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The Ubyssey Mar 26, 1970

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Array Senate approves bid to aid Indian enrolment
The UBC senate Wednesday night approved in
principle three motions that will make it much easier
for native Indians to get into UBC.
The motions were introduced by student senator
D„ J. O'Donnell, chairman of a special committee to
study ways to encourage Indian envolvement at UBC.
The first motion said a program for counselling
native Indian students be provided and that
information about university education be
communicated to prospective students throughout the
province.
The second motion called for "a streamlining of
the admission process for native Indian students to
reduce administrative hurdles." It was referred to the
senate admissions committee to decide how it would
be done.
The third motion, recommended that an
introductory program for native Indian students be
referred to a special committee of senate. The
committee will look at possible special programs to
make university work easier for Indians without the
educational background of non-Indians.
A fourth motion, however, was tabled by senate
for lack of information. It asked that the registrar be
instructed "to waive formal educational requirements
for native Indian students who otherwise can establish
their capacity to undertake university work."
Senators also showed a concern for environmental
problems in -opposing the siting of the law building
north of Marine Drive, near the administration
president's residence.
"Everything   outside   Marine   Drive   should   be
preserved as a park," said anthropology prof Bill
Willmott to the general agreement of the other
senators.
Anthropology and sociology department head
Cyril Belshaw also expressed concern about the general
movement of the growth of the campus in a southerly
direction
The law building should be situated close to the
faculties of arts and commerce, he said.
He criticized the lack of an overall plan for campus
construction.
Medicine prof Sydney Friedman then moved that
"senate view with displeasure the idea of starting
construction on the north side of Marine Drive.
To page 2: see SECOND-YEAR
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT activist Fred Ferdman, seen here at VSM protest against AMS in January, was
convicted of causing a disturbance while selling newspapers at mealtime in Totem Park. Ferdman, a grad student in
' math, was given a one-year suspended sentence in University Hill provincial court Wednesday.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 43 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 1970
48
228-2305
GAGE TO STUDENTS:
General meeting void;
new AMS council meets
and the show goes on
The motions passed at last Thursday's Alma Mater
Society general meeting, have been declared illegal
because there wasn't a quorum present.
A quorum of 2,000 students is needed in order to
pass any motions.
The AMS has called another general meeting for
Wednesday, at 12:30 in front of the library.
"It will last 20 minutes and will only deal with the
pub and pool expenditures," internal affairs officer Sue
Kennedy said.
Unless the pub expenditure of $225,000 is passed,
plans to build the pub cannot continue.
If it is passed, the pub will be ready for operation in
January. If the motion is not passed, the earliest the pub
could be ready would be the following September.
"It all comes down to whether the students want a
pub next year or not," Kennedy said.
At AMS council meeting Monday night, members
voted to support' AMS president Tony Hodge's
presentation to the Vancouver city council opposing the
Royal Vancouver Yacht Club's plan to build a private
parking lot on a public beach.
Council unanimously okayed Nate Smith, arts 3, as
next year's editor-in-chief of The Ubyssey.
A motion to reiterate council's stand taken at the
general meeting, that students be represented on all tenure
committees, was passed.
Council meetings will now be held on Wednesday
nights instead of Monday nights.
You wont judge tenure'
By SANDY KASS
■- Administration president Walter Gage has said
unofficially   that   he   would   not   approve   of student
- representation on the UBC senior appointments
committee.
While he has made no official statement, he indicated
his unofficial position in a phone conversation with Alma
Mater Society president Tony Hodge yesterday.
He also indicated that he would not place a time limit
on the appointments committee's review of the tenure
.committee's denial of tenure to English profs Brian Mayne
and David Powell.
The committee met last Tuesday to establish
procedures for its review.
The standing presidential committee normally deals
with recommendations for appointment, reappointment,
and promotion of faculty members at the level of
associate professor or above.
The 28 senior faculty members drawn from almost all
/acuities are individually chosen by Gage.
However, English department head Robert Jordan,
French department head L. L. Bongie, and home
economics director Melvin Lee have relinquished their
membership on the committee for the duration of the
review.
The reason for this is their involvement with the cases
before the committee was assigned to review them.
The committee now consists of 25 members.
Committee head and pharmaceutical dean Bernard
Riedel said the committee agreed Tuesday that in the first
stage of its review it will invite Powell, Mayne, Jordan,
and acting dean of arts Doug Kenny to appear before it to
state their positions and answer questions.
Riedel said the nature of these discussions will act as
a guide for future meetings of the committee.
The committee has scheduled four meetings in the
next two weeks to review the disputed cases, but Riedel
said the committee won't have any idea as to how long
the full review will take until the end of these meetings.
"I am sure this committee will conduct a thorough
examination of the problems at issue, and will make
certain that the two individuals involved are given right
and fair treatment," said Gage following Tuesday's
meeting.
He urged the committee to proceed as quickly as
possible in its review.
Riedel said that the views of those students most
concerned, graduate and honors English students, will be
sought by the committee.
He added that other students will be free to make
written submissions to the committee.
However, in accordance with Gage's
recommendation, student representation on the
committee itself will not be considered.
Women to declare war on Canada?
The Vancouver Women's Caucus has threatened to
declare war on the Canadian government.
A statement released Friday by the caucus said:
"The federal abortion laws kill 2,000 women through
illegal abortions a year. We consider the government of
Canada is in a state of war with the women of Canada.
If steps are not taken to implement our demands by
May 11, 1970 at 3 p.m., we will be forced to respond
by declaring war on the Canadian government."
The demands mentioned include the removal of
abortion laws from the criminal code, the pardon of all
persons convicted under the abortion laws and the
researching of safe birth control and abortion by the
federal government.
To publicize their demands, the Caucus has
declared the week beginning May 9 to be Abortion
Week in Canada. A cavalcade will leave Vancouver on
that date to present the demands in Ottawa. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  26,  1970
Second-year
restrictions study?
From page 1
This was carried overwhelmingly by senate.
Scratch one law building site.
The senate also endorsed a recommendation by registrar Jack
Parnall that a study be made to see if students seeking admission to
second year at UBC should have a grade point average of at least 2.4
and first year enrolment limits be reduced from 3,400 to 3,000.
The purpose of this study is to enable the university to
accommodate the increasing number of students entering third year
at UBC from the regional colleges.
These restrictions would take effect in Sept. 1971 if
implemented. The decision on the restrictions will be made by
senate not later than the May meeting.
The senate also passed a motion by education prof Roland
Gray calling on the provincial government to establish a commission
on higher education. The purpose of this commission would be to
develop a master plan which will make provision for the growth in
higher education over the next ten years.
Indians await future
Fort Lawton action
SEATTLE (UNS) - Indians laying claim to 1,100-acre Fort
Lawton here are still camping beside the fort, waiting until their
next invasion of the U.S. Army lands.
Already the Indians have occupied the fort by invading it
twice, but both times they have been carried off by military police
and arrested in large numbers for trespassing on military property.
They are claiming the fort land, due to be declared surplus by
the army, by right of discovery.
An ancient treaty in the U.S. says that land taken over by
federal authorities reverts to its original owners when the
government no longer needs it.
"What we really want now is lots of publicity, so everyone in
the United States and Canada knows the Indians have laid claim to
this land," an Indian spokesman said Wednesday.
She said the Indians were encouraged by a rumor that the fort
would be declared surplus land next week instead of in July, as was
expected.
All those arrested in the two occupations are going to ask for a
remand when they appear in court Friday. They want to postpone
the trials until the land is made surplus and its future ownership
settled.
"Otherwise most of our leaders could be in jail when the
crucial decisions are being made," the spokesman explained.
She said many B.C. Indians will be going to Seattle for the
weekend to join the undetermined number already there.
They still need money. Donations would be very welcome at
United Indians of All Tribes, P.O. Box 508. Seattle, Wash., 98111.
Citizenship survey
results released
Contrary to the latest copy of UBC Reports, extensive figures
have been compiled on the citizenship make-up of UBC faculty and
teaching staff, said former graduate student association president Art
Smolensky Wednesday.
Smolensky's statistics show that only 56 per cent of UBC
faculty obtained their first degree in Canada. In the faculty of arts,
only 38 per cent of the faculty members obtained their first degree
here.
Smolensky has taken a survey to determine how many people
are or have become Canadian citizens.
Based on this survey, he has calculated that 61 per cent of the
faculty of arts are Canadian. Of the remaining faculty, 26 per cent
are American citizens.
Most of the younger professors hired are American rather than
Canadian. In the faculty of arts only 24 per cent of the assistant
professors are Canadian, whereas 47 per cent are American. Of the
full professors, 38 per cent are Canadian and 24 per cent are
American.
In the anthropology department only seven faculty members
are Canadian, whereas 27 are non-Canadian. In the English
department, 35 faculty members are Canadian. Of the remaining 58,
34 are American.
The faculties with the highest concentration of Canadian
teachers are the professional faculties: applied science, medicine,
nursing, phramacy, and law.
"This is because most professional societies require a Canadian
certificate, or Canadian citizenship, of their members in order to
practice," Smolensky said.
Before we deteriorate into all those
irrelevant yet irresistible "thoughts" that last
columns tend to produce—just a brief
smorgasbord of some relevant information.
• Speak Easy has been hounded by
calls and mail concerning housing over the
summer in Vancouver from UBC students
whose leases are up and from out of town
people arriving this summer. Could all these
souls moving from their abodes come April or
May, give us a ring with the information. Short
of the necessary development of indexing a
central housing file, perhaps Speak Easy can
function to ease some of the pressure.
• Pen pals — want one, need one?
Requests have been made from various parts of
the country and perhaps links can be forged
with other university campusses regarding this
endeavor. Drop your name off at Speak Easy, if
interested.
To sum up for this year, with a minimum
amount of sop, what we feel (and we're
prejudiced of course) Speak Easy has
accomplished  would fill reams of paper.
Our plans for the coming year are many
and varied, but largely revolve around more
"out-reach" to where students are: more Speak
Easy sponsored programs to meet presenting
issues. What we intend to preserve by all
manner and means necessary is our student
autonomy, our informal nature, and our desire
to relate to people first — paper, never. What
has been brought home again and again to
Speak Easy staff, however, and here is where
you, UBC student in the mall-street, come
in . . . the problem is that in too many areas,
we are, as most such services, if not just a
band-aid solution, then after the fact. Concern
and publication of the specific issues perhaps is
a first step towards change.
Speak Easy can give information regarding
birth control, or abortion, we can help to
alleviate a foreboding and distressing housing
situation, we can sponsor columns to inform
university students of their position regarding
financial aid or welfare. But alone, we cannot
provide long-range, meaningful changes to
eliminate the issues, to eliminate the need for
bandaid solutions. The first step is
identification of the problem. The next is
organization. And that takes people — that
takes you.
us a chance to let our hair down, too.
We're not as square as you think! Behind our   a  water-colour  effect  with   unusual   depth  and
seemingly straight-laced image, there throb some
pretty way-out projects. And people.
Alcan is involved in many unexpected areas.
Because we do a lot more than just produce
aluminum. We and others try to find new uses
for it.
For example, one new use that came to our attention was developed in Belgium and refined by a
Montreal artist. Through a process called
Aluchromie, he "paints" on specially prepared
aluminum panels. The resulting work of art has
perspective, and endless applications in art and
architecture.
And that's just one of the exciting new developments in aluminum.
Alcan researchers and scientists are continually
searching for better ways to do things with
aluminum. And it's not always easy. Often they
have to struggle for years to find ways of making
their ideas come to life.
So you see, they aren't the only ones who have
to cope with hairy problems.
-*
ALUMINUM  COMPANY OF CANADA. LTD   'ALCAN
'ALCi Thursday, March  26,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Investigation committee not impartial—Briemberg
The three-member committee to hear the dismissal
cases of six suspended Simon Fraser University faculty
•members has finally been constituted.
The committee will decide whether Mordecai
Briemberg, Prudence Wheeldon, Louis Feldhammer, Saghir
Ahmad, John Leggett, and David Potter are to be fired
because of their roles in the political science, sociology
and anthropology department strike in October and
November of last year.
The strike was a result of an administration decision
' not to grant tenure to eight PSA faculty members and to
set up a committee to watch over the workings of that
department.
The SFU administration was accused last spring of
carrying   out   a   witch   hunt   against   radicals   in   the
department. When concerned faculty members attempted
to discuss the problem with the administration, it refused,
arguing that nothing could be gained from such
discussions.
Faculty members then had no alternative but to
strike in order to make their demands heard. The strike
received wide support from students in all departments at
SFU. The fall strike lasted about three months until the
administration slapped a labor injunction on the strikers.
After the injunction was served the strikers quickly
began losing support and the strike ended. However, the
struggle is far from over.
The professors involved were suspended after the
strike. This means they are still allowed the use of their
offices and are drawing salaries, but are not allowed to
—maureen gans photo
FORMER UBYSSEY cartoonists and photo editors sure get around. Arnold Saba, left, and Kurt Hilger revisited the
academic thing Wednesday for a heavy peace'n'love trip. See PF 4 and 5 today for more of what they're up to.
AMS opinion poll results released
The results of the student opinion survey conducted
by the AMS earlier in the year have finally been correlated
and made public.
The survey was designed at a cost of about $2500 to
tell the AMS reps what the students had elected them to
do. It seems that in the fifty years the organization has
~ existed,   its  members  haven't   known  what  they  are
„ supposed to be doing.
The students showed in the survey that the overall
purpose of the AMS should be to act as "an agency
through which student activity is co-ordinated, organized,
promoted and financed; aimed at total involvement of all
students, but speaking for majority interests, not minority
interests."
There were three areas in which the students thought
** that the AMS should concentrate its efforts. These are
enhancement of the academic environment, improvement
- of the students' economic and living standards, and more
involvement in the community.
The first two areas showed up as being relatively
equal in importance and they were closely followed by
the third area.
Several ideas were proposed on how these purposes
could be achieved including petitioning government for
better financing, more activity in the area of student
"housing   and   employment,   increase  efficiency  in  the
^ operation of SUB, and more seminars on community
problems.
New AMS president Tony Hodge said that the survey
would mean that some major structural changes would
.Rebates coming
The Great Annual Rebate is with us again.
Starting April 6 the UBC bookstore will give a
five per cent rebate to students on all articles
bought within the preceding year.
To receive the rebate students should present
sales slips at the cashier's desk.
have to be made in the AMS next year.
"We will be discussing at future meetings now the
organization should be structured to best serve the
students," said Hodge.
lecture.
At the time of the suspensions, it was decided a
committee would be set up later to consider dismissing
the professors. The committee was to be made up of one
nominee of the administration, one representative of the
faculty, and one person agreed on by both groups.
Administration president Ken Strand's nominee is
Stefan Dupre, University of Toronto political science and
economics professor. The faculty's nominee is University
of Saskatchewan psychology prof William Livant.
Seventeen internationally-acknowledged scholars
were nominated by Livant to fill the third position. The
list included Nobel prize winner Salvadore Luria, a
professor on international law at Cornell, Harrop
Freeman, a consultant to the American government on
armaments and civil liberties, and Richard Falk, a member
of the International Human Rights Commission.
"All these 17 were rejected by Dupre without any
statement of reason. The proposal of additional names
were totally ignored," said Briemberg.
Instead Dupre declared an impasse and the B.C.
supreme court was asked to appoint Earl Palmer, a law
professor at the University of Western Ontario, as the
third person.
Palmer is connected with Dupre (Strand's nominee)
through the Woods report on which they both worked.
The Woods report was a federal government
commission report which made anti-labor
recommendations in December 1968 restricting effective
strike action by trade unionists. Palmer denied that these
connections mean anything. "It is the biggest bunch of
bullshit I have heard in long time," he said.
"It is important to notice that the dismissal
proceedings will be concerned with breach of employment
contracts arising from the strike, and that two of the
members of the committee are anti-labor and anti-strike,"
said Briemberg.
Briemberg also pointed out there are no court records
showing the presentation of an impasse to the court.
Louis Kampf, first vice-president of the Modern
Language Association of America said in a letter to
Livant: "Dr. Dupre obviously wants a list of people who
will be carbon copies of his own thinking."
"The rejection (of the list of 17 scholars) is not only
an insult to fair judicial procedure, it is also an insult to
the idea of scholarship itself. If the rejection should stand,
it is a black mark against the spirit of free inquiry at
Simon Fraser," wrote Kampf.
"There are important issues of academic freedom
involved and it would therefore be most desirable that the
committee review the events leadinj up to the strike and
suspension," said Briemberg.
A similar letter was written by another nominee
Richard Wasserton, a professor of law and philosophy at
the Los Angeles School of Law.
"It seems inconceivable to me that any reasonable
person could summarily reject as unqualified or unsuitable
all these nominees. I think that Dupre's rejection indicates
a   remarkable   unwillingness   to   have   the   matters   in
To page 28: see SFU
KENNETH
STRAND
President of SFU
STEFOR
DUPRE
Strand's Nominee
Political Science & Economics
University of Toronto
GERARD
DION
Director of Woods Report
Laval University
CARROTHERS
ex-UBC professor
Director of Woods Report
Dean of Law School
University of Western Ontario
Now president at
University of Calgary
CONNECTIONS
CRISPO
Director of Woods Report
Political Science & Economics
University of Toronto
EARL
PALMER
Research Director of
Woods Report
Junior of Carrothers' faculty
Professor of Law
University of Western Ontario
ROGOW
Research Director of
Woods Report
Dept. of Economic &
Commerce
PSA Trustee
This diagram was designed by PSA's Mordecai Briemberg. It illustrates the connection between Professor Stefan Dupre,
the administration's nominee and Professor Earl Palmer, the "impartial" third member of the committee considering
the dismissal of six suspended SFU faculty. See story at top of page. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March 26,  1970
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
MARCH 26,1970
The word was no
Quick now, who remembers student
representation? Surely you must have vague memories
of it. Until about two years ago it was a matter of
heated debate — should students have some
representation (not parity, mind you, but some
representation) on faculty and administration
committees dealing with matters of student concern.
If you had trouble remembering it. as an issue, it
was probably because, like us, you thought it was
becoming something to be taken for granted. After all
hasn't every administration official, dean and
department head been prattling about "the important
role students can play in the university" provided they
remember their place?
But now, administration president Walter Gage has
said no to the AMS request that four students be added
to the senior appointments committee, which will make
the final decision on the dismissal of English profs Brian
Mayne and David Powell. Of course, it won't make any
difference in the result of the investigation. There is
very little four students could have done on a
committee with 28 (count-em, 28) faculty members. As
is the situation on most committees and on the senate,
the four students would have been only a token,
powerless group whose existence might help the
administration's attempts to legitimize the inevitable
firings of Mayne and Powell.
