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The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1970

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Array Subversion in back yards only
By SANDY KASS
City council may outlaw certain public
demonstrations in Vancouver.
Council members today will debate a motion by
alderman Halford Wilson "that the Vancouver city council
. commend the parliament of Canada for their action in
implementing the War Measures Act as an interim means
of counteracting and controlling violence indulged in by
law breakers (as defined by the act) in some areas of
Canada."
The motion continues: Be it further resolved that a
copy of this resolution be forwarded to the prime minister
of Canada;
Be it further resolved that the mayor be requested to
discuss with the police commission means of preventing
assembly of people upon public property by organizations
advocating overthrow by force of constituted government
in Canada, and who are participating in subversive
activities.
Wilson said the motion resulted from the growing
number of violent demonstrations in Vancouver, not only
those in favor of the Front de Liberation du Quebec, but
those of any group advocating the violent overthrow of
constituted government in Canada.
"The tense situation in Quebec at the moment has
speeded up the motion, but is not the direct cause," said
Wilson.
"We cannot allow the province of Quebec to separate
without taking some action," he said.
He added by the very proclamation of the act that
efforts are being taken to avoid future bloodshed.
"We must let the FLQ know they will get nowhere by
employment of violent and subversive tactics," he said.
Alderman Hugh Bird, seconder of the motion, said
that he does not wish to stop lawful assembly, but
believes the democratic system of Canada allows for the
expression of views by all parties, whether in favor of the
government in power, or not, and does not feel a need
for subversive activities under such a system.
"A person may advocate  all the social change or
anything that they will, but where violent tactics are
concerned, there is no need for bombings, kidnappings,
and murder to express an opinion," he said.
Wilson said that if this motion is passed, there should
be little interference with demonstrations advocating
peace, but did not elaborate as to how such
demonstations could be defined, or what would happen if
a "subversive group" infiltrated a peaceful demonstration
and began advocating violent action.
"A distinction must be made," said Bird, but did not
say either how such distinction could be effectively
determined.
Alderman Earle Adams said that he is mainly
concerned with law and order, and would be in favor of
any moves supporting this policy. He did not say how he
felt law and order would support civil liberties in this case.
"I do not feel that a small minority of one of two
hundred people should be allowed to disrupt the civil
liberties of everyone else," Bird said.
continued on page 12: see WILSON
WE'VE HEARD of dramatic re-enactments of history, but this is going too far. Ubyssey columnist Jim
Davies may be endowed with messianic wisdom, but he sure wished he was Barabbas when 40 thugs
yanked him out of bed Friday, dragged him out to campus and crucified him. Davies freed himself after
a couple of minutes.
Socred order
muzzles free
in-class talk
By JAN O'BRIEN and
SHANE McCUNE
It's illegal, unconstitutional and unnecessary.
The order-in-council passed by the provincial cabinet Thursday is
being called this and more.
Reg Robson, executive secretary of the B.C. Civil Liberties
Association Monday condemned as illegal the order which provides for
the firing of any public educator who advocates the policies of the
Front de Liberation du Quebec.
"The order-in-council is ultra vires," he said.
"It is discriminatory against teachers and does not provide legal
safeguards for those accused o£ supporting the FLQ."
Union lawyer Tom Berger said the order is clearly
"unconstitutional."
"It is designed to take away fundamental civil liberties of teachers
because it is not confined to the classroom."
"Fundamental rights can only be taken away by an act of
The provincial government's order in council designed to limit the
activities of teachers in their classes will be discussed Tuesday noon,
12:30 in Angus 110.
The speakers will be Ron Kirkby, professor of philosophy at the
University of Victoria, Art Olsen, fired from Dawson Creek for
discussing the Quebec situation, Louis Feldhammer, suspended PSA
prof from Simon Fraser and Walter Young, head of political science at
UBC.
The meeting is organized by the Left Caucus at UBC. There will
be a discussion following the speakers' presentations.
parliament. The provincial governments do not have the power to take
away freedom," he said.
At an executive meeting Saturday the B.C. Teacher's Federation
passed a motion saying, "We deeply resent the order and expect its
immediate repeal because it affects the civil liberties of all teachers.
"Freedom of expression inside and outside of the classroom and
freedom of political views are lost."
The federation said it would give full financial and legal support
to any teacher fired under the order.
But this pledge does not apply to teachers like Art Olsen.
Olsen was fired from South Peace Senior Secondary in Dawson
Creek Oct. 20. Although the principal reportedly told five students that
Olsen was fired on grounds of "incompetence", the only issue raised
during the latter's appearance before the school board was Olsen's
opinion of the FLQ.
continued on page 7: see ORDER
Peterson defies Turner over B.C. use of act
A power struggle is developing between the
federal and B.Cjovernments over use of the War
Measures Aot^C   ^v
Fede#af~jusiice mjnfster John Turner Monday
criticizefl/ithe B-C. cat&net order-in-council that
requires/d&missal-Tof teacfyer&who express opinions
favorably ip the front de liberation du Quebec or
advocate "the overthrow of-' ajpy "democractically
elected'^goyernmen^ £   >
Turnta told the^house^of commons the War
Measures Aif was irffroduced/iprirnarily to deal with
events in QuekfeQ. -'..;: -, .   A
"I suggest any extension of the use of the War
Measures Act beyond that purpose might very well be
harmful," he said.
However, attorney-general Les Peterson indicated
that the B.C. government will ignore Turner's
statement.
He admitted that although the War Measures Act
was not specifically invoked in the cabinet order, the
order was partially based on it.
"The cabinet has the right to declare what the
public is as far as the government of the province is
concerned and that is what we have done," Peterson
said.
"As the government we're concerned, in
educational institutions which come under our
jurisdiction, that the teachers in the institutions do
not violate the law which is passed by the federal
government and applies nationally,"
Peterson said he was in contact with federal
authorities last week, before the order was issued.
Turner denied the statement and said he had not
been consulted before the order was passed. He said
he telephoned Peterson after the order was issued to
personally inform him of his displeasure. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
Quebec-Presse attacks federal hard  line
MONTREAL (CUPI) - Quebec
- Presse Sunday devoted much of
its issue to analysis of repression
and the effects of "law and order"
in Quebec.
The left wing weekly, financed
partially by Quebec trade unions,
was under police surveillance last
week after publishing an editorial
denouncing "political repression"
and urging Quebecois to use
nonviolent means to resist the
imposition of military rule by the
Canadian government.
Jacques Keable, a member of
the paper's editorial board, wrote.
an article this week titled: James
Richard Cross — a life to save at
all costs.
■
"The morale of those being
detained is not at all good. In
certain cases if incarceration
continues much longer, nerves will
crack: you can't stay in prison
seven or 10 or maybe even 21
days, as in certain cases, without
feeling harmful effects."
Keable said the climate is ripe
for people to phone the police on
each other:
"It is currently enough for a
citizen to phone the police and
tell them something is fishy next
door for the police to search your
neighbour at any hour of the day
or night, without a court order."
Among those arrested this
week, was a 14-year-old whose
principal phoned the police
because the student posted the
FLQ manifesto onto a bulletin
board. He was held for half a day.
In another case, a teacher was
arrested (and there has still been
no news of or from him as
prisoners are held without bail
and legal counsel and can write or
phone no one) because his
principal, while eavesdropping on
the school intercom, caught part
of the . answer he was giving a
student concerning recent events.
Into     this    already    charged
climate, several people have
introduced elements which have
only heightened the tension, the
story said.
"Jean Marchand, Wednesday
night, shot a cannonball into the
back of a democratic political
party, FRAP, the only serious
opposition to Drapeau's
non-existent Civic Party."
The Civic Party is tightly
controlled by Drapeau, to the
point that even city councillors in
the party rarely know what the
mayor is up to.)
March an d's coup, like the
Brinks coup (the day before the
April 29th provincial election,
amid much publicity in the
English press, the usually discreet
Brink's Security Co. hustled a
convoy of trucks filled with
securities and bonds put of
Quebec) is an exceptional
example of violence and.
irresponsibility: A federal
minister, worried about electoral
WM Act protest continues
despite dangers involved
OTTAWA (CUP) - While the commercial
media is attempting to play down the situation in
Quebec, protests against the Trudeau government
for invoking the War Measures Act have by no
means decreased.
In Ottawa, a group of 50 people led by
Carleton university prof Robin Mathews
demonstrated on Parliament Hill Sunday charging
that a "filthy, viscious partisan attack is being made
on the structures of free society."
The protest was organized by the committee to
repeal the War Measures Act. Similar committees
have been established in major cities across the
country.
Quebecois students at the Universite d'Ottawa
are putting their resources together to get out a
paper explaining the situation in Quebec to their
fellow students and the Quebecois living in the
Ottawa-Hull area.
Papers are being watched closely in Quebec but
it appears that censorship is less of a problem there
than it has been in most other places.
The only danger in Quebec comes from
showing any sympathy towards the FLQ or any
political line which contradicts the status quo.
In London, England, a group of 100 Maoists
attempted Sunday to storm Canada House, charging
Trudeau had turned Canada into a "police state".
The group was beaten back by police in a series of
violent clashes.
Sixty-five men and women were arrested and
charged. Twenty-six policemen were injured.
I (cimirvmus mERKIN
■ever (-forger^
IllERClf Hu'mppe
md find true happinem f
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Students 50c - Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM
The situation in Quebec is also affecting the
content of television and radio programs.
The CTV network cancelled two episodes of
"Ironsides" scheduled for Monday and Monday
night next week. The programs were dealing with
political crimes in Quebec.
CAUT shocked
The executive secretary of the Canadian'
Association of University Teachers said Monday
he is opposed to the B.C. government
order-in-council making teachers and university
professors subject to summary dismissal for
indicating in any way support for the Front de
Liberation du Quebec.
The action "places the teachers of that
province in a position so vulnerable that it is
shocking," Alwyn Berland said.
"It means that all individuals teaching in
B.C. are automatically subject to double
jeopardy and indeed, implies that the action of
the federal government in applying the War
Measures Act was simply not enough,," he said.
"This act negates the civil rights of the teachers
and sets them apart as a marked group entitled
to less justice under law. As well it removes
safeguards over academic freedom. I have
personally requested Premier Bennett to rescind
it immediately," Berland said.
,.,.,.
I IHroimiitis MERKIN
ewr
/MERCY Humppe
mid fit id true hnppmem r
FRIDAY 30 & SATURDAY 31
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday, Nov.l - 7:00
democracy denounces, a party
dedicated to the electoral game.
And he does it on the eve of the
election, the article said.
(Although he later claimed it
came out wrong because he didn't
speak English well, Marchand
accused FRAP of being an FLQ
front.)
"The way Jean Drapeau, the
following day, preferred
Marchand's accuations by
accusing many of these people of
being terrorists and assassins
constitute an indescribable
violence, irresponsibility and
vulgarity."
"As for Real Caquette, his
reaction amounts to a cry for
revenge murder: 10 heads will roll
for every hostage. If this man
wasn't tied in with the powers
that be, he would be in jail for
years. Nevertheless, he is at large,
and guarded by soldiers."
Keable's article was the
introduction to a special section
of the weekly entitled: "To
establish real justice." It
contained articles from "several
well-respected citizens from a
variety of sectors."
Most writers agreed the
government had to act, but felt it
had been excessive.
