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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1970

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Array Page 2: New protest planned over second Amchitka atom
blast.
Page     3:     Le     Dain    stands    by    drug    commission
recommendations.
Page 7: Where your $24 is going.
Page 9: First in a new series of classroom reports.
WHAT'S THAT THING on our nice clean concrete? When it comes to a choice
between cement and flowers, who chooses And when it comes to a choice between
cement and flower children, who wins? The result will be determined at today's AMS
—dirk visser photo
general meeting close to this very spot. You can't pick a bouquet of concrete for the
teacher, but you can give a patch of hard floor to people who need a place to sleep.
Chaplains, Left Caucus support SUB hostel
By ROBIN BURGESS
Signs of support for the AMS scheme to house
. Jericho youths temporarily in SUB are beginning to
emerge in the face of obvious student reaction against the
plan.
Due to active student opposition to the proposal
council voted Thursday to take the issue to the student
population at a general AMS meeting today at noon.
Student support for the Jericho residents' cause
seems, however, to be growing.
In a conference over the weekend members of the
Anglican United Campus Ministry concluded that students
should be involved in the community - and right now
that means the plight of the Jericho transients, said
campus chaplain George Hermanson.
The practical result of the conclusion was that the 26
members of the group paid for an ad on page 8 of today's
Ubyssey urging students attend the meeting and support
the AMS offer of SUB facilities.
Basically the ad examines four questions, said the
second campus chaplain, Peter Fribley: Who are these kids
and what's happening to them? Does the university have
the responsibility of doing something? Will the decision
take the city off the hook? And is SUB really suitable?
"We concluded that 'yes, the university does have a
responsbility to these kids'," said Fribley. "Since no one
else will do it, it's up to us to provide them with a place to
stay."
If the university takes on the responsibility of looking
after the Jericho transients when the Jericho Hostel
closes, pressure will be off the city to act, said Fribley.
But at least transients sleeping in SUB will be visible and
can't be just forgotten.
"We decided that SUB is not a suitable place for the
AMS releases 1971 budget
By LESLIE PLOMMER
This year's proposed Alma Maier Society budget
contain* hi lie to s Untie students.
The budget is based {in funds totalling close to
1464,000 which come irom about 18.500 full.
fee-paying students.
It was originally slated lo be broken down into
the four "commissions" proposed for the student
', council if appioved by a general meeting this fall:
. community relations, wider external affairs officer
.- John Zaozirny; academics, under the vice-president;
* gerriccs, under co-ordinator Hanson Lau and finance
under treasurer Stuart Rrucs.
However, the budget i» still set out under the old
categories, and various interim nanus twitches and
juggling of jurisdictions make the document rather
confusing at limes.
At present, the AMS executive is hoping that
SUB will break even rlns year loi the first time in its
history
Last year, almost S16.U00 was spent on SUB
and  most  ot   il   went   to   leplacinp and icpairmg
damaged furniture which had sl-?u only two years ot
use.
The couche* in I lie mam floor conversation pit,
for example, arc missing right now because they air-
out for complete re-upholsiciing jobs.
If revenues generated by SUB mciease rJus >ea;
as planned, these damage costs may he oft set.
Otherwise, students will keep paying roi the damage
they inflict in SUB.
The B.C. Union of Students receives no money in
the current budget.
"Bruce said Monday il is ihe executive's feeling
that' uiftjt BCUS stiaightens out its internal problems
and demonstrates that-it has something (o offer to
UBC students, the money won't be foi ihcoming.
At the time of budget planning, the Canadian
University Students Overseas organization had not
told the AMS what its plans were. Bruce said.
Thus there is no CUSO allocation at present,
though it is likely that money wilt be given when final
budgetary detail* are worked out, he said.
Proposed allocations to undergraduate societies
aie down fiom last year, dcspiic an incicasc in tees
levied by the AMS on these oiguiiiyniiuns.
In many cases, '.his is becciiw ihe undi-igud
societies   didn't   icquesl   funds.  01   had   suflicn-m
Continued on page 8: see BUDGET
kids to sleep but it's better than the streets. If we take oh
this responsibility we must find a way of making the
arrangements more human," said Hermanson.
Forcing the youths to leave at 7 a.m., as proposed, is
not a particularly human regulation, he said.
Also making plans to muster student support for the
AMS motion is the newly-formed UBC Left Caucus.
The 15 members of the Left Caucus have prepared a
hand-out to be distributed to students before and during
today's meeting, filling in the background to the Jericho
situation.
The handout brings out the following points:
• Close to 20 per cent of young people are
unemployed and looking for work;
• Teenagers in our age group are the hardest hit
by this situation, especially those who have no money for
education or job-training;
• The people in the Jericho hostel are in our age
group. By rights they should be in school too. Since
unemployment is on the rise students now at UBC could
feel the pinch next summer;
• The closure of the Jericho hostel is the federal
government's way of getting itself off the hook. Direct
action is the best way to put political pressure on the
federal government.
Evert Hoogers, grad student representative on council
and a member of the Left Caucus called Thursday's
motion to hold a general meeting an attempt by council
to "weasel out" of the responsibility of their decision.
Hoogers was one of three council members to vote
against the general meeting motion.
Without today's meeting the motion to open SUB to
Jericho transients "would probably have ended up being
rescinded by council," said AMS vice-president-elect
Christine Krawcyzk.
"A general meeting will open up debate and continue
debate rather than confining it within the council
chambers," she said.
This way the issue, said Krawczyk, will not be
decided by "emotional reaction to a lobby on the part of
council members."
Krawcyzk predicted that students will support the
AMS decision.
"I have faith that the humane element of UBC
students will come out.""
How does AMS president Tony Hodge predict
students will vote today?
"The right way," said Hodge and grinned. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29, 1970
Plans afoot to undermine
1971 Amchitka bomb test
By JAN O'BRIEN
Another plan to foil the U.S. nuclear bomb
tests in Amchitka, off the Alaska coast, is in the
making.
Last October 6,000 students protested the
Amchitka nuclear blast by demonstrating at the
Peace Arch.
The latest plan involves sailing a ship, equipped
for scientific research, to Amchitka, where another
nuclear blast is scheduled for September, 1971.
"The Peace Arch protest was appropriate but it
didn't accomplish anything," said Jerry Stanleigh,
law 3, of the Don't Make a Wave Committee.
"By going directly to the sore point the U.S.
government will be forced to deal with the
problem."
In an effort to raise money to finance the
purchase of a ship the committee — affiliated with
the National Green Peace Movement — is holding a
benefit concert featuring Joni Mitchell and Phil
Ochs in the Pacific Coliseum Oct. 16.
Alma Mater Society president Tony Hodge said
the AMS had been approached to lend the
committee approximately $1,000 to finance tickets
and miscellaneous initial promotional costs.
"The proposal has not yet been approved by
the finance committee," said Hodge, who will make
an announcement about the plan at the general
meeting today.