However, the issue is one of principle. The
administration has obviously decided that even
tokenism should go only so far. It pats the students on
the head and tells them they can be represented (if not
listened to) on the committee deciding whether chapter
27 of a particular text will be required or recommended
reading, but says they have no business deciding the
kind of instruction they will receive.
Supposedly, the controversy surrounding the
Mayne-Powell case stems from the old question of
teaching vs. research. The two are, by all accounts,
excellent teachers but have few publications gathering
dust in forgotten corners of university libraries.
Now we're right back where we started from.
Mayne and Powell will be judged by a committee made
up fully of faculty members and consequently, will be
judged only on their publications. (The chairman of the
committee even says "scholars" from other universities
will be asked for their opinions on the two prof's
publications. Wonderful.) We are told that teaching will |
be given equal consideration with research. How can
that happen if students, the only people qualified and
experienced to judge a professor's teaching ability, are
not even represented on the committee?
Oh, well. There's always the food services advisory
committee. Just think what fun you can have being
out-voted on price increases.
-N.S.
Editor: Michael Finlay
Newi    Paul  Knoxi
City  Nate Smith)
Managing       Bruce  Curti#
Wire       Irene  WasilewskS
Sports  Jim Maddin
Senior   John Twigg
Photo      Dave Enns
Ass't News   Maurice Bridge
Ass't City  John Andersen
Page Friday  Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Where have all the optimists gone,
long time passing?
Yep, another glorious year (our
fifty-first) has —30-ed and with it pass
(at least we hope we pass. Profs, are
you reading?) one of the finest staffs
ever collected, or should that be
contracted, as in disease?
In any case, (Nate, can you help me
find another cliche?) these worked,
most of them a little more than the
others:
Les Plommer (who is sweet) helped
Paul (nokout) Knox on newsdesk, as
did Jennifer (perfect grammer) Jordan,
who also happened to be Maurice
Bridge's groupie. You see. Bridge was
Knoxout's ass'tant and it was very
complicated but they all worked it
out .. .
City desk is another story. Smith
started (and for the first year in ages)
and finished, aided ably by Brian
Mc(pass)Watters (because of all the
booze he drinked). Token rad John
Andersen helped too, but ended up
pulling his wire editor job away from
former wire ed Irene Wasilewski. So
did liberated girl Robin Burgess.
Other eds who put their name up
above included sports ed Jungle Jim
Maddenin, photo ed Bruce Stout, or
should that be Dave Enns, or Dinky
(David)   Bowerman   or  Maureen  Gans
To page 5
"AM right, so he passed his oral exams at 12, 5,000 students
attend his lectures and he leads one hell of a graduate seminar.
But where are his publications?"
LETTERS
Praise
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
This being your last
publication day of the year, we
thought it appropriate to offer
our congratulations.
The past year has been by far
the finest in The Ubyssey's long
and glorious history. Your campus
and off-campus news coverage and
your brilliant features such as the
expose of the forest industries
have been superb. Try as we
might, we cannot think of a single
point on which to criticize your
paper.
Despite your success this year,
we have every confidence that
next year's Ubyssey will be even
better.
MICHAEL FINLAY
arts 4
NATE SMITH
Buses
arts 3
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am concerned about the
increase in bus fares and B.C.
Hydro's ridiculous new policy of
requiring bus patrons to have
exact change ready. However,
many students are unable to
boycott buses as they have been
urged to do.
I would like to suggest that
people who are as concerned as I
am and who have to take the bus
from time to time deposit their 25
cent fare entirely in pennies.
Hydro will have to spend more
time and energy in counting its
money. The fare boxes will fill up
faster and will have to be emptied
more often. Perhaps in this way
we can demonstrate our iritation
at such absurd policies.
AN OCCASIONAL
BUS PATRON
Scholarships
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
For years, scholarships have
been offered as incentives to allow
hard-working students to attend
university, where they can work
harder. Bursaries have served the
same purpose for those in serious
need of finances.
However, money is no longer
considered the incentive it once
was. The common student claim
that one studies hard in order to
get some scholarship does not
carry much weight. If a student
studies, he does so only for a goal
that is more important to
him—prestige of marks, desire to
enter grad school or personal
feeling of achievement.
If donors of scholarships wish
to encourage participation and
achievement by students, they
should start looking for ways of
making courses more meaningful
and giving the students a chance
to become involved in society
through meaningful jobs and
social responsibility. As for the
money, that should be given as
bursaries to those who most need
it.
At present, scholarships only
perpetuate the financial
restrictions that prevent the poor
from attending university.
DAN BANOV
commerce 3
Typists
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to warn all people
seeking typists for their essays to
beware of a man living on West
Twenty-First Avenue. His finished
essay may cost five to 10 cents
above the estimate and the quality
of the work is deplorable.
My most recent shafting was
returned to me after five days and
appeared to have been done by
two different typists or on two
different typewriters. Errors were
nicely spaced throughout the
essay, footnotes were
incorporated into the body of the
essay and, in many cases, not
numbered, errors were scratched
out and corrected in ink, typed
mistakes were not erased, my
instructions to the typist were
typed out and charged for, pages
were numbered incorrectly and I
was charged $8.35 for 26 pages of
useless trash. The 29 pages for
which I was charged also included
two pages of instructions and one
page with only four lines.
G. H. DUNBAR
NOT PANTHERS
America
is source
of hatred
By CARLTON FRANCO
Early last month, I read a
rather disgusting Province article
on the Black Panthers, written by'
a Mr. Jon Harper. Harper has
charged that the Panthers have .
been trying to offer
rationalizations for their use of
violence and hatred. It is quite
apparent that he is ignorant and
has been misled into thinking the
Panthers are the purveyors of
violence and hatred in America.
Mr. Harper, Sir, it is white*
America and its institutions that
have always rationalized practices
of violence and hatred against
black people, and still continue to
do so.
In the early days, when black
people were lynched, shot at, had
their churches bombed and were
prevented from entering public
facilities, the broader segments of""
white America always
rationalized their guilt by
blaming the Ku Klux Klan, the
John Birchers and Jim Crowism.
It was never America, it was
always the southern states. But as
Black people moved north or east
or west they quickly found out •
that violence and hatred were
inherent within the whole
structure of American society and
were not confined to any
geographical area or institution.
These rationalizations continue
today. The murders of Malcolm
X, Medgar Evers and Martin
Luther King are all made to look
as though they were the work of .
some mentally deranged person
like James Earl Ray rather than
the racist American institutions
that are the true carriers of
violence and hatred.
Therefore, Mr. Harper, I
believe you have focused your
attack in the wrong direction. The *
truth is that white America has
always been the executor of
violence and hatred with black
people as the recipients. Hence
the Black Panthers do not need to
rationalize. They are only fighting
for their survival and the survival
of black people, using the best
means necessary. The allies did
not use love and non-violence to
combat the violence and hatred of
the Germans in the second world
war.
Furthermore I do not see
America using love and
non-violence to gain so-called
"freedom" for the people of
Vietnam. One can always hear
rationalizations for dropping
bombs on Vietnam, but when
Black people in America stand up
and fight for their freedom we
hear such phrases as "mindless
violence".
Well, Jon Baby, if white
America does not want violence,
tell them to stop using violence in
Vietnam, in the ghettoes and in
other places across the world.
Finally, a Cleaver, Newton or
Seale could in no way organize
more violence anB hatred than a
Daley, Reagan or Hoffman. If
America had justice, the reverse
would happen: Daley, Reagan and
Hoffman would be the ones in jail"""
for the practice of violence and
hatred.
Carlton Franco is a former
Simon Fraser University student
now working with the department
of Indian affairs. Thursday, March  26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student scabs damage hope for unity
By DICK BETTS
A scab is anyone who takes employment at an agency
whose employees are on strike or locked out.
The incidences of students scabbing on workers this
year could be high because jobs will be extremely difficult
to find for students and the workers of this province will
be having more trouble with their bosses.
These two factors will contribute to students acting
as strike-breakers in their desperation to return to this
goddam place.
But compare stakes. The striker probably has a family
to look after. He is supporting himself. The job is all he
has as capital on which to live. With these things in mind
the worker takes a fairly dim view of students scabbing.
I spent a lot of time on the B.C. Tel picket lines last
summer during one of the biggest student scabbing
incidents in the province. It was an exposure to a volatile
situation, a situation of ignorance on one side and
bitterness on the other.
Many students who crossed the picket lines were
ignorant of the total situation. They didn't realize that the
job they held really belonged to someone else. They
didn't realize that in their individualistic rush for money,
and jobs they were alienating important potential union
support in tackling the over-all job crisis.
What is most important they didn't realize the
problems involved in the bargaining process between
workers and management. With Bill 33 and the Woods
Report, legislation has made the strike as ineffectual as
possible in securing the rights of workers to fair
bargaining.
Scabbing has made the problems more difficult for
workers. Workers, through their unions, have contributed
to the running of this and other universities, but the
student response to the B.C. Tel workers was scabbing.
Many students remained unemployed last summer
but the situation will be worse this summer.
The Manpower ethic is if there is a job for a student
he can take it regardless of whether or not he is
scabbing. But Manpower is a government agency like the
Woods Commission. The federal and provincial
governments are anti-labor. The encouragement is there
for students to be like-wise.
This summer, with up to 200,000 workers out on
strike in the province of B.C. alone, the temptation is
going to be great for the potential scab. In fact the unions
and workers are going to be blamed for the over-all job
shortage.
With inflation and wage freezes on the way plus the
possibility of decreased job securities in the longshore
dispute it is no wonder that workers in Canada are
becoming a little uptight. These problems cannot be
placed on the shoulders of the unions. They lie with the
economic practices of the federal and provincial
governments.
The economic problems are originating with U.S.
spending on the war in Vietnam. This has been
substantiated by U.S. and Canadian economists. With our
branch-plant economy, the economic ills of the U.S. are
automatically translated to the Canadian people. The
result is a tightening of government aid to students and an
increasing job shortage.
The ultimate causes go to the roots of Canada's
situation, not union practices. Therefore solidarity, not
self-interst, is needed to solve the problem.
A student who scabs is perhaps solving his problems
for this year but what about next year when the situation
could become worse? Many workers on the B.C. Tel
picket lines saw the need for joint action in solving all
employment crises, those of students and those of their
own. The students who scabbed did not encourage joint
action between unions and student employment groups.
Some of this hope to do something to combat
student scabbing. Last year action was taken too late. The
actions of the scabs were protected by law, the law being
on-the side of owners of industry and not the workers.
A ban was placed on the picket lines last year on
intimidating scabs. This included, in many cases, talking
to students who crossed the lines. There was nothing we
could do in a direct action sense.
Indirect action was taken and the AMS passed a
motion condemning student scabbing but this was just a
motion that could not be backed up.
This year anticipating a scab crisis and making plans
to combat it is probably the most constructive type of
action that can be done. When the law is explicitly against
you there is not much that can be done except doing
educational work on the issue.
The Action Committee for Unemployed Youth,
formerly TACUS (the S being for students), was the main
student contingent on the side of the workers last
summer. We hope to do more work on the problem this
year in conjunction with unions, the Community
Education and Research Centre and other student groups
concerned with all aspects of student unemployment.
There will be a meeting at the Research Centre, 434
West Pender, on Apr. 15, time to be announced later, to
co-ordinate ideas on action on the problem of student
scabbing. All interested should contact the centre
(683-2630) for more information. Ask for Saghi or Mord.
MORE LETTERS
Obligation
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In a recent interview with the
Vancouver Express The Ubyssey's
new editor said he will give more
coverage to community issues and
less to the campus. Student
power, he implies, was irrelevant
to student aims because many of
the real decisions are made by
outsiders who control the
community too.
He is right that students are
having little impact. But that is
not because outsiders have
control. It is because students in
power will not grapple with
complex questions. The Ubyssey
will not research many-sided
problems. Differences of opinion,
reflecting differing views of
intricate choices seen close at
hand, are dismissed as '"petty
quarrelling". Student committee
members, senate members, and
departmental unions simply
evaporate.
This is easy to understand.
Distant fields do look greener. It
is easier to prescribe for an
outside issue than to probe and
finally take a view on something
that is plainly visible, something
you know about.
May I finish this letter by
referring to a related question?
Recently you criticized me for
saying that it was not the job of
UBC to serve the community.
Although it has been repeated on
your pages several times, no-one
from The Ubyssey has invited me
to defend this opinion.
Let me then expand it. As an
economist specializing in things
that get done outside the
market-place, I have sympathy
with the demand for more
pollution studies. Many of B.C.'s
problems are special to the west
coast, and we cannot rely on
research and teaching done
elsewhere.
But this research need is only
one of many. The
community-B.C. and the whole
world—need applied research on
thousands of questions. Further,
because applied research must
lean on basic research,
scholarship, and philosophy, the
university must find room for
them too. Finally, as you have
often pointed out, the university
has an urgent teaching job to do.
We can't do everything. So the
hard question is raised: in what
proportions is UBC to mix
teaching, applied, and basic
research?
The answer suggested (in the
pollution debate in Senate) was
that we should decide on the
proportions "responding to the
community needs". As for the
direction of applied research, this
answer isn't all wrong. Indeed, the
very fact that we have schools of
community planning, agricultural
science, dentistry, theatre and so
on suggest that we are, if
anything, all too responsive to
community needs. It may well be
that we should now help more
applied researchers to look at
pollution and our environment.
The Senate is going to find out.
But applied research isn't
everything. And deciding on the
university proportions by
referring to and publicizing what
the community wants and needs is
to respond to the very community
control which for universities in
B.C. and in Canada has been
minor. But even here, outside
interference in the humanities, the
social sciences, and the "harder"
disciplines has been attempted. In
the U.S., Europe, Asia and Africa,
students and faculty are
continuing the desperate struggle
of former decades and centuries
to preserve the university's
independence, detachment and
objectivity in the face of
community, government or party
attempts to influence or censor
what is studied and taught.
The   university,   in   rejecting
priority for "community", is not
simply an escapist. In the long
run, the community will value the
detached teaching and the basic
research. Further, it will value the
new approaches, alternative goals,
and disinterested criticism that a
university, free from an obligation
to serve the community, but
existing in the community, can
offer. But these are offered only if
the university steadfastly rejects
community judgements and insists
on its own autonomy. It was to
plead for such steadfastness that I
argued that the university has no
obligation to serve the
community. And it is to
encourage vigilance against
outside influence that I now urge
the Ubyssey not to abandon its
difficult role as university
conscience.
ANTHONY D. SCOTT
Professor of economics
- It was never our intention to
ignore the campus in favor of
off-campus events. The point is
that the university does not
operate in a vacuum, its problems
are directly related to the larger
political, economic and social
problems that concern the
community as a whole. The
university is useless if education
does not introduce the student to
the relevant current issues in
society. Student power is
important, but improvements in
the nature of the university
should not be ends in themselves.
As for the community
obligation of the university itself,
the highest priority should be
placed upon the research that may
contribute to the solution of the
most immediate problems.
Your definition of
"community" is totally different
from ours. You refer to the
government and the business elite
of the community. We refer to the
majority of the population,
people who pay taxes toward the
university but are unlikely to ever
see their children come here.
/ The university must begin to
serve the latter; it already does an
excellent job in serving the
former. The university is not now
and never has been objective.
Its dependence on the
government and its role as a
corporate training school prevent
it. The academic freedom ydu
cherish is allowed, but allowed
only within the context of the
existing system. Have you already
forgotten the purge that took
place at Simon Fraser University
when some faculty members
expressed radical views?
Granted, no such purge  has
occurred at  UBC, but has UBC
ever had a faculty member who so
seriously     challenged    the
yuniversity's  role? —Ed.
Food services
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I note that at a recent meeting
some of the students have
requested that a special
committee be set up with the
purpose of examining the
university food services.
I am personally sure that any
competent group which cares to
look into the facts will find:
(1) the food services is
efficiently run;
(2) that in spite of great
difficulties associated with finance
the Food services management has
bent every effort to do everything
possible in the best interest of its
customers, the students;
(3) that in spite of the fact
that over the last three or four
years food prices and labour costs
everywhere have increased
substantially, the food services
management has been able to hold
down the rise in prices to an
extremely small amount whereas
every other food outlet in the area
has had to raise prices
enormously;
(4) that   the   recent   rise   in
prices announced to take place in
May is long overdue.
J. F. McLEAN,
Chairman,
Student-Faculty Committee,
Food Services.
From page 4
(what, a girl? She'll never make
plowboy photog ((we hope)) ). Others
still are John Twigg (no nasties cuz he's
writing), and the pf guys, except
they've got their own masthead so get
the hell out of here. Bruce Curtis too.
Reporters, er pubsters, er nacks,
were the sunshine kids (for a while)
Ginny Gait and Colleen Hammond,
except Gin became a cynic and
Hammond found a husband.
Sandy (big momma) Kass brought
Nate bagels each day, while Jan
O'Brien (Finlay's groupie ((who's he)))
showed she could write as did her
room-mate and fellow convert Linda
(whinnie, neigh) Hossie. Leslay
provided up to the Minot news while
Krawczyk Christened the PSA and
tenure affairs with her pressence. Fran
McGrath grathped for hot ones while
Bev Gelfond drooled 'tween classes.
Tarzwell took it'Laine down but Urve
Torva stood up for her rites. Drool all
you Sun and former Ubyssey hacks,
never has such a crowd of newshens
crowed ...
While they crowed, these cocks
clucked: Davies (he's had enough
publicity this year. Phil (the pill)
Barked for all he was Worth but John
Gibbs proved totally worthless (he quit
as ass'city and went to The Sun in time
for the lockout and is now languishing
on The Calgary Herald. Dave Schmidt
schmote us with his style while Murray
Kennedy and Dave (killer) Keillor and
Shane McPrune crooned. Bob
(rumored to be the son of) Bennett
told Bernard to Bischoff while John
Butler served Nick Orchard fruits. That
appalled Peter Ladner becasue it Is
Easter.
Dick Betts bettered the ed onto the
floor while Phil (no, he's not a pill)
Lingley lingered on to watch Steve
(specs) Lucas do his thing three times
Into the garbage can.
Photogs Brett Garrett, Marc
Kenton, Reg Faulkner, Keith Dunbar,
Barry Narod, Dirk Visser, Richard
Sullivan and Dick Button recorded the
whole show. Scott McCloy, Tony
Gallagher, Steve Millard and Laura
Patrick helped cliche the year away in
sports.
The printers, who guiltily published
the whole show (well, not the whole
show because we are still liable to
obscenity laws), were: Wayne
McDonald, George Tayler, Stan
Waring, Jimmy Pollock, Norm Holden,
Sid Reely, Ted Brown, Earl Lowry,
Doug Milne, Jack Hill, Colin Milne,
John Roberts, Frank Morrison, Ron
Jones, John McRae, Roger McPherson,
Dwayne Ball and a fella named Dave
(free lunch) Nelson, who is actually
human. Al Vince gets his name in too,
which is more than a lot of the
reporters we forgot. Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March 26,  1970
Cliff erosion
still on
Board's mind
The Vancouver park board's
plans to control erosion of the
Point Grey cliffs are not dead.