Even Pierre de Bane, federal
MP for Matane said: "I am obliged
to support the government
because we must not give into
blackmail.. . but I am against any
excesses in the application of the
law ... each arrest made must be
carefully justified."
But while federal Liberals are
backing the government, members
of the Quebec Liberal caucus are
demanding explanations from
Bourassa according to an exclusive
article in Quebec-Presse.
The weekly reports that to
avoid a caucus crisis, "Bourassa
will have to, in black and white,
prove to the deputies that the
measures taken, measures that led
to the death of Pierre Laporte,
were absolutely inevitable to
avoid an insurrection in Quebec.
If the famous 'plot' is bunk, there
will be a crisis. The anguished
Liberal MNA's are afraid of
exactly that."
Several members have already
threatened to quit if the proof is
not forthcoming.
In addition, three MNA's have
told Quebec-Presse they intend to
resign unless the government
changes its current hard line: a
policy these deputies feel is being
pursued without justification.
"Until now, there have been no
resignations . . . but once the
military crisis is over, certain
MNA's and ministers are going to
be asking questions . .. what was
'the plot'? Why is Pierre Laporte
dead? . . . Bourassa will have to
justify the death of one of the
most popular deputies
remember that at the leadership
convention, Laporte received
more support from caucus
members than any other
candidate."
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PLACEMENT OFFICE Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Vancouver meeting opposes WM Act
By DICK BETTS
The Free Quebec, Free Canada
committee — members of which
have been harassed by police for
distributing the Front de
Liberation du Quebec manifesto
— met Sunday to discuss
opposition to the War Measures
Act and self-determination for
Quebec.
Speakers were Mrs. Jean
McLaren and Louis Feldhammer,
both of the committee.
McLaren treated the War
Measures Act in a class perspective
rather than applying a legal
analysis. She said that repression
in  general   was   "part  of labor
history that we do not learn
about.
"The state is a tool of the
ruling class used to suppress the
workers and others who attempt
to oppose the rule of a few."
McLaren blamed the lack of
widespread dissent to the act on
the soft attitude of trade union
leadership.
"Bureaucrats have not had
confidence in rank and file
membership," she said.
"The workers' movement has a
history of repression from capital.
They have also fought it."
She spoke also of the role of
women in the past labor struggles.
"Women    have    worked    in
menial jobs in strike action," she
said.
"They have risen to the
forefront on many occasions as in
the Lenkurt Electric Co. strike
where they manned the picket
lines in the face of police
repression."
McLaren called for the unity of
men and women of the working
class movement in opposition to
the act and all other repressive
legislation.
A letter on the present Quebec
situation sent to McLaren by a
young Quebecois was then read.
The letter stated: "The Quebec
people are beginning to be
educated.  The FLQ is all those
—dave blair photo
THE FUN STOPS when your partner has a class to attend. This young romantic decided to wait out the
lonely hours in sleep. The things that happen on SUB couches are only outdone by the things that
happen in SUB paintings.
who have woken up in Quebec.
Thousands   supported   them   in
Montreal."
"LaPorte was killed. He had
asked Bourassa to help him but
Bourassa ignored him. The army
came to Montreal when the FLQ
became a people's movement."
Feldhammer dealt with the
historical situation in Quebec. In
his opening remarks he stated,
"Everyone has learned here how
fascism is implemented.
"We have been forced into this
inadequate room through
intimadation."
(The meeting was originally
scheduled for the Fishermen's
Hall on Cordova St. However, due
to the fishermen's union executive
fear of the group contravening the
War Measures Act, the committee
was forced to move the meeting
place to the Women's Caucus hall
on Carrall St. where 125 people
were crowded into a small room.)
"The sea of hypocritical
emotion and the appeal to love of
life have manipulated us into
forgetting who destroys life. Who
killed the people who have lived
and died in an oppressive life?"
said Feldhammer.
"In the national struggles of
1837-38 people were slaughtered
in the repression which followed.
Quebec was maintained through
force and terror as a colony," he
said.
Outside interests have always
determined the future of Quebec,
he said.
"The national lines are class
lines in Quebec. 83 per cent of the
population is French-speaking. Of
the corporate executives in
Montreal 83 per cent are English.
"They control Quebec,"
Feldhammer said. "They keep the
Quebecois among the highest
unemployed.
"Drapeau sells Montreal like
Havana and Shanghai were once
sold — to tourists looking for a
good time and a place to spend
their money. Meanwhile the
people live in misery. The wall put
up near Expo 67 was put there to
hide the nearby slum,"
Feldhammer said.
UBC student Paul Knox, talked
about the provincial government
order-in-council banning
discussions of the FLQ in
classrooms in the discussion
following the speeches.
"The provincial government
forbids teachers to say anything
which may be construed as
support for the FLQ. This may
extend to those who criticize the
war in Vietnam," he said.
"They have also threatened to
withhold funds from institutions
who do not take action against
dissenting faculty. Free speech is
being crushed," he said.
Printers suppress
university papers
HALIFAX (CUP) — Talks are now under way for the
establishment of a co-operative print shop in the maritimes to combat
attempts by printers to censor news of the Quebec struggle.
University papers who normally print at the Dartmouth Free
Press — the name has nothing to do with the ideology — have been
severely censored in the past week by the shop's owner John Nesbitt.
Both the Dalhousie Gazette and the St. Mary's Journal have been
forced to leave blank spaces in their latest editions when the printer
refused to publish copy dealing with events in Quebec.
The Gazette appeared Monday with a blank front page after
Nesbitt refused to print three stories that appeared originally in the
Montreal Star — not known as a heavily radical or anti-government
newspaper.
A spokesman for the Gazette staff said discussions are now going
on between Maritime newspapers to see what can be done to establish a
co-operative print shop. All papers will then be guaranteed that the
copy they decide to print will go in their papers.
The Journal came back from the Nesbitt print shop last week
with a rather large hole on page three after the printer decided not to
print stories from Canadian University Press.
Nesbitt did not inform the Journal staff that he was not printing
the articles. They (the Journal staff) intend to see what legal action
can be taken against the printer.
In Newfoundland, the Muse was printed only after a call to the
federal justice department to get clearance of copy dealing with the
Quebec struggle.
In Prince Edward Island, the Cadre at the University of PEI
reported this weekend that much of the copy they wanted to run in
their paper would probably not be allowed by their printer.
Beach road unnecessary to curb cliff erosion
By PAUL KNOX
A UBC geologist who was consultant for a park board
study of University Beach says a road in the board's latest
proposal isn't necessary to control cliff erosion.
Geology prof R. E. Kucera says the rest of the
proposal is exactly what he advocated at a public meeting
on beach erosion, but said Monday the 12-foot wide road
is a park board addition to the study's conclusions.
The study, done by Swan-Wooster Engineering Ltd.,
recommended a $235,000 "layer of gravel", one or three
feet thick, for 6,200 feet west of Spanish Banks, to
control erosion on the cliffs above the beach.
Kucera said this is the minimum measure necessary to
control the erosion threatening the buildings above the
cliffs.
"You know what the beach is like up at Sechelt, with
a mixture of sand and pebbles," Kucera asked. "That's
what the University Beach would be like with this plan."
But he said the 12-foot wide road also contained in
the report was not part of the original Swan-Wooster
erosion control proposal and was inserted later at the
request of park board officials.
"I was never in favor of a road, but I guess that's
what the park board wanted and" it was inserted at their
request," said Kucera, who was retained by Swan-Wooster
as a consultant to the study.
The park board will decide whether to accept the
Swan-Wooster proposal after hearing from the UBC
administration, alumni association and Alma Mater
Society.
AMS president Tony Hodge has already accepted the
proposal, saying it is a "moral victory" for opponents of
desecration of the beach.
Board members are not expected to have many
objections to the report.
At a park board meeting Oct. 19, commissioner
Sandy Robertson hailed the Swan-Wooster proposal as
one which would "enable us to get a fire truck, police or
ambulance vehicle down there."
Board members have expressed concern about
drinking on the beach and fires that get out of control. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE UBYSSEY    B.C. joins the parade
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 27, 1970
"It is all too easy, should disturbances erupt, to
crush them in the name of law and order. We must never
forget that, in the long run, a democracy is judged by
the way the majority treats the minority. Louis Riel's
battle is not yet won."
—Pierre Elliot Trudeau,
October 2, 1968, at the
unveiling of a statue in Regina
to honor Louis Riel
Rude awakening
So far, this year has been a big one for the*
standard talk about an objective university.
Administration president Walter Gage told a
senate meeting in September that the university
should not be "involved in what you might call
relevant problems." In the Americanization
question, those opposed to restrictions on foreign
faculty constantly said the university should be a
value-free institution that rises above such trifling
considerations as national boundaries.
UBC has worked hard to perpetrate the myth
that the university is somehow not a part of the
society in which it exists, that it can go its own
way without reference to the world outside its
gates.
Yes, it's a comfortable, sheltered life, but the
provincial government has just torn down the
walls.
With its order-in-council, the government has
told the university to fire faculty members who
express certain political views.
The university has been told it is a part of
society and that those in power have a very
definite role they want it to play.
The university has received its orders. "Yours
is not to reason why, yours it but to run an
efficient production line, turning out the
commodity we want."
The Bennett government's attempt to stifle
free speech may accomplish what generations of
radicals and reformers have failed to do. It may
wake up a few people on campus and hit them
with the sudden realization that there is a world
out there.
We are currently witnessing an assault on the
rights and freedoms of all Canadians. The
university, as a tightly controlled corporate
institution, probably can't do much about it, but
the people within the university can.
They can be one group that refuses to be
stampeded by artificial mass hysteria. They can be
one group that sees what's happening and stands
up to fight it.
But, just as likely, that can quietly bow to
pressure, step into the role assigned them and give
repression another victory by default.
The university community has been rather
harshly knocked from the clouds and into the
centre of the battle. Now it must decide which side
it's on.
By DICK BETTS
Some subtle hints have been
coming through the provincial and
local officials' offices that
legislation in B.C. could get more
repressive.
The actions being taken here
have nothing of the scope and
magnitude of those in Quebec,
Northern Ontario and New
Brunswick (all centres of French
speaking population), but they are
abnormal.
Ban on marches?
For instance, Oct. 17 saw the
most armed police on the streets
of Vancouver in recent memory.
They did their best, successfully,
to inhibit an ecology
demonstration.    They    were   in
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
Citv     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wire     John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Rosie started the day off wrong by
liberating seven blorgs and Shane
McCune, Sandy Kass and Kathy
Stewart. Nathalie Apouchtine
considered marrying Jim Davies for
simplicity's sake and Jan O'Brien
chatted with puppets. Dick Betts.
Kathy Carney and Elaine Tarzwell
evaded police escorts while Mike Sasges
intoned Beowulf. When David Schmidt
showed signs of going mad with power
Maurice's typewriter and Saanich
mayor Hugh Curtis were promptly
flung in his direction. Tom Campbell
dropped in to smoke a little dope with
Ken Lassasen but ended up discussing
Timothy Leary with Josephine
Margolis, not to be confused with
Stewart Little's Margalo. As the ocean
roared and the birds sang in the west
the Sunset Kid came to mind along
with Mike Goodman, Kevan Perrins
and Dirk Visser of the clacking lenses.