Stanleigh said the group planned to sail to
within a certain range of the Alaska coast making it
impossible for the explosion to go ahead.
When asked what was to prevent the U.S. Navy
from escorting the ship out of the area Stanleigh
replied: "We won't argue with an American
destroyer.
"We will move 200 miles from the site (extent
of the U.S. jurisdiction) to do research. A
geophysicist on campus has said he will accompany
us and carry out experiments."
The blast, scheduled for 1971, is the third in a
series and about 1,700 times the size of the
Hiroshima bomb.
Stanleigh said the committee was concerned
about the long term effects as well as the danger of
tidal waves and earthquakes.
"We hope to release information on the effects
of the blast that has previously been held back by
the Canadian and American governments."
He said one of their main objectives was to
bring attention to the blast and ask the question is
further nuclear experiment testing necessary?"
"The U.S. has said it has enough nuclear power
to destroy the world, then why is it necessary to
continue perfecting the systems?"
"General television coverage has been
committed to the sailing but we need the concert to
get the ship."
The committee hopes to make $20,000 to
$25,000 but have not yet found a ship.
Tickets for the concert which includes the
Chilliwack rock group as well as Joni Mitchell and
Phil Ochs will sell for $3 and are available at the
Vancouver Ticket Centre and all major campuses in
B.C.
Space crisis in main library
By KELVIN BECKETT
The main library is full. So full
that up to 50,000 books will have
to be moved out and put into
storage by Christmas.
"This practice will necessarily
have to continue until a new
library   is   built,"   head  librarian
Basil Stuart-Stubbs said.
The new Sedgewick library,
construction of which will begin
in late October or early
November, "will not help to
alleviate the problem" he said.
The 100,000 volume collection
added by this extension will only
Industrial  ed fee cut
set for Oct.  8 ballot
Should UBC students who
never use SUB be required to pay
for the building?
Students will be asked by
referendum Oct. 8 whether almost
60 students enrolled in the
industrial education teachers
program in Burnaby should have
to pay for SUB.
At present they arc required to
pay the full $24 fee, which
includes the $15 for the payment
and upkeep of SUB —
although they never use it.
The students take all their
classes at the B.C. Institute of
Technology and, because they are
never on campus, feel they
shouldn't have to pay the $15.
The motion that the 60
students be exempt from the
payment was brought before AMS
council last week by education
rep Connie Sinkler.
A similar motion was taken to
referendum last year but was
defeated because the necessary 10
per cent of the campus failed to
vote. The referendum needs a
two-thirds majority of that 10 per
cent to pass.
The vote will be included in
the ballot for the AMS
by-elections to replace the
vice-president and ombudsman.
Christine Krawczyk, arts 3, was
elected vice-president last March
then declared ineligible because
she hadn't completed her second
year at UBC. She is now eligible.
Richard Harrison was elected
ombudsman at the same time, but
was not allowed to return to UBC
because of his academic standing.
serve undergraduate students in
the humanities and the social
sciences.
"In deciding which books are
to be put in storage, frequency of
use will be the principal factor
considered,"   said  Stuart-Stubbs.
The books might have to be
stored off campus and students
will have to wait to use them.
"There will be the
inconvenience of not being able to
browse through them and of
having to wait up to a day to get
the books," he said.
Stuart-Stubbs first said he first
warned the university community
about this problem in his annual
report of 1964-65.
MEET ME AT
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
Prof dies of heart attack
An internationally known
chemistry prof and UBC assistant
dean of science, Dr. Ken Harvey,
died Sunday.
Dr. Harvey, 42, had a heart
attack while mowing his lawn at
his home at 2292 West
Thirty-third.
As assistant dean of science he
responsible    for    arranging
° vim
PATIO.
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Alienation, isolation, anomie — popular terms for the
loneliness all of us have experienced from time to time but which
often becomes more acute at a multiversity such as ours.
Hardly a wonder we may feel lonely here — this campus is
large, located away from many home communities, attractive to a
wide diversity of people yet barely equipped to bring people
together in small informal groups.
Many of us confront classes of hundreds, nameless faces in
the SUB, on the bus, and home to basement rooms off campus.
There seems to be another kind of loneliness beyond the
strangeness of a new and impersonal campus.
Many of us seem to feel along even after we have made
"friends", joined clubs, and fallen in with the routine of classes,
social life, exams etc. We still don't feel we belong or that people
really care what we are doing here. We aren't even sure we do.
Some of us don't understand what it is to be lonely around
here. We may have had already made friends and contacts from
high school or met a good group in residences or been in one of
those rare small faculties where even the profs know the
students.
Moreover, some people when they come to university have
firm ideas about what they want and where they are going.
Admitting your loneliness even to yourself can be difficult
because it implies that socially you're some kind of failure.
However, more and more people seem to be coming to grips
with this problem and approaching Speakeasy for some solutions.
In response to this, Speakeasy volunteers are available to help
form small groups for discussion, activities, sensitivity training,
etc.
If you are interested in participating in one of these groups,
please contact the Speakeasy office room 234 in SUB (Office
hours for discussion with a Speakeasy volunteer are 11:30 a.m. to
8:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.)
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooopoooooooooooooooooe
UNDERSTANDING ROCK and FOLK ROCK
8 Tuesdays starting Oct. 13-8 p.m., Rm. 301, Hennings Bldg.
Special Student Rate - $10.00
Mr. William Titland will explore music and lyrics of
contemporary culture. Recorded material will be used to
illustrate communicative possibilities of various verbal and
musical combinations.
Register in Advance
St. Mark's College
Center for Continuing Education
Telephone 228-2181
mfffWftr Fwi««>M«w«HWW><(ww(WWwnnnnpnwiw»vi«
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
introductory
talk
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
A teacher of Transcendental Meditation speaks
THURS. OCT. 1st - 12:30 - BU 104
Admission Free
For further information - 266-0862
was
timetables   and
science students.
registration   for
a SUB FILM SOC PRESENTATION
CASTLE KEEP
with Burt Lancaster
Friday 2 & Saturday 3 - 7:00 & 9:00 - Sunday 4-7:00
Students 50c — Others 75c — SUB Auditorium Tuesday, September 29,  1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Le Dain remains firm in decision to cut drug penalties
By CHRIS KRAWCZYK
A kid who smokes or pops a
pill may be foolish - but he
doesn't belong in jail.
The federal government's Le
Dain commission on the
non-medical use of drugs
recommended that jail terms for
users of soft drugs be abolished, in
its interim report to parliament
released last June.
And commission chairman
Gerald Le Dain - in the face of
considerable opposition since the
interim   report   was   released   —
repeated the commission's stand
over the weekend at UBC.
The commission was attending
a closed session here, arranged to
expose them to feedback on the
report from concerned
professionals and agencies and
individuals involved with drugs
and drug users.
A spokesman for Parents
Anonymous — an organization
for parents of children with a drug
problem — attacked the interim
report   during the session.