"We in the park board are
determined people," said
Ccommissioner Stuart Lefeaux
Tuesday. "We are not easily
deterred from our goals."
The park board had proposed
in December, 1967. to build a
24-foot-wide paved road (see Fig.
1) around Point Grey to prevent
the erosion, but public opinion
against the road made the board
adopt a second proposal in
November, 1969.
The new proposal is much the
same as the original, except the
road is now called a "foot path"
and the sand berm reaches to the
base of the cliffs, (see Fig. 2).
Lefeaux said the board is still
applying to the provincial
government for the $420,000
financial assistance.
"it is provincial government
property that is being eroded." he
said, "and it is a provincial
university that could be affected
by that erosion."
He said the board was
negotiating with groups such as
the Alma Mater Society and
Public Concerns to produce a
more acceptable proposal.
AMS    president-elect    Tony
driftwood-underlined.
whatdoe|JLin|gnX_
my dictionary says:
Ml come again Tomorrow
Hodge delivered a petition to
Premier W. A. C. Bennett on Dec.
19 1969. The petition was signed
by close to 5,000 residents and
protested the park board plans.
"We are aware of the cliff
erosion and support its immediate
and effective control, but we
know that it can be achieved
without the destruction of this
priceless community resource, an;'
ai a small fraction of the
half-a-milhon dollars requested b'»
the paries board from the
provincial government," the
petition said.
Hodge said a stalemate has
existed since the fall of 1969
"The board has not been able to
get the money requested nor has
it been, willing to change its
plans," he said.
However, Hodge said unofficial
discussions with the board
indicate they are in favor of a plan
without    a    roadway    and    the
retention of as much naturalness as
is feasibly possible.
"1 won't believe it until it's all
in writing though," added Hodge.
Engineering prof Ian Bain has
proposed several alternatives to
the board plans, the latest of
which appears on this page.
The objection to the board
pian. according to Pub-c
Concerns spoKesman Maria
Furstenwald is that it covers tl;o
natural beach under 10 feet of
sand and makes the water brea^
on a three-foot layer of gravel.
Tne dotted line on the above
photo shows approximately where
the board's plan would put the
level of the beach.
Meanwhile, the board is broke
and unable to do much until it
gets provincial funds. But as
Lefeaux said, the board is
determined to adopt some kind of
an erosion control plan.
Alternate plan
proposed by Bain
By DR. IAN BAIN
A new plan for protecting the base of the Point Grey cliffs
from marine erosion has been proposed by myself in a recent
brief to the Vancouver Parks Board.
The main component is an adjustable timber groin to be
built up like a fence in stages and extend 800 feet seaward from
the high tide mark, protecting the area of most need — below
Fort Camp and Cecil Green Park. It will dam up sand being
washed toward Spanish Banks by wave turbulence and currents,
and will be raised as the sand is impounded. A raised beach
advanced seaward will keep waves from washing sand away from
the foot of the cliff, so that a stable slope can become anchored
by vegetation.
The groin can be built this summer with the first stage
costing under $10,000. When filled with sand, the top can be
cut off and concealed with gravel and rock to keep it natural.
Not included are drains needed to conduct away
intermittent seepage and springs which cause gullies and weaken
the slope farther to the west.
Smaller cliffs less threatened by erosion can be protected
from wave wash by a three foot high barrier about 30 feet away
composed of beach boulders similar to the natural protection of
wooded stable slopes nearby. Both these and the groin can be
designed according to observations of the effect of the first
construction. Engineering students can make a research project
of it, and provide much needed data for any other coastal
construction.
The cost, totalling less than $20,000, is a small fraction of
the estimate for a two mile beach roadway of the 'sand and
gravel blanket' proposition which will wipe out the existing
valuable land and buildings with the least noticeable change to
the present beach and no deterioration of its quality. The first
installment of this protection can be constructed this summer in
about a week, and it is needed now!
The pictures on this page were
taken by Dirk Visser (top) and
Dave Enns (bottom). The poem is
by Reinhard, a student in UBC's
Creative Writing department. It
was written expressly for the
Point Grey beach hassle.
Dr. Ian Bain, the author of
the article on the left, is a member
of  Public   Concerns,  the  group
formed to protest the original
beach road, and is also an assistant
professor of engineering at UBC.
The lead article is based on
material supplied by Maria
Furstenwald, an assistant
professor of German at UBC and a
member of Public Concerns.
Layout was done by John
Twigg.
Scale    1" = 30'
- 265' - 315' t  	
'FUTURE    PUMPED   SAND   FILL
/FUTURE 'FREE1 FILL
• r-uiuKt   r-KM   i
/ (Waste   Fill)
( 3' of GRAVE
GRAVEL   PROTECTION
PAVED   2-LANE ROAD FUTURE   FILL  and   PARKING
^_(<24_'~1 /h21^
SAND-FILL • (Dredged)"
r>/ CUFFS
- Low   Water     Elev.   0.0'
Fig.1   DECEMBER   1967   STAGE 1   PROPOSAL.     (From   Swan   Wooster   Eng.,   Drawing 13.)
Total  Cost   $500,000.
 High   Water       Elev   163
12'   WIDE   GRAVELLED    WALKWAY)
,~ elev    19'V "
SAND ■^■..lOreaged,'
PR'-St.Nr   St-'A"-'■
■ Low   Water       c ev    G.);
Fig.2   NOVEMBER   1969   PROPOSAL      (From   Swan   Wooster   Eng     Drawing    A-323-i4.1
Total    Cost    S 425 OOO. Thursday, March  26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Ladner resigns from
persnickety watchdog
By PETER LADNER
Ex-student Senator
OK, Stuart Rush, you win.
You told me I was wasting my
time, that only Stan Persky could
stand up to all those harrumphs
and gravy suits, (and now he
seems to have given up.)
You were right; it was a waste
of time.
Nothing is different at UBC for
my having been on the senate for
six months, so I'm quitting. True,
I graduate this spring and don't
plan to be around next year, but
even if I did, I'd quit.
Friends have often asked me
this term, "What do you do on
senate?" I have to admit, pretty
well nothing because there was
nothing to do. Besides attending
regular and special senate
meetings, I sat on two
committees: the agenda
committee and the curriculum
committee.
The agenda committee is a
friendly meeting of the president,
vice-president, dean of arts, and a
few department heads and others,
and of course, its two students.
It spends about two hours a
month deciding what order items
should be listed on the agenda,
what excuses could be found for
ruling "objectionable" motions
out of order for senate meetings,
and chatting about the merits and
demerits of certain motions.
Then there was the curriculum
committee.
Picture about six people sitting
around a table on the second floor
of Cecil Green Park every two
weeks. A few of them have huge,
indexed university calendars
beside them.
The rest just leaf through
sheets of different colored lists of
courses. Imagine conversation
like, "Mr. Chairman, they can't
call this course anthrophorestry
301 because there already is a
course of that number listed in
the calendar." And: "Mr.
Chairman, can we call in Dr.
Toscanelli from the
geophysiological department to
explain why this course has four
credits instead of the usual
three?"
That's where the curriculum
committee is at.
That also sums up my view of
the   senate;   it's   nothing  but   a
Register
those
cars
Car owners living at Acadia
Park residences have suddenly
been told that unless they register
their cars by Friday, March 27,
they will be towed away.
Mr. W. Hobb, president of the
Householder's Association, made
an application for this year's
residents to be excused from
paying the $5 fee on the grounds
that there is less than a month of
classes left.
His application was turned
down by administration president
Dean Gage's student-faculty
advisory committee on parking.
persnickety watchdog over
academic carryings-on here. The
main concern of many senators
seems to be to protect their
academic domains from scholastic
interlopers.
No one ever asks why? on the
senate because they're too busy
answering how. Ideology isn't
dead; everyone just thinks it is.
They talk themselves into
believing Belshaws's federated
colleges proposal couldn't be
debated directly because it was a
minority proposal and it's against
the rules to present the minority
viewpoint. The real reason was the
none of the big-shots liked the
idea. They refuse to discuss policy
about hiring more Canadian profs
"because hiring and firing is not
our responsibility."
I think any student who runs
for senate, unless he really wants
to discuss whether we should limit
enrolment to 3,400 students or to
those with averages over 65 per
cent, is wasting his time.
Twelve students on a senate of
101 doesn't give a student
influence to university affairs; it's
just window-dressing.
It seems to me the best way to
get real things changed is to work
at a much lower level, in your
own department, to change things
you really care about and you
really know about. Those are the
issues that really mean something
to students.
THE TACTILE and the SENSORY
IN CASUAL CLOTHING - BODY SHIRTS
FLARES AND VESTS IN FABRICS
YOU CAN REALLY GROOVE ON
IF IT FEELS GOOD - DO IT
RICHARDS AND FARISH LTD.
786 GRANVILLE ST.
AND
THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
869 GRANVILLE ST. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  26,  1970
Amchitka, PSA, student
left made for a rather
boring year at UBC...
John Andersen takes a last look at 1969-70
It was all rather a bore really.
The year came and went with
all the profundity of a Vancouver
Express editorial.
Students came in September,
22,000 of them; (as one old
academic put it, this university
would be a real nice place if it
weren't for all these students)
most stayed, a few saw the light
and dropped out, some studied,
complained, screwed, smoked
dope, played cards while others
weren't too sure.
As in other years, about 70 per
cent of students either couldn't
give a damn or were unaware of
the fact that the world is going to
hell in a bucket. Another 28 per
cent were vaguely aware of the
fact but felt it was necessary to
use the "proper channels" to stop
the downward slide.
This leaves a two per cent
minority of activists, many of
whom wouldn't know a hammer
from a sickle or what to do with
them if they had either. Suffice it
to say that if these are the only
people we have to rely on to save
the world, we're in big trouble.
Food services continued to
serve meals with the same bland
aroma  as  a  well-used  mattress,
ANNUAL BOOK SALE
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not to mention their hamburgers
which resembled pterodactyl
pturd on a bun. Students
continued to complain about food
services. Nothing really new there.
What was new was that some
students got together for a change
and tried to do something to
combat rising food costs.
Black Cross food services was
the result, showing it was possible
to produce good food at a
reasonable price.
CLAM's aim was to radicalize
students around the issue of
American domination of Canada.
It tried to carry out its activities
in the realm of pure theory which
resulted in a group that sat around
and talked.
As a result, it attracted people
who liked to sit around and talk.
One bored CLAM member
summed up the result with the
comment: "CLAM is but a shell
of its former self."
about 250 members in Vancouver
and growing rapidly.
So much for the generalities.
Students came back to campus
last September to be confronted
with three Alma Mater Society
blunders.
First of all, there was this
election one; the summer to select
a premier/prime minister/god. The
AMS decided to get in on the
action by sponsoring a candidate
to run against education minister
X       if:K* Urn §m
HMtWf
Vancouver's Women's Caucus on the march protesting abortion laws.
Research-oriented profs
continued to give lectures with
the interest and content of last
year's want-ads.
Whither the left?
It whithered.
After the action-oriented,
love-freak, anarchist,
do-your-own-thing Students for a
Democratic University of the year
before, the Campus Left Action
Movement came on with the other
extreme of all theory and no
action.
It was also the year women's
liberation came on the scene
with the efforts of the Vancouver
Women's Caucus to raise women
from the status of objects to that
of human beings. Discrimination
against women in hiring and
protest against the image of the
"inherent inferiority" of women
were among the chief objects of
the group's attack.
At present, the caucus appears
to have developed into a
movement,    having    at    present
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Apparently the idea was to
promote higher education in the
province. Net result was an
expenditure of $6,500 for 228
votes and practically nil publicity
for the campaign.
Then it seems the AMS
executive decided over the
summer to fire AMS general
manager Ron Pearson. Students
charged that Pearson exerted
illegitimate control over council
decisions and the operation of
SUB as well as being personally
objectionable.
The matter was brought to a
meeting of AMS council.
What happened next is
anyone's guess.
All that's known is that council
knuckled under after ejecting
Ubyssey editor and council
member Michael Finlay from the
closed meeting for refusing to be
bound to secrecy.
Pearson stayed, but games area
manager Dermot Boyd went. The
uproar following Boyd's initial
firing caused council to reconsider
and rehire him on a short term
contract. Then in January, after
the noise had died down, he was
quietly dismissed. Thursday, March 26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Then there was this thing at
Simon Fraser University.
It seems there were these
Marxist profs in the political
science,    sociology    and
- anthropology department who
had been teaching Marxism to
their students under the
benevolent eye of a liberal
administration.
The administration attempted
to resolve the problem by
recommending    non-renewal    of
- tenure (where have we heard that
before?) for eight of the 20 profs
in   the   department,   refusing   to
" recognize Mordecai Briemberg as
duly elected head of the
department and by slapping a
trusteeship on the department.
The department went on
strike.
Three months later it was all
> over.
Through the use of court
injunctions banning mass rallies,
picketing and the distribution of
literature the administration
managed to crush the strike,
destroying the academic
reputation of the university in the
-process.
While the strike on the hill was
in  full  swing, the United States
"decided to set off an atomic bomb
on    Amchitka    Island    in    the
Aleutian chain.
The good ol' AMS decided to
do something about it and 24
„ hours later, 6,000 students were
blocking the U.S.-Canada border
at Blaine. Only problem was that
the appropriate authorities had
been warned of the demonstration
so were able to divert traffic to a
crossing about two miles east.
A  small minority of radicals
decided to block this crossing too.
This   was   too   much   for  the
AMS types who wanted to keep
_the demonstration a symbolic one
even  though  they had criticized
Ottawa  for   only   sending  off a
symbolic protest in the form of a
telegram. Spot the contradiction?
However,  despite the prestige
gained by the AMS for conducting
the    border    close,    the    first
runblings about the organization
, began to be heard. Law student
Sheldon Goldberg was the first,
presenting a brief to the AMS in
October questioning  the legality
of the organization.
In February, arts student John
Cherrington presented a petition
to    the    AMS    asking    that    a
""""referendum be held on whether or
not AMS membership should be
voluntary.
It seems students think it
shouldn't.
In the largest voter turnout in
AMS history, they voted by a 2-1
One of the AMS efforts that really worked was the Amchitka blast protest which
mobilized some 6,000 students at the U.S. border, complete with speakers, signs and
banners. All in vain.
margin in favor of continuing
compulsory membership.
A week later, only 15 per cent
of the student population could
be bothered to vote in the first
slate of the AMS elections.
There's another contradiction for
you.
Oh yes, they elected Tony
Hodge as next year's AMS
president.
Getting back to October,
internal    affairs    officer    Dave
Mordecai Briemberg, one of
the prominent figures in the
SFU dispute over the
non-granting of tenure in their
PSA department.
Gibson resigned from the AMS
executive while under fire for
alleged incompetence.
There was also a big football
match that month. The UBC
Thunderbirds  put on  their best
show in years as they managed to
tie the SFU Clansmen by a 6-6
score.
Staying with sports, in
February the basketball
Thunderbirds trompled the Clan
under a 103-67 score to win the
Buchanan trophy. They went on
to win the Canadian
championships with a 23-0 record
against Canadian teams. The
women's team also won the
Canadian championships.
Things started with a bang in
January.
The worst of the cultural
revolution appeared at UBC in the
form of the Canadian Student
Movement/Vancouver Student
Movement/Canadian Communist
Movement conglomerate.
Struggle sessions and mass
democracy meetings were the
order of the day as the various
movements protested the AMS's
decision to merger the Academic
Affairs Committee with the newly
formed education commission.
This failed when education
commission chairman Stan Persky
told council his commission did
not wish to affiliate with the
A AC.
The only choice left to AMS
council was to oust VSM member
Elaine Wismer as AAC chairman.
Now, three months after, the
AMS is looking for a new AAC
chairman and the education
commission exists in name only.
The UBC senate also put on a
good animal show during second
term, denying it had a
responsibility to serve the
community and limiting
enrolment among other things.
The tenure conflict in the
English department leaked out in
January.
What  happened was that six
iz''-__ta_ma
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profs in the department were up
for tenure consideration, but had
failed to produce sufficient
publications.
The profs were offered a two
year extension on their
probationary contracts, but two
of them, Brian Mayne and David
Powell, decided to fight the case.
Student rallied to their cause,
bringing the whole issue of
teaching versus research at the
university into the open. At press
time, the case was continuing
although it appears to be
dangerously near exams to be able
to make any concrete action.
There was also the AMS annual
general meeting, which took place
last week and attracted a total of
600 students. Need more be said?
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X Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March 26,  1970
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Canada and the Third World:
learned to screw the develop
cantries, aid love it too.
This article was compiled by the Fraser Group,
composed of UBC students who are doing research on
Canadian involvement in Africa, Asia and Latin
America.
True to the guild of a burgeoning capitalist
society, Canada has amply proved itself a member of
that exclusive international club, "Imperialist Powers
of the World."
Under the motto "we learned to screw and be
liked too," Canada has successfully penetrated various
Third World economies either directly through private
capital investment or indirectly through tied foreign
aid.
Exploitation Through Private Investment
The growing list of Canadian corporations actively
engaged in economic exploitation in the Caribbean
include:
Massey-Ferguson - $6.5 million plant in Mexico.
Air Canada - 40 per cent interest in Air Jamaica.
Canadian International Power Company - owner of
Barbados Light & Power.
Bank of Nova Scotia — 42 per cent interest in banking
in Jamaica.
Ogilvie Flour Mills Co.
Salada Foods.
Marigot Investments Ltd. — controls West Indies Stock
Exchange & Caribbean Packers Limited.
In Africa the activities of Canadian firms is at least
as brisk if not more significant considering the nature
of political conditions in the southern part of the
continent. Some aspects of Canadian involvement in
foreign trade and investment present a clear picture,
while others, perhaps more important ones, remain
shrouded. Trade in commodities is a straight forward
item. A glance at the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
figures shows that Canada does a brisk trade with
South Africa, Portugal and Angola and a small amount
of business with Mozambique.
South Africa
Canada imported $39.3 million worth of South
African commodities in 1968 including $16.4 million
worth of sugar. It exported some $68.3 million worth
to that country, including more than $2 million worth
of aircraft and more than $22 million worth of motor
vehicles.
Portugal
Angola's and Mozambique's colonial masi
us $12.3 million worth of goods in 1968 and
$6.3 million worth. Canada imported $7.7 mi
goods — most of it was coffee — from Angi
exported $376,637 worth in 1968. Mozan
Canada bought $579,422 worth of tea
Mozambique in 1968 and not much else. We so
million worth of goods.