Keith Dunbar made a cameo
appearanve just to add a little class to
the place. Fred Cawsey Esquire also
dabbled in darkroom chemicals with
the stirring words of Aid. Halford
Wilson ringing in his ears. Photogs will
meet at noon today in the office hole.
evidence at a rally held by the
Vancouver Liberation Front.
They did not break up that
particular demonstration but
there is proposed legislation
before the city council to forbid
demonstrations in the future.
(There is a Vietnam march corning
up Saturday.) We used to be able
to say "Victory to. the NLF of
South Vietnam". We may not be
able to say that much longer.
Teachers threatened
Bob Higgenbotham, editor of
the Martlet, at University of
Victoria was warned by the police
not to print a letter in support of
the Front de Liberation du
Quebec. We used to able to say
JqSUr&'To
The Kirkby letter
Below we print a letter written
by Univeristy of Victoria assistant
philosophy prof Ronald Kirkby.
Kirkby has been called on the
carpet by UVic, although not yet
fired, for his opinions on the
Quebec crisis, and the writing of
this letter prompted the B.C.
government to pass its
order-in-council instructing
schools to fire professors
supporting the FLQ.
This letter was written
originally to the UVic student
newspaper, the Martlet, whose
editors killed it after they were
warned against printing it by
Saanich police and RCMP.
The Ubyssey publishes it here
in the interests of free speech and
in the hope that students will
come and hear Kirkby speak at
noon today in Angus 110.
While it is tragic that the FLQ
must resort to political coercion
in order to achieve its just
demands, it is even more
deplorable that the prime minister
of Canada, Pierre Trudeau, should
respond by depriving all Canadian
citizens of their civil liberties and
rights, and by imposing a
totalitarian regime on the
dominion of Canada. No state of
affairs justifies such measures,
with the possible exception of
armed invasion by the USA.
Trudeau's response had as a
direct consequence the death of at
least one man, Pierre Laporte,
and perhaps the death of many
more to come. Such callous
trifling with men's lives, in the
name of "law and order", is
despicable. The government and
the media accuse the FLQ of
murder; in reality it is the
government of Canada which
must face this charge.
The FLQ has been declared a
criminal organization, and its
members and supporters
criminals. I am proud to announce
my own consequemt criminality,
since I am a supporter of the
FLQ, of its demands and of its
methods, just as I am a supporter
of the demands and methods of
the National Liberation Front of
Vietnam, and of all socialist
liberation movements across the
world.
The U.S. justifies its murder
and pillage in Vietnam as being
necessary to preserve the "free"
world. The Trudeau government
justifies its wholesale political
arrest and terror in Quebec as
being necessary to preserve
Canada. But necessity, as William
Pitt is said to have remarked, is
"the plea for every infringement
of human liberty. It is the
argument of tyrants. It is the
creed of slaves." I denounce the
Trudeau government as
tyrannical; I refuse to be a slave.
"Solidarity with the FLQ". We
may not be able to say that much
longer either. Teachers cannot.
There is legislation now to
drastically curb the right of
people in educational institutions
to speak their mind in their
classrooms. Any statement taken
to be anti-government could be
used to fire a teacher. Rational,
critical approaches to education
are a rarity in B.C. Now it seems
they may be gone for good.
People used to be able to
assemble in buildings in order to
hear points of view being put
forward and to discuss these
points     of    view among'
themselves.
Union backs down
On Sunday the Free Quebec,
Free Canada Committee of
Vancouver was denied the
pre-arranged use of the
Fishermen's Hall. They were to
hold a rally in the Hall to discuss
the War Measures Act and the
struggles in Quebec. They had to
settle for a place less than half the
size with terrible accoustics.
Shades of the movie "Z".
The section of the act which
intimidated the executive of the
Fishermen's union was
horrendous enough to set many
people on edge. Union executive
member Jack Nicholls gave this
statement to The Ubyssey
Monday.
"Given the powers of local and
provincial authorities and the
extent they may be prepared to
go we decided not to let the hall
be used by the committee.'
"We feared the section of the
act which could incriminate
proprietors of buildings who
knowingly give out their facilities
to groups who support the FLQ."
(The Free Canada Free Quebec
Committee is not founded upon
support for the FLQ. It supports
the right of self-determination to
Quebec).
Leaflets seized
In another incident, three
members of VLF were detained
when they attempted to hand out
leaflets criticizing the federal
government and containing the
manifesto of the FLQ.
The three were questioned,
photographed and fingerprinted.
They were released but their
leaflets were confiscated. The
procedure used on them was
illegal since no charges were
pressed. Now somewhere in the
files of the police their
fingerprints and photos are
preserved for future use.
We once had the right to
disseminate political literature. We
no longer have that right it seems.
The leaflets in question have been
sent to the attorney—general's
office for scrutiny and opinion.
Whether or not the people of
Vancouver for whom they were
intended will ever see them is now
an open question.
What will happen to people
who continue to distribute them
is also an open question.
One positive point is that the
Free Quebec, Free Canada
Committee and the Committee
for the Repeal of the War
Measures Act will continue. How
long they are able to do so
depends upon those who would
support them. Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Picnickers protest flooding of Skagit valley
By NATHALIE APOUCHT1NE
More than 2,000 people went
for a picnic on Sunday, but their
lunches weren't the only thing
they took along with them.
They also brought placards,
picnic tables, and the
determination to save the Skagit
Valley.
The picnickers organized by
the Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control were
protesting the leasing of 6,000
acres of land in the Skagit Valley
to Seattle City Light Co. for
flooding for electrical power.
"It's not just that we're losing
the 6,000 acres," said Gwen
Mallard, the organizer of the
rally-picnic.
"If the valley is flooded, the
access road to 60,000 acres more
will be cut off."
And the people came by bus
and by car from all around to
prove that it is necessary to save
the land.
A number of speakers
addressed the rally, including
David Brousson, the MLA for
North Vancouver-Capilano; Geoff
Warden, the executive director of
the B.C. Wildlife Federation; Bill
Hartley, the MLA for
Yale-Lillooet which includes the
Skagit Valley and Robin Harger,
the President of SPEC.
Vera Johnson sang "Skagit
Valley," a song composed by
Malvina Reynolds (the author of
"Little Boxes").
A petition against the flooding,
to be sent to the federal and
provincial governments, and to
Seattle City Light was passed
around as well.
Before marching the half mile
from the picnic area to Ross Lake,
the picnickers left behind them
eight picnic tables, donated for
the purpose by various
organizations.
"We left the tables to
demonstrate to our neighbours in
Washington and to both levels of
government that we want the
picnic area to remain there," said
Mallard.
"The valley was at its best,"
she said. "The colorings—the gold
and the red, the snow-topped
mountains     sharply     outlined,
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART FIVE
I believe that it was Eleanor Roosevelt who
once said Marines were just a bunch of under-fed,
under-paid, over-sexed teenage killers. Not all of
them are quite as wholesomely American as that.
Some of them are really perverted.
Gorman was a good example of the base
things a Marine can sink to. The most exciting thing
that happened to him in infantry training was
finding a rattlesnake in the shower.
It took him about half an hour but he finally
caught it and stuck it in his foot locker.
Gormon had a friend Nelson who was an
"ex-squid." He had spent four years in the Navy as a
carpenter's mate and when his enlistment was up he
decided he'd rather be a Marine.
Gorman's and Nelson's greatest moment came
in the second part of infantry training when they
were selected the company birds. Whenever one of
the troop handlers would yell, "Where are my
birds?" it was their job to run out in front of the
company formation and squawk, "Awk, awk, we're
the company shitbirds and the time on deck is..."
The leaders there went in for yelling in a big
way. At the end of every day when they dismissed
us to go into the barracks and get everything
cleaned up for the next day we had to give the
company cheer.
Since our company was designated W-16 we
were called Whiskey Company. Our cheer went
something like, "Whiskey, whiskey, kill, kill, kill;
aaaargh!"
Corporal Crisp, one of our platoon leaders,
had a favorite stunt he pulled at least once a day. He
would call out to his platoon, "Who are your
heroes?"
His platoon would shout back, "Sir, our
heroes are Dan Daly, Smedley Butler (two Marines
who won the Congressional Medal of Honor) and
Corporal Crisp."
They kept this up for almost two weeks until
they decided they were a little tired of it. The next
time he called for his cheer they all answered back,
"Sir, our heroes are Sugar Bear, Captain Crunch and
Corporal Crisp."
He never tried that stunt with any of our
company again.
Inter-company rivalry was rampant in infantry
training.
At one of the practice ranges there was a
hillside of about four or five acres. One day when
we got up to the range we found the hillside covered
with stones spelling out T-20, the designation of
another company in our battalion, and the names of
all their officers and leaders.
We spent all of our hard earned lunch hour
rearranging the stones to spell W-16 and the names
of our leaders.
One of the main causes of the rivalry was the
distinction between the grunts and the poags.
The grunts were the men who were being
assigned to the infantry and were stuck in special
companies for almost eight weeks of training. The
poags were those who were assigned to office or
technical jobs, who only spent about two and a half
weeks in infantry training before going off to the
various specialist schools.
Just after our grunt company got settled in
there was a company of poags moved into the set of
barracks right next to us.
We were feeling a little depressed for the first
week hearing them tell us how soon they would be
out of th6re.
Then, when they had only a week to go, six of
them came-' down with hepatitis and the whole
company was quarantined for five weeks. After the
quarantine was lifted they had to start training all
over again.
They eventually went home on leave about
two days after we did.
We left for home at 10 a.m., December 24.
Which just goes to prove all over again, if
there's any way at all the Marine Corps can do it to
you, they will.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Twelfth Night
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ^~*
November 13 - 25
Directed by John Brockington
SPECIAL MATINEES STUDENT TICKETS $1:00
Tuesday, November 17 - 12:30 p.m. (available for all performances)
Thursday, November 19 - 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: The Frederic   Wood Theatre, Rm. 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE      It Is For You
couldn't have looked more
beautiful or impressive."
"The attendance was
tremendous, for this time of year
and considering the road which
goes to the valley. It shows that
people are concerned and the
issue won't be dropped.
"I don't see how the
government can ignore the feeling
of the people, and I feel it will
reverse its decisions in this
matter," said Mallard.
Brousson agreed that the rally
will "strenghten our case as far as
the federal government is
concerned."
Brousson    was    one    of   the
originators of the ROSS or Run
Out Skagit Spoilers Committee, a
group of concerned people who
first started organizing opposition
to the Skagit flooding a year ago.
"We were suggesting on
Sunday, by the picnic tables and
the sign 'Skagit Park' which we
put up, that a larger park (than the
present undeveloped part of the
valley designated as a provincial
park) be set up," said Brousson.
"We would like to see North
Cascades National Park in
Washington joined to the Skagit
Valley area to form the
Skagit-Cascades International
Peace Park," he said.
Rally against war
on campus Friday
A moratorium to discuss the Vietnam war will be held on
university campuses across Canada, Friday, Oct. 30.
Andrew Finlay, spokesman for the steering committee of the
UBC anti-war group said: "Any feeling that the anti-war activity of
recent years is futile or irrelevant is irrational and dangerous".
"The peace movement has had an impact," he said. "In our
programs of education and mass action we have exposed many myths".
"The domino theory and the theory that the war is good for the
economy no longer holds water".