The woman said: "My son has
been on drugs for five years and it
has completely ruined him. He has
no continuity of thought, and
very anti-social attitudes.
"By taking away jail sentences
and substituting fines, you are
making things more difficult for
the parents of these kids.
"You don't seem to realize
how easy it is for these people to
raise money for these fines," she
told the commissioners.
Replied Le Dain: "The
commission recommendations are
on    the    law    and    are    made
New day care centre a first
By CINDY BROWN
The basement of a former frat house is
now the scene of UBC's only day care centre
for kids under three years old.
It was organized by a group of parents who
are now $250 in debt after paying for this
centre without the help of any welfare or
government subsidies.
They bought outdoor equipment
themselves and qualified supervisor Monica
Mitchell takes care of the children with help
from volunteer parents, who work in shifts.
Mitchell and two parent helpers look after
the 14 one-and-a-half to" three-year-olds
enrolled at the centre.
Student mothers initially protested the
lack of facilities for young children by staging a
SUB sit-in.
After that came unsuccessful requests to
use the old traffic control office on Wesbrook
near Chancellor boulevard.
The group was in the graduate student
centre over the summer but had to leave when
UBC opened.
Meanwhile, the frat house centre is plagued
by lack of money and facilities. Anyone who
has equipment or regular time to donate can
contact Mitchell at 224-3014.
Since the present centre is full, Mitchell
will help interested parents set up other centres.
She is also willing to meet with parents and
have them come to the centre for an
orientation session to learn what is needed and
what it's like with a room full of kids.
All parents need is some money and a place
to house the kids, and Mitchell will help with
staff hiring if necessary.
If a group is short of cash, welfare
authorities will probably give subsidies, Mitchell
says.
regardless of any effects of the
drugs. We simply don't consider
jail terms to be any solution to
the problem."
The session — closed to the
press - was attended by about 60
people, representing about 25
organizations, including the Alma
Mater Society and several UBC
faculties and departments.
The discussion was sponsored
by UBC's centre for continuing
education, and chaired by Gerald
Savory, supervisor of the public
affairs program for the centre.
Instead of formal briefs -
which are presented at the
commission's public hearings —
there    were    several    hours    of
discussions on the interim report.
"We invited professionals and
others who are involved in various
ways with the question of
non-medical rlrug use and abuse,"
Savory said.
"The reason for this was to
allow these concerned individuals
to exchange their ideas on the
report, and to provide the
commissioners with an
opportunity to receive comments
and criticism on their report from
the public," he said.
He said the commission plans
to return to Vancouver later in
the fall to hold public hearings
before completing their actual
report on the drug laws in Canada.
Are women in res
in favor of keys?
Midnight — the coach turns into a pumpkin, the footmen turn
into mice, and UBC women are locked out of their residences.
But the scene may soon change if female residents vote in favor
of abolishing the curfew and providing all residents with keys.
Now, only male students have keys to the outside doors of their
residences. If the women miss their midnight deadline, they must be let
in by the residence clerk.
Housing director Les Rohringer said proposals for change in
residence rules may be made up to Oct. 14.
By this time new students will know ihow the present rules work
and will be able to decide if they want any changes, Rohringer said.
He said each residence area would vote on proposed changes and
present the results to the office of housing administration.
"If they can convince me of the need for change, I'll be happy to
go along. If I refuse, I'll explain my reasons."
Rohringer said there "may be no reason why female residents
can't have keys.
"But I honestly don't know. I want to hear both sides from the
students."
He said some residence areas had already voted on whether
female residents should have keys, but these were only open
show-of-hands votes, not secret ballots.
And in previous years, while some women's residences were in
favor of keys, others were not.
Poisons build up
By NYM HUGHES
UBC needs some method of disposing of dangerous chemicals.
Alma Mater Society council meeting Wednesday endorsed a letter
written by chemistry grad student Art Smolensky proposing the
establishment of a chemical dumping pit.
Smolensky said in the letter that most chemistry students and
staff now bottle their poisonous chemicals. Merely dumping them down
the drain could "cause irreparable damage to marine life off Point
Grey."
A more immediate danger is that the chemistry labs "now have
glass jugs full of poisonous materials and non-disposable oils. These
present a real danger to human life should a container be broken
accidentally. Something must be done," the letter said.
UBC has large amounts of land and should be able to fence off a
small area, said Smolensky. A concrete-lined pit could be constructed at
a "relatively small cost and the precautions would be well worth it."
Copies of the letter were sent to various administrative personnel
but Smolensky told The Ubyssey the only response he received was
that "the matter was in the hands of a committee."
Dr. Basil Dunnell, chairman of a committee set up last December
to study the problem, said the university "is concerned."
A report will be soon submitted to administration president
Walter Gage and action should be taken "in the near future," Dunnell
said.
But Smolensky said the situation is serious enough to warrant
immediate action.
Save money with AMS
Your AMS card can save you
most of the price of a cup of
coffee every morning.
If you ride the bus between the
Blanca loop and the campus, that
is.
Students using this route are
charged only a 15 cent fare
instead of 25 cents if they present
their cards to the driver.
There's an even better way to
save money, though.
Hitch-hike. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29, 1970
TM UBYSStY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
.228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 29, 1970
The hostel issue
Gambling is an activity not usually associated with
the AMS council, but that's exactly what they'll be
doing today at noon.
After voting to house transients in SUB if and
when the Jericho hostel is closed, certain council
members had second thoughts. Rather than using the
safe, but highly embarrassing tactic of reversing
themselves without provocation, they called today's
general meeting, gambling that the students will vote the
idea down.
It is our fervent hope that they lose and students
approve the plan.
Opening SUB as a temporary hostel is going to be
a lot harder than passing resolutions in support of the
Jericho residents or donating money to them. In some
way, it will inconvenience each and every one of us.
It won't really do anything to solve the problems
of transient youth. That is part of a wider problem of
general unemployment.
The plain fact is that the people at Jericho are
separated from us by only the thinnest of lines. Many of
them would be at university if they had been lucky
enough to find jobs for the summer or had come from
families that could afford to pay for their education.
They are dependent on hostels and groups like the
AMS not because they want to be but because they have
been forced into circumstances that leave them no
choice.
The decision we have to make today is a simple
one of whether to offer people a place to sleep in case
they need it — a hard request to refuse.
Perhaps it will take the federal government and
the city off the hook, but the federal government has'
already decided it will try to get off the hook by turning
people onto the streets. As for the city, its
determination to do nothing is well known.
SUB is not the best place for a hostel. The Jericho
residents know that and many of them are determined
to stay where they are.
A strong "yes" vote today, showing the transients
that they have some outside support, may encourage
them in their fight to keep Jericho. But they still need a
last resort, and today we can offer SUB for just that
purpose.
Make Les pay
Just in case there was any doubt, the provincial
government has again showed that it couldn't give a   •
damn about any of us.
Despite wide campus approval for the idea of a
pub in the SUB basement, the word from on high is
"no".