This is the clear part of the picture. Ami
murky parts, an outstanding one concerns Rr
Since the white government of that c
unilaterally declared its independence of Bri
1965 in order to avoid giving the vote to black c
it has been the object of a boycott and ei
recommended by the United Nations.
The DBS figures would have us believ
Canada does almost no business with Rhodesi
widely accepted, however, that Rhodesia circu
the boycott by routing its trade through
countries, especially South Africa. The
therefore, do not reveal the extent to which &
goods are bought by Rhodesians and Rhodesiar
by Canadians.
Another area that remains murky is that of j
investment. A scattering of information is a\
from various sources. For example, the Rand
Mail of South Africa carried an article in 1967 i
speech by the chairman of Alcan Aluminium of
Africa to a group called the Canadian-South t
Businessmen's Association.
The Alcan chairman reported that his co
planned   to  double  Canadian   investment   in
African aluminium  by   1972. Alcan, the Dail
noted,   supplies   75   per   cent   of   South   A
aluminium ingot requirements.
The African National Congress says the
largest farm machinery plant in the world belc
Massey Ferguson of South Africa. 'This typif
rapid expansion of this company in South Afri
its steady acquisition of other companies," the
publication Sechaba says.
"However," Sechaba adds, "while the Ca
Massey-Ferguson provides technical advice
research, it has severed its formal ties with the
African company so as not to endanger its
international investments. Another Massey-Fe
plant ... exists in Southern Rhodesia." The AN
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1968
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Sinclair-Dickin
(finale)
Passion   Hospital
Chapter Eight
"Spring! Spring! Oh, at last it has come! Spring! Spring!
How I love the word! Let me repeat it again and again! Spring!
Spring! Spring! Spring! Spring!", hummed.Nurse Jane to herself
as she emptied the bed-pan. "At last I have found a true love!"
Chapter One
Doctor Spermatozoa, (He was Italian), looked out on the
winter snows from the thirteenth floor of the Hospital. The ice
that shrouded the countryside was the ice that shrouded his soul.
He decided to kill his wife.
Chapter Seven
Nurse Jane tore herself from his arms. "Doctor
Spermatozoa," she cried, "I cannot love you. I cannot marry you.
And you — how could you think of marrying me while a slug lies
buried in the heart of your wife?"
The Doctor turned away. "It was a foul blow, indeed. Yes,
but even though you know that the foul murderer of my late
beloved wife is still free, I must live in the present, not the past.
My heart must still live."
Nurse Jane said to herself, "There's life in the old boy yet!"
Chapter Two
It was early spring when Nurse Jane first met Dr.
Spermatozoa. Nurse Jane knew the Doctor had fallen in love with
her the moment they met. He offered to give her chest X-rays.
Nurse Jane blushed and refused. They'd told her in university
about his kind. She had been longing to meet one ever since. She
had been nineteen, six long, dreary, icey, endless, eternal, fairly
cold winters ago. Her heart was in a deep-freeze, immune to love,
but longing for sex. Now at last she had found love.
Chapter Sixteen
"I think," said Doctor Spermatozoa to the convention, "I
have found that the serum that we thought would render the
patient immune to the disease, does, in fact, have serious faults.
Are there any questions?"
Dr. Greenflex, of the Mao Clinic, rose unsteadily to his feet.
"Where's the patient?" he wheezed.
"There!", pointed Doctor Spermatozoa dramatically as the
orderlies brought a coffin onto the stage.
The convention fell silent. Several nurses began to weep.
One of them was Jane.
"Oh, come on", said Dr." Spermatozoa, "It's not that bad."
"But it's permanent!", wept Jane.
"Oh well," said Dr. Spermatozoa, "At least we were able to
transplant his heart eighteen times. The last time, when we
transplanted the heart of a living platypus into his body, proved
to be our undoing."
"Nothing happened!", cried the enraged Dr. Greenflex. He
had obviously gone mad.
The coffin was opened.
Jane screamed.
It was Mr. Fallingray.
Chapter Nineteen
They struggled to their feet, brushing sand from their
clothes. "Well," said Nurse Jane, 'That was no fun."
bed.
Chapter Thirty-Three
"I'm dreadfully ill", said Mr. Fallingray from his hospital
Little does he know, thought the evil Doctor Spermatozoa,
as he trimmed his fingernails, that his heart is the heart of a
platypus.
Chapter One Hundred and Eighty-Nine
She could feel the weight of life pulling her down into the
depths of despair. She looked once again, not wishing in her heart
to believe it, at what remained of the flower in her hand.
"Doctor Spermatozoa", she sobbed, "You don't love me!"
"Don't be silly", replied Doctor Spermatozoa.
"I'm not silly", Nurse Jane argued, her voice becoming
hard, 'This flower went - 'He loves me, He loves me not."
"Only two petals?", asked Doctor Spermatozoa coldly.
Nurse Jane could feel the acidic burn of the tears brimming
in her eyes. She began to cry — heaving, convulsive sobs.
Said Doctor Spermatozoa reasonably, his voice warming
once again, "You probably started in the wrong place. Try again.
Best nine out of seventeen."
"That was the last flower!", Nurse Jane sobbed. "What
shall I do? Oh, what shall I do? Sixteen times straight the flowers
said — 'He loves me not!' ".
"Well, maybe I don't", said Doctor Spermatozoa
reasonably. "Sixteen times in a row is pretty impressive."
Nurse Jane looked up at the tall pine trees.
"Hey", cried Doctor Spermatozoa, "where did those tall
pine trees come from?"
"My own true love!", cried Nurse Jane, throwing her arms
around him. "My own true love!"
At last Nurse Jane had found true love and eternal
happiness.
"I still say sixteen in a row is pretty impressive", mumbled
Doctor Spermatozoa.
—^-^—— pf ZVfO___________m______mm_mmmmm
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 26,  1970 Rock-n-Roll
Radio station CKVN. after an
attempt at total news approach
to broadcasting, will jump back
into a rock format beginning April
1. Running the show, as program
director, will be former boss jock
Fred Latremouille, who has some
very definite ideas about the
function of a commercial radio
station. What follows is part of a
conversation with Latremouille
and Michael Finlay and Fred
Cawsey.
FRED: I want to do a good rock and roll
station. A station that plays good rock and roll
and has people that have an understanding for
it, a feeling for it, and can play if right, and
who hopefully pushed aside this deejay game so
they can be with their audience rather than just
talk at them.
PF: Is top forty music necessarily good music?
FRED: No, not necessarily. But what's good
and what's bad? It is changing but the question
is how fast is it changing. Like, are you talking
about the 1910 Fruitgum Company as opposed
to "Give Me Shelter" by the Rolling Stones?
PF: Isn't there music that's "better" ...
FRED: Well, sure there is, but that's just my
opinion, isn't it. There are people who think
the 1910 Fruitgum Company are great . . .
PF: But musically it's just tinsel ...
FRED: Sure.
PF: But is it good, that's the question?
FRED: Well, I don't know, man, the Creedence
Clearwater Revival play hard old rock and roll
and they're great at it. They're beautiful, I love
'em. There's a simple basic kind of music
happening. And I'm relieved to hear it, because
there's a lot of the other stuff happening too.
What I'm getting to is that I will applaud a
parapalegic tapdancer who is into his or her
thing. I just like to see people doing their thing,
I really do. And I find it less and less fascinating
to just go out and destroy music forms just for
the sake of it or because it makes me feel
superior by doing so. So when I hear "Sugar,
Sugar" by the Archies, I'm not particularly
fond of it, it just doesn't make it for me. But I
can appreciate that there is probably going to
be somebody out there who really thinks that's
a great record. Somebody did, man, because it
became the biggest selling record last year. So
it's a difficult area. Personally I would like to
never play the stuff. Just hate it. But I just
cannot impose that on others.
However, I saw 19,800 people go and
watch Led Zeppelin and so it's changing, it's
changing fast. And they're saying things like
"Nobody hears a single word but you keep on
talking till your dying day." They're not saying
things like "Sugar, Sugar". And yet there are
people nine and 10 years old who are digging it.
And they're the super rock and roll group.
PF: If the music is becoming more
sophisticated, is radio keeping up with it?
FRED: Well, this is the question. You see, radio
is a multi-million dollar business and
multi-million dollar businesses are run by
multi-millionaires. And I'm not quite sure if
their concept of reality is real anymore.
And they're very afaid of change. When
they get into a successful thing, they don't
want to blow it. The common phrase I heard
over at the other place (CKLG) all the time was
"Don't rock the boat." Well, my God, what are
you there for if not to rock the boat?
PF: What do you do to change CKVN into a
good rock and roll station?
FRED: Well, you hire some people who have a
feeling for what they're doing and who are
hopefully on a contemporary kind of basis with
their audience, who are going to go to a Led
Zeppelin show and dig it, not just go because
they're suppose to, because they're some kind
of  "rock-jock."
Radio
PF: But if you don't want to force your own
opinions on others, you're going to have to play
both the Archies and Led Zeppelin.
FRED: No, I didn't say that. We want to be
heavy. We want to be a heavy rock station.
We're going to program albums, although it
may be a risky business. We're going to program
albums because I believe albums are the hits of
today. I think the Rolling Stones' album (Let it
Bleed) is the best rock album I've ever heard.
You can't sit still. It's happening now. Anyone
who can't see that is blind and I don't plan to
be blind. That's one thing that I look forward
to playing on the radio.
PF: What kind of age group are you directing
that at?
FRED: Well, that's hard to say. You can't put
down   teenyboppers   anymore.   It's   all   Led
Zeppelin. They don't like the Archies. There's a
whole new clan who I suspect are around five
to seven years old who are listening to radio.
Microboppers or something. I really feel bad
about the teenyboppers anyway. I think that's
a rotten thing to call anybody. Like nigger and
kike.   Cause there's all these horrible things
associated with it.. .
PF: Pimples and pubescence and ...
FRED:  Yeah, and wet dreams and... aw, I
don't know.
PF: So it wouldn't be right to think of CKVN
as being directed at the 18 to 30 market?
FRED:  Well,  we  want  that  audience. I like
those people, I mean I'm one of them. We want
that audience, yes, and that's principally the
audience we're going for.
PF: What happened to the old format?
FRED:   What, the news format? (Laugh)
PF: Yeah. How much money did the station
lose?
FRED: Well, I guess a fairly accurate estimate
would be around a half million dollars. What
happened, was a very large American city trip
applied to Victoria and Vancouver. And people
don't dig it here. They don't have to know if
there's going to be a race riot down on Fourth
Avenue.
PF: It used to blow my mind. Two hours of the
news, it used to really freak me out.
FRED: Ohhhh. You listened to it, I had to read
it. Blew my mind a lot. But give the people
around here who got into it all the credit in the
world. They tried their best. It just didn't work.
PF:  Are you going to do any public affairs
stuff?
FRED:  Yes.   It's tough  to  talk about a lot
of things that I'm going to do because I'm right
in the process of putting it together now. But I
would like to see a talk period, not necessarily
a talk show, but a talk period, where there will
be   an   interchange   of information   between
young people for a change, instead of these old
things  who control all the hot-line shows in
town.
pf 3hree
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Thursday, March  26,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY J Jul TFiaxjsinixi, J>JW£f~ TWai}.
by
Ctf&tiAky
and
fiaJbwda
TTiok
THE MAGENTA
FROG MAGA-
SINE, arranged
and printed by
Gordon F idler
and Arnold Saba.
Talonbooks, 9 x
12, 74 pages.
$2.50 in stores,
$2.00 by private
sale.
The Magenta Frog Magasine is actually a book — one of a series, varied in
content, and therefore called a magasine, but printed and sold as a book.
Arnold Saba and Gordon Fidler, a pair of artist-madmen who left Page Friday
in a Huff (two-door hard-top) about a year and a half ago, have come out with this
collection of photographs, drawings, fairy tales, nonsense, absurdities, and lots of
things of interest to all us girls and boys. It includes literally hundreds of drawings,
including about twenty full-page pictures, and most of the book is in colour.
It is hard to say in this time of revolutionary anarchistic love-peace fight the
pigs left-wing communist communal macrobiotic acid freak Zen Bhuddist Hare
Krishna Hippie Christians just where this book fits into the scene.
The book is definitely a good trip, concentrating on the positive side of life.
But someone' could always be found to denounce it as reactionary, just as surely
someone, somewhere could be found to point and say, "Look! That's where it's all
at!"
Actually, it is two artists' trip, presenting a very cohesive if multifarious point
of view. An intriguing combination of beauty and fantasy, madcap humor and
deliberate grotesqueness, it would best be read in the manner it was conceived; that
is, in several related states of Euphoria.
At least this book could never be parodied. It takes cares of that itself.
Saba, former Ubyssey cartoonist (of MORALMAN) has been expanding his
horizons as an illustrator. While obviously still improving, his style has become
clean and sure. Future work of his may'be something to watch for.
Gordon Fidler continues to excel as graphic artist, and his unusually morbid
and obscure interests have lent a fascinating touch to this joint effort.
With five films, several years of journalistic anarchy, and this magasine under
their belts, no doubt the team of Fidler and Saba will continue to widen their
abilities in the coming years. Future projects include the world's most tasteful
pornographic magasine, several more books of nonsense, some experiments in
graphics and colour, an animated feature, and more magasines.
This magasine is definitely worth reading, as one of the most enjoyable and
unique publications you are ever likely to see.
dolls and fantastic figures by Jph
Plastic Fantastifo
Japan  . . .   and 1
America . . . both ined
Attention:
Japanese food lovers, magic realists, advertising executives an
Goldberg fans, there really is a place where you can all groove tc
The place is the Fine Arts Gallery in the basement of the Main 1
where the Japanese Culinary Pop exhibition is being shown in conji
with the John Martin Gilbert exhibition.
Japanese Culinary Pop Exhibition
In one of the most interesting exhibitions this year, the Fii
Gallery with the help of Japanese architecture historian Dr. Teiji It
the Japan Cultural Society is showing a collection of wax models
of the types commonly displayed in the windows and glass c;
popular restaurants in Japan, together with signs, banners, arti"fa<
photographs concerned with the atmosphere of Japanese eating plac
The  wax  food  displays  are  created by unknown artists
purpose of advertising and they are seldom, if ever, seen in North A
The absolute realism of the three dimensional models gives
magical quality reminiscent of Alex Colville's paintings, and (
something about realistically capturing a perishable object that i
this magical quality to the objects. The creation of the magic is v
inexplicable, but it has something to do with capturing an instant •
along with an instant of reality. The models are fascinating, so
them. Remember that they were not intended as works of art, a
artists are unknown both in Japan and here. It is the distance betwt
cultures that make these models art, and perhaps the fact that we
them art is indicative of the lack of truth or reality in our culture.
John Martin Gilbert
The John Martin Gilbert exhibition is the work of Art
graduate John Gilbert, and it includes thirty five of his three dime
balsa contructions. Although Gilbert is an advertising designer hi 1
let this prevent him from criticizing the advertising industry a
Myths of the consumer society with his dolls and their fa
mechanical constructions.
Gilbert's mildly satiristic models are directed at Canadian m
well as those of America, and their refreshingly soft cynicism
equally well against the American mammary fixation as it does agai
peculiarities of MacMillan Bloedel megalopolic justice.
The models reflect Gilbert's awareness of the great North An
consumer machine, but the satire is not vicious, instead, it is cute <
The models gain their cynical power through portraying the myths
consumer machine within a toy-like atmosphere where they are nc
grotesqueries, but rather, laughable inanities. By placing these myt
toy like atmosphere, Gilbert is utilizing one of the great powers of
reform - humour. When the myths become humourous, they ■
longer be taken seriously, and as such they can be dispensed with.
The show is at the Fine Arts Gallery in the basement of th
Library until April 11; it will close over the Easter holiday March* 27
Plastic food . . .
made in Japan now.
A full page illustration from Saba's fairy tale, "A Voyage to the
Sun", in The Magenta Frog Magasine.
■p£ 4our>
—brett garrett photo
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 26,  1970 THE
CRIMINAL
CAPER
n Gilbert        -re9 faulkner photos
od from
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ises of
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go see
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-36Y      -TIM WILSON
-brett garrett photo
—seen now in retrospect
—the production I think pointed out many potential avenues for
new alternative kinds of staging techniques and general
approaches to theatre presentations. It was tremendously
successful in terms of elevating the whole production to the level
of a public ritual, a 'theatre festival' rather than 'just a play'.
Where the production fell down, on the other hand, was in the
play itself, i.e. the actual script. Triana's play itself I thought was
very weak and therefore strongly negated the power of the whole
production
The two-evening idea was good: it. made the play stay alive,
one knew one had to confront it again on another evening and
had time to discuss, ponder and dream about it in the meantime.
The "publicness" of the whole play was also appealing -
commando raids by the cast, raving appearances in public places,
the "newspaper bulletin", the questionnaire, etc — all opened the
play up and brought it into the streets. And one had the feeling
that .the cast was involved in this "criminals" thing all the time,
and not just on "work nights" when they were "officially"
acting. (The only thing I would criticize here is that the PR
tended at times to be unsubtle and overly aggressive, sometimes
smacking a little of sensationalism.)
One of the strongest elements of the play I thought, was the
environmental idea incorporated into the actual staging. The
atmosphere in the whole Arts Club was intensely gripping,
demanding, unavoidable. There was no way one could not be
involved. Also, very fine use of media ... lighting, sound, etc.
... in fact one of the most theatrical moments of the whole
production was right at the beginning of the first evening: the
spot-lights in the corridor, the totality of the attic environment
were tremendously powerful. We, the audience were all together,
all eyes, which had somehow strayed to find ourselves
communally in this wierd attic. And then just the simple tape
played over the radio immediately grabbed and rapidly
monopolized all our consciousnesses.
Again, the weakness of the production lay in the actual play
itself. After that brilliant radio enthralment, the advent of the
actors was almost a kind of come-down. As a whole, throughout
the evening I thought the play itself was too active, too
psychically aggressive for the space in which it was happening.
The play came on so strongly that we almost had to back right
away from the quiet communication we had achieved with the
environment.
Thus the play began progressively to contradict the space in
which it was happening. Rather than blatant, aggressive psychotic
action, I would like to have seen cool, ritualized action ... which
involved rather than objectified me. The many eyes which were
sitting in this attice with me, and which I could in no way ignore,
were ignored by the actors. These tried desperately to create their
own space over the heads of a hundred very 'obvious
co-inhabitants of their world. I think Juliani failed to realize this
very basic thing: if you invite a whole audience onto your stage,
in an effort to bring them closer to the action, you cannot then
totally ignore their presence in terms of the actual action (sic)
and the actual content of the play. This brings with it an
atmosphere of artificiality which, although not totally
insurmountable, is extremely difficult to pull off convincingly. In
this department, I think Juliani's production fell down.