"The mass actions held over the past years have significance in
that, many people are beginning to see that they have power in a
group," he said.
"People no longer feel impotent when they march with a group.
Before they were unpatriotic (in the U.S.). Now they believe in the
Tightness of their cause."
Finlay also noted the positive effect of mass involvement.
"The U.S. government cannot ignore large numbers of people.
This is our strength."
There will be a Moratorium on campus at Friday noon on the
SUB plaza (in SUB ballroom if it rains).
"People not taking part should examine their own motives for
not doing so. They must think about what they are doing about
situations as terrible as Vietnam," said Finlay.
As a further move toward stopping the war in Vietnam the
Vietnam Action Committee has invited the municipal parties to send
delegates to an anti-Vietnam demonstration at City Hall, Saturday, Oct.
31.
Two days of abortion clinics
The Alma Mater Society is sponsoring a two day program
concerning abortion Nov. 12 and 13.
During these two days there will be booths set up throughout
campus and in residences to provide information on abortion in B.C.
On Nov. 13, at noon there will be a slate of speakers. Among
these will be Mrs. R. D. Makaroff a psychiatrist, and Dr. Philip
Alderman, who has been active in having abortion liberalized.
Mrs. Makaroff is the wife of Dr. R. D. Makaroff, recently
convicted in Vancouver of performing illegal abortions.
This will be mainly a fact oriented program. The object is to tell
students where to go for abortions, how much they cost and other
pertinent information.
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
Nominations For
External Affairs Officer
The External Affairs Officer is concerned with university-community
involvement across Canada, issues such as the War Measures Act and the
Jericho Hostel are dealt with through this office.
If you are interested in local and national affairs, you may wish to run
for this position. Nominations are now open and will close Tuesday,
November 3rd at noon.
Anyone interested should contact Anne Clarkson, AMS Secretary, SUB
248, for nomination forms. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
Reports spotlight
residence trivia
By ELAINE TARZWELL
It is midnight and a UBC residence clerk is making his nightly
report.
"I caught Mr. X letting his girlfriend Miss X out of the house via
the back door."
Sbunds like a joke, doesn't it? The only trouble is that this
midnight report really exists.
Ed Mint, a former don at Place Vanier residence, came to The
Ubyssey office Thursday with a folder full of copies of shift reports of
residence clerks at Place Vanier.
The above and following writings are direct quotes from these
reports dated Feb. 28, 1970, Nov. 17, 1969, and Nov. 14, no year
given.
"With reference to various reports that many, hippie type people
are staying in the main lounge, common block, of this area for the
whole night long. They don't go and don't sleep. Eight (8) of them
were still there as late as 5:55 a.m. this morning. It turned out that
three of them are resident students and five of them are outsiders."
"A fre<|uent visitor to the common block, a young man of hippie
description known simply to the students as Ugo, has been causing us
some concern. He is not a resident, nor is he a student of UBC ... he is
a steady g«est at residence, invited by unspecified hosts ... I personally
feel that should he be allowed to loiter futher, we will soon be running
an open house fsr homeless indigents... the RCMP haveisince informed
me that he is Isiown to them, his full name being (name given), an
American draft dodger, wanted by the Chicago police for questioning."
Mint said the residence clerk fills out such a report for every shift
he works and sends it to the housing administration assistant.
If names are mentioned, housing contacts the appropriate area
coordinator (head don of the residence) to discuss disciplinary action,
said Mint.
This "disciplinary action" may result in the offending student
being brought before the area standards committee.
The area standards committee is made up of students living in
that area. If the person brought before the committee is found guilty,
he or she will be warned, fined, required to post a peace bond, or, in
severe cases, be expelled from residence.
legitimate
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Hitchhiking has been recognized by the university administration
as a legitimate form of transportation.
This morning, signs indicating destination points in the
Vancouver area were erected on Wesbrook beside the fraternities.
The ten foot tall signs are painted red and white so they can
easily be seen by drivers.
Hitchhikers are expected to stand beside the sign giving their
destination.
Advance Polls
TIME: Wednesday, October 28, 11:30 - 3:30
Polling Stations For ARTS SENATOR: S.U.B.
Polling    Stations    For    SENATORS-AT-LARGE:    S.U.B.,    Education,
Residences—5:00-7:00 only.
Regular Polls
TIME: Thursday, October 29, 10:00 - 4:00
Polling  Stations   FOR  ARTS SENATOR:   Buchanan, S.U.B., Sedgewick
Library
SENATORS-AT-LARGE:    Barn,    Buchanan,    Bus    Stop,    Education,
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Or. Cho in a Korean Dance program. Return visit
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WEDNESDAY—NOV. 4
Dr. Cho in a poetry Recital, "Secret Yearning".
Seldom heard readings from Korean Poetry. A new
Sound experience.
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Alma Mater Society Business Office 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
ASIAN STUDIES STUDENTS TAKE NOTE — a presentation of SPECIAL EVENTS Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
in the
classroom   how
Christ Crusader speaks today
By    LESLIE PLOMMER
The time has come to spell out
some of the aims and criteria used
in classroom reporting.
Recent student comment in
one Monday class has brought to
light certain questions about
classroom reporting.
The answers to many of these
questions seem to me implicit in
the format of this column, but
should perhaps be re-emphasized.
First, each classroom column is
a review of one class and one class
only. Apparently some people
need to be reminded of that,
though it seems obvious.
As one student pointed out, a
column is a "snapshot" of an
entire course and is therefore
subject to all the possibilities of
distortion which such a limited
view contains.
Though there is merit in that
argument, we assume that The
Ubyssey has a readership
intelligent enough to take that
limitation into account when
reading a classroom report.
If the readership makes the
mistake of drawing far-ranging
conclusions about a prof or course
from one classroom report, that is
a short-coming of the readership.
The one class per column
format has been used here because
it is one of the most workable
schemes for bringing the
classroom into the light of day.
The Ubyssey is not in the
business of total course
evaluation. We do not have the
time or the space. Besides, a
committee for UBC course
evaluation is currently functioning
on campus.
This classroom series does,
however, leave us in a position lo
evaluate certain facets of one class
on a given day.
The basis for this evaluation
includes the following categories:
An account of the general
substance of lecture content, in
other words, what the professor
said. At this point we may suggest
whether the content could have
been more complete.
In this regard, it is only fair to
make specific suggestions for
improvement, by posing
additional questions about the
content.
It is also at this point that we
should record the extent of
student questioning of the
lecturer.
Second, since a lecturer is so
integrally linked with what the
students get out of any class, we
will look at the professor's
delivery style.
This includes his language and
level and clarity of thought.
This is necessary because the
best contents must first be
understood by students to be of
any use. Complicated academic
jargon or lectures far above the
students' background and
understanding defeat any course.
Students should, of course,
take the responsibility of pointing
this out to a faculty professor, but
for various reasons they often
don't. A classroom report can
bring such things to the attention
of the professor.
Finally, where possible, a
classroom report includes the
views of students in the class. For
purely technical reasons, however,
this is not always feasible.
In a large class it is not possible
to talk to more than a few
students nabbed at random inside
and outside the lecture hall.
Where possible, a classroom
report includes student views, but
can be a valid evaluation without
such views.
Classroom reporting is not an
RULE&REVOLUTION
People in modern society have both rights and
responsibilities. Are we stressing rights at the
expense of responsibilities? Is society moving
toward law and order or chaos and anarchy?
A program of investigative broadcast journalism with host BARBARA FRUM. Tonight,
Suicide: Who Owns My life? We kill through
war, starvation, stupidity, yet taking one's own
life is taboo. Is suicide the ultimate civil liberty? October 28,
6:30 pm edt, pdt; 7:30 adt, cdt,
Sask., mst; 7:00 ndt.
attempt to indict anyone. It is an
attempt to bring lectures out in
the open.
It is also an attempt to do
something which students
themselves should be involved in
on an on-going basis.
And that is, giving professors
and administrators necessary
feedback about their
performance.
If more students and professors
were involved in this reciprocal
feed-back process a classroom
reporting column might fade away
as unnecessary.
Until that time, however, it is
important, if only to get a few
more people talking about what
goes on in hundreds of rooms on
this campus every day.
These, very briefly, are some
facets of classroom reporting.
Inevitably, other aspects will arise
from time to time in varying
classroom situations.
Comments and criticisms are
always welcome-send them along
to The Ubyssey.
Josh McDowell of the Campus
Crusade for Christ will be
speaking on a new type of
revolution this Tuesday and
Wednesday on the south SUB
plaza at noon.
McDowell will be giving four
talks at UBC Today at noon he
will speak on the basic error of
student revolutionary movements,
and his topic tonight at 7:30 p.m.
will be, World War III: Will it be
the Last? On Wednesday he will
speak on, Sick of Hypocrisy, in the
south plaza at noon and on the
Midnight of History, at 7:30 p.m.
in the Buchanan lounge.
McDowell has spoken on more
than 400 campuses in 35
countries. He has recently
returned from two years in Latin
America.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Deputy minister for academic
affairs, Mr. Snod-Mason, today
declared unholy war on the
radical GUR faction of red blorgs.
This faction of the scarlet terrors
has been advocating the violent
overthrow of several toddering
edifices. "They're a very serious
health hazard," said an
unidentified    spokesman.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
TODAY
EM1LE <J. ANTONIO'S f»
IN THE YEAR
OF THE PIG
-A   DOCUMENTARY
HISTORY OF THE   VIETMAM
WAR
-NOMINATED FORI
1970 ACADEMY
AWARD  FOR
BEST
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Senate Candidates7
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50
back • 9 caftttrla
Senators-at-large
JOHN CAMPBELL
I believe the role of the student senators is to
guarantee an awareness of the opinions of the
student body in the senate chamber. We should act
on your behalf, presenting your views as concise,
well-researched arguments both in the various
senate sub-committees and on the senate floor.
Under the Universities Act, the senate can act on
any academic or social issue which relates to the
university, and it is the purpose of the student
senators to ensure that the legislation passed by
senate represents the views of the students as nearly
as possible.
I have served as student representative on the
Future Housing Committee for two years, and on
the short-lived Presidential Advisory Committee on
University Government under President Hare. In my
four years at UBC I have studied one apiece in
science, engineering, political science, and am
presently in economics. Honest, I'm not dumb,
really, just curious.
Of the various issues presently facing senate, I
feel the most important are the Canadianization of
the university and the institution of the liberal arts
centre, though all I can promise is to listen to your
opinions on these and other issues and to represent
them well in senate.
For your part, vote in the senate elections on
Thursday and stay concerned all year.
(P.S.) It's impossible to write one of these
statements without sounding conceited and/or
pompous, but I tried.
PETER HLOOKOFF
If elected to senate, I will agitate for:
1. Free university for poor students. Fees are a
means of class discrimination, which is just as
vicious as racial discrimination. Fees should be
charged as a percentage of parents' earnings. The
industries which benefit most from univesity
research should pay a proportionate educational
tax. Students at the lower end of the financial scale
should be paid to go to school.	
2. Full revision of entrance qualifications, to
bring them into line with real needs. Above all, we
must avoid a repetition of this fall's disgraceful
situation, where large numbers of interested
students were turned away. Again, this is a form of
discrimination against working-class students, who
may have been forced to drop out because of
financial pressure, and thus lack of academic
qualifications, although certainly possessing enough
intelligence to pursue a course of studies.
