassitude. The
offending statement was Ginny
Gait's immortal "A young man,
sobbing hysterically, wants to kill
himself."
Anyone who could make such
a cheery remark without
surrounding it with details of the
excitement can only be fitly
characterized as a moral and social
hog crazed by mental receivership.
The following questions are
raised in any self respecting
Christian intellect. Did anyone
offer the child some poison for his
bowels? Had anyone the good
sense and decency to hand the
youth an acetylene torch or a
sharp chisel? Am I to believe that
none in attendance had the spirit
to assist in positive action? Gosh,
even   a   well  wielded  grapefruit
To page 5 Friday, October 9,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
From page 4
could   have   provided   adequate
results.
The most important question
is: Did he die, or is he still alive
and dealing in platitude's? In the
future Ginny, please expand on
statements of wild or
controversial nature, this way
they will never be mistaken for
lies. Right now I suggest you
repair to the SUB cafeteria to
ingest a step-ladder.
STUART FOSTER
APSC 1
To the best of our knowledge,
toithe young man in question is still
alive, at least physically. As for
the further details, we suggest that
if such ghoulish matters draw
your interest, you can always wait
for the next Boris Karloff
triple-feature at one of the local
drive-ins.—Ed.
Grad Class
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Executives for the 1971
graduating class committee will be
chosen today at noon in SUB 125.
As the engineering undergraduate
society has informed all its fourth
year members of the meeting, it is
anticipated that the majority of
those present will be engineers.
We have dominated the grad
class executive in previous years
and are willing to do so again,
which will be the case if no
interested students from other
faculties attend the meeting.
I would like to remind other
students, particularly in arts and
science, of their responsibility to
elect a representative and warn
them not to bitch about the grad
class committee if they can't be
bothered to attend the meeting.
CHRIS GREEN
president
engineering undergraduate society
nadir of their journalistic careers.
Let us hope so, anyway. It
would be deplorable if things got
any worse.
What ever happened to the
brilliant satirists who so deftly
declared the AMS to be
non-existent? Who conducted an
inquest into the death of the
universe? Who exposed illicit deals
Davies
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
So far this year, The Ubyssey
has been almost everything one
could ask of a campus newspaper.
I say "almost" because the
paper still has one glaring flaw. It
appears on your editorial page
under the title of Davies' Ravies.
Mr. Davies writes with all the
quiet charm of an Al
Fotheringham, the brilliant humor
of a Jack Wasserman and the keen
perception of a Lome Parton.
As for Davies' position as a
popular humorist, I'm sure he is
destined to rank right up there
with Adolph Hitler, Joseph Stalin
and Maggy Muggins.
How long must your readers
endure his insanity?
GEORGE KERSCHBAUM
Wot happen?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It is with a great sense of
disappointment that I have
witnessed what would appear to
be the demise of the
SINCLAIR-DICKIN REPORT. I
have noticed since the beginning
of the year a rapid decline in the
quality of these feature articles in
Page Friday.
The SINCLAIR-DICKIN
REPORT of Oct. 2 has confirmed
my belief that the authors of this
piece of writing have reached the
in international politics? Who
scooped the world's news agencies
in reporting the suspension of the
distribution of The Bomb?
Are Sinclair and Dickin alive?
If so, they're not kicking.
GRANT DICKIN
Arts 2
We couldn't agree more.—Ed.
"MR. MONDAY9'
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OPEN THURS. & FRI. TILL 9 P.M. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 9,   1970
"MR. MONDAY"
ON TUESDAY
AT 12:30
STUDENTS STREAM to the polls in Thursday's AMS vice-presidential election. Turnouts like this
ensure that the AMS will continue to represent students as a democratic institution. (See story page 3).
in the
classroom
Physics 115 student
fights back
By LESLIE PLOMMER
The Ubyssey has on several
occasions asked students to make
use of this space to write about
their own classes.
Although the following letter
isn't an original classroom report,
it is an indication of one student's
feeling about Dr. McMillan's
physics 115 class reported in this
column Tuesday:
"This article (in The Ubyssey)
could be related to a blind man's
account of the Battle of Vimy
Ridge ... by sight ... wait . ..
don't TITTER.
"Dr. MacMillan (sic) never
spoke the words 'centrifugal
acceleration,-' if this person
(PLOMMER) had been more
intent on learning something rather
than criticizing someone, he
would have discovered that this
particular lecture was about
'centripetal acceleration.'
"Also if PLOMMER had been
observant he would of (sic)
noticed that many students did
consult the Doctor after class, and
that people did talk with him
during his lecture.
"Of  all   my   lectures,   I  have
COOKY'S    Iv.bN'S
HAiRSTYLING
APPOINTMENTS - 731 47 i'
MEET ME AT
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
ENGLISH 100
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
! found that Dr. MacMillan's
lectures are the only ones where a
student finds himself in a relaxed
atmosphere.
"It is not the type of lecture
where   the   student   is  bored  to
sleep     by     some    stiff-necked,
white - collared, monotonic-voiced.
lecturer.
"In conclusion, if LESLIE
PLOMMER kept his ears and eyes
open and mouth shut, he might
hear and see things as they really
are, and as they are meant to be,
not as he wants to see them and as
he wants others to see them."
The student who wrote the
letter is in first year agricultural
sciences. His name is Hank
Blommers.
We must apologize for
mis-quoting Dr. McMillan (by the
way, learn to spell the man's
name correctly Hank old boy).
Part of the problem, as we
noted in the original article, was
the high noise level in the class,
which made McMillan hard to
hear half-way up the lecture
theatre seats.
Yes Hank, people did indeed
talk to McMillan during the
lecture,     but     they    did    not
QUESTION him which is what we
said.
Students said things like,
'could you move the screen down
— we can't see the writing at the
top,' and one student near the
front of the room made a slight
correction on one of McMillan's
formulas.
Furthermore, if McMillan's
class is the most 'relaxed' on your
schedule Hank, it only confirms
the whole science-as-factory aura
that permeates large Hebb
lectures. I don't believe I've ever
been in a class where the element
of pressure was so great.
Finally, The Ubyssey has no
desire to screw professors through
the classroom reporting series.
We do not enter a class with
this in mind. You will note that
we did make an effort to talk to
students in McMillan's class and
that we recorded their comments.
Finally, Leslie Plommer may
be spelled like a man's name, but
Leslie Plommer is not, we repeat,
NOT a man. What, which or who
this person is, we leave to your
imagination.
For the benefit of agriculture
types, however, we rule out the
major farm animals.
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pfage 2wo
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1970 DICKIN AT THE PREMIERE
I should start with the yogurt. I bought it just
before I headed out, while getting change for the
bus. My original intention had been to buy
nothing, merely get change but I thought I might
as well pick up some yogurt while I was there, and
besides, the cashier looked pretty miserable.
It wasn't until I was going over a bridge at
about thirty-seven miles per hour, that I realized
the yogurt would be warm by the time I got back
home. I decided to play it cool, and eat it in the
theatre. After all, I thought, there's no point in
buying popcorn when there's yogurt in your
pocket.
It wasn't until I had carefully chosen my seat,
(picking a spot where I could see any celebrity
who might be there, no matter where he or she
tried to hide), that I realized I was without a
spoon.
I considered a possibility, but dismissed it
when I was faced with mixing up the pineapple
with my thumb. You just don't stir your yogurt
with your thumb in polite society. I was well
aware that the social elite present at a premiere is
the politest of all society.
At this point, a rather large gentleman trod on
my toes, burped, uttered an oath, and took the
seat beside me.
"Excuse me sir," I enquired, "but do you
have a spoon I could borrow?"
"Huh?"
"A spoon. Do you have a spoon?"
"What the hell would I want a spoon for?"
"Could I borrow a spoon?"
He burped once more, and turned away.
"Dirty, filthy, long-haired freaks." he muttered.
"Perverts, all of them. Now they want sex in the
theatre. Not just on the stage. Hell. Right in the'
seats Right in the aisles."  He spat.
I was still faced with my problem. They don't
sell spoons in a theatre, I thought, so what do they
sell that I could eat my yogurt with? (I made a
mental note to remind myself that prepositions are
not good things to end a sentence with.)
Perhaps a straw? Perhaps not. I had never
tried eating yogurt through a straw, and was not
eager to attempt it in front of hundreds of people
unless I was sure it would be successful.
I reached into my pocket and felt my yogurt.
It was no longer cold. .
I   realized   I   had   to   do   something  fairly
quickly. Nobody likes warm yogurt, and I wasn't
sure it would keep. What does rotten yogurt smell
like?
As I was contemplating the lack of options
open to me, I spotted my friend S. entering. The
aisle was only about twenty feet away, and I knew
S. liked yogurt and usually carried a spoon, so the
solution was obvious
I first attracted S.'s attention.
"Hey S.," I cried. "Have some yogurt!"
It was a perfect throw, and I am sure that S.
would have caught it. If the yogurt had stayed in
the container.
It came off about half-way between the
gentleman in the purple tie and the lady in the fur.
Not one of them got a handful.
They received, respectively, an  earful, and
armful, a hatful, a lapful, a wigful, a kneeful, a
purseful, a sockful, an elbowful, a wristful, and an
eyeful of yogurt. The last fellow got the pineapple.
It was at the bottom.
I was in such a state of shock that it only took
two of them to throw me out.
The Letter Jim OLeary
I was in the midst of a happy reverie, in which
8:30s glided gracefully by, when I heard the
landlady yelling. "Hey, you got a letter!"
"Oh, God, no!", I cried, tears streaming down
my face as I bounded up and waded through the
pole of junk mail, bills and threats. "I don't
believe it!" I gasped, snatched it from her greasy
fingers and slammed the door on her eager nose.
But yes, yes, after all these years, it really was a
letter. My shaking fingers tore it open, my mind
flashing back to that last letter... she was French
and fourteen, a good year for the French. "I no
speak English too well," she had written. "Please
send five Beatle pictures (two of Paul). Love, your
penpal, Elaine."
But this was a letter. Why, it even had a
postage stamp on it. My stomach recoiled at the
thought of those red postmarked jobs. "Dear Mr.
O'Leary:" it began. Dear Mr. O'Leary! What could
one read into that? Honesty! Respect! Gratitude!
Love? My mind boggled. Yes, by God, love! I read
on. "As a junior enrolled at UBC, you can now
subscribe to TIME for only 15 cents a week." I
wept with happiness. Someone cared.
Who were these people? And why had they
singled out me for this honour? Me, of all people!
I had never been brilliant or outstanding in my
life, though God knows I always did my best. I
thought back. Had there been anybody following
me? A kindly, rotound gentleman with a twinkly
in his eye? A dark, trench-coated, secret lady? I sat
down,  expecting someone  to  leap  in  the door
singing, "Did you get my letter?" "Yes, yes!" And
we'd leap into each other's arms.
Had something gone wrong? Was there a car
somewhere, turned over, smoking in the rain, and
a solitary figure sprawled out, painfully issuing it's
last words? "Dear Mr. O'Leary:" and another soul
goes Across the Universe?
Was it all a giant hoax? Or worse still, a mere
advertisement? I examined the letter more closely.
No, by gum, it was a letter. They knew I was a
junior, they knew I was at British Columbia, they
knew my name, and they had my address. And on
top of that, there was a signature at the bottom, in
blue ink. Blue ink! It must be the real thing.