Aside from all this however, the acting itself was tremendous.
The rampant madness, the constantly shifting reality was both
mind bending and gut-churning in its effect ... if, again, we had
seen it from somewhere removed, from in front of steel bars as in
Marat-Sade for instance. From right there among us, it tended to
easily to appear excessively animalistic and aggressively
overplayed.
—tony westman photo
— some notes on John
Juliani's production ot
Triana's "The Criminals"
which completed happening
at the Arts Club —
compiled by Norbert Ruebsaat
The Criminals completed its gruelling three-week run at the
Arts Club last Friday night. (And I am amazed that the three
actors have not in the meantime all become totally mad ... or
maybe they are ... or were . .. etc.) And now, of course, it will
be asked, whether or not this kind of "far out" theatre can make
it; whether Juliani's kind of theatre is feasible within the
generally cautious, commercially dependent conditions under
which the Playhouse Theatre Company operates. This
production, as Juliani himself told me, was somewhat of a
gamble, a test case for future risque "avant-garde" productions.
Well, first of all, "The Houses" were generally good. (That
means that quite a few people in fact came to see the play.)
Secondly, the questionnaires which Juliani distributed are
revealing. Almost all of these show a quite extreme reaction to
the play — in a positive or a negative direction. People were not
left complacent and averagely massaged but reacted as
participants. And this is good, because one of the main and
primary things theatre is all about, is stimulating people to some
kind of action.
Most of the reactions — almost all from the younger audience
members — were favorable, commenting especially upon the
lighting and general environmental character of the production.
(Middle aged people commented more on the play itself, and the
calibre of acting.) Some of the middle-aged (almost none of the
younger) disliked the idea of having to come twice and to chose a
seat. Most of the extreme negative reactions went from people
who disliked the aggressive, audience-involving character of the
play, through people who ".. . go out in the evening to be
entertained, not tortured ..." to those who who flately stated,
"Not my idea of art." And one dear elderly lady's sole
observation was that, '. . . throughout the play I had an uneasy
feeling that the set was a fire hazard." True. True.
Although in terms of age, Juliani attracted quite a
cross-section of audience members, and I think this was beneficial
to what was actually happening in the Arts Club - it is still quite
evident from the questionnaire that most of the audience was
indeed younger people. And also, younger people who did not
necessarily have a history of theatre attendance and general
theatrical involvement. And this is important because it raises the
theatre experience above the traditional ritualized one that many
young people often See it as. The theatre here becomes a trip, a
thing to go to like any other thing which involves an intense,
compelling confrontation with someone's artistic vision of reality.
In this sense, I think Juliani's "gamble" was successful not
only artistically but also commercially, in terms of future forays
by the Playhouse into the unestablished and experimental. The
Criminals has shown, I think, that there is some kind of future for
a city theatre which is not so entirely dependent on the
traditional concept of "theatre entertainment" and the fear of
comfortable commercial security which nutures this concept.
,p£ Sive.
Thursday, March 26,  1970
THE      U BYSSEY >
Don Soule's theatre labyrinth -
Inside the Ghost Sonata — exploded
into being last Monday night, to the
mixed amazement of the inquiring
minds who came. And they were
moved, obviously, in many and fantastic
directions, to which not all of them
could relate with practised ease.
We were very definitely "inside" the
play. There was no doubt about that.
Soule's environment labyrinth of many
freaky sensual spaces and deceptive
directions grabbed one, swallowed one
up immediately as one entered the
endless corridors and strange rooms of
Strindberg's original mansion; where
Hummel, the mad, aged ruler of the
mansion and recreator of his life (and
ours) opened and imposed the
demented visions of his mind and the
depraved wraiths who populated it; as
these latter walked, recited their dead
lines — right here among us — to their
own images of long dead bodies and
recreated people. It was their mansion;
we had little business there except as
silent momentary watchers of a process
long begun and long ago ended. And
they did not see us, and merely
continued their slow inevitable life. (.. .
so much for the Barberism .. .)
In this production Soule wanted to
probe into new, multi-media concepts
of theatre presentation, including films,
taped sound, photographs etc. In the
right spirit of the play, the labyrinth
was one of the essentially lifeless
images, two-dimensional visions rather
than real people. "Live" actors
translated easily and silently into
simulated screen images, their voices
into taped communications. And the
whole created a more distant dream-like
mind reality than does the immediate
presence of live theatre .. . and yet at
the same time the actors were still more
directly (and bodily) there right among
us than on thee normal screen. The
synthesis created a somewhat shaky, but
potentially real space of its own.
The "play" was definitely an
experiment, a search for, rather than
realization of, a new theatre concept.
Thus is is difficult to relate to
"critically" (objectively) and on the
basis of previous theatre experience. As
a trip, as a simply sensual experience, —
which is what good theatre should be in
the end anyway - I found it very
appealing - although lacking in some
aspects. The power of the labyrinth was
somewhat muted, for instance, by the
narrow intricacies of the corridors,
through    which    many    people    were
the other "observers" too much, and
the interwoven actors not enough - at
times one experienced the whole sensual
onslaught too much as a circus side
show, because the few actors scattered
among the spaces were not able,
individually, to maintain the heightened
atmosphere. I would have liked to see
more interaction between audience and
cast; I would like to have been drawn
into the ritual of the mansion more
totally, instead of being distracted by
moving, colliding and jamming. One felt
the other audience members. Somehow
also, the three main scenes, which we
watched in traditional seated manner,
did not weave well into the general
movement around the labyrinth: the
two elements were too distinct in terms
of mood.
However, as an experiment the
production is definitely worthwhile, and
it's good to see that some imagination is
being applied to the whole idea of
expanding some of the traditional
boundaries of theatre presentation
distinction between the various art
forms and media. That's sort of how
theatre will remain alive.
Also, a fine way to terminate this
year's   season   at   the   Freddy  Wood.
-NORBERT RUEBSAAT
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March 26,  1970 1
>v
About this time last year, the first issue of See/Hear, a
Vancouver-based record-magazine made its appearance,
featuring music and poetry by B. P. Nichol, Lloyd Burritt,
Ross Barrett, Al Neil, and Wayne Carr,among others.
Now another See/Hear has appeared, this one called
o see can u say, available from either The Record Gallery,
or See/Hear at either 1581 East 31st Avenue or through
Talon Books, 1911 Acadia Road, both in Vancouver.
The-recent issue is devoted to the sound-poetry of Jim
Brown, local word mechanic well known for his efforts in
propogating publications from Talon Books, based in
Vancouver.
The album is not just spoken poetry, but a playing
with words through distortion and their interpolation with
electronically produced sounds, as well as the employment
of stereophonic effects achieved with two microphones.
As such, the album is extremely interesting, especially
in Poem for Two Voices,, which makes use of stereophonic
punning. However, when using a solo voice in the opening
cut, The Very Tissues of Language, the results are
somewhat tedious. But perhaps this latter instance is more
the fault of the poem itself than the manner of
presentation. That was the only track on the album I didn't
like.
As a whole, the album is not innovational, but instead
as interesting media document which helps further realize
See/Hear's original objective of "making sound available."
Enclosed with the record is a book containing the texts
of the poems, simEar to the first See/Hear album which
contained several sheets of poetry, pictures, and graphics
relating to the material on the album.
-MICHAEL QUIGLEY
CaAcadinq Chap.
Last time at this year, we had many musical goodies
to tell you about the plans of the Vancouver Symphony for
the upcoming months, with a Spring Festival and Judy
Collins concerts and other stuff.
No such luck this year, however. What remains is
basically a Viennese Night concert on April 4 which is
already sold out, and a Request Night on April 10, at
which will be heard Beethoven's Third Symphony, Sibelius'
big boss hit Finlandia, Wagner's Meistersinger Overture, and
the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. As well, there's a
sold-out Beethoven concert and a Simon Streatfield concert
in May.
There's no contemporary music of any kind to come.
Pray for better concerts next year.
Musical conservatism has struck the Vancouver Opera
Association as well after their adventurous Salome of last
October. Coming up on April 30 and for three
performances thereafter is A Masked Ball by Verdi.
Presumably this could be of interest.
Next year's offerings from the VOA are rumoured to
include Madame Butterfly, Tales of Hoffman, and Aida. Ho
hum.
If anything, look for a revival of the successful festival
which ran last summer at the Planetarium, including
chamber music, dance, electronics, and jazz.
-M.Q.
Somebody just rushed in to scream that Dr. Zhivago,
the Russian equivalent of Gone With the Win<Lwill be
showing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, April 3,4, and 5 in
the SUB Theatre with one performance each evening at
7:00. Admission is the usual cheap 50c.
^____p£ 7even___
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THE      UBYSSEY *¥*¥**¥¥*¥¥¥**¥*¥*¥¥¥¥*.¥¥¥*
PF *
MASTHEAD
CO NOT CORRECT
151/2 ems —10 universe
Well here we are at the end og the year and so
on , ,, og should be augumented). And so it is
now time to make end of the year type
statements which tell about, present to you,
the myth of the infamous happy far out group
that has presented you with these the many
cultural gooodies and such like this year. (Put
that down in the masthed that's a good
quote.) (saith QM.)
ROumour has it (and we believe this of course
and implicitely.) that people diligently collect
our PF's mastheads and anthologize them as
(put that down put that doen.) This is getting
trippy. We'll both attack the typewriter and
do it that way. I'll get left behind. You write
down wbat you just said whag I said. I'm
t5rying to set up some kind of contimuum
here. And then it's some sorb of Hoe do you
spell tha tHow do you spell what. You
splelled whay wrong. Its the only way Watch
put shutup you gaggot I forgot the previous
one thogh You're not gonna make Quigley
you're going to tptype that gast; Quigley
you're not making it He's qthetlci///'". Ha ha
You made it yes you made it Norbie!
I was just talking about people collecting our
mastheads actually when Qm sort of
interrupted the general flow of the genreal
actigity . . . Ah yes, as aeth^tic monuments to
the absurd flow of of far displaced critical
creative and otherwise activity. In other
wordds (to put it antother way in othe words.
that is to say, what I am trying to say is
thatthis is what happens as it happens we put
up no pretenses and that's the beauty of the
whole fucking thing.
Your hosts this year, as we end the year in
this irgy of artitic madness . . . never however
losing our critical awareness and distance . . ,.
have been:
Tim Wilson ... om the art catagory . .. (and
also next years editor of PF.
Bruce Dolsen ... as also ih the atr catagory
Michael   Quigley   (the  great)   ...  as  general
music maniac and hound about town.
K.   Tougas   ...   in  the  realm  of  films  and
assorted flicks.
Olga  Ruskin . .. wjho we here criticises, at
any rate writes about art. Can  I   interrupt?
Okay.   Hahahahahahaheheheh.   Uh.  Shhhhh.
We don't wqnna sen quigley off on another
trip, do we. Ha, lok at him go. Boo. Oh fuck
I'll write what I bloody well please. He said
leaving abruptly.
Jack Khouri ... who erected himself as sex
specialiat this year.
Dirk Visser, Dave Enns, Dave Bowerman and
Marc Kenton .. . Quig.ey, I want my name
onit - ti orthy Wil etc. at printers, who all at
times took pictchurs for us .. . and finally ...
Fred Cawsey and Norbert Ruebsaat . .. who
did most of the actual work and especially the
corrleation of activity.
So it's good bye.
Thank you  Frankenstein. THIS TOWEL IS
KLEEN.
30
********** p5 sight **********
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AND   THE   MIRACLES
Special  Occasion
THE TEMPTATIONS
In   a   Mellow
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BOBBY  TAYLOR
AND
THE VANCOUVERS
GOS 924—The     Temptations     In     a
Mellow  Mood
GOS 926—Martha    Reeves   and   the
Van  Delias
GOS 927—The   Temptations  Wish   It
Would Rain
GS 930—Bobby    Taylor    and    the
Vpncauvers
King  1024—J.     Brown     Presents     His
Show   of   Tomorrow
King  1031—J.     Brown     "I    Got     the
Feelin"
SS 706—Gladys Knight and the
Pips — Everybody Needs
Love
SS 707—Gladys Knight and the
Pips—Feelin'  Bluesy
MOS
MARVIN   GAYE
TAMMI  TERRELL
You're   All   I   Need
661—Tamla   Motown   Big   Hits
Vol. 7
MOS 647—Four Tops  on  Top
MOS
TS
652—Tammi  Terrell —  Itresist-
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285—Marvin     Gay      In     the
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TS 290—Smoky  Robinson and The
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between Dunsmuir   . (0n*
571   Granville   St.       and Pender
location
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* Open Friday 'Til 9 p.m. •   MU 2-1919, MU 2-4846
r
V
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 26,  1970 Thursday, March  26,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
er sold
bought
Uion in
)la and
ibique:
from
Id $1.8
flg -the
odesia.
ountry
tain in
tizens,
nbargo
; that
i. It is
nvents
other
igures,
nadian
goods
weign
ailable
Daily
bout a
Sduth
ifrican
npany
South
/ Mail
frica's
ninth
lgs to
3S Jhe
:a and
ANC
ladian
and
South
other
guson
I! says
that the International Nickel Company of Canada is
also active in South Africa.
It is not only private Canadian investment that is
active in South Africa. According to the Toronto Star,
Polymer Corporation, Canada's publicly owned
synthetic rubber producer, owns 20 per cent interest in
the Synthetic Rubber Company of South Africa.
It would be possible to go on dropping gems of
information, but all of them combined would not
begin to add up to a clear and comprehensive picture
of Canadian-Southern African investment activities. In
the absence of a prodigious research effort, it would
not be possible to estimate the extent of those
investments, nor — more important — to judge whether
they form a pattern that would yield politically
possible means of striking an economic blow at the
southern African regimes. But it is reasonable to
assume that the Canadian government has all this
information at its fingertips.
Our government, however, vacillates. On the one
hand — presumably its left hand — it officially deplores
the southern African systems of white domination. On
the other - possibly the government's right hand - the
Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce, in a
slick-paper publication entitled Foreign Trade offers
businessmen    detailed   information    on    investment
opportunities in southern Africa.
An economic remnant of the 1950's adds another
aspect to the Canadian government's encouragement of
trade with the Republic of South Africa. Although
South Africa withdrew from the Commonwealth in
1961, Canada continues to extend Commonwealth
trade preferences to it. The Toronto Star commented:
"It is not only hypocritical but absurd that South
African goods should be entering Canada at an
advantage over the products of many countries with
whom we have no quarrel whatever. And it's nothing
short of disgraceful that a company owned by the
Canadian public should be in a position to profit from
the economic injustice which South Africa imposes on
its black people."
In a plea to the Canadian people President Nyerere
of Tanzania notes, "if Canada cannot supprt our
struggle, will it at least be able to refrain from giving
comfort and help to those who would deny freedom
and dignity to us."
The Government's Contribution
to the Exploitation Racket
Not only does the Canadian government encourage
private investors to reap profits from the "ignorant"
Third World, it actively pitches in and lendsa hand.
Mr. William Nedow, the media relations chief of
CIDA (Canadian International Development Agency)
estimates that 90 per cent of grants and loans actually
go back to Canadian exporters, consulting firms,
construction companies, advisers and teachers.
Referring to the "Canadian content" provision
outlined in the government's foreign aid policy.
S. L. Reeber notes, "Canadian aid is tied, it is
made available subject to two point conditions: (a)
that the proceeds be spent in Canada, and (b) that the
project supported by Canadian aid meet stipulated
Canadian content provision." Recent Canadian aid to
the Caribbean region included:
An $800,000 interest free loan to Trinidad and
Tobago to acquire six prefabricated factory shells,
made in Canada, along with boilers, water coolers,
electrical and plumbing supples, and air conditioning
Equipment to service the buildings.
A $600,000 interest-free loan to Jamaica to
purchase Canadian equipment and services in the
construction of 40 small prefabricated primary schools
in rural areas.
A $1.8 million loan to Guyana to finance
participation by a Canadian survey company in the
intensive mapping of the country's unexplored interior
region.
A $345,000 loan to Trinidad and Tobago to pay
for the services of M. M. Dillion Ltd., of London,
Ontario for surveying the country's water resources.
A $500,000 interest-free loan to Trinidad and
Tobago to acquire as many as 3,000 head of Canadian
Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle for its dairy industry
development.
Construction of additional airport facilities in
Antigua (1.6 million), St. Lucia, $2.10 million and
Dominica $200,000 using Canadian material.
Special development loan of $350,000 to Trinidad
and Tobago for purchase of Canadian porthandling
equipment for Port-of-Spain.
A $50,000 grant to St. Vincent & Lucia to buy
Canadian fertilizer.
Is this "aid" to the Caribbean or a subsidy for
Canadian businessmen?
"The general requirement to buy in Canada
subject to prescribed Canadian content provisions
reduces the real value of the aid to recipients in two
ways relative to what its value would be if it were
untied. First, to the extent that Canadian prices are
higher than world prices Canadian aid commands
smaller volume of goods and services than if it were
untied. Secondly, the dual constraint imposed on aid
recipients reduces their range of choice in allocating aid
funds. Moreover, there is a substitution effect arising
from differences in relative prices domestically in
Canada and internationally. The limitation on choice
together with this substitution effect may distort
demand away from the pattern of aid purchases that
would be preferable if allocations were governed solely
by development criterion. In essence we determine
what form development in the Third World should
take."
"Willy-nilly, aware or unaware, (our Government)
serves as the advance guard for voracious private
pillaging of the Third World." We are thusrevealed the
noveau neo-colonialists of the Western World following
in the footsteps of our illustrious teachers, France,
Britain and the United States.
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BLACK & LEE
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631   Howe 688-2481
OVERLAND
By bus from London to India or Nepal.
By   train   from   Moscow   to   Siberia   with   connecting
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Details   available   on   these   once-in-a-lifetime   trips.
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagen's   Travel   Service   Ltd.
HAGEN'S
736-5651
2996 W. Broadway Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  26,  1970
NEW EXACT
COIN FARE SYSTEM
Effective April 1st on all
B.C. Hydro buses in Greater Vancouver
Drivers will no longer
carry change
Beginning April 1st, you must deposit the exact
bus far in coins to ride a B.C. Hydro bus in Greater
Vancouver. Drivers will carry no change . . . and
will be unable to accept anything but the precise
amount of your fare.
These are the new cash fares
effective April 1st
Adult:   Single zone 25c cash
Multi-zone fare  during  hours 3 a.m. to 10
a.m. and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through
Friday 40c cash
Multi-zone    fare    during    other    weekday
hours and on weekends    25c cash
SPECIAL UBC STUDENT FARE
Between Blanca Loop and UBC, valid on
presentation of current Alma Mater Society
Membership Card      .15c cash
® B.C. HYDRO
TENNIS
ANYONE?