3. Elimination    of    mind-destroying    course
.overloads, so that students, particularly in applied
sciences, will have time to learn not only what they
are studying, but why.
ED MINT
Many issues exist in which a student voice is
essential. First, most UBC students have
experienced overcrowding and have also observed
literally millions of dollars having been wasted on
campus. Why? Are students caught in the middle?
Second, since some students feel certain
problems are not understood by a department such
as the housing administration, their complaints do
not reach anyone outside such a departmental
structure and are never acted upon. Therefore, I
propose a student committee to investigate
responsible, corroborated complaints with the
housing administration.
Your concern is mine.
ART SMOLENSKY
I've got a big mouth and I plan to use it.
Campus services, quality of education, finances
- these are all things which greatly affect us as
students. These are supposedly areas of senate
concern.
Yet how many in this august body actually
teach clases, deal with large numbers of students on
a day-to-day basis?
When was the last time one of them ate on
campus elsewhere than the Faculty Club? Bought a
-book   at   "regular"   prices?   Thought   about   the
scholarship and loan programs and the fees we pay?
And you expect them to make reasonable and
BROTHERS & SISTERS RISE UP
OFF YOUR BUTTS & Make Sure You Hear The Super Concert Of 1970
Redbone  now  lays  rightful   claim  to the "swamp-rock"
sound made popular by groups like Creedence, but actually
"invented" some years ago by Redbone's Vegas Brothers
when they wrote "Niki Hokey".
They    have    now    emerged    triumphantly    with    their
"primitive", hypnotic, BEAUTIFUL backwoods sound.
Rarely has there been such brilliant equalization of voices,
guitars, bass, and drums. No single element subsumes any
other; all are right there to be heard.
Ed Leimbacher, Rolling Stone Apr. 16,1970.
HOLLYWOOD WOULD NEVER APPROVE
There are no stereotype Saturday-at-the-movies Indians in this band.
Just four hard-driving rock musicians from the West Coast who call
themselves Redbone.
Two of the group, Lolly Vegas and Pat Vegas, backed Odetta and
John Lee Hooker while still in their teens. And have written songs
recorded by Aretha   Franklin, Bobbie Gentry  and  the Righteous
Brothers.
Chances are you're not going to expect what you hear when you see
Redbone.
Chances are you've been to too many movies.
Rolling Stone May 14, 1970.
Gof a little money/Gonna spread some honey/Gonna get it
on all night... Rhythm is a-heavy as a ton o'
lead/Redbone, mama, 's gonna do your head.
ROD STEWART, SMALLFACES, REDBONE, & The Legendary Seeds of Time
HURRY TO GET YOUR TICKETS
Advance Tickets At The Bay — At The Door, Sun.   Nov. 1 $4" Cheap — Agrodome
Presented by the People who from time to time brought you My Indole Ring, the Afterthought, Papa Bears Medicine Show, the Retinal Circus, & Strawberry Mountain Fair! Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Statements
relevant decisions concerning our community? Not
likely!
Students in the past have been intimidated by
an unfeeling and committee top-heavy senate.
I will not be intimidated.
If you feel the need for a concerned student
voice on senate — one who isn't afraid of a fight -
vote for me.
CLAYTON VOGLER
My areas of concern in the university senate
are:
(i) the removal of recently-instituted
restrictions and quotas on university admittance.
and the increased utilization of facilities at "off
hours;
(ii) the creation of a faculty of
underdevelopment studies and an affiliated college
located in downtown Vancouver to study urban
problems at first-hand;
(iii) the active support of any moves on the
part of the federal government to minimize
penalties on cannabis, and opening a joint
faculty-student financed, staffed, and operated
"brothel", and
(iv) a senate ruling opening all tenure and
faculty-hiring committees to students as voting
members p£RRY  YORK
I am a fourth year anthropology major and
psychology minor with plans for social work, who
believes the most critical problem facing the senate
is overcrowding. I have a solution. Since forty per
cent of students drop out in the first two years,
enrollment at UBC should be limited to arts and
science I and II and to specific disciplines such as
engineering,  commerce,  education i and  nursing.
•in
But, the  junior college should become the
place.
Housing problems too, are well known to me. I
spent two years in Place Vanier.
Your interests and concerns are mine. Vote
York for senator.
Arts constituency
GARY LETCHER
What exactly does this university offer its arts
students? Why are students compelled to take five
courses a year for four years? Is there a better way?
I believe it is the responsibility of the
administration, of the senate, to at least reassess
this structure and give careful study and
consideration to such things as the implementation
of a semester system and of a new course structure
which would integrate knowledge drawing from the
various social sciences — for example a course on
poverty   might   draw   from    sociology,   history,,
English,    urban geography and economics to
provide greater understanding.
Remember, the senate is THE power at this
university. The type of reassessment that I have
suggested can and should be done.
BOB SMITH
Course unions — rah! Malcolm McGregor —
Boo! Student participation - rah! Teacher
omnipotence - Boo! Student rights - rah! Faculty
and corporate control — Boo! <:
But the senate grants the degrees — Yeah!
I want to give legitimacy to the student voice in
the senate by organizing more course unions and by
developing better communications between those
course unions and the senate . .. that's all!
P.S. Campaigning results in political debts, so
this blurb and the all candidates meeting are the
only chances for you to find out that 1 will-won't
blow up the senate. Besides, with a name like Bob
Smith, the cost of decreasing my anonymity is
staggering.
THE UNIVERSITY
RECREATION
COMMITTEE
is seeking both faculty members and
students interested in the long-term
recreational facilities on this campus.
Interested persons should apply
by letter to
Sean McHugh, Chairman, Rm. 329
Woodward Library
Senate revealed
What's the senate?
For the uninitiated, and for all those who plan to vote in
this week's senate elections, this is an important question.
However, the big trouble with the question is that there is
no one answer.
The senate means different things to different people.
To the deans and department heads, senate is a nice little
social function and a place to show off their knowledge of
university trivia.
To the professors on senate, senate is a 'proving ground'
where they can climb into the elite academic circle of heavies.
To the convocation members (or members from the
community), senate is a nice place to sleep and also a good
reference to put alongside their name.
To the student members, it ranges from a bad joke to the
worst sort of intimidation since the guillotine.
Physically, the senate is easier to define. It is composed of
101 people, including a nice token 12 students.
It meets once a month in the old administration building to
decide academic policy at UBC.
All academic matters, ranging from how many students can
attend the university to what new courses will be accepted, come
under the jurisdiction of the senate.
Basically, the senate is just a rubber-stamping organization
which considers decisions made at department levels at the
university.
Under the chairmanship of administration president Walter
Gage, the senate molds (moulds) your life at UBC.
The building you are in, the courses you take, the books
you read, and the money you may or may not receive in the form
of bursaries and scholarships—these are all senate concerns.
Elections for student senators will be held around campus
Wednesday and Thursday.
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A professional career with
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CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your plans for a
career in Chartered Accountancy during their annual recruiting
visit at the University of British Columbia.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1970
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,1970
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1970
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of our Firm as
well as throughout Canada for 1971 graduates in Commerce,
Science, Arts, Engineering and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a
convenient time for a personal interview on campus or to
obtain a copy of our recruiting brochure.
If the dates of our visit do not suit your time schedule, you are
invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our Vancouver office,
at 682-7821.
PEOPLE
An Experience in Human Relations and
Human Sexuality
Monday Nov. 2 7p.m. Sharp
"An Encounter of Honesty"
DR. LEEPULOS
SUB BALLROOM
DRESS CASUALLY AND COMFORTABLY
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATIONS
The External Affairs Office is again organizing High School Visitations
throughout the province. People who are interested in going on any or all the
trips are encouraged to drop into S.U.B. 100-A —across from the
information booth, or drop a note under same, or phone us at 228-2083.
THE TRIPS PLANNED ARE TO:
1 CHILLIWACK
2 ABBOTSFORD
3 KAMLOOPS-SALMON ARM
4 TRAIL-NELSON
5 KELOWNA-PENTICTON
Jan. 12
Jan. 13
Jan. 17 - 19
Jan. 27 - 29
Jan. 31 - Feb. 2
6   QUESNEL-PRINCE GEORGE Feb.24-Feb.26
— An exciting opportunity for University Students
— P.S.—Bob Smith is granted first priority on all trips — Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
Groups to discuss alienation
A social worker lured by the
dean of women's office has
proposed a series of discussion
groups to help students
counteract their loneliness.
"Kids at this large university
are often lonely and have
difficulty making friends," said
Sharon Anderson, who was hired
in July as a group social worker.
"To counteract this, I would
like to set up a series of discussion
groups of eight to 10 people each
to help students have free
discussion and honest
communication with others."
She said the group would be
similar to the session of mature
women students that met last year
New journal
now planned
Last year's Rho has become
this year's Myriad.
The Rho newspaper, sponsored
last year by the inter-fraternity
council and the Alma Mater
Society, has changed its format to
a periodical.
"It's going to be a compendium
of various ideas and outlooks all
on the same general theme," said
Ron LaBonte, the only surviving
member of the Rho and new
Myriad editor.
Four issues are planned for
each year, eacli issue to have a
separate theme. The first issue has
been scheduled for December.
The Myriad is sponsored as the
Rho Publishing Committee by the
AMS and has incurred a debt of
$370 from last year. However, the
AMS has not provided any funds
for this year's operation.
"We have contacted the
Alumni Association and they will
probably loan the money we need
to the AMS who will repay them
in future years. The AMS would
then give us the money as a
grant," LaBonte said.
They won't give us enough
though, so we'll probably have to
charge something for it, ,ie said.
The most important thing the
Myriad is looking for is writers
who know what they're talking
about.
with Mrs. Betsy Macdonald, a
Vancouver consultant in human
relations.
"That group was very
successful in discussing attitudes
and problems with returning to
university. My role is to do the
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
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in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In— Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. 224-6121
Greek Lamb
Fricasse
will be featured
TOMMORROW AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Lamb with vegetables,
egg and lemon sauce,
and bread
85c
same thing with younger male and
female students," said Anderson.
Students interested in
participating in the discussions
should contact Sharon Anderson
in Bu. 456 or phone 228-4195 or
228-2415.
Booze dollars for grads
Six UBC grad students have received scholarships valued from
$1,000 to $2,500.
Seagram Business Fellowships have been awarded to Ken Bailey,
Alex Lee, Robert O'Rourke, Peter Robinson, Hamilton McDonald and
Terrence Brown. All are in the faculty of commerce and business
administration.
These scholarships are awarded by the Bronfman Foundation to
students and faculty in Canadian business schools.
Robert Thompson
Federal M.P.
SPEAKS ON CURRENT POLITICS
WED. OCT. 28 12:30
SUB BALLROOM
CUcfan^
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nf Rotng- reducer ^ ^^ten.-^o** *e
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WAf^ is ^cond ^BBe^-t integrated ^ W^ sign^ica^
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iTid lttW stop *ere. coBB^^^cb
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,,.„ proving ••;   bich *V\n cotiservati
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Personnel Director
AMERICAN METAL CLIMAX, Inc.
1270 Avenue of the Americas
New York, N.Y. 10020
Please send me AMAX Kit "Economic Growth and Quality of Life."