"You can now subscribe" Now? What
scientific breakthrough had permitted that? I had
read nothing in the papers. I imagined an absent
minded man with thick glasses and white smock
holding up a smouldering test-tube before a
hushed multitude of reporters saying, "Gentlemen,
you may now subscribe to TIME for only 15 cents
a week."
But wasn't there something else, a clue
somewhere? My eyes fell on the red pencil and I
shuddered. It couldn't be! It was one of those
little red pencils that are just impossible to write
with, they're so small. My fingers ached at the
memory of having used the last one for four
months and the painful trip to the jewellers to
have my fingers opened. So, I had been duped
again. TIME, you are evil. Why don't you stop
ruining people's lives and get involved in world
affairs, or something?
U.B.C.    STUDENTS
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R. W. McDonald
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Friday, October 9,   1970
THE       U BYSSEY
pfage 3hree RECOLLECTIONS OF JANIS
-by  John   Gibbs
"People seem to have a high sense of drama
about me. Maybe they can enjoy my music if they
think I'm destroying myself.
"Sure I could take better care of myself, I
could eat organic foods and get eight hours of sleep
every night, stop smoking. Things like that. Maybe it
would add a couple years to my life but what the
hell?
"I got to do this because of something inside of
me. I'm not one of those people with a learned skill.
If I'm going to do it, I'm going to do it for real. I
can't just get on stage and fake it. I've got to let
loose with whats inside.
"I don't have any idea what I'm going to be
doing in three years from now. You have to take it
one day at a time. You do what you have to do
today and you do what you have to do three years
from now.
"Hell, I'm no legend. I'm only 26. You can't be   "
a legend at 26. What else would you do with your
life? You would just have to sit around and wait for
the legend to crumble.
"It's really lonely (on tour). I live for that one -
hour on stage. It's full of feeling. It's more exciting
than you'd expect in a lifetime. It's a rush, honey."
Janis Joplin killed herself
Over the past three years, she
systematically whittled away her
life, singing the blues on stage and
living the blues in frenzied,
intense personal life.
Everybody who followed
Janis's music knows that.
Everybody kept saying it.
And Janis agreed, many times.
She spoke these particular words
to an interviewer in October,
1969 — almost exactly a year
before she was found dead last
Sunday in her Hollywood
apartment. Dead, apparently from
an overdose of some drug, at 27
years of age.
Behavioural scientists are
planning to conduct a
"psychological autopsy" to
determine whether she really
"wanted" to burn herself out.
Like thousands of her fans, I'll
be interested in what they decide.
But it really doesn't matter one
way or. the other now: JANIS IS
DEAD.
And I'll miss her. I didn't know
her, or even that much about her.
I have never owned a Janis Joplin
record. 1 saw her only once in
person and once on film. And met
her once.
But in a selfish and ignorant
way, I worshipped her. The
raunchy, grating voice with
infinite variety. The animal
presence. The sexual and
emotional joy of her performance.
The exciting knowledge that every
time she opened her mouth to
sing, she retched portions of her
body and soul: the fascinating
knowledge that she was killing
herself.
Janis Joplin was a personal
religion with me.
She became something special
the first time I was aware of
hearing one of her recordings — it
was probably in the winter of
1967 when the radio stations
started playing Big Brother and
the Holding Company music. That
was after the summer Monterey
Pop Festival, when the world first
became aware of Janis and her
band in a big way.
But my devotion - and it has
always been a frivilous, joyous
devotion — was cemented when I
saw the film of the Monterey
festival.
I talked about my love for
Janis a lot after that. My friends
were inflicted with stories of an
orgasm in the back of the Varsity
Theatre while Janis howled the
blues through a poor sound
system and rocked back and
forth, caressing a microphone, in
living color.
It became a standing joke.
People would cut down Janis in
my presence and I would oblige
with screaming defensive rhetoric.
A good time was had by all. jAnd
Janis kept singing. And dying.
But when I heard she had been
found dead, my mind went
immediately to Calgary last
summer, the time of my most
intense courtship of the Janis
Joplin legend.
It was in Calgary that I met
Janis — ever so briefly — and saw
her in concert for the fiist time.
The last time.
I was working as a reporter for
the Calgary Herald and, with two
other reporters, was assigned to
cover the Festival Express rock
festival.
The entire festival — starring
Janis,   The   Band  and   others -
travelled across the country by
train, setting up in Toronto,
Winnipeg and Calgary. (Vancouver
was replaced by Calgary because
Empire Stadium officials refused
to allow the festival on the Lions'
new artificial turf.)
As the festival date approached
I fantasized at length about an
encounter with Janis. My_ love for
her became a newsroom joke at
The Herald — a joke I nourished
regularly.
People took to walking past
my desk and saying "Janis": I
would drop my work instantly
and writhe in mock ecstacy,
shaking spasmodically with
pleasure for a few second. This
ritual was performed several times
daily as the festival approached.
The festival train arrived on a
Friday morning before the show
and, with a photographer, I was
sent to the station about 9 a.m. to
get a frothy little story for the
home edition.
The train — which included
two cars specially equipped with
electronic musical instruments
and equipment for jamming — had
stopped the night before in
Saskatoon and loaded several
hundred dollars worth of booze.
Everybody had a hangover
The photographer and I ended
up in the dining car, where most
of the musicians were nursing
their hangovers with breakfast.
Janis was there.
She was drunk. She had been
drunk all night, and hadn't been
to bed. She looked an awful mess.
Her hair was dirty, all over. She
had no makeup and her face was
blotched and smeared with tears
and sweat and booze. She looked
old at 27.
Her rumpled purple dress was
unbuttoned half-way down the
front. (And, as United Press
International felt compelled to
note in an obituary, she wore no
bra.)
Sitting behind a half-eaten
plate of ham and eggs she was
talking and laughing. Her voice
went through the same incredible
acrobatics as on stage. When she
talked, it was a growl, grumbling
and crackling. When she laughed it
was a high grating howl, with a
happy wind blowing through her
voice.
I sat down across the aisle
from Janis Joplin.
"Can I welcome you to
Calgary, Janis?"
I sat with pencil poised to
note pad.
She turned in disbelief. Then
seeing my earnest pose, she
laughed. Janis laughed and
laughed.
"Why sure ya can, honey. Sure
ya can."
"How did you enjoy the trip?"
"Outasite. It was like a big
party man and I love parties. This
train is really wild. Like
everybody played and sang. Man
its the best fucking party I've ever
been to."
I asked other trivial questions
which I now forget.
The photographer meanwhile
began adjusting his light meter for
a picture.
"Hey man, none of that. No
fucking pictures today. You just
put that fucking camera away".
We both apologized and
promised no pictures.
I asked Janis about the advance
publicity sent ahead by her pr
firm that said she would explode
on stage, reaching for the
unreachable note and drinking
herself numb. For the price of a
ticket, you might get to see her
explode on stage, it had implied.
"I didn't write that shit man."
The interview—if it could be
called that—continued. Mostly she
laughed at questions. Who is this
kid anyway?
Then, when everything seemed
to be deadly silent for just a
moment, there was a loud "click".
The photographer had been
standing behind me. He had
leaned out and taken a picture of
Janis Joplin.
"You fucking little bastards.
Goddamn it anyway. I said no
pictures."
She was on her feet screaming.
Her hands were on the half-empty
plate. She was on the verge of
tears with sheer frustration. She
had trusted these pimple-faced
little twits and they had
double-crossed her.
"Goddamn, Goddamn,
Goddamn bastards"
I   said   no fucking pictures."
The whole dining car was
watching tensely. We left.
Janis had always mistrusted
journalists. I couldn't blame her.
We—the photographer and I—were
killing Janis on behalf of Herald
readers (although that particular
picture was never published).
In my own adolescent way, I
wanted to apologize.
A press conference was
scheduled for that evening. But
she didn't show up.
pfage 4our
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1970 Instead she toured Calgary's
bars, drinking and posing for
pursuing photographers.
And at a party that night in a
hotel room she was drinking
straight tequilla-which replaced
Southern Comfort in her last
months-and sniffing white
powder.
And when several members of
different bands jammed, Janis
sang the blues.
That was Friday
The rock festival started noon
Saturday and 15,000 people were
assembled in McMahon Stadium
when the Janis Joplin Full Tilt
Boogie Band—which replaced the
Holding Company—came on stage.
I and a few of my friends were
luckier than most. We had placed
ourselves below the stage in the
press section and shared some
wine and a pipe in preparation for
the communion.
Janis came on stage and 15,000
people stood up. The applauded.
She sang the blues in the way only
Janis Joplin could sing the blues.
Applause was often replaced by
open-mouthed silence as 15,000
wondered how she could do the
things she did with her voice.
And she was drinking tequilla
straight. She drank a whole bottle
during an hour and 40 minutes on
the stage that night. She sang and
drank and left the stage four
times. Three times she came back.
JANIS
Mama, you'll be on our minds
(We don't believe it yet; we've lost too much this
piece of time
and   now you — up there  screaming through the
lights, defying life
and sound by ecstasy).
There'll be no coming down
(We could have wished your going easier, smoother
than it was
but it could not have been you —)
Bright fire living
in bright fire die
no ball and chain no more
but Mama, you'll be on our minds.
V.O.
And the multitude danced, hoping
it would go in forever.
When she was singing and
clutching the microphone she was
the real JANIS JOPLIN-A
LEGEND IN HER OWN TIME.
But the frenzied activity and the
booze were taking their toll. When
she stepped back out of the
floodlights during instrumental
sections, she wobbled. She was a
drunk girl, lost, fighting to focus
her eyes. But only those close to
stage saw it. For the rest, she was
in full control.
The concert—it was a religious
experience for me—ended with
her classic Ball and Chain. Janis
took time in the middle of it to
lower her voice and tell the
audience to find love now because
maybe tomorrow will be too
late.
Finally, just out of the lights,
she collapsed into a pair of arms
and was helped off the stage.
Our group stood in silence for
several minutes, hardly able to
grasp what had happened. Then
we, and others around us, started
asking each other: How long can
she do that? We decided she was
killing herself.
But one girl said that if Janis
Joplin could do what she did for
only a few years, she had done
more than most people could
expect to do in lifetimes.
I'll remember Janis Joplin. And
if I have kids, I'll tell them about
her. But I don't think they'll
understand.
Film
Fantasia is unique. It is a
sight-sound experiment. It is, at
times, a worthy precursor of
2001. And it was made in 1940
by Walt Disney.
Fantasia takes eight different
types of music and puts them to
images. It's not always
successful, but it's always
interesting.
The evolution of the earth is
accompanied by "Rite of
Spring", with a few shots
strangely reminiscent (for us
youngsters) of the beginning
shots of Jupiter in 2001.
Moussorsky and Schubert
interlock in a visualization of
good and evil. Mickey Mouse
takes the role of the Sorcerer's
Apprentice. And the Nutcracker
Suite has lots of gossamer and
star dust.
The greatest opportunity for
Fantasia
this ingenious concept is the
Bach Toccata and Fugue, in that
it is non-programmatic.
Unfortunately, this is the least
effective, dwelling on the
conductor (Leopold Stokowski)
and the members of the
orchestra. The free-associational
possibilities are completely
bypassed.
Possibly the most interesting
part is the section on the
"sound-track", illustrating wave
length and frequency of musical
sounds with humor and
imagination.