We are now featuring
our new lines of
ladies' and men's
Tennis Wear
FOR THE LADIES
Dresses from 14.95 to 30.00
Shirts 6.95
Tennis Shoes 7.95 to 12.95
FOR THE MEN
Shirts-6.95 to 7.95
Shorts - 4.95 to 16.95
Sweaters - 15.95 to 17.95
TENNIS  EQUIPMENT
Racquets from 5.95 to 60.00
Tennis Balls from 1.50 to 3.00 per tin
SPORTING GOODS
SHOPPING  HOURS: 9-6 - Fri.  9-9
2120 W. 41 st Ave. - 261 -6011
CAR  LOT  OK'D
Yacht club
wins battle
By GINNY GALT
Beaches are for people, not cars. But Vancouver city council
doesn't seem to think so.
Council voted 5 to 4 Tuesday to approve a proposal by the
Royal Vancouver Yacht Club to build a private parking lot on the
public beach in front of Pioneer Park at the foot of Alma Street.
The parking lot will occupy a strip of beach 530 feet long and
160 feet into the water.
The RVYC's parking lot proposal was discussed extensively at
a council meeting on March 17, but the whole issue was tabled until
a decision was made by the board of variance. Six delegations
appeared before the board appealing the technical planning board's
original approval of the parking lot, but the board of variance also
approved the parking lot.
City Alderman Harry Rankin said the majority on council who
support this are putting private privilege ahead of public welfare.
"Worse than that, council is going back on its own decision
because only a year ago it agreed to acquire the land north of Point
Grey Road for beach and park purposes."
So what happens now? Aid. Rankin says legal action will be
taken. The law firm of Fraser, Hyndman, and Weddigan has been
hired.
The firm's Paul Fraser said the case will be addressed to the
city of Vancouver, the technical planning board, the board of
variance, and the attorney general of B.C.
"What it will seek to do is quash the approval of the technical
planning board and the board of variance. If this succeeds, their
approval will mean nothing," Fraser said.
Rankin believes the building of such a parking lot in the
middle of a public beach and park area is illegal because:
• the 21 year lease which the RYVC obtained from the
provincial government clearly states that the area is to be used
for "floats and boat mooring purposes only".
• the lease provides that in any dispute over its terms, the
minister of Lands and Forests will have the final say and his
decision will be binding.
• under these terms the city's technical planning board had no
legal right to change the terms of the lease and approve the
construction of a parking lot on this public property.
» the board of variance for the 'same reason has no legal right to
make a decision.
• and the decision is in direct conflict with the earlier decision
to acquire the property north of Point Grey road so there will
eventually be one continuous beach from Vanier Park to
Spanish Banks.
Long jobless summer
ahead for students
By JAN O'BRIEN
It will be a long jobless summer for many students, even
though many different groups are attempting to combat student
unemployment. According to Canadian government statistics, the
bare minimum necessary for existence during the summer and school
year is $2,680.
So far this term, the UBC student placement office has
registered 1,350 men and 1,100 women. The temporary jobs offered
range from clipping poodles, selling flowers on street corners to the
usual standby of camp counselling or working as a Waitress.
The placement office deals mainly in career related jobs;
during the winter about 600 firms recruit employees through the
office but only about 65 of these are looking for summer employees.
"If you don't have a saleable skill you have to take a menial
mediocre job," said placement officer J. Cameron Craik.
The placement office is publishing a guide to assist students
seeking summer employment. The guide offers suggestions that, in
effect, tell students to register with Manpower and the placement
office and them to keep active walking the streets looking for work.
"It's a little too early to tell what the employment situation
will be like, most students are not available and employers have not
registered," said Canada Manpower officer Hal Malone.
"Most students are pessimistic on the general basis that there
are possibilities of a lot of job stoppages this summer," said Norm
Wright, a director of the British Columbia Union of Students task
force on student unemployment.
Employment offices are only meaningful when equated to a
live body, said Wright.
Other campuses have involved students personally and assisted
placement office by having a office that coordinates efforts of
manpower and placement office, he said.
The Action Committee of Unemployed Youth is providing
projects such as the cleaning of Burnaby Lake for students who are
desperate for work.
"After the job has been completed, we will present the bill to
the provincial government," said a TACUY member.
TACUY is sponsoring a conference on student scabbing
between various employment groups, unions and student councils on
April 15 at 434 W. Pender. Thursday, March  26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
The Ubyssey exposed!
Strange as it seems, there is more to The
Ubyssey than a dirty office in SUB, full of bums
and broken-down typewriters. In order to get all
the crap out of our writers' heads and into print,
we employ the services of a print shop, i.e. College
Printers, whom we plague twice a week.
What happens is the copy is taken to the
printers', where it goes through all kinds of
wonderful changes. First of all, it is typed up on
the IBM machine. . . .
The IBM machine
rattles out a decent copy
of it all, which is read by
drunken staffers hunting
for mistakes. All this,
complete with heads, is
laid out in pages, and
then photographed.
Metal plates are prepared from the negatives,
and these are slung onto
the presses and inked.
During the night, this
monster is primed. . ..
(norm on the linotype
says he works too.)
photos by david bowerman
. . . and finally, 16,000 copies roll off the presses early in the
morning and into your hot little hands.
LEARNING POWER
ARE YOU SATISFIED
WITH
the summer job situation?
the availabality of jobs for graduates?
the present system of loans and bursaries?
YOU CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT...
Next week a questionnaire will be sent to 15% of the students on campus. This survey of the student situation must
be statistically valid in order to carry any weight. This
requires your help.
•IF YOU RECEIVE A QUESTIONNAIRE, FILL IT IN IMMEDIATELY. THE SUCCESS OF THE
SURVEY DEPENDS ON YOUR PARTICIPATION.
HELP WANTED: YOURS! Page  22
THE      UBYSSEY
CBW drop
by Canada
at Geneva
applauded
here
By ROBERT BENNETT
"We warmly applaud the
Canadian government's initiative
in renouncing unconditionally the
use of germ weapons," said Dr.
Harold Kasinsky, spokesman for
the Vietnam Moratorium
Committee.
Kalinsky was referring to the
March 25 announcement by the
Canadian delegation at the general
disarmament conference that
Canada "does not intend to
develop, produce, acquire,
stockpile or use such weapons at
any time in the future."
"In light of this statement, we
urge that the government convert
its chemical biological warfare
establishment in southeastern
Alberta to an environmental
research station or a public health
centre," said Kasinsky.
"Since Canada no longer
intends to use CBW weapons we
have no need to develop them.
"The problem of CBW," said
Kasinsky, "is part of the larger
question of the responsibility of
scientists to direct their research
work towards humane ends and
the responsibility of citizens and
government to make sure this
occurrs. We will not solve the
problems ot environmental
pollution if we continue to do
research on new CBW pollutants.
"We urge the government to be
explicit on the CBW weaponry
that falls under this unilateral ban.
Napalm, tear gases and defoliants
were excluded from the American
ban on biological weapons and
these are precisely the weapons
the U.S. is using most against the
NLF and the civilian population
in Vietnam.
A leach-out which is to be held
at the site of the CBW weapons
plant in Suffield, Alberta is being
organized by U. of Saskatchewan.
The Vietnam moratorium
committee hopes to raise enough
funds to send a bus load of people
from UBC to the protest.
The idea of the teach-out is to
speak to scientists at Suffield and
urge them to direct their energies
to more humanitarian pursuits.
The protesters want Canada to
pull out of its agreements with the
U.S., Britain, and Australia, to
produce, and do research on,
chemical and biological weapons.
Blorgs Boogie
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
When the citizens of this puce
ghetto heard a wild rumor that
their foreign porno supply house
would cease publication until
September, they declared a
national holiday and celebrated
their depravement at the Bowsey
and Barkless Ballet which was the
next best thing. Blorgs aren't
fussy in most cases, but while
they gave Bowsey a standing
ovation Barkless was bombarded
with blorgsome tomatoes.
Thursday,  March  26,  197C
s? mim      inorio
.; ^maiiHau    Beroman
l(C (MDfe HaWL™
l\M ->-_i *_-__-_€"* SHOWTIMES:   12:15,  2:30,
I   v* i__ Cs\C/(/& 4:40< °:55< 9:1°
-f=jJXj£K> SUNDAY:   2:30.
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
BOB & CAROL &
TED & ALICE
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR at 30th
NATALIE WOOD
ELUOTT GOULD
4:40,   6:55,   9:10
ROBERTCULP
DYAN CANNON
SHOWTIMES: 7:30,9:30
Sunday 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
"•MASIMS THE BEST
AMERICAN WAR COMEDY
SINCE SOUND CAME IN."
" 'M*A*SSH'
begins where other
anti-war films end!"
—Time Magazine
MASH
—Pauline Kael, New Yorker
'"M*A*S*H'iswhat
the new freedom
of the screen
is all about."
—Richard Schickel, Lite
"'M*A*S*H'isa
cockeyed masterpiece-
see it twice."
—Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek
20th century fox presents An Ingo Preminger Production
*»,.« DONALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD TOM SKERRITT
NO ADMITTANCE TO PERSONS UNOlfl  IS
.,„.,,        , „   . WARNING: Frequent swearing and very
876-2a747 coarse language. B.C. Censor
Show Times 7:30, 9:30
Sunday 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30
SPECIAL MATINEE GOOD FRIDAY CONTINUOUS FROM 2 P.M.
^^ Announcing
The Sack of Rome
JEANSEBERG
i TANYA LIVINGSTON
JACO.UELINEBISSET
sGWENMEIGHEN
GEORGE KENNEDY
as JOE PATRON)
■*r
>
THE*1 HOVEL
OF THE YEAR-HOW
ft MOTION PICTURE!
BURT LANCASTER
as MEL BAKERSFELD
DEAN MARTIN
; VERNON DEMEREST
A ROSS HUNTER Production
/   I
O1
-V
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a JERRY
BRESLER
uss:
nloi/eyou
Coronet
851  GRANVILLE
685-6828
99
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
Showtimes
12:10,2:00,3:55,
5:45, 7:40, 9:35
Sunday 2:00, 3:55, 5:45
7:40,9:30
BURT LANCASTER • DEAH MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG
JACQUELINE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES
VAN HEFLIN     u
MAUREEN STAPLETON
LLOYD NOLAN
       TECHNICOLOR
■"YMJHHH      Showtimes 12:00
11 IIUlllliiJl 2:20, 4:40,
bLaMHlllii 7:05.9:30
682-7468 Sunday 2:20, 4:40,
7:05,9:30
SPECIAL LATE SHOW GOOD FRIDAY MIDNIGHT Thursday, March 26,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
IH MMMI tMHtfljITY
WITHBRAW ILS.TBD8PS NOW
SfU PHERMIMTION FOR THE VIETNAMESE
ASSMBIi 10:30 THORNTON PR. (C.NJL STN.J
BALLY COURTHOUSf  12:30 P.M.
VIETNAM ACTION COMMITTEE
2414 MAIN ST.»12 878J011
Moccasin miles underway
for bread for Indians
Representatives from many secondary schools. UBC. Simon
Fraser University: and Vancouver City College are taking part in tne
three-day "Moccasin Miles Walkathon" between Vancouver and
Hope beginning at 7:00 a.m. at Vancouver city hall April 3.
The walk is being held by the Resources for Native Progress
Association for the purpose of raising money
-.The RNPA is requesting residents in the Langley and
Chi. ^^ack areas to provide a place to sleep and breakfast for the
Indian jNjrtainment groups participating in the walk
Any . -sidents interested in sheltering the group are asked to
call Mrs. Fallowfield at 534-9721 and donors are asked to send
cheques or money orders made out to the Indian-Eskimo
Association of Canada to the RNPA office, Box 8746, Postal Station
H, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Receipts for income tax purposes will be mailed to all donors
for amounts over twenty dollars.
TRAVELLING ABROAD?
WORKING AT HOME?
Full complement of
SLEEPING BAGS - RUCKSACKS
HIKING and CAMPING GEAR
Work Clothes — Boots — to meet all requirements
3 VETS LTD.
832 Main at Prioir free parking 685-0856
After April 1st our new location at 6th and Yukon
We Appreciate
Your Business ...
hope to see you
this summer
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (ar Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED"
Students in UBC residences
face 'special situation
By ROBIN BURGESS
Sorry, Fort Camp, Place Vanier and Totem
Park residents, but the new tenant and landlord act
doesn't apply to you.
'"I doubt very much whether this new
legislation would apply to room and board
situations such as university residences," said
Alderman Harry Rankin.
"It's too bad. but it may be we (the Vancouver
Tenants Council) should make a move to do
something about the special situation students face
on campus," he said.
At present, a residence student who pays board
and room, is required to pay a $25 application
deposit and must give 30 days notice of vacating
regardless of how long he has actually occupied the
accepted room.
But for residents of Acadia Park. Acadia Camp
and Presidents Row it's a happier story.
UBC's three family housing complexes should
"definitely"   be   covered  bv   the  legislation,  said
Rankin.
Under the terms of this act residents should no
longer be required o Day a $30 caution deposit
before moving -,.
The onus wyJ now oe on the university to keep
the residences n> a fir state of repair and upkeep,
something many ;a.o-ints felt hasn": been done up to
now.
"The places are .mst like pigstyes. : said Harnie
Carl, a UBC graduate student who live;, with ins
wife in an Acadia Park aoartmei'v.
ij.s-'M   o.'   !;."•   was,s   :s
, even wjrji ci^ari hands..
"The pain; jeyv;
absorbent. If you "■■.•"men
the fingerprints sta> :';.><?■ ■■.■ :."
There are cracks iorming in the waijs oi many
of the apartments sa.-d Carl, and if tenant- compiar,
the management sends a repairman who just "slops
plaster over the crack and paints over it."
"Even the cracks are cracking." he said
/ Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 26,  1970
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BY YOUNG PEOPLE
FOR
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BY MINI-BUS - SMALL GROUPS
Are you young (under 30) - budget minded?
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Example Tours:
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5 weeks - N. Africa - Spain - Portugal     $179
5 weeks - Scandinavia - Russia   .... $205
9 weeks - Grand European Tour (16 countries)... $367
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Food Kitty keeps food costs to a minimum - all cooking equipment supplied
WE ALSO ASSIST WITH CHARTER FLIGHTS
-NOW-A NEW SERVICE-
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from Amsterdam $168 for 30 days - 3000 km included
- A complete service including delivery - insurance - shipping - trip planning -
For full information, dates, etc.
Travel Headquarters
5744 CAMBIE (at 41st)
327-1162 Thursday, March 26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 25
Camp staff needed
Students are needed to staff the Holiday House Summer
Camp, a four week camp for crippled children from July 24 to
August 21.
The Office of Inter-Professional Education has agreed to
provide teams of students to help operate the camp—a core team of
a director, nurse, two cooks and two senior counsellors and rotating
teams of eight additional counsellors.
Some financial assistance will be available.
Holiday House is a city-based camp run out of Oakridge
School.
Interested persons can contact Mrs. J. Preston, School of
Social Work, UBC.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Red power rep Fraser Blorg has
been declared obsolete by a definitely motley and shapeless blorg
movement.
"I don't like movements anyway," said Blorg.
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
ffrbanki
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS & FACULTY
THE
BOOK STORE
will be
CLOSED
ALL DAY
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st and
THURSDAY, APRIL 2nd
FOR ANNUAL STOCK TAKING
M*M*^^^M
The store will be open Tuesday, March 31 stand Friday, April 3rd
The Campusbank closes in
5 minutes and this idiot's got to
prove himself!
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
_t
Visit your Campusbank ■■■ Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Student Union Building Branch — T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch — G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr.
ATTENTION. . .
EDUCATION STUDENTS
COME TO EDMONTON
Employment Opportunities for 1970-71
Interviews with a representative of the Board will be available
on April 3, 1970 tp education students and experienced teachers interested in teacher employment starting September, 1970.
Whereas our staffing situation is adequate at most grade levels
and subject area fields, applications are solicited for the
following:
ELEMENTARY
(particularly Division One)
SECONDARY
(1) Industrial Aits (Multi-phase)
(2) Merchandising
(3) Instrumental (Band) Music
(4) Vocational Teachers-Beauty Culture, Food
Preparation & Services, Graphic Arts-
Lithography, Commercial Art, Merchandising,
Institutional Services and Horticulture.
(5) Drama
. Applicants must be eligible for Alberta teacher certification requiring a minimum
of two years of post-secondary (university) education beyond Senior Matriculation if education program commenced September 1, 1967 or earlier, or three
years of post-secondary (university) education beyond Senior Matriculation if
teacher education program commenced September  1968  or later.
For application forms, employment information and interview
appointment please contact:
CANADA MANPOWER CENTRE
125 EAST 10th AVENUE, VANCOUVER, B.C. Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 26,  1970
Vk Rollins backhands a shot to Bob Bardsley       S 0 C C 6 T   IQQS
look hopeful
Tennis men roll
By KEITH DUNBAR
For many of the teams at UBC the sports year has come to an
end. Not so for Dave and Vic Rollins, Bob Bardsley, Roger Skillings,
George Lea, and Dave Hodges.
These people make up the UBC tennis team and for the next
five months they will compete in tournaments in Canada and
Europe.
In August at Toronto, most of them will represent UBC in the
Canadian National tennis championships.
In May, the Rollins brothers will leave for a tour of Europe
while the others will compete throughout the summer in the Pacific
Northwest circuit.
If they all do well, they hope to have an opportunity to
represent Canada in the Davis Cup.
Vic and Dave Rollins won a Silver Medal in doubles in the
Canada Games at Halifax last September,
Dave is also a member of the junior Davis Cup team.
Bob Bardsley is currently ranked first in B.C. and played on
the Canadian Davis Cup team in 1964. Bob and Vic were formerly
ranked in the top ten players of Canada.
This talent, coached by Bob Bardsley and captained by Vic
Rollins, will hopefully bring tennis recognition to UBC again.
—keith dunbar photo
Coach Joe Johnson and his
Thunderbird soccer team will try
to make it wins number six and
seven this Easter weekend.
Currently the team is tied for
last place with Pauls Tailors at
nine points. A double win this
weekend, however, will catapult
them into fifth place.
If they only win one they will
still get out of the basement and
into eighth position over Pauls.
Pauls have finished league play
while UBC have two games left.
Whether the team wins or loses
the situation still appears rosy for
next season with most of the
starters returning.
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Our
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It's a fact. We try harder. But we're human, so if we slip, let us know.
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And because we have a special understanding of British Columbia's
motoring needs, we're usually 'way ahead with products that fill
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Try HOME just once. Let us win you over. There are 298 HOME
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Apply tor a HOME Credit Card.
Write, or phone HOME — 685-9131.