In a letter to AMS president Tony Hodge last
week, attorney-general Les Peterson said he is not
prepared to grant the AMS a draft beer licence, nor is he
prepared to meet with Hodge to discuss the matter.
Maybe we should all start sending Peterson bills
for our gas money or bus fare on those long trips to the
Arms, the Cecil and the liquor store.
Jewish    typewriter,    they    said.    Judy
Editor: Nate Smith McLeod and Cindy Brown agreed.
News    Maurice Bridge But  —   as Caroline  Woodward and
City     John Gidds Josephine   Margolis   pointed  out —  it
Wire        John Andersen died a good death. Suddenly. "Out like
Photo     Alan Katowitz a light," observed Christine Krawczyk.
Sports    Scott McCloy it  was then  that  Thorn  Wescott  and
Associate     John Twigg Phill Chubb began to sob quietly. Jan
Ass't City     Robin Burgess O'Brien    and    Robin    Burgess   reacted
Ginny Gait coldly: "Nothing worse than old men
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan wno cry."
Leslie Plommer Qjrk   visser,   David   Bowerman  and
Managing        Bruce Curtis Kevin Perrins were pragmatic and took
Page Friday Tim Wilson pictures of the corpse for   the  inquest.
Unnamed   thousands   from  the sports
Sadness   swept  and  tears welled  as department  and Ken Lassesen packed
Maurice's typewriter met an untimely the remains on ice.
death  after  25  years  in the business. But   the   question   remained:   Who
Tim     Spencer     demanded     that     we killed     Maurice's    typewriter?    Some
publish an obituary. But Nym Hughes, thought   it  was   Mike,  the  blonde guy
Tom   Harrison   and   Amarjeet   Rattan who   typed   up   'tween   classes.   But,
decided against it. really — and don't auote me on this —
No obit for  Nasser,   no obit  for a it was Andersen.
LETTERS
Waste
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I sat in the SUB cafeteria one
afternoon last week and, looking
out the window, I saw a young
guy moving slowly from garbage
can to garbage can. From each
container he took out discarded
bag lunches which he probed with
his fingers.
He succeeded in picking
bananas, apples, oranges, cookies
and uneaten sandwiches. After
visiting each garbage can he
proudly walked away carrying at
least six full bags of food.
What really bothers me is that
those same people who threw
away that food are probably those
who oppose allowing transients
the use of SUB facilities.
Canada and the U.S. are the
greatest polluters and most jealous
of their form of over-consumption. UBC students ideally reflect
this national attitude.
MIKE GEE
Education 4
their problems then we all lose.
The government just gets shielded
from the genuine beefs of the
people in this country. The people
still suffer.
Why did the Council not bring
all the power and influence it has
to bear on the municipal,
provincial and federal
governments? Why were not
student finances used to pressure
our politicians into legislative
change, into eliminating the
causes of poverty and not just its
end product?
It's because they're all satisfied
with a patch-up job, so they can
preserve the current problems and
keep these people in endless
transiency. Well, good show;
because of your efforts the end of
this situation is further still.
ART SMOLENSKY
Graduate Studies 9
When you find out what kind
of influence the AMS has over any
level of government, we'd
certainly like to hear about
it.-Ed.
Hosfels       More Hostels
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Students' Council has
done a disservice to the poor,
unemployed and uneducated of
this country. I refer, of course, to
the proposal to billet the Jericho
"transients" when their current
lease expires.
Why a disservice? Because the
Students' Council has condemned
them to a continuance of their
situation. They have effectively
let every level of government off
the hook for what is not a room
and board problem but a
manisfestation of our present
economic and social systems.
Who cares now why these
people are unemployed, why they
are poor? Someone else has given
them a place to stay — let them
handle it. We have let ourselves
become the innocent dupes of
Tom Campbell, Wacky Bennett
and Pierre Trudeau.
These people are a symptom of
our society. They are our
cast-offs, those who didn't fit the
mold.
Sure they need a place to stay
and yes it should be the Student
Union Building if there is no other
place. But they do have a place,
right in the laps of government, at
Jericho.   If we hide them from
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The people on both sides of
the debate concerning Jericho
hostel youths have, I think, shown
insight and intelligence.
But there is the ridiculous
point raised by the administration
which says students must not
complain about lack of space in
SUB if they are going to give it to
non-paying people.
This is a splendid example of
the cold, inflexible thinking
(usually with a touch of
selfishness) that is called
"practical" and deemed to be the
product of those older and wiser
than we of the "idealistic but still
young" generation.
If the students do give up part
of SUB it is commendable.
Bennett strike us dead, but we
may give something for nothing.
Whatever will this do to human
initiative?
The administration might have
us shrug off the problem as "we
paid and they didn't". But each of
us knows that we do have a home
for winter and they don't. We also
know that they are in
demoralizing and frustrating
conditions that can break the
human will. Knowing this, can we
appease our consciences with "we
paid and they didn't?" *
Furthermore we know they
can't pay because our economy
has shut them out. We of the
university are supposedly working *
to better this situation, so what
does the prospective graduate
have in mind? Seven years on a
campus and into an administrative
position? Does the gathering of
knowledge leave no time for
experiencing? Is initiative really
deterred by human com-
compassion?
The alternative answer, a drive
for funds, would produce little
more than sighs or relief. No one
would be confronted with the "
problem and each would go about
his studying, leaving the project to
whoever does all the others.
It's time we realize that .
education as a means to avoid the
pitfalls of the less fortunate
doesn't give us the right to forget
them. Let's meet these people -
from Jericho and find out for
ourselves what is going on.
NAME WITHHELD
Place Vanier Arts 2
*
More yet
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Thursday morning Alma Mater
Society president Tony Hodge, -
supported by two members of the
engineering undergraduate society
hierarchy, stood before our
second year engineering class and
delivered a searing invective
against the transfer of the Jericho
hostel residents to SUB. His
diatribe was gilded with
anti-hippie rhetoric, presumably
to mask the absence of any
factual or humanitarian reason for
opposing the transfer.
But did the Engineers see
through this ruse, did they bring
forth any compassionate
sentiments for the destitute, the
homeless, the lonely? Not a
chance; they pounded their desks,
stamped their feet, and drowned *
out in a chorus of jeers any
protestations, save only those
which proclaim that the dirty
long-hairs would depreciate our _
SUB.
Hodge, of course, could not
advocate any violent reaction, but
nonetheless through the raucous
mood    transcended    an    air   of -
To page 5 Tuesday, September 29,  1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
From page 4
hostility and reflected on many
faces was the gleam of power of a
red horde.
The purpose of this letter is
not to provide a moral
substantiation for the hostel
transfer, but rather to expose the
acquiescing,  self-effacing core of
* engineers who quail in the
mindless veneration before the
EUS executive. Their belief, and
,' dependence on mob rule is
piteous; their quest for
individualism and self-liberty
never began.