I am attending College, and will graduate-
I am majoring in
Name
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Economic
Growth &
Quality
of Life «?> Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
'Order an unwarranted threat
to academic freedom'—Young
continued from page 1
Olson does not have a teaching
certificate and iss not a member
of BCTF.
He has not yet received an
official statement from the
Dawson Creek school board giving
the reason for his release,
although they said last Tuesday
that a statement was
"forthcoming."
BCTF Burnaby representative,
Gary Onstad said his personal
reaction was that the order was
extremely restrictive.
"It is deliberately vague to
throw fear into teachers. Even if it
is repealed teachers will still
consciously censor their
discussions," he said.
Onstad said the students in
secondary schools were very upset
about the order-in-council and the
War Measures Act.
"They are more aware of what
their rights are than many adults
because They are a minority
group too," he said.
UBC administration president
Walter Gage said, "The order
seems to me to be unnecessary.
The War Measures Act seems to
cover everything that needs to be
covered."
Gage said it was not a wise
order, because "it creates feeling
that don't need to be created at
this time.
"If anything is necessary, the
order's intention needs to be
made clear. It is not clear in my
opinion."
He said he has not received the
full text of the order or any kind
of directive from Victoria, "but
from what the newspaper have
quoted it seems rather vague."
Political science head Walter
Young agreed with Gage.
"I think it is unnecessary,
unwarranted, and unjustified, and
a serious breach of individual
right," he said.
"If the order-in-council was
declared under the public schools
act, then university teachers are
not susceptible to prosecution.
Only public schools and junior
colleges, which are under the
jurisdiction of local school boards,
are included.
"But the order is still a threat
to academic freedom, in that
professors are afraid to air their
views in class," he added.
The UBC Faculty Association
president Peter Pearse said the
order has the effect of putting
teachers and professors under
double jeopardy.
"It singles out this group and
implies that they should be
subject not only to the special
restraints placed on all Canadians,
but also, apparently to summary
dismissal.
He said the Universities Act
could not be altered in this way,
as the university's board of
governors is responsible for hiring
and dismissing faculty acting on
the advice of the president and
using procedures established by
the board and faculty.        	
"While the order cannot
supersede the Universities Act, it
puts pressure on university faculty
and administrators," he said.
Vancouver school trustee Fritz
Bowers said the order infringes on
academic freedom but this was
only to be expected under the
War Measures Act.
He stressed that "a clear
distinction must be drawn
between what a teacher advocates
inside and outside the classroom.
"The provincial government is
probably playing politics."
Arts dean, Doug Kenny said,
the university's determination to
uphold academic freedom would
act as a "safeguard" against the
provincial order.
Graduate student association
president, David Mole, said. "If
the aims of the FLQ are so
self-evidently obnoxious, the
government has nothing to worry
about in classroom discussions.
"The GSA is prepared to offer
aid up to the limit of its funds to
defend any teaching assistant of
faculty member exercising his
duty an intellectual," Mole said.
Tony Hodge, Alma Mater
Society president said that the
cause of the order-in-council is the
War Measures Act.
"I still believe the federal
government did the right thing
but this is an example of how it
can be abused," he said.	
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Next Course Starts
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PHONE
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FIRST AND ONLY Vancouver Concert Appearance
Direct from Monterey and Newport Jazz Festivals
and Isle of Wight Pop Festival
group consists of rock quintet, string quartet
and brass quartet (13 in all)
& $42,500 worth of sound equipment
Music in the "Chicago" tradition
Monday, Nov. 2 - 8 p.m
UBC War Memorial Gym
$1.50 (Student advance) - $2.50 (Student at door)
$3.00 (Non-student)
Tickets at: Information Desk in the
Student Union Building (8 A.M.-10P.M.)
A.M.S. Business Office (10 A.M.-4 P.M.)
For further information call 228-3708
A Special Events Presentation
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
"Puts Them
All Together"
For Easy Reference
Now Available at
THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
Pre Sale Tickets Will Be Redeemed
Only at Publications
Office, Room 241, SUB
THE UBC's "WHO'S WHO"
BIRD CALLS
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
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YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
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Age -     Male □   Female D
Married D    Single □
Date first licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accident In last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, e/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
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One way driving distance
Is car used in business
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Give number and dates
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in  last 5  years.
Car No. 1
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Date current policy expires .
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tfl
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
Wilson likes liberties, but...
from Page 1
"I do not like to see civil liberties interfered
with in any way, and the faster the act can be
revoked, the better, as far as I'm concerned. But I
feel the freedom of speech in this country is being
abused by groups of a violent and subversive nature,
and this must be curtailed for the benefit of us all,"
he said.
Wilson and Bird were both asked how they
hope the police can curtail public demonstrations
by subversive organizations.
"I certainly believe in the maintenance of law
and order," said Wilson, "but I don't tell the police
how they should handle these things. It's their
business."
Bird did not reply.
When asked about incidents of police brutality
in removing demonstrators from a public place,
Wilson denied that police deliberately use violence.
If demonstrators purposely disobey an order by
police to disperse, they're asking for a
confrontation, and when that happens, somebody's
bound to get hurt, he said.
Opposition to the motion came from aldermen
Art Phillips and Harry Rankin.
"The    federal    government    will    soon    be
introducing legislation to be incorporated into the
criminal code concerning such subversive activities,
and until this legislation takes place I do not feel
that as a city we should be taking things into our
own hands," said Phillips.
"I approve of the federal government's
implementation of the act, but as a whole, I am not
taking this thing too seriously," he said.
Rankin called the whole thing idiotic, saying
that by banning demonstrations of any form, city
council would be creating added violence.
"This motion is certainly not passed as far as
I'm concerned," he said.
Vancouver mayor Tom Campbell, in a
statement prepared to The Ubyssey, said:
"People should not advocate the overthrow of
government, but anybody can demonstrate and
advocate any+!xing they want, just so long as they
don't block traffic.
"We're a free country and we want to keep her
a free country, but we don't want to be mugged and
thugged into it," he said.
He added, however, "You want to
demonstrate? You're darn tootin'! You want to
protest? Go to it!"
FILM SOCIETY presents
Eng. Dept. Course Films
Thursday Nov.5
Shakespeare's
OTHELLO
Thursday Nov.12
Pinter's
THE GUEST
(The Caretaker)
Both Films
50'
12:30
OLD
AUDITORIUM
OCT 30
N/IETNAM MORATORIUM
STUDENT DAYS OF PROTEST
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ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
GEOPHYSICISTS
Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas
WILL HAVE REPRESENTATIVES ON CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 3, 4, 6, 6
to interview bachelors candidates in Engineering for permanent
positions, and 1972 and 1973 Engineering graduates for summer
openings
NOVEMBER 5
to interview for permanent and summer positions in Geology and
Geophysics. Applicants must be advanced degree candidates,
bachelors or 1972 graduates in four-year Major or Honors
Geology or Geophysics, or a discipline providing equivalent
training.
Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas
320 SEVENTH AVENUE S.W. CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA
4f
Representatives of
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
at Copper Cliff and Port Colborne, Ontario, and
Thompson, Manitoba. Positions will be of interest to
graduating and post-graduate students in
ENGINEERING ■ mining ■  metallurgical ■ chemical
■ electrical ■ mechanical ■ civil
CHEMISTRY, GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 3rd, 4th and
post-graduate years.
November 2nd and 3rd
We invite you to arrange an interview through your
university placement office.
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL
The International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Universities grow in colonies
By JOSEPHINE MARGOUS
Universities in developing
countries must be suited to the
specific needs of those nations, a
British educator said here
Monday.
Lord John Scott Fulton said
higher education must facilitate a
country's move from colonial
status to independence by
educating the citizens so they can
replace the positions formerly
held by colonialist elites.
Fulton's     lecture     on
co-operation with developing
universities traced the
development of higher education
in post-Second World War colonial
countries to the present.
"I do not intend to expound
the rights and wrongs of
colonialism but I must point out
that the essence of colonial efforts
was certainly not the development
of education institutions in
colonies," said Fulton, past
vice-chancellor of the University
of Sussex.
Panther shootout
DETROIT (CUPI) - No Black
Panthers are dead following a
nine-hour confrontation between
about 15 party members and 100
well-armed policemen.
"The law" however, was not as
lucky — one policeman is dead,
another slightly wounded.
The shoot-out was the result of
incidents which followed the
pattern established in other
American cities like Chicago, New
Orleans and Toledo.
The National Committee to
Fight Fascism, and affiliate
organization of the Panthers,
issued a statement saying that two
policemen, without provocation,
began to beat two boys who. were
distributing NCCF literature. Two
NCCF members intervened and a
crowd gathered. The patrolman
fired into the crowd and someone
in it fired back at the policeman.
However, police say they were
investigating a complaint that the
Panthers were blocking the street
and that they (the police) were
attacked.
In any case, patrolman Glen
Edward Smith, 26, is dead.
But unlike similar incidents in
other cities, a total bloodbath was
averted when black community
leaders mediated between the
occupants of the NCCF
headquarters, who had fortified
themselves inside, and the police
THE CURRY HOUSE
3934 Main (at 23rd)
Van., Ph. 879-7236
Food Deliciously Hot
Atmosphere— Friendly and Warm
Costumes Knock You Cold
No extra charge for curing your sinus
SPECIAL STUDENT GROUP RATES
Open Tues.—Sunday 5-10 p.m.
Closed Mondays
force which had fortified itself
outside.
The seven men and eight
women are now in police custody
facing charges of first degree
murder and conspiracy.
They join more than 450 other
Panthers currently in jail.
Shootouts around the country
have left 11 Panthers dead,
according to the U.S. justice
department figures.
PIZZA
PATIO
• EAT IN .TAKEOUT^ DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
"The fact that after World War
II there were only two universities
in the British empire - one in
Hong Kong and one in Sierra
Leone and 25 years later, when
the era of colonialism had drawn
to a close there were 30
universities that had reached
academic maturity supports this,"
said Fulton.
After the war, many European
and North American countries
extended their aid to establish
higher education in developing
countries.
In Britain, prime minister
Herbert Asquith's post-war
government established the
Inter-University Council to
investigate the educational needs
of developing countries,
particularly those in Africa, he
said.
The work of the Council in
establishing universities included
meeting with colonial
governments, obtaining capital
grants, and recruiting faculty from
the British universities.
Lord Fulton divides this work
into two periods.
"The first period was one of
amateur experimentation which
attempted to replicate the
universities of the donor countires
like Cambridge, Oxford and
Harvard".
"The second period,
continuing its influence today, is
characterized by a more
sophisticated nature of activities
which realizes the need to
establish universities relevant to
the needs of the country," said
Fulton.
Countries would need to
replace foreigners in every facet of
activity with qualified citizens and
the purpose of a higher education
would be to train these citizens,
said Fulton.
As an example of this Fulton
quoted Kwame Nkrumah, past
president of Ghana who pointed
to the irrelevance of
British-oriented universities in
Africa when, he said: "strange that
we have an abundance of classics
but no engineers to build roads."
Fulton said that British
academicians felt a moral
responsibility to promote
education in developing countries.
While altruism was the main
motivation for offering the
'bootstrap' to these universities
the British also gained much
self-knowledge.
"In the course of redressing the
poverty and ignorance of these
countries we have had to reflect
on the role of our institutions at
home."