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HOME
Basket birds
roundedup
By TONY GALLAGHER
Upon being so rudely interrupted by the ruthless editors of
this mournful publication, I shall continue my laborious comments
upon the astounding success of the UBC basketball Thunderbirds.
As you may or may not recall, the last discussion ended with
the justifiable use of superlatives concerning the play of forwards Bob
Molinski and Derek Sankey and centre Terry MacKay. However
there was no effort to comment on the performance of the players
who provided the rather unexpected depth the club had all year.
Leading the endeavour was forward Jack Hoy who saw
considerable action stepping in for Sankey or Molinski in tight
situations. The results were amazing. Hoy turned in a brilliant year
as he shot in excess of 45 percent from the field.
At only 6'2" Hoy gave away a good deal of size on the boards.
Undoubtedly he will get the starting nod at forward next year
combining with MacKay and Sankey to give the Birds a small but
great shooting front line.
Other notables in the forecourt were centre John Mills and
John Hawkins, both rookies this year and both with promise to
match their colorful performances.
Mills played the role of backup to centre MacKay this season
and considering his size, did an admirable job. At 6'3" however, it is
unlikely that he can make a college career at centre, thus
necessitating a transition to forward.
If he can effectively develop his shot and moves, something at
which he has proven entirely competent, he will be an excellent
addition to the future Birds.
Hawkins is another small forward with a great shot and the
ability to afford fans great bundles of entertainment with his leaping
ability. Baring another attack of mono which beset the former high
school star, he should aid future Bird clubs for the next three years.
At guard, as well as superstars Alex Brayden and Ron Thorsen
there were three players with unquestionable talent.
Foremost in the category is Stan Callegari who had developed
into a quick guard with a good shot and the ability to dunk; an
ability he could well have done without, as he did his ankle
irreperable damage, putting him out for most of the season.
Rod Matheson showed similar development at guard, allowing
him to make appearances, most noteably in the WCIAA finals
against Manitoba and against McMaster in the Canadian final.
Joe Kainer completes the trio in the backcourt. He was able to
step in at any time and perform in the manner of a seasoned star. He
led the club in shooting percentage despite not playing enough to
bring out his best performance.
With such personel returning, combined with a great crop of
rookies coming up from the Jayees, it seems likely that the Birds will
again represent the west in the CIAU finals, next year.
UBC Rugby Season Ends
The Thunderbird rugby team
ended the season on a winning
note last Saturday with a 15-0 win
over Western Washington State
College of Bellingham.
This win puts the team in third
place in the Pacific Northwest
Collegiate League. University of
Washington finished second while
University of Victoria took first
place.
The team finished up with 3
wins, 2 losses and 1 tie. This was a
step better than the showing that
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - The
West Pango Pango bailers won the
basket   trophy   this   year.
they made in the Vancouver city
league which they competed in
first term.
Fencing President
Wins Novice Meet
Norm Price president of the
UBC Fencing club won the Mens
Novice event at the B.C. Novice
Fencing Championship held at
Mount Pleasant Community
Centre last weekend.
The whole fencing club will be
participating in the Western
Canadian Championships which
are being held here at UBC next
weekend. Thursday, March  26,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
Hartley, Cardno womens winners
. .    *> "«, 4 -Hut
—dick button photo
WAA Individual trophy
Sandi Hartley
Sandi Hartley won the
' Outstanding Athlete Award at the
Women's Athletic Association
banquet Tuesday night.
The award which was
presented for the first time last
night recognizes those athletes
who compete for Canada.
Sandi placed second while
trying out for a berth on the 1967
Canadian National Gymnastics
team and went with the team to
the 1967 Pan Am games in
Winnipeg and then to Mexico City
in 1968 for the Olympics, so she
was deemed the most deserving
this year.
As a member of the UBC team
Sandi won the Western Collegiate
individual trophy for three years
and the Canadian Intercollegiate
invitational individual award for
the past two years, placing first in
each event.
Sheila Cardno won the other
One Call to Westco
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MAIL THIS  COUPON   FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
(Pleflise Print)
Residence
Address  .
Occupation    -	
Phone: Home    Office 	
City - Pro».
Age Male □   Female Q
Married □     Single □
Oate first licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accident in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five vears has your
license been suspended? 	
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
bays per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in   last  5  years.
Are you now insured? 	
Date current policy expires
This   coupon   is   designed   solely   to   enable   non-policy
holders to obtain an applicalion and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVI
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Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years
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OCW-UBC 3
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
C\
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major trophy, the Barbara
Schrodt Trophy for outstanding
contribution to athletics at UBC
in three areas; intramurals,
extramurals, and administration.
As this years president of
Women's Athletics, she served on
various committees, and lead the
Women's Athletic Directorate.
Winning her fourth consecutive
Big Block as a member of the
curling team, Sheila also found
time to play intramurals, winning
the table tennis trophy.
BEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR!
- NEW YORK CRITICS AWARD
WES MONTANO / IRENE PAPAS
J L TRINIIGNANT JACQUES PERRIN
English Subtitles
Show Times
7:30, 9:40
Sunday
 „«      3:00,5:10,
224-3730** „
4375 W. ioth        7:30,9.30
Varsity
North Van
DRIVE-IN
300  PEMBERTON
9870422
Westminster
DRIVE-IN
So. of Pattullo Bdge.
522-7529
THURSDAY
March 26th Only
Triple Horror
"MASK OF THE RED
DEATH"
"HOUSE OF USHER"
"CIRCUS OF
HORRORS"
Adult Entertainment
SUNDAY
March 29th Only
Double Horror
"NIGHTMARE
IM WAX"
"BLOOD OF
DRACULA'S
CASTLE"
Designed by Ingmar Relling
Isn't this what you deserve at the end pf a
long, difficult day? Layers of leather to sink
into. Sculptured, body pleasing contours. A
footstool that's not just an ornament. And
design that's a collector's item. So nice to
come home to.   .   .even   if  you're  not  tired.
SCANDINAVIAN FURNITURE CO
1804 West 4th (at Burrard), Vancouver, B.C.
7326426 Page  28
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March 26,  1970
THURSDAY
UBC    NDP   CLUB
Executive meeting Thurslay, at
12:30  SUB   113.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
General meeting Rm. 119, SUP on
Thursday.
LEGAL    AID
Every Mon., Wed., Fri., at noon,
SUB   237   and  237A.
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Anyone interested in summer sailing in the Gulf Islands sign notice
on Sailing Club notice board in
SUB basement or phone Dave
Mitchell, 731-0914,  6-7 p.m.
'tween
classes
WOMEN'S     LIBERATION
Abortion arrest re Mackaroff meeting in SUB auditorium on Thursday
at 12:30. Discussion of action and
nossible   support.
UBC   GO   CLUB
Meeting in club's lounge for members and all people interested in
the  game   Go,   at   12:30.
SUS    ELECTIONS
Nominations open for SUS president, secretary, etc. Turn in forms
at SUS common room. En trie;
deadline March 30, elections Apri
1.
CAMPUS    CAVALIERS
Last fling of the year Thursday in
!AM  SUB   at   12:30.
WEDNFSDAY, APRIL  1
UBC   STUDENT   WIVES
Fnshinn s b o w at International
irouse  with door  prizes,   at   8  p.m
FILM   SOCIETY
Dr. Zhivago showing April 3-5 at
7:00   in   SUB  Theatre.
ENGLISH    HONORS   STUDENTS
Wine and cheese party in SUB Bail-
room at 8 p.m. Students bring wine
;md  cheese
CANADIAN    WELDING    BUREAU
The Canadian Welding Bureau is
presenting two papers with slides.
The Japanese People and Industry
and Welded Steel Fabrication in
Japan. 7:30 to 10:00. All engineering and science students are welcome.      April   15
SFU   PSA
From page 3
controversy adjudicated in a fair,
reasoned fashion," wrote
Wasserton.
Palmer has set April 3 and 4
as the beginning of the dismissal
hearings. This was done arbitrarily
without any consultation with
Livant.
"We do not plan to attend
the hearings for three reasons,"
said Briemberg.
"Firstly, the connection
between Palmer and Dupre is too
obvious to be a coincidence.
Secondly, we nominated 17
reputable scholars who were all
rejected. Finally, the date was
arbitrarily set without consulting
us and three of us are going to be
out of town attending different
meetings.
There is another reason why
the six faculty members have
decided not to attend the
hearings. There are two
independent investigations being
conducted into the case by the
American Anthropological
Association and the American
Sociological Association.
Professor John Porter (author
of The Vertical Mosaic) is heading
the ASA investigating committee
looking into the case.
Porter recommended that
"since a review by an outside
committee such as the ASA and
AAA may be helpful, the hearings
be postponed until the
investigations are completed."
EAT IN • TAKE OUT • 1ELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. &Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines,  1  day 7St,  3 days  $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone end are payable m advance.
Closing Deadline ia 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications OSice, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
GUY IN RED CONVERTIBLE
who picked up hitchers on Fri.,
please look in back seat for a
purse — address   inside.
THANKS! TO THE PERSON WHO
found by brief case Thur. night
behind Chem. Build. Could I buy
you   a  beer?  Rudolph,   253-3265.
PERSON WHO FOUND AVIATION
sun glasses in bookstore Friday
please return. Reward. No questions.    Rob,    263-9516.
Rides  &  Car Pools
15
NEED RIDE TO PRINCE GEORGE
April 10, share expense. Phone
John,   733-3162  week  days,   5   to  6.
Special Notices _16
ENJOY YOURSELF IN 1970.'
Work, study and travel abroad
this summer. Come to Int. House
April 3rd from 4 to 8 p.m. Get
information and meet the organizers, and find out how you can
get   involved.
A NUMBER OF CLASSIFIED
advertisers are entitled to partial
refunds due to cancellation of
Tuesday's Ubyssey. If you are
one of those affected please bring
receipt to the Publications Office
_for   payment.	
"l VRAPERY TRACK REPAIRS^ FIX
those Frat. House drapes. Re-cord
and   reconditioning.   731-8916.	
BECOME XXeGALiT'FoRDAINED
minister. $2.00 donation, appreciated.    World    Life    Church.    Box
_ 717-D,   Ceres,   California   95307.
AFRICAN STUDENTS PRESENT
"Tom-Tom l'Afriqije", Sat., Mar.
28th at l.H. 7p.m. dinner (Canadian). 9 p.m. Dancing to the
sounds of Tom - Tom I'Afrique.
Pinner & Dance, $3.00. Dance
only. $1.50. In advance from I.H.,
224-4535.	
NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN FOR
science imdergrad. president, vice,
treasurer, secretary, etc. until
March 30. Election April 1. Turn
them in at SUS common room,
Hut 07. Rehind education building.
FOR    YOUR    NEXT    DANCE
if   you   want   Blue   and    Rock
you  want
MILES
For   bookings  call
732-6028   or   224-3626
Travel Opportunities
17
SAIL THE GULP. ISLANDS IN 28-
foot sloop after exams. See sailing
club notice board, sub basement.
Phone    Dave. 731-0914.    6-7   p.m.
HOT A JOB? FATHER A MASON?
Have 2 charter flight tickets to
Europe leaving May 18, to June
22nd.     873-1003.
THREE ONE - WAY CHARTER
Flights to London. Leaving May
9th.   $140.   Ph.  299-4233 or 291-3144.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1953 CHEV. STATION WAGON.
Tested. Starts like a dream. $50.
Phone  263-7274.
1962 VW, GOOD CONDITION (BUG)
$400. 65,000 miles. 3565 W. 1st
Ave.	
'67 TR4A, TOP COND. 4449 W. 14
Ave.   228-8124.
1965 MUSTANG 289 AUTOMATIC,
buckets, radio, 33,000 miles, lady
driver, excellent condition 980-
209S  after  6.	
1960 PONTIAC 2-DR. HARDTOP,
V-8, auto, trans., custom radio,
good tires. Only $275. Phone 943-
5001.
'64 MGB., EXTREMELY WELL
looked after. Radio, wire wheels,
new paint, an honest deal, ali
work receipts available. 224-7686
after 6:00.
'1969 BLUE MINI COOPER. LESS
than 6000 miles. $1850. 4653 West
15th,   Vancouver,  after 5:00 p.m.
1954 CHEV. AUTOMATIC, RUNS
perfectly, new plates. $98. Owner
needs food, really. Phone AVayne,
731-5513.	
1963 VAUXHALL ENVOY $350. 1963
Valiant wagon auto. $900. 738-0968.
T.7 YOLKS. GOOD MwShXnTCAL
condition. New battery, muffler
and   tires.   $300   o.n.o.   988-6783.
1964 VOLVO CAN. 122-s 2-DOOR.
red (new paint), leatherette
int. immaculate throughout, only
60,000 miles. $975. (291-7492 eves.)
(263-9840 weekend) or inquire
(Auto   Henneken   263-8121).
'65 VIVA DELUXE offers 266-9703"
and    RCA   stereo   with   earphones.
_S_ 0_	
'63 VOLTCS BUG RADIO GOOD
tires reblt. motor exeell. cond. $500
phone Bill  224-9834  after 6^00 p.m.
1965" MGR MUST SELT "reTiUTLT
engine   transmission   roll   b;ir  wire
 wheels John  266-7710.
1962   TR^^EXCELLENT-CONDI-
lion.  New paint.  Bruce  733-3762.
Autos For Sale (Cont.)
21
1966 RENAULT R8 AUTOMATIC IN
excellent condtion Just $700 call
224-1579   today   or   after   monday.
'62 ANGLIA GOOD CONDITION.
Must sell. Phone 263-8088 Rick.
'67 CORTINA FOR SALE $1,000
1300 cc, standard, dark green 39,-
000 mi., Call Andrew Quarry 224-
5525.	
1961 RENAULT, GOOD CONDITION
very economical and reliable. $225
or offer. Phone Paul, Room 428.
Ph.   224-9720.	
68 VOLKS;  PERFECT CONDITIO.*,
radio   &   options;   ph.    Doug   22,
7235,    5:30-6:30   weekdays   or   434-
4603  after  6:00  p.m.   daily.	
$450—1962 DODGE DART 440 HARD
top, P.S. P.B. auto. Phone 988-
0544.	
68 VIVA DELUX, 70 H.P., DISCS,
4-speed stereo tape, 18,000 mi. $14,-
500  or best.  Jim,   224-1769.	
56 V.W., GOOD CONDITION ALL
around. Asking $150. Call Frank
late,  about  11  p.m.   685-2648.	
1962 VOLVO 544 B18 MOTOR GOOD
condition, must sell, $600 or offer.
Jim.   298-7991.	
1951 FORD, FOUR COLOURED"
one owner, classic, fine condition,
inspection sticker, offers. Phone
261-2124,  Rob.	
1963 FORD GALAXIE 289, V-8.
auto. 228-4178 days. $650. 1949 W.
5th,   No.   205.   Exc.   shape.
1967   M.G.B.
White,   red   interior,   radio,
for   Quick   sale   $1750
JIM     MACDONALD    985-9344
EVENINGS   684-4685
Automobiles  Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
VW VAN RACK (USED) 6'x4'
$49.50 (Cost $125.00) Good cond.
224-9152   Evenings  and   Weekends.
Motorcycles
25
'66 TRIUMPH 650cc TROPHY GOOD
condition,    equipped    for   highway
if   wanted.    Must    sell   desperately!
Phone Glenn 266-7425 Approx. $600
 Offers   heeded!	
67 SUZUKTHUSTBR. NEW~TKAN-
smission, excellent condition $450
with  all   accessories.   Ph.   733-6203.
' 67 BLK HONDA. 450, 2 YK. IN
storage; under 1000 mi; immac.
cond; oversize rear tire; Girling
shocks; 2 helmets; shop manual,
etc. Owner must choose between
bride & bike; best offer, Ph. 731-
0998   after   5.	
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Art  Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPEC-
ialists in graphs, maps, text book
illustrations,     complex     formulae.
Scientific displays advertising, phone
733-4506.
Photography
34
Scandals
37
GAY UBC STUDENT 22 WILL
send 21 pages on how and where
to meet young homosexual guys.
Box 8969 station H Vancouver 5,
B.C. Not one complaint in the 17*
replies   already.	
SEND YOUR AGE AND QUES-
tions for 21 pages on how and
where to meet perfectly normal
looking homosexual guys. Box
8969 Station H, Vancouver 5. (no
complaints   in   144   replies).
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC IBM TYP-
ing my home, essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.	
ESSAY AND THESTS TYPING —
Electric.    Mrs.    Hall   434-9558.
EFFICIENT TYPING — ELITE
Type. Term papers, essays, thesis,
etc.   My   home.   Ruth   731-8578.	
ESSAYS ETC. TYPED AT HOME.
Pick up and deliver. 254-7959. oi
254-5085."	
ACCURATE    EXP.    TYPING    froi.
legible  work;   reas.   rates;   738-68
after  nine  a.m.   to  nine p.m.
RUSH ESSAYS DONE BY ~EX^
Secretary 35c pg., Olivia, ph. 733-
6656.     3534  W.   26th  Ave.
EXPERT TYPING—THESIS 35c/
page Essays 30c/page 5c per copy
Fast efficient Service. Ph 325-
0545.	
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references
946-4722.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy.   738-8794.   35c   page   —   5c
EXPERIENCED T Y PISt FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancou-
ver  home.   988-7228.
EXPERIENCED ELEC. HO ME
typing.      Essays,      theses, etc.
Neat, accurate work, reasonable
rates.    Phone   321-2102.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING" 35c
a page; 5c copy. Mrs. Stewart,
733-6098.
Typing (Cont.)
40
ESSAYS, THESE, AND TECHNI-
cal matter typed by experienced
secretary at my Dunbar home.
Reasonable   rates.   263-6256.	
FAST ACCURATE . TYPING OF
theses, term paper, essays, manuscripts. 6707 Angus Drive, Ker-
risdale,   266-4264.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, ESSAYS,
theses, etc. 35c a page, 5c copy.
738-5200.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist, (Italics, symbols, other types).
Experienced essay and thesis typ-
ist.   Reasonable   rates,   321-3838.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays. Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317	
GENERAL TYPING, ESSAYS,
thesis, etc. Phone 224-5963. Mrs.
Brown.	
ACCURATE ELECTRIC TYPIST,
theses, manuscripts, etc. Phone
688-7051  around  6,   after  10  p.m.
TYPING DONE. 30c A PAGE. PH.
732-9488,   Petra  Graves.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
STUDENT SUPERVISORS NEED-
ed tor the following areas in SUL,
for the 1970-71 term—1 Games area
2. Information desk. 3 Pit. 4. Ma-
mooks. Applicants must be full-
time students for 1970-71. Please
make appointments for interviews
in  room  236.
"STUDENT REQUIRED FROM
May 1 to Sept. 1, 1970 in Prince
Rupert. Excellent salary and fringes. Must have knowledge of fishing industry, preferably halibut.