Can anything be done to bring
a humanitarian introspection into
a faculty that engenders its own
morality gap? Perhaps, but one
small voice of dissent cannot
penetrate the technocratic din. A
' multitude of voices is needed;
voices that speak from the minds
of individuals to renounce the
mob     control     of    the     EUS
executive.
Engineers, speak out, whatever
your viewpoint, on the hostel
transfer   issue,   but  don't  allow
* your mind to be dissolved into a
red mob that uses power as a
medium of protest.
JIM SCOTT
Engineering 2
Debate
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Ned Glick's analysis of the
Canadian problem in Friday's
letter column was painful but
true.
He managed to hit the problem
immediately, i.e. deodorants. By
all means ban them, ban them,
ban them. To at last be able to
distinguish   an   earthy   Canadian
from an embalmed American is
far too good an opportunity to be
missed.
I though it only unfortunate
that, as so often happens, he was
unable to correctly assess the U.S.
Although I hold his opinion in
great esteem, I think it is only
correct to set him straight.
Americans are without
question a very unhappy people,
an exceptionally energetic people
and, as Mr. Glick suggested, they
are a very simple-minded people.
But above all, they are a totally
soulless people.
NIGEL HOLLICK
Agriculture 1
Americans
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I was born in Canada and
consider myself to be fairly
radical. Generally, I enjoy reading
The Ubyssey and think I learn a
fair bit from it. However the
Americanization issue that you
have so fervently taken on seems
rather petty to me.
Sure, I'm concerned about
encroaching American
imperialism, but let's think a bit
and find out who the real enemy
is. Is it the intellectuals who are
only seeking a better, saner life
here or is it the capitalists who are
gradually getting more and more
control of us by buying up all our
industries and resouces?
Your statement "we may as
well raise the stars and stripes on
the main mall flagpole" could well
become a reality if we don't stop
wasting energy on nothing issues
and start defining the real
problem.
The Americans who are coming
here are trying to escape the same
monster. Good living in the U.S.
has become almost impossible.
The backbone and cream of their
society is either trying to change
things or coming up here. The
teachers coming to Canada are not
going to be teaching the American
point of view. They are fed up
with their country and its
imperialist leanings.
Two of the best profs I've had
were Americans who had recently
moved to Canada. Most of this
group are anxious to learn about
and become part of a less
ego-centred culture. At the same
time, they should be able to
present their knowledge to us for
examination.
Your example of a way in
which we are being taught to
think like Americans is a mighty
poor one. I say "right on" to
anyone who writes about an
American issue (such as the Viet
Nam war) using phrases like "our
problem" and "what we must
do".
BILL MARLES
Arts 3
Praise
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Congratulations!
So far, this year's Ubyssey is
excellent beyond belief.
Your staff is obviously skilled,
and as for you, dear Mr. Smith,
your editorial pages have been
outstanding.
In short, UBC students should
be grateful to have such people
producing the finest university
newspaper in Canada.
ELVIRA FINCH
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
Second in a series of reminiscences by a former
U.S. Marine.
Boot camp isn't a funny place.
It's a place designed to accept hundreds of
young men every day and, in nine weeks, turn them
into killers, creatures with about as much emotional
response to the taking of life as a wounded animal.
The process begins as soon as the truck carrying
sixty kids jerks to a stop inside the compound.
Someone outside swings the door open and shouts,
"you got three mother-fucking seconds to get off of
this truck."
As each body comes off the truck it is greeted
with a slap on the head and the advice, "faster,
puke!" The recruits somehow find themselves on a
set of yellow footprints where they will wait
silently, without moving, for an hour or more.
After the paperwork is completed the recruits
are moved single file into a drab yellow building
where they get their heads shaved, mail their civilian
clothes home and receive their first uniform.
This uniform consists of running shoes with
white socks, green utility trousers, a yellow sweat
shirt with a red Marine Corps crest and the ugly
green hat or "cover" found everywhere in the
services.
There is a fascinating mystique surrounding the
hat in the military. To salute you must be
"covered", which means have the proper hat on, so
in most places being caught without a hat means a
severe lecture and quite possibly a fine or
restriction.
After they get outside again the recruits are
organized into a platoon of just under eighty men.
The platoon is formed into four columns according
to height by three sergeants who introduce
themselves as drill instructors. "I'm your drill
instructor, ladies, and you're going to hate my
guts."
The recruit soon learns his place in the platoon
and learns that the only time he is considered as an
individual is when he steps out of place.
The personal attention of a drill instructor is
nothing to be envied. Although physical contact is
officially illegal, a hard right to the stomach is a
common remedy for inattention or incompetence.
The approved method for correction is physical
tasks and this is used quite frequently.
A favorite of many DI's is the squat thrust,
better known as "squat mothers" and before they
graduate at least half of the recruits will have
collapsed of exhaustion from doing them.
If the normal ration of discipline is not enough
there are two specialized programs. The first is
corrective custody, reserved for those being
punished after what passes in the military for a trial.
Most of the recruits in this group are there because
they went "over the hill".
The other is the motivation platoon. You can
be sent there for being stupid, uncoordinated, weak
or any combination thereof. This group is
commonly called the "fat farm" - the majority are
there because they're overweight.
Both these groups are basically an
18-hour-a-day variation on the classic theme of
shovelling dirt from one hole to another.
But the main ingredient of boot camp is a
constant mental harassment. This harassment is precisely calculated to drive all human emotions out of
the marine, to make him an isolated individual even
while he is packed into a small room with a hundred
other sweaty bodies, and ultimately, make him
incapable of anything but immediate, unreasoned
response to simple commands.
The end result of this harassment is that 300
men can sit and laugh at a close combat lecture as
one of them is poked, punched and kicked until he
loses consciousness from slow, overwhelming pain.
CLUBS DAY
1970
S.U.B.
SEPT. 30 & OCT. 1
All day
VISIT
PONDEROSA
ON THE WEST MALL
For
• Coffee Breaks
• Lunch
• Dinner
More Room — More Comfort
Convenient
tm
BIG FOOTBALL GAME
THURSDAY NOON
U of MANITOBA
"BISONS"
Canadian Collegiate Champions
vs.
U.B.C. "Thunderbirds"
AT THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
THURS. OCT, 1 AT 1 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS
MMMBMMMMMNMMMMM Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29,  1970
Clubs Day  70
starts tomorrow
Four blobs will come
plummeting from the sky onto
the field between SUB and the
gym     Wednesday and Thursday
No Mabel, not pigeon blobs
but four members of the UBC
skydiving club who will be landing
around 1 p.m. both days as part
of an attempt to recruit you to
their gang of free fall freaks.
They will be jumping from a
light plane at 4,500 feet,
demonstrating a 15-second free
fall before landing with a 'p'°P' m
the middle of the target and
disintegrating into a quivering
mass of strawberry jello.
If the chutes open, they will
attempt a soft landing in the
middle of the same target.
It's all part of Club's Day, an
animal act that manages to
combine the worst elements of
the Black Hole of Calcutta and
the PNE.