In the more programmatic
pieces, the animation tends to be
cloying - in Disneyland terms,
Bambified. The sight of baby
pegasuses flying into rainbows
and cupids nestling into clouds is
a bit cute for Beethoven's
Pastoral symphony. "The Dance
of the Hours", admittedly a
musical warhorse (as most of
them are) and ballet music at
that, comes to animation with
foolish but endearing
hippopotomi and gangly
ostriches in ballet shoes.
It's a fascinating idea, but all
too often it is executed so
concretely that the fun goes out
of it. And the very vividness of
the animated action frequently
relegates the musical classic to
background music. If the forms
were less identifiable, the viewer
would not only have to give
more from his imagination, but
would be allowed more freedom
to associate.
Still, Fantasia deserves to be
seen, and to be recognized as the
fascinating and creative
experiment that it is. It remains
a film classic, for all generations.
I FANTASIA.
The Bassoon ripples through a visible dimension
WOMEN   IN   LOVE
SHARON BOYLAN
Women In Love not only
interprets reality, it helps form
our sensibilities. It affects the
way we see the world because it
is an extremely effective,
seductive film. Color, shooting,
characterization are all
masterful. I want to deal with
Women In Love as it shapes our
attitudes toward contemporary
society.
Women In Love portrays
people as sensual beings,
exclusive of all other faculties.
Invariably the sensuality is
connected to violence. Note the
initial relationship between
Hermione   and   Rupert  Birkin.
She is a ridiculous person. Her
lover's chief criticism of
Hermione is that she lacks
sensuality. He says: "Maybe if
one cracked open your head,
one could make a real sensual
woman out of you." Instead, she
cracks open his head, provoking
Birkin's naked run through the
pine forest. He thus regains
contact with reality, seen as the
sensual. But he discards
Hermione because she lacks
spontaneity and sensuality
which are associated in the
audience's minds with her
pretensions and with violence
Another scene where we see
sensuality and violence
connected is the wrestling
match. Birkin is physically
attracted to Gerald and wants a
deeper meaningful relationship
with him. Their response to each
other is contained in the
wrestling match, where each is
trying to compel the other to his
will, physically.
Thus sensuality and pain are
established as the mean of
behaviour in the context of the
film.
The movie also offers us two
types of women: madwomen,
bitches or sweet girls wanting
marriage and true love. And we
see from the conclusion of the
film that neither Gudren or
Ursula's alternative is satisfying.
Ursula's relationship with
Birkin shows the meeting of the
sensual/pain syndrome and of
the sweet young thing principle.
Birking loves Ursula partially
because she is such a strong
contrast to Hermoine, his old
lover. There is also the titillation
of loving of woman from a lower
social class. They inflict pain on
each other; the scene where she
abuses him when he is about to
go to see Hermoine, and he
warns: "I'll get my own back."
Characteristically, it happens in
a field, and she brings Birkin a
flower to make up.
Gudrun and Gerald have a
more tortured relationship. We
see Gerald's assumption of
absolute power in the
community (firing a worker,
cutting off the widow's coal)
spill over into their relationship.
He treats Gudrun as if she lacks
power to decide thhngs about hei
own life, (he decides that they
should go away for Christmas
with Birkin, not with her). She
in turn is repelled and
fascinating by him. She screams
at him after he beats the horse,
but licks her lips as she does so.
Their union is restless and
destructive.
Further, we see the
connection between sensuality,
women and death made
explicity in several scenes.
Gerald's sister Laura and her
new husband are swimming in
the pond on the day of the
picnic. They have been bathing in
sexuality since their marriage.
They drown, immersed in
sensuality. After the death,
Ursula and Birkin become lovers,
almost out of despair. The next
morning, Gerald tells Birkin that
Laura killed her husband. And
we see an image of the dead
couple tangled in exactly the
same posture as Ursula and
Birkin in the next shot.
We see death and sensuality
Cont. on Page 6
see: WOMEN IN LOVE
Friday, October 9,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
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PUBLIC
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APPOINTMENTS:
There is a position open for Cultural Programme Co-Ordinator.
(1) To co-ordinate the activities of the:
S.U.B. Art Committee
Special Events Committee
Fine Arts Gallery
Brock Art Collection
and other "culturally oriented" groups on campus
in   developing   a   comprehensive   cultural   programme   of   activities
centered in the Student Union Building but encompassing the whole
University community.
(2) To appoint an assistant to work closely with the participating
party and Building Manager in physically setting up the
"displays".
All applications should be given  in writing to Anne Clarkson, AMS
Secretary, S.U.B. 248 by Friday, October 16.
Hanson Lau needs you!
Three Deputy — Co-ordinators are needed to assist the ■ Co-ordi nator ■■ of
Activities in executing devious Chinese tactics. See Hanson (S.U.B.
Information Desk) for further information and apply for the positions
through Anne Clarkson, AMS Secretary, S.U.B. 249. Nominations close
Friday, October 16th.
SENATE ELECTIONS:
Are you willing to accept the challenge of a position on the
U.B.C. Senate? If so, it will be your duty to participate fully in the
research, discussion, and decisions of the senate and its committees,
taking into account the interest of the student body and the university
community as a whole.
Nominations are now open for the following positions:
I. Senators-at-large — 2 positions open
II. Constituency Senators
a) Education —1 position open
b) Applied Science —1 position open
c) Arts —1 position open
d) Graduate Studies —1 position open
Nomination forms can be obtained from Anne Clarkson, AMS
Secretary in S.U.B. 248. The closing date for nominations is Thursday,
October 15th at 12:30 p.m. The election will take place Thursday,
October 29th.
S.U.B. Management Committee:
Two of the 4 vital members-at-large positions are open — vital
because the other 5 positions are filled by Council nominees. This is
your chance to help establish the Student Union Building policy to
protect your SUB furniture and help allocate SUB management funds
which are 50c per student per year. Help handle the money and the
problem. Nominations close Friday, October 9th at 12:30 p.m. Please
apply in writing through the AMS Secretary SUB 248 to Hanson Lau,
Chairman, SUB Management Committee.
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Math    100
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Oct. 19
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WOMEN IN LOVE        Cont. fro
connected in Gudrun and
Gerald's relationship too. He
goes to her bed for the first time
out of desperation after his
father's death. As they make
love he is obsessed with images
of his mad mother's laugh as she
dropped the trowel on his
father's coffin. We also see
cleaily his muddy boots and
hands, signifying ambivalent
feelings toward love making.
Sensuality carries the seeds of
destruction and brutality. And
sensuality is the only meaning in
life.
Gudrun says to her German
artist: "The purpose of lovers is
to explore the furthest limits of
sensuality." All other human
faculties are denied. Man is seen
as consumer and not as creator.
We see the themes of
interdependent sensuality and
brutality carried furthest in the
artists in the film.
Hermoine's attempt at
artistry, her dance, is absurd. It
is a facade for sexual
seductiveness, an attempt to win
back Birkin. And her dance
culminates in pain.
Gudrun, whose art is more
integrated, dances to frighten off
the cattle. She succeeds, because
her personality is more powerful
than Hermoine's. The rest of her
art is never shown, except for
the head of Gerald. But it is
described as being primarily of
animals.
Gudrun's art culminates in
the game with the German artist,
where love making, previously
seen as destructive, becomes art.
So art to Gudrun also is one
more way of expressing and
transcending her sensuality. She
doesn't value love or tenderness.
We see the fullest
characterization of the artist in
the German. When Ursula asks
m Page 5
why his horse isn't more lifelike,
he says: "Art has nothing to
with the world." But then de
describes a very real method of
ensuring the co-operation of his
model. He slaps her about. His
mixture of brutality and
decadence (his casual affair with
the boy, his affability toward
Gerald, his attitude toward his
model) is subtler than Gerald's.
So Gudrun loves the artist
instead of the man of power
because he has a more perfect
knowledge of sensuality.
The fact that the visitor is
German is not accidental either.
Lawrence, in the 20s,
consciously said: "The wind
blows toward Germany." And
the tendency of the movie is to
approve that current, toward the
development of sensuality at the.
expense of all other faculties, to
the connection of sensuality and
brutality and death. In Germany
that cultural tendency emerged
as national socialism.
Birkin's yearning for a fuller
relationship than he can find
with Ursula (who says
continually that all you need is
love) leads him to love the brutal
and unconscious Gerald. Birkin
can see that the world isn't
confined but his attempts at
change are always sterile. His
love for Gerald is one example.
Another is the fact that his
hatred of Britain's jingoism and
of war is answered by killing all
people and leaving only rabbits.
So we see relationships of
people in the film framed in
terms of retreat to the hearth
(Ursula and Birkin) or death
(Gerald, whose power is sterile
and destroys him) or brutality
and decadence (Gudrun and the
German artist). And the
emphasis is always on sensuality
to the exclusion of all else.
FIVE   EASY   PIECES
Five Easy Pieces, despite its
publicity and pretenses, is not an
exceptional movie. We are
supposed to be treated to a
statement of one man's way of
life—his decisions, his priorities,
his motives—in short, the values
upon which his life is based. We
would expect, then, a fairly
strong film. We would expect it
to have direction and impact.
Unfortunately, it has neither.
Although the film should
provide an excellent possibility
for an examination of the
relationship between Bobby,
(Jack Nicholson), and the people
in his life, (especially Rayette,
the girl he lives with), we see
instead merely incidents in his
life; repetitive episodes of
discontent and happiness, like
glimpses through a slow-moving
stroboscope.
In this chronicle of a short
period in the life of a
no-longer-really-young man, we
are led through a maze of sexual
episodes, as Bobby puts
distance between himself and his
immediate past, only to stop,
temporarily, at the scene of a
more distant past; the home of
his family and a few
culturally-inclined parasites.
Here, more sex, rejection, and
Bobby is off again.
Only in the encounter
between Bobby and his
near - totally paralyzed father
does the treatment reach an
exceptional level.
At times, one is inclined to believe  that  Five Easy Pieces is
merely a parody of Easy Rider.
As the film opens, instead of
finding two men roaring into the
country on motorcycles to a
pounding rock rhythm, we are
treated to an oilrig worker
driving an old Meteor into town
as Tammy Wynette sings Stand
By Your Man. (Perhaps the song
was chosen purely for the sake
of irony.)
Instead of two hip-looking
riders being refused service in a
roadside cafe, we find Bobby,
Rayette, and two wierd female
hitchikers in a cafe, where
Bobby engages in semantic
contortions in order to obtain
the "unorderable"—a piece of
toast. As in Easy Rider, the
parties concerned leave without
a meal.
The viewer leaves the theatre
feeling disappointed and
frustrated. Disappointed because
the film has failed to go
anywhere, frustrated because, in
spite of technical high quality
and some very good acting, the
film itself lacks depth.
Physical movement, a sense
of leaving things behind, and sex
may be interesting in the movie,
but they cannot give it what it
needs—substance.
When it's all over, Five Easy
Pieces seems to have been a film
about nothing in particular.
—Grant Dickin
pfage  6ix
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, October 9,  1970 MUSIC
Joni Mitchell
Folk music is becoming
virtually extinct on today's pop
music scene. One of the causes is
also an affliction of rock
music—anybody who can pick a
guitar after a fashion and sing
"The Circle Game" without
forgetting too many lines is
being foisted on an unwitting
public. The major reason for the
decline of folk music, however,
is the growth of the "Nashville
Sound".