JJJ
&iD
mn
ever%^ ■   "  ever cF(fKJ(J(\
ftlERCY Humpps    I MERCY Humppe
md find (rue happiness f    ■       and find fme happiness r
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
FRIDAY 30 & SATURDAY 31
Students 50c - Others 75c
7:00 & 9:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
Sunday, Nov.l - 7:00
Intercollegiate Football
4th Annual Shrum Bowl Game
U. B.C.
THUNDERBIRDS
vs
S. F. U.
CLANSMEN
Saturday, Oct 31 at 8 p.m
EMPIRE STADIUM
NOTE: FIREWORKS PROHIBITED; Police will charge anyone
in possession of fireworks at Empire Stadium.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.00 Seat
on presentation of A.M.S. Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM AND SUB
UP TO AND INCLUDING FRI., OCTOBER 30th
Who's
the fairest one
-^3*
of all?
Well, let's see. She's self-confident.
She carries on a good conversation
but knows how to listen. From
fashion and beauty news she selects
what's right for her. And she
probably looks quite a bit like you.
What's more, she uses Tampax
tampons.
Tampax tampons are the internal
sanitary protection that keep her
calm, comfortable and confident no
matter what she's doing. No pins,
pads and belts for her. And no
other tampon, either. Because each
Tampax tampon comes in a silken-
smooth container-applicator, both
the applicator and the tampon can
be flushed away. No stick or plastic
tube to dispose of. And the removal
cord is securely chain stitched the
entire length of every Tampax
tampon.
Of course you only have to use
Tampax tampons a few days of the
month. So why are they so important? When you're the fairest one
of all, every day is important.
Right?
DEVELOPED BY  A DOCTOR
NOW USED 8r  MILLIONS OF  WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE  MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD.,
BARRIE.  ONTARIO Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
TUESDAY
GERMAN   CLUB
Free coffee and films in International
House room 402.
PHYS-SOC
Coffee   party  for  all students,   profs
and   grad    students   noon,   Hennings
307.
CANOE  CLUB
Meeting   to   plan   Skagit   River   Trip,
12:30, SUB 209.
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY
John & Joice Hall Exhibition opening,
8.00 p.m., Fine Arts Gallery, Library
basement.
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Come    and    rap    about   your    psych
projects in Angus 24.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Josh McDowell — "World War IH,
Will it be the last?" Buohanan
Buchanan Lounge, 7:00 p.m.
Josh McDowell — "Basic error of
student revolutionary movements",
SUB plaza south, 12:30.
UBC  LIBERAL CLUB
Elections, 12:30, SUB 207.
UBC   ANI-WAR   COMMITTEE
"In The  Year  of The Pig",  a  documentary  of the   Vietnam  war,   10:00,
12:30, 3:00, SUB  125.
LEFT  CAUCUS
Discussion   of   order   in   Council   re:
teachers  and  the   FLQ,   12:30, Henry
Angus 110.
SAILING CLUB
Lecture  on sailing, noon, Buch.  104.
'♦ween
classes
mmmmmmm:mmmmmmmmmm
WEDNESDAY
UBC   P.C  CLUB
Robert   Thompson,   MP,   on   Quebec,
12:30, SUB Ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
12:30, SUB  105B.
CUSO
Panel discussion of "Aims of CUSO?"
7:30,  International  House, room  402.
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
THUNDERBIRD  SKI  TEAM
Film in Hebb Theatre, 12:30.
UBC  LIBERAL  CLUB
Roadrunner    cartoons,    12:30,    Buch.
106.
ARCHEOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
12:30, SUB  213.
MARKETING CLUB
Lee Pulas of The Old Spaghetti Factory, 12:30,  Henry Angus, room  215.
CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE  ORGANIZATION
12:30,  Buch.   3201.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
"The   Invisible    Government",   12:30,-
Buch. 232.
IL  CAFFEE
12:30, International House, third floor
first door on left.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
Guest speaker, 12:30, SUB 125.
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY
Noon, SUB 130.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Noon, SUB 119.
THURSDAY
ANGLICAN   UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Supper-discussion,      5:30,      Lutheran
Campus Center.
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare oi Straight Pants
Up-ta-Date Accessories
SPECIAl  STUDENT RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
FILM SOCIETY presents
Eng. Dept. Course Films
Thursday Nov.5
Shakespeare's
OTHELLO
Thursday Nov.l 2
Pinter's
THE GUEST
(The Caretaker)
Both Films
50*
12:30
OLD
AUDITORIUM
THEOLOGICAL  CLUB
7:00, Lutheran Campus  Center,  Conference room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
"Violence   and   the   Canadian   Demo-
cract", noon, SUB  125.
AQUASOC
12:30, SUB 205.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Packing session, 7:00, SUB 207.
SAILING   CLUB
Skippers tests, 12:30, SUB 215.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Film,  12:30  &  7:30, Buch.   104.
FRIDAY
FILMSOC
Heironymous    Merkin",     7:30,     SUB        MISCELLANEOUS
Theatre.
PRE-SOCIAL   CLUB
Guest speaker, 12:30, SUB 105B.
SPEC
12:30,  SUB 207.
UBC  ANTI-WAR  COMMITTEE
Rally,  12:30, SUB plaza  or ballroom
UBC  CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Monday,   Tuesday,   Wednesday,   SUB
228, 10:00-12:00, 2:00-4:00; Thursday *
Friday, 10:00-4:00.
LEGAL AID
Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 12:30,
SUB 228 & 232.
ftl&llii 1%£ %£&,
2 FOR 1 SALE
Bring In This Coupon
HAVE 2 SUNDAES FOR THE PRICE OF 1
GOOD AT ALL OUR 4 STORES
3204 W. BROADWAY (OFFER EXPIRES NOV. 3)
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office. STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8. B.C.
Closing Deadline h 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE  AT  TOTEM PARK  WITH
Mantra this Friday Oct.  30.  From
9-1.   Residents   75c.   Non-residents
$1.25.
Greetings
12
Lost ft Found
13
WOULD THE FELLOW IN THE
U.B.C. Jacket who found a black
keycase in front of the Ponderosa
please return same to the Lost
and Found, Main Floor, S. U. B.
A.S.A.P. —Thank You.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
GREAT SHOWS PRESENTS ROD
Stewart, Small Faces, Redbone &
the legendary Seeds of Time,
Sun., Nov. 1. Tickets at The Bay,
$3.50, at the Agrodome, $4.25.
NEW — DIFFERENT
Character profiles on % hr. cassettes.
Comprehensive analysis of vour
page of handwriting. Know your
potential! Confidential service.
State age and sex. Send M.O. only
for $10 to: E.D.V. PERSONALITIES, BOX 128, Richmond
JOIN THE SITZMARK SKI CLUB
and ski Mt. Baker. 6 chairs — 4
ropes. $10.00 annual dues — $2.00
per weekend for sleeping and party
facilities at Glacier — 20 min. from
the top. For information phone
Stan Lloyd, 929-3441 or Jean Boy-
chuk, 526-3641 between 9:00 and
4:00.
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
a panel discussion on the "Aims
of Cuso ???" Wed., Oct. 28, 7:30
p.m. International House, Rm. 402.
ROBERT THOMPSON, FEDERAL
M.P., speaks on current Canadian
political issues, Wed., Oct. 28,
12:30,   SUB   Ballroom.
WIDELY-ACCLAIMED DOCUMEN-
tary of the Vietnam War, "In The
Year Of The Pig" — Film Showing Today 10:00, 12:30 and 3:00
S.U.B. 125. Admission 50c. Don't
Miss It! UBC Anti-War Committee.
ROUND piJT YOTTR EDUCATION!
Be at the Vietnam Moratorium
Oct. 30th starting 12:30 S.U.B.
Plaza. Weather permitting; otherwise S.U.B. Ballroom. Join the
International Days of Protest. End
The War Now!
SEE A TEST OF HEIRONYMUS
Merkin's Memory: SU.B. Theatre
this weekend — Fri. & Sat. 7:00
9:30; Sun. 7:00. A.M.S. 50c Non-
A.M.S. 75c. The Professionals Are
Coming!
PUT ON A~HAPPY. COME TO
Buch. 106 Wed. Oct. 28 or Thurs.
Oct. 29. See your favorite cartoon
heroes.
SKI SPECIAL — LESSONS IT
Tues., Fri., Sat. night. For further
information see Mill Epps, opposite
Information Booth — S.U.B. T.W
or Fri.   Noon.
THE MOON
MEN DATING MEN
ASSOCIATION
FULLY CONFIDENTAL
LEGALLY APPROVED
Call   For  Appointment, 733-8754
11:00 a.m.  -  9:00 p.m.
Travel  Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2855 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
LONDON  RETURN $225 •
also   other   destinations   —   1-ways.
687-1244  — 224-0087
2 GUYS DRIVING TO MEXICO-
City, Xmas break. Return ride for
2 Girls $100. Send resume to 3005
Glen Lake Rd.,  Victoria.
Wanted—Information
17
ANYBODY WITNESSING CAR Accident Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1970. at
approx. 8:15 a.m. at 10th & Tolmie
please phone 321-6283.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969  MORGAN PLUS FOUR   LIKE
new, $3000. Call Bob, 733-4585.
'56   HILLMAN   $65.   221 - 1241.
For Gerda.
ASK
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — FRO-
duction of Graphs, Maps, Text-
Book Illustrations and Formulations.  Advertising.   Phone 980-2928
Day Care 8c Baby Silting
32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
DON'T BE ALONE
phone   —   P.Y.C.
434-2636.
— WALK TO A
Dating  Club   —
HALLOWE'EN DANCE, SATUR-
day, Oct. 31 "Amethyst' Place
Vanier 9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. Res.
$1.00, Non-Res. $1.50. Costumes optional.
WILL JOSH SHOW UP?? COME
and see! Tues. 12:30 SUB Plaza
South.
"IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG",
you won't forget it. Nominated
for 1970 Academy Award for best
documentary. See it today. Three
showings: 10:00, 12:30, 3:00. Admission 50. UBC Anti-War.
AQUASOC. MEMBERS! HALLO-
we'en Nite Dive and Party Saturday! Larson Bay, 7:00 p.m.,
3625 Hillcrest, N. Van. 9:00 p.m.
HASSLED BY THE "CAN I HELP
YOU, SIR?" routine when shopping? Browse unmolested thru
Pier I Imports in Gastown-Powell
and Columbia—with items from 13
countries.
CORKY'S MENS HAIRSTYLING.
Go to Corky Country, 3644 W. 4th,
Alma on 4th. Appointments 731-
4717.
WANT TO RAP WITH SOMEONE?
Try a campus minister. Every
day.  SUB 228, Oct. 29. Neil Kelly.
NEED MONEY? Sell your used
outdoor equipment (skis, packs,
etc.) at V.O.C.'s used equipment
sale, to be held Thurs., Oct. 2!)th
in SUB 205 from 12:30 to 9:30
pm. Bring equipment to be sold
to V.O.C. clubroom (SUB 14) at
12:30 or 5:30 p.m. any day before
sale   this   Thurs.
"CAN HEIRONYMUS MERKIN
Ever Forgot Mercy Humppe and
find true happiness?" Well, can
he? See some beautiful scenery in
SUR   Theatre   this   weekend.
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typewriters 8c Repairs 39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche  — 437-1355.
Typing (Cont.)