Forty clubs are participating in
the event, each trying to recruit
you to their thing with lavish
displays.
It all happens Wednesday in
SUB from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. and on
Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
No Newsense
A fund shortage has muzzled
The Newsense, the official
publication of the English
department's undergraduate
society.
"The reason given by English
department head Robert lordan
for cancelling the paper was that
there was no money available to
continue publishing," said
Newsense editor Jan DeBruyn.
The monthly publication cost
$1,000 a year.
President of the English Grad
Student's Union Paul Trout said
his organization will attempt to
put out some kind of a newsletter,
despite official cancellation of
The Newsense.
CANADA
FIRST OR SECOND YEAR ???
Opportunities exist to become
an OFFICER in the Vancouver
NAVAL   RESERVE
in the ROUTP programme in
HMCS Discovery.   For more
information, come to HMCS
Discovery, Stanley Park,    on
Tuesday from 7:30 to 9:00pm.
MAKE IT MUSIC!
Fellows, Girls — Join the
Music Resource Group
Union College — Room  104
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1st, 4:30 P.M.
SING,  PLAY,   LEARN
Director: Mr. Len Lythgoe
Bring Enthusiasm and a Friend!
Seattle jazz fest
There's a big jazz thing!
happening in Seattle at the Centre
Arena on October 3 and 4. On
Saturday, at 7:30, Roberta Flack,
Cannonball Adderley, and the
Don Ellis Band will appear.
On Sunday at 2:30 there will
be a piano workshop with Keith
Jarrct, Bill Evans, Herbie
Hancock, and Joe Zawinul, and at
7:30 the same day, the Miles
Davis Sextet, the Bill Evans trio,
and the Herbie Hancock Sextet
will perform.
Tickets are available at the
Record   Galley   evening  concerts
$5.50, $4.25, and $3.00, Sunday
workshop $2.00. You can buy the
whole shot for $10.00, and all
profits are supposed to go to
various cultural organizations. It's
a jazz lineup unheard of in this
area, and one well worth taking
in.
Math    100
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
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Give number and dates of accident in last S years,
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at the door $2.50      N on-AMS (Anytime)   $3.00
Advance tickets at AMS Business Office and SUB Information Desk
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WMI THE PLANK
VOL. 1
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1970
No. 4sTree
FOREST GIANTS RIP US OFF, Forest Club doesn't. Come to Undercut '70.
Forestry publication leads
world academics
In 1953 the first edition of the
Forestry Handbook for British
Columbia was produced by the
students of the Faculty of
Forestry at the University of
British Columbia.
, T h i s was the first
comprehensive text of its kind in
North America. Followed by the
second edition, both printings
were in demand long after they
had been sold out. The second
edition gained world-wide
acceptance, as shown by orders
from Australia, Europe, and some
African countries.
The third edition of the
Forestry Handbook for British
Columbia represents the
culmination of several years work
by many students. This work on
the third edition was undertaken
entirely on student initiative. The
late Dean George S. Allen's
comment on the publication sums
up very well our situation:
"The question of 'What
motivation lay behind the effort?'
might well be asked and a definite
answer might be difficult to find.
I am inclined to believe that the
incentive is a mixture of urgent
need for self-expression and of a
st/ong desire for professional
service    and    recognition.    The
devotion of literally thousands of
man-hours to the task by students
who already carried a heavy load
of course augers well; it suggests
thar forestry students take their
profession seriously enough to
sacrifice a good deal for it and for
the student body as a whole ....
"If these things are true, as I
believe they are, there is good
reason to expect a strong
development of the forestry
profession ... More than anything
he (the young forester) must have
faith in the importance of
husbanding the nation's forests
and in his own part in this work,
he must have initiative to
undertake what are always new
and complex tasks under difficult
circumstances and the tenacity to
carry them through, and he must
continually add to his own
knowledge and that of others in
fields where much of the basic
knowledge is still lacking or
inadequate.
"The students who prepared
the Handbook have already
demonstrated their concern about
knowledge."
These remarks made by Dean
Allen in 1959 are just as true and
relevant eleven years later as they
were when he wrote them.
The third edition go on sale
November 1st, 1970, at a cost of
$10.00 or $9.50 on orders of 10
copies or more.
This third edition of the
Handbook is a useful addition to
the forestry literature of western
Canada, and fully justifies effort
and achievement put forward by
the undergraduate students and
the faith which the Faculty of
Forestry invests in the NEW
generation of foresters.
F. C. studs
UBC's cream
From the pith of the McMillan
Building is destined to emerge
many of this year's greatest sports
stories. With an addition of eighty
seedlings (four of which seem to
be cone bearing already) our
resources are virtually bounding
on the infinite. This raw talent for
eventual stardom has been eagerly
awaited by the stalwart pros of
the 71's, 72's, and 73's. Why, just
the other day, I heard Big Brucie
chuckle as he thought of getting
his hands on some of this young
growth to mould and shape it into
true trees as only Big Bruce knows
how.
This year has also witnessed
the return of many old greats,
who, for various reasons, found it
necessary to leave the campus
elite for a year or two.
In consultation with members
of The Plank staff, I feel it is only
fair    to    warn    our    over-rated
(Continued to Page 2:
F. C. STUDS
Action urged
in forestry
You have probably begun to
read this article in the hopes that
it will be witty and amusing and
Will inject some humor into your
lunch hour. I'm sorry to
disapoint you; it will not be
amusing. But if you are
sufficiently mature to care about
your future, about your economy,
about society, then you should
read on.
Needless to say, I am going to
concentrate upon forestry because
that is my chosen profession.
Perhaps you are not interested in
forestry, but you are interested in
your own education and
well-being, are you not? If so, you
should take the trouble to peruse
the following figures. They should
impress you with the importance
of the forest industry in British
Columbia and perhaps even
stimulate you to concern about
what the forest industry is doing
in our province.
Of B.C.'s 234 million acres,
171 million are forested, of which
137 million are considered as
productive forest lands.(Compare
this to the estimated 4.5 million
acres of total farm area). Of our
234 million acres, 222.7 million
belong to the crown (ie: to you).
In B.C. there are an estimated
268 billion cubic feet of mature
timber. In 1968, some 1.7 billion
cubic feet were harvested from
approximately 500,000 acres.
Clearly a great deal of expansion
is possible. In the same year
logging itseif contributed $340
million to the provincial
economy, (wood industries $449
million and pulp, paper and allied
industries $1,055 million)
compared to the value of all farm
cash receipts ($212 million) and
the wholesale marketed value of
all fish products ($119 million).
Without a doubt, our forest
industry is critically important to
B.C. Without it, our government
could not have allocated an
estimated $323 million for
education, $308 million for health
services, $98 million for social
welfare, or $139 million for
transportation and
communications.
If B.C.'s economy is to grow
and expand, our forest industry
must do likewise since her
economic activities are so largely
forest oriented. Immediately the
question arises as to how this
necessary expansion is to progress.