The "back to the land" trend
is manifesting itself musically in
a return to country roots. Some
people, like Neil Young and The
Band, have developed an original
country sound, but most have
simply appropriated Nashville's
steel guitar ensembles. The
results so far are mixed. The
sound is pleasant enough in most
cases, but its sameness from
group to group is becoming
tedious. The quality that put the
"folk" in folk music—the strong
distinctions between individual
performances—is being lost in
the steel guitar assembly line.
For this reason alone, it is
always a beautiful experience to
hear Joni Mitchell, like Neil
Young and The Band, also a
Canadian, and one of the few
pure folk singers left in the field.
Her rejection of drums and steel
guitars and various other
instruments of destruction is,
however, only a minor
attraction. She is an original and
a superb musician. She plays the
guitar so well that it's almost
unbelieveable; she has, with her
amazing chording and fingering
ability, virtually invented a new
style of folk guitar playing. She
also plays the piano increasingly
well, and her use of space to
create atmosphere reveals jazz
influences. And as if all this
weren't enough, her voice is the
purest, most melodious one that
pop music has produced since
the early days of Jean Baez. Joni
is much more of a musician, and
certainly more of a poet, than
Joan. She does things with her
voice, little, almost
imperceptible changes of pitch,
changes of tone, soft mournful
moans, things reminiscent of
jazz singers. She is totally aware
of, totally in control of her art,
and she is beautifully sensitive.
Her lyrics express the depth
of her understanding of the
modern-day human condition,
though this is not as true of her
later as it is of her earlier music.
Her later lyrics tend to be a bit
mawkish, and are overmuch
concerned with glorifying the
youth culture, communes,
Woodstock, and etc. There is
nothing in folk music, however,
to match her early lyricism,
particularly on her first album
Song to a Seagull (RS 6293).
This is without a doubt the best
folk album I have ever heard,
lyrically it is unequalled.
Joni's second album, Clouds
(RS 6341), is not quite as good
as her first, but is still a thing of
beauty. On it are songs like "Tin
Angel" and "Both Sides Now".
Her third, Ladies of the Canyon
(RS 6376), is her best musically,
but is not up to her former
poetic standard lyrically. Things
like:
You could have been more
Than a name on the door
On the thirty-third floor in the
air
More than a credit-card
Swimming pool in the backyard
which,   while   it   may   be   true
enough,   is   a   rather   limited,
generation-gappy expression, can
be contrasted with "The Circle
Game", also on this record but
written four years ago:
Yesterday a child came out to
wonder
Caught a dragonfly inside a jar
Fearful when the sky was full of
thunder
And tearful at the falling of a
star
Then the child moved ten times
round the seasons
Skated  over   ten  clear  frozen
streams
Words like, when you're older,
must appease him.
And promises of some day make
his dreams.
"The Circle Game" is not as
musically unique or
sophisticated as its companion
songs, but it is a universal
expression. Joni
Mitchell is, like all good artists,
constantly growing and
changing, and what she has lost
of her early child-like wonder,
her fresh, tremulous first-time
vision, she has more than
replaced by her phenomenal
development as a musician, and
by her sensitivity to what music
does, to the atmospheres it
creates. The music on Ladies of
the Canyon, in this respect, is
breathtaking.
Fantastic as Joni is on record,
she is even better live. She loves
to play for people, and usually
reaches new musical heights
when performing. On Friday
October 16 at 8:00 in the Pacific
Coliseum, Joni Mitchell will
make her first Vancouver
appearance. The concert is
sponsored by Green Peace and
the Don't Make a Wave
Committee, who hope to use the
proceeds to help prevent the
next Amchitka blast next
September. Also featured will be
Phil Ochs and Chilliwack.
Tickets are $3.00 at Vancouver
Ticket Centers (683-3255) and
in the AMess Business Office.
Don't miss it, even if it is in the
Coliseum. B|L|_ STQREY
THIS COUPON ENTITLES
BEARER TO 2 ADMISSIONS
FOR THE PRICE OF ONE
OVERSEAS STUDENTS
AND WIVES
who would like
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p.m. to register for assistance. There are still a number of
Canadians who have volunteered to coach and now we need
overseas students!
Chem   110
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BOOKS
• University Text Books * Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books *- Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
PROFESSOR FRED HOYLE.
One of the world's outstanding astronomers and a central figure
in the continuing debate on the origin of the universe, will visit
the University of B.C. to give two Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
on October 13 and October 14. Prof. Hoyle will speak in Totem
Park Residences at 8:15 P.M. on Tuesday, October 13, on
"Stonehenge/'the prehistoric monument in England which is now.
thought to be a primitive astronomical observatory and
computer. On Wednesday, Oct. 14, Prof. Hoyle will speak in the
Frederic Wood Theatre at 12:30 P.M., on "The Present State of
Cosmology," the branch of astronomy dealing with the origin of
the universe. Admission to both lectures is free.
I
1
1
JEUNESSES
MUSICALES
"   Youth and Music
Season  1970-71
NOW 7 CONCERTS
7
MUSIC APPRECIATION PROGRAMS
For The Whole Family
Membership
Students $4.00. Adults $12.00, Family $18.00
* BECKETT and McDONALD
Duo Pianists from Winnipeg
Sunday, Oct.   11th, 2:30, Q.E. Playhouse
'Trio Lorenx with Eva Novtak, Soprano from Yugoslavia
November 8, 2:30 p.m. Q. E. Playhousa
'Orion Piano Trio, from London, England. Winner! of th*
BBC Beethoven Competition. (Thii program will be tapea?
live by CBC)        December 20, 2:30 p.m. Q. E. Playhouse
'Pierre Bourque Saxophone Quartet, from Montreal
Q. E. Playhouse
'Pacific Salt Jazz Sextet, one of the top jazz groups In
North America in concert featuring an exciting audiovisual history of jazz. Q. E. Playhouse
'Western Dance Theatre Company Contemporary ballet
program Q.   E.   Theatre
'Choral group with orchestra (to be announced)
Q. E. Theatre
| All Concerts on Sundays at 2:30 p.m.
Memberships available from Vancouver Ticket Centre
630 Hamilton Street, Phone 683-3235
P
I
I
I
i
Friday, October 9, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 7even TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000   GARMENTS  TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full   Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors'  Coats
• White ft  Coloured Coats
• Shirts  and  Accessories
• 10'/r   U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal   Wear   Rentals
631   Howe 688-2481
FOR GOOD FOOD
At Prices
You Can Afford
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Theatre
PRIVATE  LIVES
THE  SECRETARY  BIRD
by Vibeke Ohm
There is something you
should see out at the York
Theatre. Yes, that old barn way
hell and gone on Commercial-
and-something, long-time
headquarters for the Vancouver
Little Theatre Association.
Revamped from door to
stage, the place has new
wallpaper and a new artistic
director. Not only is it finally
beginning to look like a theatre
it is actually doing good theatre.
The best in years.
Director Jace Van Der Veen,
a not-so-long-ago UBC figure of
note, is starting off the season
with Noel Coward's Private
Lives. Since the venerable Sir
Coward is having his 70th
anniversary this year, the choice
is timely.
But the production is more
than a tribute to Coward—it is a
treat to watch-and
consequently, an even bigger
tribute to Coward.
A divorced couple meet again
while on their honeymoons with
new partners and run off
together. A 1930's comedy
could easily fall flat, even with
the brilliant, wit-snapping
dialogue of Coward. But when
it's done in true 30's style by
competent actors really working
together—it's a trip. And when
you have 13 people at a dress
rehearsal laughing like a
houseful, you know it's flying
where it should.
There is not much more to
say. The set is elegant, the music
is fun but the acting is rare. You
don't often find actors coming
together on the same level in
such a way that nobody stands
out, but all are irreplacably
equal parts of a smooth,
well-paced performance.
They're Michael Berry,
Cecilia Smith, Angela Slater,
Vincent Burt & Helen Volkow.
Go see them at the York; they're
on until October 10.
Festivity, sophistication,
and lots and lots of laughter —
the   opening   of The  Secretary
Bird by the Playhouse Theatre
Company was refreshing and
hilarious event.
When a jolly writer (Tony
Van Bridge) takes the news of
his wife's infidelity by inviting
her lover for golf, bridge, and
quips, the situation is
potentially funny. Especially
given Van Bridge's full-bodied
portrayal of a man who wisely
fights with humor.
When he proceeds to invite
his secretary as well, to provide a
"foursome", it gets complicated.
Especially with so engaging a
secretary as Susan Ringwood.
When his reason for the
invitations is to win back his
wife with absurdity, it's
hilarious!
The PTC production is a
masterpiece of comedy. All
parties have conspired to woo
the playgoer from daily drudge
and into irresistable good
humor.
The acting is a light fantastic
of contrast and complement.
Patricia Gage as the faithless
wife is the perfect complement
to Van Bridge. Her sincerity and
perplexity are the necessary foil
to his exercise in ludicrosity.
Her lover (Paxton Whitehead)
provokes laughter at his first
word and sustains it by his very
humorlessness. His enunciation
of "riotously", for instance,
with all the vitality of a dying
fish, is unforgettable. Mickie
Maunsell as the maid performs
her garrulous character role
vividly. And of course Tony Van
Bridge walks away with it all.
Even an opening night
audience found it hard to
compete with the costumery on
stage. Satin and velvet and
leather appeared in delightfully
appropriate styles, harmonizing
well with the sophistication of
the play.
The evening, directed by
Paxton Whitehead, floats on a
cushion of bubbles that,
miraculously, never breaks. It's a
memory to hold in store for all
the rainy days ahead.
Heide
Symphony Opens
By MARK JACQUES
The Vancouver Symphony
opened its forty-first season last
Sunday with the well-known
Overture for Tympani and
Lieutenant-Governor featuring
an ostentatious performance by
Jack Nicholson. This was closely
followed by a schmaltzy
truncated rendition of God Save
the Queen and a performance of
O Canada which featured a
superb snare drum obbligato.
That introductory trivia
completed, the VSO got down
to the business of making music,
which it did superbly well,
considering that there were
many new faces in the orchestra.
The opening work. Sir Ernest
MacMillan's Concert Overture in
A, struck me as a piece of
patchwork which might be
useful as a score for a travelogue
about Canada. Needless to say, it
was well performed.
The next work Haydn's
Trumpet Concerto, featured the
VSO's Jerold Gerbrecht. Despite
a few nervous flubs, Gerbrecht's
playing was clean and expressive.
Lutoslawski's   Concerto   for
Orchestra which followed is not
an easy work, but the orchestra's
playing was again extremely
proficient, especially in the
woodwinds, brass, and
percussion.
The Elgar Enigma Variations
which closed the program also
received a moving performance
(especially the Brahmsian
Nimrod section), but that still
didn't prevent my mind from
wandering during some of the
work's more lethargic passages.
The next VSO concerto will
take place in two weeks,
featuring a Haydn symphony
and the Prokofieff Second Violin
Concerto played by James Oliver
("Teddy Bear") Buswell IV. The
Beethoven Eroica Symphony
was also to have been played,
but it has been replaced by the
Second Symphony of Brahms,
(how about some less familiar
substitutes in the future, VSO?)
News Flash: no more $1.00
seats cause the Symphony is a
hit, tickets will be one-half price
instead.
Turquoise, Nice Word
Isn't It?
Open your eyes please, and
look around, tell me what you
see, and I'll try to do the same
for you. Together we just might
come up with some kind of an
assessment of our existence.