Applicants with cars will be given preference. Write: G. Hew-
ison, U.F.A.W.U., 869 Fraser St.,
Prince Rupert, B.C. (prior to April
1,   1970)"	
STUDENT WANTED FOR LAWN
mowing in house near University
Ph.  228-8104.	
STUDENTS REQUIRED ON A
door to door basis during evening.
Present salesmen earning- between
$15 and $20 per evening. 255-1232
1   to   5   p.m.	
LOOK REQUIRES GTrlS FOR
part-time telephone work. Broadway location. Salary and bonus.
Call   879-5911   for   info.   Also   full-
 time  summer work.
STUDENTS TO WORK IN A SUM ■
mer camp program for crippled
children. Camp dates, July 24th
to August 21st. Some financial
assistance available. Contact Mrs.
J. Preston,  School of Social Work.
ATTRACTIVE WOMAN WANTED
by florist firm for summer employment.   684-2618,   684-5612.
Summer employment
available for women
students with a minimum net
typing speed of 35 wpm.
Office   experience   helpful-
Many clerical jobs also
available.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
540 Burrard Street
684-7177
INSTRUCTION
Wanted
61
Music
62
PIANO   VOICE   THEORY   COACH-
ing  by  qualified  teacher.   Colling-
wood   and   Fourth.   731-5459.
Special Classes
63
CHINESE SHADOW BOXING
(Gung Foo). Self-defense for girls.
Ancient meditation for tension relief. Chinese studies/languages.
For inquiries phone 872-1106.
Tutoring
64
FRENCH   LESSONS   BY   FRENCH-
man   from   Paris.   Call   Rossignol
224-9620   after   5   p.m.    Tutoring   for
exams.	
SPANISH CONVERSATION"
COURSES — University Professor will offer special private summer courses, at a downtown office,
starting next May, for beginners
and advanced, inexpensive. Call
738-5692, after 4 p.m., for registration   and   to   get   planning.
Tutoring
TUTORING IN SPANISH, $3 hour.
Ph.   738-5692   eve.
Translations
TRANSLATIONS Spanish-English-
Spanish.   Call   738-5692   eve.
EXPERT  FRENCH  TUTORING
before    exams.     Cheap,     efficient.
Phone   Camyle.   736-0953.	
MANDARIN    BEGINNING    &    IN-
tensive     classes     by     experienced
teacher.  Call 732-0016.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MUST SELT, FENDER PRECIS-
sion bass. 732-9471 anytime day or
night
PROFESSIONA L AMPEX TAPE
deck.   $175   or  best  offer.   263-9609.
Misc. for Sale (Cont.)
71
19" RCA PORTABLE TV. $70.
Hart metal skis and 9% boots,
$100.   738-0968.	
AM-FM STEREO TUNER AND
record  player,   $95.   738-0968.	
KLH STEREO SYSTEM MODEL
24 changer, FM-MPX, 2 accoustic
suspension speakers in walnut,
exc.   cond.,  $300.   683-8077.	
OFF TO SEE THE WORLD IN
August. Must sell 1970 Fender
Twin Reverb with ALTEC Lansings. Flawlessly, powerfully perfect. $600. Write: J. R. Alton, 946
Thackeray St.,  Trail,  B.C.
LARGEST SELECTION OF 10
speed bicycles, Fren and Japanese.   As   low  as   $69.00.
THE  CYCLE SHOP
5895    Fraser   at    43rd 327-4229
HEAD MASTER SKIS. MARKER
binding 190 cm, three yrs. old.
736-5351.
WHITE BRIDAL GOWN, TRAIN,
veil, size 11. Best offer. 731-4550
wkend,   or   after   6:00   weekdays.
MIXED PUPS FOR SALE—$10.00.
Three weeks old March 19. Phone
731-2735 after  six.
SPRING STEREO
SALE
STEREO COMPONENTS
BIG   TRADE-IN
ALLOWANCE
House of Stein Electronics
Ltd.
901  Granville
1005 Granville
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
"MEN    WHO    WANT    GOOD    BED-
room for summer, available 1st
of May. Near U.B.C. gates, and
with   private   entrance,   telephone
 use,   etc.,   etc.   Telephone   224-7623.
S1J-5EPING ROOM FOR RENT.
Point  Grey   area.   RE   3-7979.	
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION NOW
available at the Sigma Chi House
the newest dormitory on Campus.
Summer rates on request for both
room and/or board, 5725 Agron-
omy.   224-6374   or  224-9620	
NEED CHEAP ACCOMMODATION
on Campus? Quiet clean rooms for
male students. $50 month, with
kitchen privileges. Clean linen &
parking. Board $45 if desired.
Close to Libraries. 224-0327 or
come to 5760 Toronto Rd.	
ROOM FOR RENT IN LARGE
west end house. Shared facilities.
$50/month.    684-2618,    684-5612.
ROOM FOR RENT. PRIVATE ENT-
 ranee.    Phone    738-7897.	
FREE ACCOMMODATION IN RE-
turn for light housekeeping.
Couple or 2 girls. First or second
year   preferred.   261-3595.	
ROOM ON CAMPUS AVAILABLE
May     1.       5665'     Chancellor     Blvd.
Phone  228-8635.
Room  &  Board
82
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE,
Point  Grey area.   RE  3-7979.	
FREE ROOM & BOARD FOR GIRL
student in exchange for help with
children. Near U.B.C. gates, 224-
6192.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
THREE PEOPLE WANTED FOR
semi-furnished house on 10th
July and August. $50 month. Contact Jane Gallie, 224-9715 or leave
message.	
1 BDRM. APT., $100 MONTH,
May 15 to Sept. 15 only, Kerris-
dale. 261-0389. Liv. Rm., kitchen,
furn. ,
SELF-CONTAINED SUITE FOR
rent. Point Grey area, $100. RE
3-7979.	
LARGE FURNISHED TWO-BED-
room suite to sublet starting May
to  Sept.   Phone  732-8036.	
NOW RENTING. LOVELY ONE-
bedroom suites in brand new high-
rise in University area. With wall-
to-wall carpeting, drapes, vinyl
wall. Harvest gold colored appliances, beautiful hotel-type lobby
and all modern conveniences. Free
laundry. Cablevision, underground
parking. Rents from $155. See it!
4691  W.   10th  Avenue.	
SENIOR GIRL TO SHARE FUR-
nished apt. during summer. Phone
224-0927.	
BASEMENT BED SITTING ROOM
near Hemlock and 16th. Fully
furnished. S.C. Married couple or
male. $60 month. 738-4090 after 6
p.m.
Unf. Houses  &  Apts.
84
Houses For Sale
86
BE YOUR OWN LANDLORD!
Spacious 2 bedroom house close to
UBC gates. Large lot: double
plumbing: 3 basement rooms, $150
mo. revenue. 224-3190 or drive by
4562  West  13th Ave. Occasionalblatherinffsoccasionalblatlieringsoccasionalblattieringsoccasion
Occasionalblattieringsoccasionalblattieringsoccasionalblatheringsoccasion
■—  Like what do you think of that Par.ifir PrP«c ctr.t™ \ wi;aki» <■„,„„_ u„„ :„f  .,_..„   	
popotamus
~• HI UUil »#■■■     -  -  ~
£3Ui
at
i
Dear Dr. Showandtell:
1 have a rather peculiar pruhlcm. You see. I don't
have any problems attracting the fellows, however,! am
very self eoncious of my appearance. My breasts are a>4
trifle too large and whenever I have "the curse" "tWv"
swell even larger, making the boys come out with
comments as, "wow. ehec'i those knocker!"
at those boobs!" and "Talk about top-heavy'
I do? '        y*
Dear Ralph
1 can line you up with an agent for -rT1,
Bailey and I can get you a royalty in the next
Ripley's Believe It Or Not.
Dear Dr. Showandtell:
I have been balling ever since 1 was ei#t y»«$
am now ninety-three. I have had syphilis, gonei"
the clap, crabs, and galloping peedink. I have not. ww™
doctor about these things. Instead I mb arbut^.tegj&s?
1,11 "iy Member. How do you explain this
Like what do you think of that Pacific Press strike
We down at the Gorgeous Graight really dig it We are
getting into the hands of all the unliips in the city scene
and they are lapping it up. A reliable source told the
Graight today that if the strik$$onlinues for at least two
"J~™liil ^ likely that the^inis shoe set will be so
^^^<^JUnnoti ■9imi\d be a shoe-in as a
' W&P the Vancouver cil\ council.
f,*k-   «   #   *   "
■■_?..
it-council, or ^ftcouver's answer to
I observed the
ne   outside   the
Terrific: We in
do   way-out
illnot:    Ya!
I her wears
;m Wilting
mtt- Flying
*fihe fol
?*>eU$<s for you.
gtrsan
1. ieJE^^hifld,.,,
. jafejst.love idf^
"* ' rte eevercd Sit
^Showing the uselcssness of the medical
checked with a physician who exajInaaegStov
« ago. Apparently your penJst rotted ortjartd
years ago and what ym think.is your
is actually an arbutus twfe wedgsd between
xon is
.A'.fj^-mail. Man, I sim
$**.'&/"'•' P:lrt  (,t   lnis m"
•^Tr'.'.        solution to the rem
m Vietnam.
ic latest
in set is
a new
let one
, .^.   «Bfj*fce State*: I. hear
«*A tif the army to deliwjjf the
|fi^-iO saliite my postman! A good
""jNfctton is that it is a possible
l^ftrqops and the end of the war
. sde, twenty years ©Id, 36-24-38. hm I have
■Although j am heautffi4..|huist have «\
s,ffty ioteresi in me. I do not
& Jain very *ie1i. What shall I do?
Brigitie
*****************
Dear Dr. Hippopotamus is a collection of oddballs
chuckles and porno published by Grope Press, 95 cents,'
paperbound.
A limber tinman riit-jfigt troops-maiI service issu*
is   thai   il   will   no   doubt'be   set up  with  sergeant*
delivering the liisi class mafr,privates delivering second
class   mail,   and   ollicers   vuitfog letters to  solve  the
employment pioblenis. .«*>'■■
11 occuired to me the i>thcrjfl|£jgiBt Shakespeare
was actually concerned will) polics^pfcthe pigs. Why
else would he have wiiiien Hamle^.ib*(pusly a title
referiing to small pigs. ()r could it he %m itwas written
by Francis Bacon, also a pig.
HJn
classified
Groovy, well-hung hippie wishes to meet horny flower child
iM^rrTff .In'icri.mSS:   Wa,f'eS   >"   'l™
s^y%it"enbaaaeatain?0h'Sh*hing together with  ,ove wl.he.
n^  pNho?o%S!ev;6rS'asTemhbaeVde  bthenfinest   "...etlon   of   ma„
handling. M  '"Ciuae 543.85 for postage and
t?UmeetUrsbamee   for "L^l   1*°^   Eur°P«"   '"eas   wishes
Ralph   Bemquist,
GG   office.
please   contact George   Kershbaum   at  the
08008. r-none   rxate s   Tent   &   Awning,   542-
A reliable source has informed thr Graight that the
head narc, Ralph Bemquist, is actually hooked on
artichokes. "He is hooked on artichokes," said the
reliable source. The same informed source mentioned
that he had it on good information that Spiro
You-kriow-who blows goats. "I have it on good
information that Spiro You-Know-Who blows goats,"
said the informed source.
Seventy-three RCM Porkers recently raided the
home of a friend of the Graight: They proceeded to
Keelhaul him, shave his head, hit him in the tummy with
their brickbats, and then forced him to watch their
immmitations of Ed Sullivan. Man, that's what I call
police brutality.
* *   *
Man, I must say that the local rock scene groupies
are terribly disappointed about the failure of one of top
groups to appear in town. I refer to Crosby, Stills, Nash,
Young, Bemquist, Kershbaum, Quigley, Davies,
McWatters, Freakout, Spaghetti, Manhavalich, and
Agnew. Oh well, Perhaps they can keep their plaster
fresh until the scheduled performances of The Pineapple
Crotch, The Peanut Butter Mathematics, and the
Sloughfoot five featuring Hank Snow.
* *   *
More on the rock scene and remember you heard
it here first: CKLG will go into t he sympohny bag,
while CHQM will trip out on acid rock. It figures . . . QM
is higher on the dial.
* *   *
Man, I was at the latest big "in" protest and it was
a gas. We all lit a joint to protest the war in Vietnam. I
expect the war to end now ... or maybe tomorrow. It
actually should have ended when CKLG had everyone
beep their horns for peace. I just can't understand why
things aren't working out.
* *  *
Closing note: Please send in more great tidbits so I
can rap with all you beautiful people out rhere.
Bye for now... love, peace, brotherhood,
ecology,and tight lines, straight shooting.
with jim
boteSon
|B«miy Hills, and I had to grope my way to the top I
TBCSS you could say I had a little pulling too. But I'll tell
'ou, man, it's hard when you're the greatest.
>ks like it. Is it true you first got
VVe"have 9tht ^n_l? °? bUt tired of tnose t'red old drugs'
KRy-'M'Hn"?'^9; wlnnXin^ ".& "bloo^™9 "
c'TaTo-tane^a?/,   ^*     "'^V'SiS&rW
^ge^b* '^aTown' JSj-KS^^-^?
m^-"9 1° raram?' Rome'  London, and Paris.    Seek young
B^c,,Cahop,%_*wn.  eXPerienCe'   C0"tact   pau.'s   Tandem
!?nn!.rrdoSfao-?«man  seeks fema,e  camel.   Contact  John
linger,   tfvo-yo/o.
Dil-
Feeling horny? Feeling frustrated? Feeling your crotch
nignt^t^o".^.    Ph°ne   Dia'-A"-°»scene.Message   day   or
I can cure those painful Hemhoroids in a matter of seconds.
Call   Fraser's   Double   Bladed   Axe   Company,   453-0909.
Nude modelling done in my home. It is not necessary for
«?"♦ __ ave a camera as I will supply my brownie. Contact   Peppermint   Patty   at   Box  444,  GG.
Want to be a well-heeled hippie? Get your Volkswagen
bus, flower decals, BO cologne, faded blue jeans, sandals,
wigs, hippie dictioina ry, old mattresses, posters, and old
copies  of  the   GG.   at   Norbert's   Hippie   Emporium.
John   Dillinger,   please
gone.    Bewsie,
come   home.     My   hemhorroids   are
(Graight   bop   writers   Alphonso,   Mike.   Laurie,
Henry, Sheldon and Waning snuck backstage after the
latest Floors concert for a sexclusive interview with Jim
Boreson, king of the king of all stone groups. Boreson
dripping with sweat and other bodily excretions from
the show, was sitting in the dressing room panting in his
black-leather fur-lined jock strap:
Graight: Gee, Jim.
Jim: Yeah, wow.
Graight: Tell us about the revolution, Jim.
Jim: We wanna seize our times and seize them now
Graight: Yeah, how true, Jim, I didn't realize you
knew so much about politics.
Jim: Do your thing, man, and do it now.
Graight: Wow, that's profound.
Jim: Right in, brother.
Graight:  Tell us about how you wrote your hit
single, "Light my Wire".
Jim: We were all sitting around stoned one night
really out of it, when it just came.
Graight: Do you sing when you're stoned too?
Jim: Naw, not too much anymore.
Graight: Why not, man?
Jim: Cuz after I come onto the climax of our new
hit, "Beat Me," the rest of the show is cold jerky.
Graight: What about your movies, Jim?
Jim: They're just the greatest, man. Like they just
say where the existential struggle of the hip scene is at
in true Jean Luc Rodhard tradition.
Graight: Tell us about your life, Jim.
Jim: I was born real poor for our neighborhood in
Graight: it
laid when you were
Jim: Nah, I've never be^frjtg*wftfi t^gjgjlgipily
stick to microphones and mirrors. It really helps my
singing, you know.
Graight: What else helps your singing?
Jim: Groupie gropes are my greatest inspiration,
because of the existential uncertainty; you never know
where your next grope or poke is going to come from. I
once wrote a song about that: "The Unknown
Shoulder".
Graight: Tell us about your next far-out hit.
Jim: I wanna write one about when I was in
Australia. I painted myself like a dehlia. At 10 cents a
lick the crowds thronged in thick, but at a dollar a peek
it was a failure.
Graight: Wow, what a natural poet you are, Jim.
Can you use your brilliant musical imagination to'come
up with a title?
Jim: I can come off with anything, (loud laughter)
Yeah, sure: how about "Suck Me'"
Graight: Far out: how do you do it, man? You're so
great.
Jim: Yeah, I know. It takes weeks of practice   It
took two weeks of practice to think up the title to
Bathroom  Man," not to mention working out the
chords.
trfaight: Wow, you've got to be dedicated, man.
Jim: Yeah. We spent four hours on "Crystal Tit".
Graight: Wow, that's real dedication.
Jim: Too much.
Graight: Too.fucking mcuh.
Jim: That's what I meant. Now if you don't mind.
I'm gonna get this jock off and go over to the mirror and
start composing.
Graight: Sure, man; keep up your groovy scene, eh?
Jim: Yeah, it's up as much as it can be.
Graight: Wow.
Jim: Fuck off, all of you.
Graight: Thans a lot, Jim. EMERGENCY
GENERAL MEETING
The AMS botched the spring general meeting. Because of the executive's attitude towards the students on this
campus, a quorum was not present and although it was not directly challenged and the number present counted,
the legality of all motions passed is somewhat shaky.
YOU, the students of this campus are the ones who will lose out. Two very worthwhile capital allocations, the
one for the campus pub and the one for the pool covering project, cannot be made without the approval of a full
quorum of 2,000 students. The new Student Council agreed to call an emergency general meeting for next
Wednesday, April 1, at 12:30 in front of the main library to seek approval of the student body so that both the
pub and pool projects can go ahead this summer. YOU, are the people who can decide if you want a campus pub
and if you want a covered pool for recreational swimming.
I urge you to take twenty minutes, that is all it will take, next Wednesday, in front of the main library and
decide if you want these two things for next year. There is every indication that you do want the pub and covered
pool.
VOTE YES or NO
**** to pledge a sum of six thousand dollars towards the cost of covering Empire Pool
subject to the pool being used primarily for recreational swimming
**** for the Students' Council of the AMS be authorized to borrow the monies, not to
exceed a maximum of $200,000, for the construction of the campus pub, the PIT,
subject to the following conditions:
a) borrowed funds to be repaid through the pub's generated revenue
b) that   the   construction   begin   at  the  earliest   possible  date  for  the
completion during the fall session of 1970
It is up to YOU, and only YOU can make the decision. There will be no band to entertain or attract you.
Remember, next Wed. at 12:30 in front of the main library for only a few minutes.
SEAN McHUGH
PAST OMBUDSMAN
NEXT NED -12.30 MAIN LIBRARY

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