Will it be a fast, short-sighted
"grab    the    buck    and    run"
operation with no view towards
posterity? "Of course not", you
say, but let's face it, that has been
the story too often in the past.
And here is where you enter the
picture, as the modern forester.
As stated previously, 222.7
million acres of the 234 million
within the provincial boundaries
(or 95.2%) belong to you. As a
citizen, you have the right to say
what happens to your land. If you
are dissatisfied with any given
method of resource use (be it
mining, agriculture, urban
development, industrial expansion
or forestry) why not raise your
voice and express your opinion.
If you disagree with government
policy regarding the use of your
land, why not say so through
letters to your MLA or cabinet
ministers, or through some
concerned organization with
whose views you concur?
You can be sure that we
students in forestry are
concerned. We are concerned
about the need for public control
over public land. We are
concerned about our environment
and its increasing pollution. We
are concerned for continuing
economic growth without
sacrificing our land. We are
concerned about prosperity and
its needs. And we are most
definitely concerned about
deriving the maximum benefit
from our limited resources, both
now and   in the future.
We realize that forestry is not
"the be-all and end-all", but
rather that in most cases the best
policy is one of multiple use (i.e.
simultaneous campatible
endeavour such as forestry and
grazing, forestry and hydrology
etc. In fact, this facet of land use
is heavily emphasized throughout
our studies in forestry).
As resource managers we
realize that forestry is but a part
(albeit a very important part) of
B.C.'s natural resources and that
our task is to harmonize our
pursuits with those of many other
disciplines for the overall benefit
of our fellow citizens. This is not
a "pie in the sky" philosophy, it is
a hard fact. And we are dedicated
to seeing that such resource
harmony is realized before it is
too late.
With our work from the
"inside" and yours from the
"outside" as a concerned public,
this desirable situation can be
attained soon.
.-V
Hand logging at Undercut '70 Page 2
THE     PLANK
Tuesday, September 29,  1970
THE PLANK
The official organ of the UBC Forest Club published in conjunction
with Forestry Week. Forestry week is a non profit function
culminated by UNDERCUT. No slight or insult is intended by any
material appearing in this edition. The Plank is not published by The
Ubyssey. It is a product of the Forestry Undergraduate Society which
is solely responsible for its content. The Ubyssey supplied the
technical assistance for the layout.
Tuesday, September 29th, 1970
Act now
In the past, with few exceptions, foresters'
were content to put on their cruisier's vest and blinders
and head for the security of the bush pretending that
more competent people can handle the decisions that
concern them. Unfortunately, the decisions are being
made by commerce and law oriented businessmen who
usually do not have the biological and scientific
background to make the proper decision. The effects of
this are evident.
The recent series of articles on the forest industry in
the local newspaper indicate that things are not that rosy
in this province. The public is not going to accept some of
the current so-called "forestry" practises much longer.
Who is to blame for the situation? As foresters we must
become increasingly involved in the important political
and social decisions that are being made for us.
The forester must begin to realize that forestry is
people and not trees. We must be able to competently
manage the forest and deal with the public. People are not
as predictable as growth and rotation length. Perhaps our
university education needs to incorporate into it more
courses of a sociological nature. This is the trend that is
occurring in some of the American forestry schools
because they have realized the need for it.
The level of scientific and professional iforest
management in British Columbia is unsatisfaqtory.
Logging is viewed as the operation in the forest, not as
part of the over-all management process. The problem is
obvious. In most cases the money is available and
hopefully the knowledge to improve the management is
there. But, we are not the ones making the important
decisions. Eventually, the public will begin to make them.
One only has to look at the situation in California to see
the effects of this. When will we in British Columbia start?
Gears wiped
Again this year, the Tea Cup game will be held
between the nurses and HOMEC on October 15. The
Homewreckers have been out getting in shape for the big
game, which by some mistake they lost last year.
However, this year I anticipate great things from them as
they will trample the nurses into the turf.
As usual, half-time entertainment will feature a
chariot race. This year's contestants are the Great Green
Machine, the red mob and a few lower forms of life. This
race (i.e. the Flying Pig Shzt Affair) is a very strange affair
with rules (Ed. note: Wot rules?) that are far too complex
to explain here (or anywhere for that matter).
However, the idea is to get around the track at
Thunderbird Stadium before the other teams. As per usual
the Foresters have gone into rigorous training down at the
Arms. Their star players are getting exceptionally fast (at
downing beer) and will be in prime shape for the great
race. The engineers will be quaking in their boots once
again. All in all it should be the usual gross performance
between the Big Green and the degenerate red, with three
new additions.
The football game and the chariot race are held
every year to raise money for the Crippled Children's
Fund. That is its sole purpose and all money collected
goes to the Fund, so get out, have a good time and help
the kids.
Editor: Toncas
News Cousin Crash
City       Lap Lips
Photo Super Hiker
Wire     Senyah
Sports  Trapper Dan
Associate      Alice P. Nipples
Senior Big Thick
Ass't City       Ravis
Ass't News     .... Napper
Managing Trickle Dickie
Mother Petahh
S.P.C.A  Drumheller
Lav'n Wopper
Otho's Othe's
NO   COMMENT NEEDED .
Forestry activities
complete the week
Forestry week got off to a flying start yesterday with the
Official Forestry Vehicle, "The Flying Caulk" beating the
Engineers' Red Bomb in 2 out of 3 drag races in front of SUB.
We have a full slate of activities planned for each lunch hour this
week, and they include:
Today — Axe throwing and Chokerman's race.
Wednesday - Double bucking.
Single bucking (no, that is not a misprint - double and
single bucking involve sawing wood).
Thursday — Log birling — all competitors welcome.
Boomstick racing — Nursing (Boo!) vs. Home Ec. (Yay!)
Friday — Boat races on SUB mall.
All faculties are invited to come out and participate and
be beaten by the Green Machine.
F.C. STUDS
VICTORIOUS FORESTRY TEAM
Chuckles I think it would be a wonderful
treat
Oh Lord, about this reincarnation    To come back as a toilet seat.
bit In this position I would truly fit
I've thought it through to the end    Cause I'd get twice the Ass
of my wit And about half as much shit.
(Contined from Page 1)
opposition of a couple of the
tougher boys in Forestry. The
'young oak tree' has aged and
meanness and crotch-rot has set
in, so stay clear! Moose has
switched from raving to a
let-actions-speak attitude.
(Anyone that crosses this Tree
will have the Dean and Rosie to
deal with.) Napper gave up goats
and plans to take out all
frustrations on th-e
soon-to-be-pitched Engineers
Hamburger Hockey. Big Thick is
training to get down to his weight
for his B16 debut in the 137-142
pound class.
A few technical innovations
guarantee at least a first place
finish in Campus Sports. The
hiker has contracted to supply
twenty pairs of elevated shoes to
the volleyball and basketball
teams. Big B figures to cut down
equipment weight by burning all
uniforms and outfitting the teams
with his latest fashion creation,
the maiden hair G-string. The
Brownie Club is even doing its bit
by running the demanding
training sessions.