Write for Page Friday, submit
your articles I won't promise to
print them, especially if you
write what someone else tells
you to see, or only what you
want to see.
It is easy to tell when
someone writes only what he or
she is told to see, there is always
a parallel that can be seen
between the writing and a
standard point of view. I know,
and you know that no two of ys
being the same can possibly see
from the same point of view, so
if you pretend to see something
even close to what someone else
sees, then it makes me think that
you aren't awake. Bring your
stuff to, the Ubyssey office and
address it to Page Friday. Herb
Gilbert's show is still on at the
Fine Arts Gallery in the Library
Basement, and you are invited to
attend.
There is an Art
Telecommunication thing
coming to SUB Gallery. It could
be happening right now, but
since I didn't get the note till
late tonight, and since it was
very nearly illegible, I can't be
sure. What I can be sure of, is
that the Show in the Fine Arts
Gallery, is worth taking a look
at, and that the one in the SUB
Gallery will be too.
Take care, and whether it's
school or your girlfriend don't
strain yourselves, it's not worth
it unless you do it out of love.
This week, Page Friday would
just never have been possible
without the indubitable help of
Grant Dickin and Dave
Bowerman.
Saved,,   a   UBC   Dept.   of
Theatre presentation, will be
shown in Freddy Wood Theatre
Oct. 21-24.
Set in South London, Saved
is still relevant to the problems
of any city dweller who is
willing to admit that the poor
are still with us, and that
violence is a necessity of slum
life.
At first refused a licence for
public showing in England due
to it's scenes depicting this
violence, they give Savad it's
relevance to present city life.
live
RESERVE NOW!!
CHEV. IMPALA
WE FEATURE G.M. CARS
STUDENT OVERNIGHT
SPECIAL
$6.00 Plus 6' per mile
Budget
Rent a Cap
685-0536
450—W. Georgia
(% block east of The Bay)
pfage 8ight
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1970 Friday, October 9,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Tickets are going fast
for Mitchell, Ochs show
If you want to see the Joni
Mitchell benefit concert Oct. 16 -
you'd better hurry up and buy
your tickets.
Vancouver Ticket Centre has
told the Don't Make Waves
.Committee organizers of the
show, that based on advance
ticket sales, the concert will be a
sell-out.
Which means about 14,000
people will Tje donating $3 each to
the committee to protest the
September 1971 Amchitka bomb
blast.
Also appearing with Mitchell
will be Phil Ochs and Chilliwack.
Tickets are available in the Alma
Mater Society business office and
the Vancouver Ticket Centre.
The money the non-profit
committee makes on the concert
will go towards its Amchitka
protest project, which entails
buying a boat to sail into the area
of the bomb blast. The boat will
carry scientists, reporters, and
equipment to measure the effects
of the blast.
. The organizers first plan to sail
Legal aid offered
by law students
If you have legal troubles the
free UBC legal aid clinic may be
able to help.
In the legal aid office in SUB
228 and 232 law students are on
hand to give legal advice to
students involved in hassles from
tenant-landlord disputes to drug
charges.
About 150 law students
participated in the service last
year.
The clinic was set up two years
ago to reach people who would
otherwise not get needed help.
The regular B.C. legal aid
misses a lot of people, said one
law student. For example anyone
who has had a criminal conviction
in the past five years is not eligible
for B.C. legal aid.
The law students can only give
legal advice. They can't represent
clients in court except in cases
i
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Sundays
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FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
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where a youth is being transferred
from juvenile to adult court.
The law students at legal aid
are there simply to help
individuals find legal solutions to
problems not to form a pressure
group to lobby for legal reform.
The legal aid. clinic is open
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
at noon hour. If you're looking
for free, practical legal advice,
drop around.
into the area of the blast, thus
preventing the blast until they are
outside the "safe" area.
If the boat is blockaded, the
organizers plan to wait on the
edge of the safe area and take
scientific tests. The data they
obtain will be published — the
first data on atomic blasts that
will be made public.
The Amchitka blast is not the
sole object of the committee's ire,
however. "We're against bomb
blasts everywhere by everyone,"
said committee member Jerry
Stanleigh, Law 3. "This protest is
not just a polemic against the
U.S."
Stanleigh said Mitchell is
coming because she believes in the
committee's project.
Mitchell, Ochs and Chilliwack
are performing free — they get
only their transportation and
accommodation paid.
The concert will be held
Friday, Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. in the
Pacific Coliseum.
Chilliwack will perform first,
followed by Ochs, and
intermission and then Mitchell.
Seats will be on a first come
first served basis. The Coliseum
floor will be filled with seats and
there will be no standing room.
ANTHR0P0S0PHY
Lecture and Discussion
every Wednesday, 8 p.m.
at
Rudolf Steiner Centre
3201 West 4th Ave.
° mm
PATIO.
• EAT IN •TAKEOUT. DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Cck&HOi ODEON leatiPA 89
MAD WORLD    ever to rock the screen
WITH LAUGHTER I
Vogue
VII ttRJ
ttS-3434
Show Times: 12:05, 3:00
5:55, 8:50
Sunday: 2:30, 5:35, 8:40
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNIAK tf 30th
Warning: nudity. sex and
hrutullty.       —B.C. Director
Show Times
7:30, 9:40
Mat. Sun: 2 p.m.
ALAN BATES - OLIVER R^LD
D. H. LAWRE\'C:'S
"WOMEN IN LOVE'
Park
CAMBIE at 1 Ith
176.2747
rrtqutnt marine ■»* W7
eo«rt* l»n«uM«-
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7:30,9:30
Sunday Mat. 2 p.m.
DONAtO SUTHERLAND
ELLIOTT GOULD
MASH
"An exceptionally fine movieLquiet, lyrical,
bawdy, funny and sad.'!|   *"""*
Haida
Time Magazine
KINGS'Y •>  JOYCE       Show Times
41S-J222       Mat. Sun., Mon. 2
Rome.
Before Christ.
After Fe lini.
"There is no end, no beginning.
There is only the infinite passion of life."
-FELLINI
FFLLIN1 SATYRICON
Varsity
224-3730*»
4375 W. 10th
(English Subtitles)
Show Times:
7:30, 9:40
Sunday Matinee 2 p.m.
NO AMIUTANCt TO PERSONS UNOfR t|
The Dolphin Theatres presents
A DECADE OF CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL WINNERS"
Sunday Afternoons
at 2 p.m.
Dolphin
Hast, at Willmadon
299-7303
/jEBHEfflS^
Two new papers
launched in city
Two new anti-establishment newspapers have begun
publication in Vancouver in the last few weeks.
One called the New Leaf is a monthly tabloid put out by
UBC graduates Gabor Mate and Al Birnie.
The second publication, Rage, is a joint project of The
Vancouver Liberation Front and Vancouver Women's Liberation.
Leaf editor Birnie, has previously edited The Ubyssey and
his own newspaper the Western Gate. iMate was a widely read
Ubyssey columnist four years ago.
The paper concerns itself with humanistic issues such as legal
aid, medical aid, human rights, labor news, pollution and
Canadian nationalism as opposed to U.S. imperialism.
The first edition of Rage explains that the publication is an
outgrowthjof the Yellow Journal, Vancouver's official Yippie
newspaper.
Rage will publish "factual, muckraking and analytic articles
exposing the contradictions of this racist cjhauvinist imperialist
society," say the paper's editor.
The first issues of both papers are being distributed free.
10TH & SASAMAT HOME SERVICE
4494 W. 10th - Ph. 224-1244
"WE GUARANTEE ALL REPAIRS
90 DAYS OR 4,000 MILES"
Licenced Mechanic
10% Labour Discount to all UBC Students
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Open 7:00 a.m.
to 12 Midnite
"Great movie making.
The Perrys' best film!
Superbly theatrical performances...
Carrie Snodgress will surely receive
the critical praise she deeply deserves!'
^nOflSf BfMMpWI* N.V.TMMS
"Holds up the unsparing mirror to the
New York marriage. You don't have to admit
how much of it you recognize but a lot
of it is there. Richard Benjamin is brilliant!"
diary
of a mad
housewlft
a frank perry film
-Aretar Wirt*. Ptst
starring
richard benjamin
frank langella
carrie snodgress
Odeon
NO ADMITTANCE TO MKSONS ONDM II
Warning:
Much Swearing,
Coarse Language
and Simulated
Sexual Scenes.
B.C.  Director
SHOW  TIMES:
12:00,   1:35, 3:35
5:30,  7:25,  9:25
881 GRANVILLE
682-7468
"YOU MUST SEE THIS FILM!'
— Richard Schickel. Ufa
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents a BBS Producttor
JACKNICHOLSON
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191   MRAHTILlt
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COLOR
Show Times:
13:10, 2:05, 3:55
5:50,  7:45, 9:40 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9,  1970
FLQ delays Cross execution
MONTREAL   (CUP)   -   The
struggle between the government
and police officials and the Front
de Liberation du Quebec has
escalated almost hourly since the
FLQ kidnapping of British trade
commissioner James Cross
Monday morning.
Thursday the FLQ notified
authorities that the deadline for
acceptance of their demands
would be extended a second time
to midnight that night. They
demanded the broadcast of their
manifesto over Radio-Canada by
that time as a sign of the
government's intention to carry
out FLQ demands.
Radio-Canada agreed to the
demand and the manifesto was
broadcast in Quebec at 10:30
p.m. Thursday night.
In a communication received
Wednesday by a Montreal radio
station, the FLQ warned, "We will
not hesitate at all to do away with
Cross. The life and liberty of
Quebec political prisoners is well
worth that of a hundred
diplomats and big-boss Americans
and Anglo-Saxons.
The message also included a
signed note in Cross' handwriting
which stated he was well and
requested "the authorities to
respond favorably to the demands
of the FLQ".
On Tuesday night, after a day
of secret  meetings  with  harried
Quebec and British officials, the
Trudeau government announced
its refusal to accept the conditions
for the release of Cross. Instead, it
let loose a full scale sweep of
police raids and arrests in
Montreal.
A combined "anti-terrorists
squad"   of  the   Montreal   police,
Quebec Provincial police and
RCMP rounded up 25 FLQ
members and other radical and
revolutionary separatists
Wednesday morning. They are
being held without charge or bail.
Since then, fifty more left
wing Quebec activists have been
arrested in continuing police
sweeps of Montreal.
Excerpts from the document
of demands to Quebec authorities
released Wednesday are as
follows:
"They must see to it that the
repressive police forces do not
commit the monstrous error of
attempting to jeopardize the
success of the operation.
"The political manifesto which
the FLQ will address to the ruling
authorities will have to appear in
full on the front page of all large
newspapers in Quebec.
"Liberation of 21 political
prisoners.
"Wives and children of the
political prisoners must be
allowed to join them if they so
desire.
"A plane must be made
available to the patriot political
prisoners for their transport either
to Cuba or Algeria.
"In the course of a meeting
attended by militant postal truck
drivers fired after failure of
collective bargaining and the
postmaster general, the latter
must promise to reinstate them.
"A voluntary tax of $500,000
in gold bullion must be put
aboard the plane made available
to the political prisoners.
"The name and picture of the
informer which led police to the
last FLQ cell must be made
public."