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home: essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING . . .
fast, accurate work, theses, essays,
papers; 35c per page. Call Mrs.
Duncan,   228-9597
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter; shorthand.
325-2934.
EXPERT FAST TYPING. THESES
term papers, essays. Pick up and
del. Selectric machines. Miss Butler, 681-4888 — 24-hr. service.
—   TYPING   SERVICE   —
Mrs. Gail Symons
224-6435   —   3885   W.   12th   Ave.
NEED  TYPING DONE?
CALL  731-8096
EXPERIENCED TYPIST
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Anne Treasy,  738-8794
EXPERIENCED IBM SELECTRIC
typing service: theses, essays, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.  Mrs.   Troche,  433-1355
ON-CAMPUS TYPING, FAST, Accurate, all types of theses, texts,
essays,   IBM  Selectric,   224-9183.
"TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, engineering, social science,
psychological terminology. High
quality   low   charge.   733-4708".
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
REQUIRE IMMEDIATELY PART-
time light house-cleaning 8 hrs.
per week at $1.75 per hr. Mr.
Norton, 688-3411, 9-5 or 263-5079
after 6:00.
NEEDED: MEN AND WOMEN
for part-time work in Canadian
and International Company leading to career possibilities at executive level If interested, present
this Ad. on any of the following
nights at 7:45 p.m., Oct. 22, 26,
29 at Golden Canada Product
meetings held at the Blue Boy
Hotel. Sponsor: Doug McDougall,
General Distributor.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION 8c SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
SPANISH CONVERSATION, THE
shorter way to speak. Prof. Pareja
(Colombia, Argentina & UBC) will
tutor $3 hr., individual, no groups,
M to S, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 12
hours minimum paid in advance.
Limited number. 1405 Cypress (nr.
Cornwall)   738-5892.
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.
SPANISH TUTORING & TRANS-
lations — Spanish native. Have
Cambridge University certificate
in English;  $3/hr. Phone 732-5754
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW AVAILABLE $1.00
at the  Bookstore  and
AMS Publication* Office
Pre-sale tickets  redeemed only at
Publications Office
215 HEAD MASTERS. $75 OR BEST
offer.   Ralf  263-5783.
FOR MEN ONLY. ASSTD. NEW
100/33 rpm party & stag records.
Also—8 track stereo cassettes—
reg. $8.00 each to clear $5.00. Ph.
731-2343   evenings.
USED SKIS, BOOTS, PACKS,
sleeping bags, etc. Get them at
VjO.C.'s used equipment sale this
Thurs. in S.U.B. 205 from 12:30
to  9:30 p.m.
YASHICA ELECTRO 35MM. PRO-
fessional model f. 1.7 plus lens
conversion kit. Must sell. $115.
Greg, 261-1068.
FREE: BEAUTIFUL AFFECTION-
ate pussy cat. Desperately in need
of  good   home.   Ph.   224-1400   evgs.
FENDER TEDECASTER, HUM-
bucking pick-up. Signature amp.
55 watts rms, 2—15" heavy-duty
speakers.   228-9325   Jacques.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LARGE CLEAN FURN. BEDROOM
with shared kitchen and bath.
Quiet UBC girl preferred, $70 per
month.   Call  224-1727
AVAILABLE NOV. 1, 2 FEMALE
students: Room & ktch., priv. — all
equip, provided. On Campus, ph.
224-7230.  $50/mo.,   student.
DON'T BUILD AN ARK! LIVE ON
campus for less. Quiet rooms with
kitchen privileges, linen changed
weekly. Large T.V. and study
rooms. $50/mon. Phone Bill Dins-
more  224-4530.   5760 Toronto Rd.
ROOM & BATH. PRIVATE EN-
trance. Some cooking facilities.
Quiet person only. Less rent for
work   if   desired.   733-6447.
SHARE A HOUSE AND Expenses with three others. Your
own bedroom. 1st and MacDonald.
733-7358.
Room & Board
82
DUE TO THE NUMBER OF STU-
dents who were unable to occupy
residence accommodation for the
Winter Session, there are a number of vacancies for female students. Please contact Housing
Office in the New Administration
Bldg or phone 228-2811
Furnished Apts.
83
MALE WANTED TO SHARE APT.
in Kits. Furnished. Available im-
mediatly.   Call Jim,   733-3446
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE
house near gates. Rent $58 plus
share  of utilities.  Phone  224-3140.
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE FUR-
nished apt. $50 month. 15th &
Maple.   Call   731-6300   after   4:00.
GIRL TO SHARE 2 BEDROOM Duplex with same. $50 per month.
Avail.   Nov.    1st.   Phone   733-6953.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
TWO U.B.C. STUDENTS WITH
house need four others to share
rent. Available Nov. 1st Phone
Irv 263-3653. Tuesday, October 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Rugby gets back Boot
Football keeps record
intact losing to Calgary
A couple of B.C. football teams travelled to Calgary over the
weekend and if nothing else they proved that wheat farming is
conducive to producing football players.
Our pro team, B.C. Lions were clobbered 29-0 by the Calgary
Stampede rs.
Win Sixth
in a Row
This year's Thunderbird Rugby
side reached the age of maturity
Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
University of Victoria Vikings,
the first team UBC has faced this
season that has been comparable
in conditioning and training,
suffered a convincing 22-6 loss in
Saturday's play for "The Boot".
Some 800 rugby enthusiasts
enjoyed the opportunity of
applauding well-played,
hard-hitting action. The Birds'
pack again proved the decisive
factor with excellent loose play
and fine cover. The back line was
superb defensively and always
dangerous when given the ball.
Winger Spence McTavish
opened the scoring early in the
game with an unconverted 'try
finishing off a strong team effort.
UVic battled back to tie the score
before Ray Banks put through a
penalty goal for a 6-3 lead.
With less than a minute
remaining in the first-half
McTavish again scored in the
corner on a determined individual
effort. Banks converted for an
11-3 lead at the half.
The Thunderbirds dominated
the second half, adding a try and a
drop-goal by centre Doug Schick
and a convert and penalty goal by
Banks.
The most impressive asset of
the Birds was the solid team
effort. Fifteen players beat the
Vikings and this spirit, if
maintained, indicates a successful
season to come.
After the game the Birds
exulted in the win avenging the
two losses and the loss of the
Boot last year.
Intramurals
And our local heros, the UBC
Thunderbird were stomped 27-0
by the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs.
Don Cohen returned a punt 54
yards to put Calgary ahead 20-0
UBC Braves secured a hard midway through the last quarter,
fought win by downing Western An eight yard touchdown pass
Washington 6-3 in other collegiate from Greg Gibson to Bud Copland
action to also stay undefeated in the last minute completed the
while  UBC  Frosh  suffered their   scoring.
first loss at the hands of the UVic        Calgary     scored    its     other
frosh, losing 11-3. touchdown on a 16 yard pass to
Vancouver     Rugby     Union   Copland   from   quarterback   Joe
action continues next week. Petrone. Petrone also added a 37
yard field goal, singles of 63 and
70 yards, and a two point
conversion. Another two point
conversion rounded out the
Calgary scoring.
Saturday, the Birds can make
up for all their previous failures
this season by defeating the
Simon Fraser Clansmen.
The Clan apparently are taking
the Birds quite seriously. They
respect UBC's size and are out to
avenge last year's tie. Coach Lome
Davies hasn't yet recovered from
that one and will be making sure
than his players are ready.
Teacuppers Thurs.
The sixteenth annual Tea-cup
football game between the Nurses
and the Home Ec. crews goes this
Thursday afternoon, 12:30, at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Proceeds will go to the
Children's Hospital and admission
will be 25 cents or a donation.
SWIM MEET  FINAL RESULTS:
1. Engineers 193
2. Betas 164
3. Delta   Upsilon 138
CYCLE   DRAG   FINAL RESULTS:
1. Fort Camp 186
2. Forestry 165
3. Engineers 143
RESULTS   OF   INTRAMURAL
TUG OF WAR:
1. Engineers
2. Fort Camp
3. Commerce
TOTAL   POINT STANDINGS TO
OCTOBER 15, 1970:
1. Engineers
2. Forestry
3. Fort  Camp
4. Beta Theta  Pi
5. Commerce
481
449
427
383
291
The Ice Hockey schedule will be
up today. The football playoffs are
tentatively scheduled outside the
office, and the Basketball league
play starts Mon., Nov. 2. The schedule will  be up Oct.  28th.
There was no room for the
report on the cross-country team.
This will appear in Friday's issue.
^1
r-«:>"
,'je   .. -,_»■■■■
—keith dunbar photo
AS SEEN IN THIS PICTURE most things went the Birds' way Saturday as they downed the University
of Victoria Vikings to regain the Boot trophy for UBC.
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
SPECIAL PRICES FOR
STUDENTS AND FACULTY ON
HAIRSTYLING   AND   CUTTING.
4605-W. 10th
228-9345
Open 8-6 - Tues. - Sat.
GRAD STUDENTS:
Intramural & Recreational
ICE HOCKEY
Wednesdays   10:45 P.M.
U.B.C. ARENA OLD RINK
SKIERS!
THE SNOW HAS COME!
And Now You Can Get a DELUXE SKI SET At a Moderate   Price
From Austria -FISCHER SKIS With P-TEX BASE,
Interlocking Steel Edges, And Inlaid Plastic Top Edges Together With
The Ever-popular TYROLA 123 Step-in Bindings With Runaway Straps
And Aluminum Ski Poles — ^-^      _•        _t^^
ALL FOR      W\/\   "  «'*)
ONLY      ^^^T
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
2120 W. 41st Ave.
— SKI DEN —
Open Daily 9-6 Thur.-Fri. 9-9
261-6011 Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1970
—bennett photo
When you're
only number
2...
Within the giant system of government, B.C.
Government Ltd., is only number two. Being second
place is no fun so we have to try harder. We figure it's
the little things that make a customer turn to B.C.
Government Ltd.
When Number One made a policy statement we
went right to work. Number One stated that it would be
against the laws to favor support of the FLQ. We looked
at that and decided that our customers wanted more.
Our Vice President (Customer Services) said that
consumer surveys had shown conclusively that you
really wanted us to get to the root of the problem and
take care of any chance that your children would be
influenced toward any incorrect thought.
We decided to suppress (oppress?) the teachers.
After all, if we can't take care of our children's minds
how can we expect them to grow into good,
clean-minded, Socred citizens. We want your business so
we have to work a little harder than Number One.
"When we're only number two, we try harder."
B.C. Government Ltd
WE TRY HARDER
B.C. Government Ltd. is a wholly owned subsidiary ol
the American Empire (Canada Ltd.) with branch offices
the world over to serve you best.
*"»<•»« i-i^
Woihtngton. Ottawa
Ha. aongltoli. Seoul.
Panama Gty. lima,
tiibon. Madrid. Ram*. Bonn. Bam. Tlw Hague. Copenhagen. Brutaalt. Vienna. Odo. Dublin. Canberra. Saigon. Man-
Kuala Lumpur. Taipei. New MM. Tel Aviv. Karachi, iohonoiiburg. Lagos. Salisbury. oraxilia. Buanet Aires. Quito.
Santiago. Mexico Gty. Tegucigalpa. San Juan. Guantanamo. Pari*. Vientiane. Caracas, and many, many mere to serve

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