The demands were
accompanied by very specific
instructions for the televised
release and flight of the prisoners
and the gold. The FLQ
emphasized that their political
objectives be clearly defined to
the public by the release in the
media of their political program,
in a one-hour telecast of the
released prisoners and by an
invitation to the public to meet
the prisoners and attend their
departure.
Robert Lemieux, a member of
the Movement for the Defense of
Quebec Political Prisoners and
lawyer for several of the FLQ
members has been attempting to
see the political prisoners referred
to in the demands. He has been
refused access to nine of the, but
of those he has seen, most are
willing to be part of the
agreement and be flown to Cuba
or Algeria.
"There is no doubt in my mind
that James Cross will be executed
if the demands are not met. That
is my personal opinion, based on
my experience," said Lemieux.
The kidnapping was the first
successful attempt by the FLQ in
the wake of a series of diplomatic
abductions by other liberation
groups throughout the world.
Two others had apparently been
planned for last February (Moshe
Golan, Israeli trade commissioner)
and in August (American consul
Harrison Burgess), but had been
broken up by the secret police
squad.
FLQ
From page 1
• The FLQ is in solidarity
with all Quebecois movements
that are militating for real
economic liberation of Quebec
workers and are fighting for the
political emancipation of Quebec.
It will be independence or
destruction.
MEANS (MOYEN D'ACTION)
• To fight the reactionary
forces who are effectively working
against the Quebec people it is
urgent that we form a common
front of all thh progressive forces
in Quebec. It is necessary to end
our isolation which plays into the
hands of the establishment. We
must continue the fight together.
The enemies of our enemies are
our friends.
• This common front will
reunite the numerous movements,
committees and popular
associations that are currently
militating in favour of a real
democracy, real economic
liberation, cultural revolution and
for independence and socialism in
Quebec.
• The leaders of all these
movements in coordination with
the political committees of the
trade unions must meet together
to establish a base together to
aprticipate in the publishing of a
manifesto and to elaborate a total
strategy (stategie globale) that will
respect the particular
characteristics of each of the
movements.
Next Tuesday or Wednesday
H
DON'T miss
The Canadian
MIME THEATRE
Something substantial and exhilarating  —  a Joy to  watch and often
startling. Funny." - Nathan Cohen, Toronto Star
"Remarkable and wonderfully entertaining presentation - treat yourself!"
— Jim McPherson, Toronto Telegram
SUB AUDITORIUM
TUES. OCT. 13 - 12:30 Workshop 50*
WED. OCT. 14 - 8 P.M. Full Performance
$1.50 Advance   $2.50 at Door   Non AMS
&n
TICKETS AVAILABLE TUESDAY AT AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
7*1
"MR. MONDAY'
TUESDAY
VT  12:30 I\ THE B\LlKOOM
we're sure that
EACH  CUSTOMER
will get	
$1,OOOOOOjOO
worth of satisfaction
YES!    AT LAST!    GROOVY is the only word to
describe the COMPLETELY NEW food trip that's happening
in Vancouver. DROOPY'S , 3623 W. Broadway is serving
giant hot dogs of a quality never before available in
Vancouver — and at reasonable prices.
WHY ARE DROOPY'S HOT DOGS SO MUCH
BETTER THAN ORDINARY HOT DOGS?
Most weiners sold in Canada are produced for mass markets, and
often as a result the quality of these weiners is very low. Flour and
other fillers are usually used. Low quality weiners are almost always
made without a natural casing (skinless).
Quality weiners such as those served by DROOPY'S consist of
only good, red meat and carefully blended seasonings. They also have a
natural casing.
WHY IS A NATURAL CASING WEINER BETTER
THAN ONE WITHOUT A NATURAL CASING?
A sausage without a natural casing does not acquire good flavor
because it is not cured properly. When a natural casing weiner is hung
in the smokehouse to cure, the thin porous natural casing allows the
smoke to penetrate and flavor the meat. On the other hand, a skinless
weiner is wrapped in cellophane to give it its sausage shape. This
cellophane must remain around the weiner during the curing process
and it effectively blocks the smoke from contacting and flavoring the
meat.
Skinless weiners are much quicker and cheaper to mass produce
and therefore some large meatpackers have attempted to popularize
them (see the meat section of your supermarket).
Because of the natural casing and the curing process the weiner
used by DROOPY'S has a definite "pop" when you bite into it.
WHY SHOULD YOU TRY DROOPY'S HOT DOGS?
Because we're so sure that you'll be just as excited about these
hot dogs as we are that for a limited time only we are making you the
following special offer:
BUY ONE HOT DOG - GET ONE FREE
BUY ONE CHILI DOG - GET ONE FREE
Offer expires OCTOBER 26, 1970.
Coupon must be presented.
DROOPY'S
3623 West Broadway
736-7021
Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 11:45 A.M. - 2:00 A.M., Fri. & Sat.
1U45 A.M,-_3:00 A.M., S_un1[1I :_45_A._M. -J :00 A.M.J Friday, October 9,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Street theatre parodies
education in university
By DICK BETTS
The class opened when
professor Capitalonia • and his
assistant Technomedes entered
the room.
The class? A presentation on
education and the B.C. power
structure Wednesday noon in the
SUB ballroom. It was the first in a
series on "power and the people
of B.C.", sponsored by the
Community Education and
Research Centre and the Alma
Mater Society.
The prof and his assistamt?
Members of the Vancouver Street
Theatre.
Capitalonia and Technomedes
circled the audience of 180 people
mumbling in academia, a language
which is incomprehensible.
Capitalonia then gave his
lecture on how to measure people.
With the help of Technomedes he
concluded: "The way to measure
people is to put.them through the
university".
Two actors representing
students were then put into
university, where they learn about
education from the well-known
Chant Report:
"The utilization of reasonable
competition to encourage
effective learning should be
accepted as a normal feature of
the society in which we live".
Mordecai Briemberg, speaking
from the ballroom floor, then
took up the dialogue.
. . street theatre
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Five
quoritic blorgs inopportunely
happened by a polling booth on
their way home from a local pub.
They constituted the entire
turnout for this year's national
election. Fortunately only two of
them were far enough out of their
minds to vote for the perennial
Borphlic who has vowed to
abolish the first office he is
elected to.
"Competition stimulated and
regulated by examinations, sifts
the wheat from the chaff, the
intelligent from the stupid" he
told the class.
Briemberg summarized the
rationale for competitive
education:
"The more exams you pass the
more intelligent you are. The
more intelligent you are the
longer you continue going to
school. The longer you continue
your education the more
important you are. The more
important you are the more you
are qualified to tell other people
what to do".
Briemberg outlined the class
bias in the ; educational system:
"It is not intelligence but the
occupation, and hence income, of
one's father which correlates most
closely with scholastic aptitudes,"
he said.
He said that although we are
taught to believe in competition
"those who control, believe in
monopoly and not in the free
market they talk about".
The university trains many
students for jobs that won't exist,
he said.
"Added to the dehumanization
of selling oneself will be the
inability to find a buyer."
Tried the Stardust?
Today's retraction has to do
with a statement in Tuesday's
Ubyssey saying that roller skating
would take place every noon hour
this week in the Fine Arts Gallery
under the library.
In fact, the skating was only a
one-day event. Our information
came from a supposedly informed
source in Fine Arts. This source is
hereby chastised. We apologize to
students who hauled roller skates
around all day, only to find out
the bitter truth.
UNISEX
WASH 'N WEAR
AFRO
WIGS
$14.95
Off black
dark brown
med. brown
Auburn
blond
Gone With the Wig
49 W. Hastings
(between Woodwards & A & W)
688-1201
REG.$1995
The Wig-Wam
595 Dunsmuir St.
at Seymour
688-2578
Tuesday, October 20
at 8:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM
Advance Student Tickets $1.50
At the Door $2.50
Non-AMS (Anytime) $3.00
TICKETS OF AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
AMD SUB INFORMATION DESK
Presented by the Special Events Committee and Arts Undergraduate Society
KERNS   SHELL   SERVICE
SPECIALIZING IN
VOLKSWAGEN AND
PORSCHE
Service & Repairs - Reasonable Rates
1005 W. 12th Ave. at Oak       738-9033
PUNJAB
RESTAURANT
Open 7Days -5P.M. to 11:30P.M.
Finest Foods of India — Full Facilities
Complete Curry Dinner
$3 — Non-Vegetarian - $2 — Vegetarian
796 Main St. Near Georgia Viaduct         688-5236
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
leek to
Plesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OfHCE NEAR YOU
OVER 1,000 NEW and USED
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING MACHINES
CALCULATORS
OFFICE FURNITURE
LOWEST PRICES
IN CANADA
NEW TYPEWRITERS
FROM	
IBM ELECTRICS
FROM,—	
$49.50
$jg.so
USED TYPEWRITERS
FROM	
NEW   ELECTRIC
ADDING MACHINES.
$14950
$
.50
All Makes and Models of
RENTALS—LOW RATES
Cash and Student Discounts
Trade-Ins Accepted Every Machine Guaranteed
POLSON TYPEWRITERS ltd.
458 W. Broadway - Phone 879-0031
World's First Office Equipment Supermarket Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9,  1970
FRIDAY
FOLKSOC
Latinized blues of Saturday Afternoon
Matinee at noon in SUB Ballroom.
NEWMAN   CLUB
New  voices  welcome   to   practice   for
Folk Mass at noon in the Music room
of St. Mark's College.
UBC WOMEN'S OOLF TEAM
Interested girls of any calibre needed
on the team.. Leave name and number
at the Women's Athletic office in
main gym. First practice at M*usqueam
Golf Centre at 49th and Marine Dr.
at 4:30.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK  CLUB
Chief   Probation   Officer   Richardson
to speak at meeting in SUB 105B at
noon. All welcome.
V.C.F.
Thena   Ayres   to   introduce   a   Bible
Study in SUB partyroom  at  noon.
L'ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
French conservation  and  free   coffee
at noon every Fri. in Int. House. Sign
up for hike to Mt.  Seymour  on Oct.
18th.
FLYIN6 CLUB
New   members   welcome   to   general
meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
CHINESE  VARSITY  CLUB
First general meeting in SUB  Club's
lounge at noon.
FOLKSOC
General meeting for all members and
those interested in SUB 207  at noon.
SAILING  CLUB
Lecture   on  sailing   for  beginners  in
Buch. 104 at noon.
PRE-MED SOC.
New  members   are  welcome  to  hear
Dean   McCreary   speak   on   Medicine
Today  and  Tomorrow  in  Wesb.   201
at noon.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
The Original Cast playing a noon hour
concert in  SUB  Ballroom. Admission
$1.00 at the door.
PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVES
General meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
UBC  ANTI-WAR  COMMITTEE
Steering   committee    meets   to   plan
Moratorium   and   Oct.   31st   march  in
SUB 211 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
fcv*
'tween
classes
Ht?**~,-i%im&tl&.x  -V><   #-v>.
PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVES
New members welcome to "Beer
Night" from 8:00 to 12:00 p.m. at
2706 S.W. Marine Dr.
SATURDAY
UBC  MEN'S   BOWLING TEAM
Tryouts and practice   at 3:00 p.m.  in
SUB    lanes.    For   more    information
phone  Vern at 224-9691.
CHINESE STUDENT ASSOC.
BB-Q picnic at Cultus Lake. Cars leave
SUB loop at 9:00 a.m. $1.50 each.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN   CLUB
Folk Mass at 11:30 a.m. in St. Mark's
Chapel.
MONDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Guitar concert in Int. House upper
lounge at 12:30.
TUESDAY
MUSSOC
General meeting in old Aud. at noon.
For information on revue auditions
check at SUB 210.
CREATIVE  WRITING  DEPT.
Harold Tichenor (independent Canadian film maker) will give an illustrated talk on techniques in film
making in Buch. 104 at noou.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian Mime Theatre workshop at
12:30.   Performance   on   Wed.   at  8:00
p.m.   $1.50 advance and  $2.50 at the
door. Both in SUB Aud.
PRE-DENTAL   CLUB
New members  welcome  to  important
general meeting in SUB 119 at noon.
CAN. CROSSROADS
Meeting for those  interested in  summer work-study projects in Africa and
India  in  Int.   House   main  lounge   at
noon.
COMMERCE   SEMINAR  COMMITTEE
New members welcome to meeting in
Ang. 404 at noon.
THURSDAY
ANGLICAN-UNITED   CAMPUS
MINISTRY
All invited to meeting in SUB Club's
Lounge at noon.
UBC   SCIENCE   FICTION   SOCIETY
Meeting of both B.C.   and UBC clubs
at 12:30.
PHOTO SOC.
General  gripe  session  at  8:00  p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL  AID
Every Mon., Wed., and Fri. at noon
in SUB 232.
SIMS
Transcendental   Meditation    Mon.-Fri.
8:00  to  11:00 a.m.,  Tues.,  Wed.,  Fri.
3:00  till  6:00  p.m.,   and  Thurs.  from
4-6 p.m. in Int. House 406.
COMMERCE SEMINAR COMMITTEE
Thurs., Oct. 22: Seminar on Business
Responsibility. Applications are now
being accepted for a day-long seminar.
Students and businessmen will be involved. Applications available in Ang.
750A.
.* HUE! ■ BE*T Au- WCfff Jh
*m lypewriier Town   h
New & Reconditioning Typewriters ft Adders
All Office Equipment     Trades Welcome
<3fe>     SPKialitiai ,„ smith CORONA compact ilaetriei „*N
^4TnAVEBBM3V^
<J-)iamond Ki
for ike If jow Lje
$5
tl
enerauon:
l
':.'., $375
Budget Terms, of course        \
YJ
r0 %*W0
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club-3 Lines. 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Gommercial-3 lines. 1 day SI .25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
tlasuliftiaih arc nut accepted by telephone and are pavuhlv in advance.
Clmmx Deadline is 11.30 a.m. the day before publication
Publications Office. STUDFNT UNION BI.DC. Univ. ttj U C, Vancouver 8. B C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LANTERN NITE: SAT. OCT. 10
Featuring The Mushrooms. SUB
Party Room. 8:30. Frosh Members
Admitted Free. Paid Members 50c.
Another CVC  Production.	
T>ANCE IN SUB BALLROOM SAT.
Oct 17. 8 p.m. African Students
Band. "Ngoma Ya Africa". Refreshments.
Greetings
12
TO SHARE A PERSONAL INSPIR-
ation or problem tune in Radio
CJOR 600, Sundays 9:15-10:00 a.m.
and 11:30 p.m.-1:00. Or drop in and
chat with Sunday Line Moderator
Chaplain Bernice Gerard "Wednesdays at the Lutheran Student
Center, Tuesdays— Chaplain's Office, S.U.B. For appointment call
266-9275.
Lost 8c Found
13
REWARD FOR 2 PICTURES
taken from Pre - Med Display av
Club's Day. Call Al,  224-0500.
LOST DIAMOND RING WITH TWO
rod stones left on sink in Women's
washroom on main floor of Education. Please return, is engagement
ring.   Reward.   688-6072.
LOST GREEN FLOWERED CASE
with books. Contact SUB Lost and
Found or telephone 731 - 2870. S.
Waldman.
Rides & Car Pools
14
DRIVER REQUIRES PASSENGERS
from vicinity of 12th Ave. and
Burrard 8:30-3:30 classes Mon.-Fri.
Phone John, 733-8607.
Special Notices
15
REDUCED PRICES ON HAIR-
shaping and jetstyling at U.B.C.
Barbers  (in  the Village}.
U.S. ARMY DESERTER NEEDS
wife for Immigration. 984 West
7th.  Come to address or write.
ENCOITNTER GROUP. THOSE IN-
terested in Student Encounter
Groups please phone 228-9949.
Travel  Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2855 or 224-0087.-106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
LONDON  RETURN $225
also   other   destinations   —   1-ways.
687-1244  — 224-0087
STUDENTS — EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
information (air mail) Anglo-American Assn., 60A Pyle St.. Newport I.W., England.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
POETRY WANTED FOR POS1-
sible Inclusion Cooperative Volume. Enclose stamped envelope,
Editor, Box 4444, Whittier, Calif.
90607.
PART TIME WORKERS. CALL
Mark 682-3481 for information. Be
persistant.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1968 AUSTIN .1100 STN. WGN. NEW
tires plus snows. Good Cond. $1000.
228-3489 or 733-1258.	
'57 FORD $150. D. KLANG, HIS-
tory Department or 263-3159.
LATE '66 HEALEY 3000 MK III.
28,000 miles. New tires, top. Exc.
 cond.  Take small trade.  988-5405.
1969 DATSUN GT-1600 2-DR. SEDT
Extras   .   .   .   253-1314   after   6:00.
1955 CONSUL GOOD RUBBER^
very low mileage, excellent student transportation. $100 or offers.
263-7145.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
TURN    ON    —   —    —    TUNE    UP.
Full Services to All Makes
Licensed Mechanics
Scope Tuning and Brakes a Specialty.
MACDONALD TEXACO
16th and MacDonald
CAR REPAIRS
TO
VOLVO, MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
• Factory trained mechanics
• Fully Guaranteed Work
• Reasonable Rates
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Art Services
31
CREATIVE GRAPHICS — UNIQUE
poster and display artwork; precision publication and scientific
graphics; photography. John, 224-
4146.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
fidelity graphs maps, text-book
illustrations, formulations and advertising.  Phone 980-2928.
Day Care & Baby Sitting     32A
LOVING DAY-CARE IN MY HOME
near 41st and Dunbar. Fenced
yard,  toys and meals.  261-0549.
Photography
34
CUSTOM PHOTO WORK; ALSO
your B&W film developed & printed.  733-9423,  Steve.
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND
guys: free 9000 word essay on Vancouver gay life from graduate student 22, Box 8969, Station H, Vancouver 5. Phone 683-4864. Over 750
copies sent already.
CORKY'S MENS' HAIRSTYLING.
We guarantee not to ball-up your
Haircut. 3644 W. 4th. Alma on 4th.
Appointments,  Phone 731-4717.
WHAT THE HELL IS THE ANG-
lican United Campus Ministry?
Find out Thurs. Oct. 15 in Club's
Lounge. SUB. 12:30.
WANT SEX, BOOZE, AND FUN?
Dance to Swinging Sounds of
Trilloty plus Black Sheep. I.H.,
UBC,  8:00- 1:00 a.m.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters  &  Repairs
39
Typing
40
ON-CAMPUS TYPING, FAST, Accurate, all types of theses, texts,
essays, IBM selectric,  224-9183.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche  — 437-1355.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home: essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
TOPLESS DANCERS NEEDED
Two  References  Required
One  on Each  Side
GULF CLUB
48 E. Hastings
Interviews from 10:30 p.m.     684-3838
PIZZA PATIO MANAGEMENT
Ltd. would like to thank all those
students who replied to our recent
advertisement. The position has
now been filled but all applications will be kept on file in the
event of future vacancies.
REQUIRE IMMEDIATELY PART-
time light house-cleaning 8 hrs.
per week at $1.75 per hr. Mr.
Norton, 688-3411, 9-5 or 263-5079
after  6:00.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
LESSONS IN PIANO, CLARINET,
Recorder, Helena Sandler (B.Mus.)
McGill in your home. Call 684-3587.
I THE MEDITERRANEAN
I GUITAR SHOP
m     *  instruments * lessons
repairs
fine imported strings
hand built Spanish guitars
(10% discount with AMS card)
77 Powell St., right in Gastown
687-2328
Special Classes
63
SPANISH CONVERSATION, THE
shorter way to speak. Prof. Pareja
(Colombia, Argentina & UBC) will
tutor $3 hr., individual, no groups,
M to S, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 12
hours minimum paid in advance.
Limited number. 1405 Cypress (nr.
Cornwall)   738-5692.
Special Classes    (Cont.)
63
PATTERN DRAFTING DRAPING,
sewing instruction by refugee
from the Fashion World, Tuesday
evening, 7:30-9:30 $12 monthly.
Call Lid 263-4606
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
PRE-SALE TICKETS - 75c
at the  Bookstore  and
AMS  Publication!  Office
QUALITY USED CLOTHING,
very reasonable prices. Sonia's
Dry Cleaning, 957 Denman, near
Stanley Park,  688-5814.
SKIS: 1 PAIR ALLAIS MAJOR 215
cm Nevada binding 1 yr. old. $130;
1 pair Fischer metals 195 cm Solomon binding $75; Men's double
breasted leather coat. Size 38. $60.
224-0942 or 926-4789.
HARMONY SOVEREIGN GUITAR,
$50, or best offer. Ask for Steve
228-9602 after six.
N.U.S. HAS 6 PANELS (45"x80"),
lined drapes, burnt orange with
gold $20. Ph. 434-5911 after 6 p.m.
MIRANDA SENSOREX, $140; 105
f2.8 Auto Miranda Telephoto, $75;
Miranda DE, $65.  738-0994 after 6.
MY EQUIPMENT FOR A SONG!
Fender Telly Humbucking P.U.
(Belonged to Poppy Family), Tra-
nor Head, 2 - 15" spkrs. Jacques,
228-9325
KLASSEN'S BARGAIN WEEK . . .
Widest selection of ready-to-finish
furniture in Western Canada,
3207 W. Broadway. Phone 736-0712;
Beer-cans and Bottle Drive-in at
rear.
CIVIL ENGINEERING BOOKS FOR
sale at Great Reductions, by family of deceased engineer. Ph. 228-
8104 after 5 p.m.
FIVE STRING BANJO, EXCEL-
lent condition, $45. Mai, 732-8151
after 6.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
• 'ELEGANT' '—UBC AREA— GIRLS
sharing—Point Grey Estate. P.O.
Box 4234, Station D, Vancouver 9.
COUPLE(S) OR GUYS. ALL
house facilities. Kits. Quiet and
roomy. Doubles. Phone 738-0784.
Please ask for Paul.
ONE ROOM—MALE STUDENT $45.
Share bathroom. Private entrance.
Phone. Breakfast extra. 3945 Puget
733-0462.
SLEEPING ROOM INCLUDES
kchn., priv. laundry facilities.
224-7646 after five, weekend all
day. Male, Upper Year.
2 ATTRACTIVE SLEEPING RMS-
male students. Non-smokers. Ph.
after 6,  738-6102
TIRED OF COMMUTING? LIVE
on Campus for less! Rooms with
kitchen privileges. Large lounge
and study room. Ph. Bill Dinsmore,
224-4530 or come to 5760 Toronto
Road.
Room & Board
82
MEN
Room & Board avail, at the D.U.
House! Convenient, reasonable,
and the best food on Campus!
Phone the house manager at
224-9841 or drop by at 5780 Toronto Rd.
ROOM AND BOARD NEAR UBC.
2 male students, quiet, abstainers,
non smokers. Good home and good
food.  738-2305
Furnished Apts.
83
WANTED MALE STUDENT TO
share furnished apt. $50 month.
Call  731-0205  after  4:00.
MALE STUDENT, 23-30 TO SHARE
luxurious 1-bedrm. apartment in
Kitsilano, Nov. 1, $85. Phone Roy,
688-0879
BASEMENT SUITE. FURNISHED,
completely p rivate. 3rd - 4th year
male. Available now. Visit 3981 W.
25th.   See Dominic.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86 Friday, October 9,  1970
UBYSSEY
Page 19
Football team has chance
to break winless record
By DON GARDNER
The UBC football Thunderbirds will continue to pursue their
first victory of the season this
Saturday when they will entertain
the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies.
The Huskies defeated the Birds
21-0 earlier this season, but were
fortunate to do so. In that one
they ran two blocked punts back
for touchdowns.
Saskatchewan will be led by
their highly-touted quarterback,
Dave Pickett. One Saskatchewan
sportswriter has already compared
Pickett to Joe Namath. But based
on Pickett's performance so far
this season, the only similarity
between him and Joe Namath is
that they are both bachelors.
Pickett likes to run a lot of
rollouts, as he prefers to throw on
the run. Birds assistant coach
Norm Thomas points out that,
"They won't hurt us with their
running. They'll have to pass to
beat us."
Saskatchewan's strength lies in
their defense, which is led by the
aggressive     play     of    their
Intramurals
The results of yesterday's turkey trot
are as follows:
1st — Ski Team
2nd — Zoology Grads
3rd — Forestry
Individually
Ed Day of the Ski Team walked away
with first place and a turkey with a
winning time of 19 min. 16 sec. over the
three and a half mile course.
The soccer schedule will be posted
outside the intramural office on Tuesday.
The Tug of War goes underway on
Tuesday, Oct.  15.
Women's Intramurals — The swim
meet deadline for entries is October
ninth. Entries can be directed to the
women's athletic office in Memorial
Gym.
linebackers,   Max   Abraham   and
Glenn Ponomarenko.
Several UBC regulars have been
on the limp this week. Hurting are
Ron Fowler, hip-pointer; and
quarterbacks Gord Diewart, bad
knee; and Chris Balzer, tonsilitis.
The injuries to the quarterbacks
will allow Al Larson to start.
FOOTNOTES: One person
who will be missing is defensive
back John Bellamy, although he
isn't injured. Bellamy, you see',
was planning on getting married
this Saturday, and he actually
appears to be serious about the
whole thing.
This prompted head coach
Frank Gnup to say, "Why
couldn't he get married during the
summer."
Don't worry, Coach, he should
be back next week, that is, if his
wife will let him. After all, he is
our defensive captain.
But, then again, the coaches
seem to doubt that he'll be in any
condition to play after a week
long honeymoon.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. 224-6121
JUNIOR HOCKEY
SUNDAY 2:00
Vancouver Centennials
vs.
Kamloops Rockets
at
KERRISDALE ARENA
Advance Tickets Available
at Thunderbird.Shop
Students $1.00
Fri., Oct 16, 8:30 vs Penticton
Bird rugby team braces
for league champions
Head Rugby coach Don Spence returned this week from an
tinternational rugby conference at Twickenham, England. His
capacity there was as official representative of the B.C. Rugby
Union. UBC rugby in particular is to benefit from his
opportunity to participate in such an international meeting.
Coach Spence returns to a successful rugby team operation
... no losses have been posted against any of the five teams
currently playing for UBC.
The Kats provide top opposition as they are defending
league champions. Doug Shick, returning to the Birds this week,
will add experience to the backs. Shick missed the victory over
the Rowers as he was in Calgary as a member of the B.C. Rep
team which successfully overcame a determined Alberta Rep side
last weekend.
This Saturday will provide the best test to date of the
calibre of all teams:
UBC BIRDS vs. KATS, Wolfson, 2:30
UBC BRAVES vs. KATS II, Wolfson, 1:15
UBC TOTEMS vs. BURNABY, Burnaby South, 1:15
UBC TOMAHAWKS vs. ROWING CLUB, Wolfson, 1:15
UBC FROSH vs. BCIT, at BCIT, 1:15
<^6?
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd.  224-6414
■P'
^ *
W'
■~*m
f
Ready To Ski?
Checked,    Your   Skis    Over
Lately?
Drop in with your skis and
boots and we make sure your
"Safety Harness" is Safe.
We now have the "LIPE RELEASE CHECK"
AVAILABLE  FOR YOUR SAFETY
October Special!
a few left    Cortina Buckle Boots
REG. 55.00 NOW   $40.00
INDOOR TENNIS IN THE ARMOURY
Students and members of faculty are invited to join the
University Open Tennis Club. A membership fee of
$2.00 for the academic year 1970-71 entitles the
individual to reserve a court for one hour periods by
telephoning 228-4452 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday thru Friday. Membership cards may be
obtained from Mr. Howard Tyndall, Room 101, in the
Physical Education Building in Thunderbird Park (South
Campus).
THE    HOURS
MONDAY
TUESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
FOR    OPEN
FOLLOWS:
PLAY    ARE    AS
9:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9,  1970
HOWS TRICKS?
Ubyssey campus report
Students at UBC are fed-up
with what has happened so far
this year, a Ubyssey survey
Thursday revealed.
The survey was prompted by a
UBC PReports administration
survey published Thursday,which
found the campus was "calm and
contented".
UBC PReports admitted:
"Impression. Mood. A pretty
nebulous assignment for Reports
staffers, who are accustomed to
chronicling only the facts."
The Ubyssey agreed that it
was, indeed, pretty nebulous.
So we sent our three intrepid
reporters — Bruce Fearless, Elvira
Finch, Tom Messcorps — to scour
the campus and ask students
"How's tricks?"
They found that students are
not happy. Tricks are not as well
as UBC PReports seems to have
decided.
A male third year engineering,
resplendent in fuzzy red jacket
with Chula Vista Mothers
emblem, reported:
"I ... I gotta problem. My
Aunt Bessie has come down with
the rheumatiz and she can't
hardly walk and she's only making
$30 a month selling flowers 'cause
it's the only work she can get and
my cousin Ralph, he's
vice-president of CPT&G? and is
making a fortune.
"My mom wants him to buy
her a dishwasher but he says if she
really wanted a dishwasher she'd
go out and get a decent job and so
my mother isn't talking to him
and Dad isn't talking to Mom
'cause Ralph is Dad's brother and
George's boy, well really he's his
stepson but anyway Dad isn't
talking to Mom and nobody's
talking to anybody and I phoned
home last night and they wouldn't
accept the charges and I haven't
got anybody and I'm all alone and
I don't know what to do anymore
and it's raining all the time and I
just don't know . .."
Two students in science said:
"We think this place if full of
Commie effete snobs."
How's tricks, we asked an
artswoman, in hopes of getting a
better answer.
"This place is full of Nazi
middle-class reactionaries," she
responded.
"I sure wish they'd put some
more cans around this place.
Yeah, that's what I wish," said
another engineer.
We encountered a
ruddy-cheeked   faculty   member
Services need help
Two organizations in the
Vancouver area need UBC student
volunteers or full-time help if they
are to continue with the programs
they have planned for the coming
year.
The Kimount Boy's Club is
appealing for UBC students to do
volunteer work with boys from 8
to 18 years of age in East
Vancouver. The club is now filling
the needs of 150 boys.
Activities range from group
clubs, an extensive gym program,
game rooms and camping and
hiking trips, to photography, arts
and crafts and tutoring.
Volunteers will receive help from
the club director.
Those interested in helping two
or more hours a week should
contact Rob Noyes at 435-3636
or 874-0117.
Another organization, the
Company of Young Canadians, is
eager to recruit five students for
full-time, paid positions.
This would supply good
opportunities for students who
are taking a year out and seeking
meaningful employment, a
spokesman said.
Working in conjunction with
the Vancouver Tenants'
Association, the CYC has two
positions open for students
interested in bettering the
conditions of tenants in
Vancouver.
These people would lend
assistance and moral support to
tenants with grievances, act in an
advisory role, go before the small
claims board, etc.
Also, one person is needed to
work with people from Public
Housing.
And two positions are open in
Vernon for young people to
organize drop-in centres and work
with youth groups in any capacity
in which they are needed.
To qualify for these positions
you must be from 18 to 28 years
old and enthusiastic. The salary is
$225 per month and a free
training course is given.
Those interested can contact
Student Placement or Susan
Brosseau at 876-1712.
wandering the halls in the classics
department. How's tricks?
"Myfriendgavemesomebadacidla
stnightandistillcan'tfiggeroutwh
olambutlthinkl'mreallyagreekcanal
oupe.Ifonlylfindacanlgottagoand...,
the poor, dazed man blurted out.
Our first sincere and unbiased
conclusion is that one of the
major campus issues is lack of cans.
"Why are they digging all those ;
holes all over the place? I've fallen
into three of them already," said
an education student.
How's tricks, we postulated in
front of a science student, replete
with briefcase and bottle-bottom
glasses.
"It's all a gas except for my
Chem 110 lab partner, Clyde
Tingledwarf. He's really wierd,"
the student responded.
How's tricks, we asked a
slick-looking young commerce
gentleman in Angus.
"Business-wise, things aren't
too good. As you know, all those
goddam workers striking has
really screwed up the country
economy-wise.
"But object-wise, I've really
been getting my share of chicks,
you know, broads, over at the frat
house.
"I guess I'd have to say, and
seriously, I mean, frankly now,
that sex-wise, things are A-Okay,
but business-wise,. the country is
going to the dogs."
Our second conclusion,
therefore, is that dogs working
under the name of Clyde
Tingledwarf are overrunning the
campus and indeed, the whole of
this great nation.
E & B RESTAURANT
4423 W. 10th Ave.
Open 24 Hours - Fully Licensed
FOR ALL UBC STUDENTS 15c OFF ON THE DOLLAR
THANKS TO THUNDERBIRDS
& GOOD LUCK NEXT TIME
OVERSEAS AUTO
12th & Alma Telephone 736-9804
Sports Car Accessories, also goodies for Datsun — Mazda —
Toyota - VW — Cortina - Mini and other popular imports.
(10% Discount With AMS Card)
■    v.- '•*   '..
'-■^wJ'JP-*?'-
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD:
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
-22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
WORSHIP - CELEBRATE
THANKSGIVING SUNDAY *'■■
9:30 a.m.—Discussion: "Responsible Roles
in the Family."
10:30a.m.-Folksong Mass
Thanksgiving Day — 5 p.m. Reservation
Dinner. Phone 224-1614 or 224-3328
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd. across from Admin. Bldg.
WORLD
WIDE
TRAVEL
YOUR OFFICIAL TRAVEL AGENTS
ON THE CAMPUS
FOR ALL
YOUR TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS
AMERICAN EXPRESS REPRESENTATIVE
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
SORRY
The Printer
Has Reneged
Directories Will Not Be Available
Until LATE NEXT WEEK
Pre-Sale Tickets Still    ^£.
Available For    #3y
(AFTER PUBLICATION PRICE IS $1.00)        ~
AT THE BOOKSTORE
AND SUB
THl UBC's "WHO'S WHO"
BIRD CALLS

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