Coach Cliff said they were
operating on two new training
principles: (1) if a doctor will
recommend one bottle of beer to
provide extra lift, just think what
forty ounces of grape jack will do;
and (2) the complete sex act is as
good as a five mile run. He reports
a jump in attendance thaj
necessitated the running of three
extra dosses..
In closing we would like to
offer our most sincere afbologies
to all those who inevitably will be
stomped on as Forestry rapes its
wav to the ;oo. Tuesday, September 29,  1970
THE     PLANK
Page 3
A sweet thank you
S. Garcia,
Vancouver, B.C.
Alexander Rest Home
September 29th, 1970
Dear Mr. Garcia:
I am sure the Alexander Rest Home has thanked you and the
many others who made gifts to the home through the Forest Club and
that have brought such pleasure and comfort to us residents.
However, I wish to thank you personally, because I was the
recipient of your donation, the little portable radio. The radio has
been much comfort to me; I listen to it constantly while I am awake. I
have wanted a radio of my own since I came to the Home to live.
We have nice accommodations here, and they take wonderful
care of us. There are two of us in each room. My roommate is Miss
Blanche Gentry. She is 87 and I am 83. Blanche has had a radio of her
own ever since I first came here ten years ago. She always kept it so
low that I couldn't hear the programs. Whenever I asked her to turn it
up so that I could hear, she wouldn't do it.
Bless, her, she is such a sweet soul, and I suppose she cannot
help being that way. Last weekend, she dropped her little radio, and it
broke into many little pieces and cannot be repaired. Last night I was
listening to the evening service of the Chalmers United Church with
those beautiful old hymns that I love so much. Blanche asked me to
turn up my radio so she could hear it too. Naturally, I told her to go
fzck herself.
Again, thanking you in my prayers.
Mabel Henderson
Truth about Nero
Since I was knee high to a base
drum, I've heard the wild yarn
about a fat regal sport with a
Beatle haircut named Nero who
gaily fiddled while ancient Rome
burned. I have just found out that
that's all bunkola off the old
Victrola, because at the time Nero
is supposed to have dragged his
bow over a snaggy G-string, the
violin hadn't been invented. There
was nary a fiddle, snare drum,
electric guitar or do-ah in the
whole of the Roman Empire. It
wasn't until the Middle Ages,
hundreds of years later, that
someone discovered you could
make music by dragging the tail of
a horse over the interior of a
pussy cat, and, thus the first
fiddle was fondled.
Actually Nero ran hither and
thither plucking on a zither or
some other kind of old time
kookbox during the big fire which
cooked the goose for Rome. Nero
was very hep on music and
sponsored many command
performances, meaning that his
loyal subjects were commanded to
appear at his one-man shows
whether they liked it or not. The
average subject would gladly have
made a deal whereby he would
have broken his leg if old Nero
would have broken his
instrument. When Nero fiddled no
one dared to say "Boo" or he'd
wind up as a luncheon special in
Nero's Lion House.
With his fancy hairdo,
tailor-made toga and sneaker
sandals, Nero was a hep cat. When
Rome caught fire, Nero was still
playing around. This definitely
bugged the people who had been
burned out of bed and board.
Nero's trumpet was to toot no
more. Nero was nominated as
Public Enemy Number One and
won hands down. A mob of music
haters led by Elliot Caress
marched over the rubble of what
once was Rome and stormed into
the palace where Nero sat
fingering his fiddle and fondling
his organ. "Ah dost though come
to accompany me?" asked Nero.
"We come to accompany you
alright — to your execution!"
shouted one voluptuous hooker.
Thus Nero made his last public
appearance. But somewhere an
angelic fiddle was waiting and
Nero could keep harping on . ..
L//VD£RCUT   '70
Me mudder
(Or "That's Gratitude for you")
When Me prayers were early said
Who  tucked  me  in  my widdle
bed
Who spanked me bot 'till it was
red?
Me Mudder.
Who lifted me from me cozy cot
And set me on the ice-cold pot?
Who made me wee if I could not?
Me Mudder.
And when the morning light had
come,
And in Me bed I'd dribble some,
Who wiped me tiny widdle rum —
P.
Me Mudder.
And when I reached the age of
four,
And kissed  the  little  girl  next
door,
Who stopped me when I wanted
more?
Me Mudder.
And when I grew to man's estate,
And with a cute blond made a
date,
Who tried to break it up too late?
Me Mudder.
And when I have wed my Nell,
Who came to live with us as well?
Who makes our life a living hell?
Yeah, you're right...
A.H.O.T.Y. 70
A dumb girl is a dope. A dope
is a drug. Doctors give drugs to
relieve pain. Therefore a dumb girl
is just what the doctor ordered.
While at spring camp this year,
in training for the game "Hide
from the prof Killer Kowalsky of
the Loyal Order of the Browns,
disguised himself as a tree trunk.
He made a sudden move which
was noticed by Les Laitewaite
who was sitting up in a tree. "You
fool," cried Les, "D2 is sure to
find us now. Why can't you keep
quiet?" Cliff replied, "I stood still
when a flock of pigeons used me
for target practice and I never
moved when JVT's dog peed on
my lower branches but when two
squirrels ran up my pants and
heard the bigger one say, "Let's
eat one now and save the other til
winter - I had to get the hell
out!!!".
• •"•
ODE TO A ROBIN
As I woke this morn,
When all sweet things are born,
A robin perched upon my sill,
To signal the coming of the morn.
The bird was fragile, young and
gay,
And sweetly did it sing,
The thought of happiness, or joy,
Into my heart did bring.
I smiled softly at the song,
Then as it paused, a lull,
I gently closed the window,
And crushed its fzcking skull.
FOREST CLUB PRESENTS
UNDERCUT
DRESS - HARD-TIMES
BAND - HANK & THE HOBOS
TICKETS - $3.50/ COUPLE
Full Facilities  SUB CAFETERIA
FRIDAY, OCT. 2
9:00P.M.-1:00 AM. Page 4
THE     PLANK
Tuesday, September 29, 1970
VIET NAM
m
y
Love it or leave it
UNDERCUT HASSLED
H
In obtaining a liquor
licence for UNDERCUT
70, the Forest Club ran
into a legal entanglement.
Technically, no B.Y.O.B.
functions are allowed on
University premises. Some
events go around this law by
observing the "keep it under
the table" principle. In an
open function as large as
Undercut (500 couples),
this is not feasible as a few
people are bound to get
"noisy" and confront the
rule. Incidentally, the
Forest Club, by policy, also
tries to stay within the law.
Consequently, arrangements
were made to arrange a bar
set-up.
When attempting to
advertise the bar, thereby
saving patrons the cost of a
bottle which they cannot
consume at Undercut, the
Forest Club   ran  into  the
legal dilemma once more. It
seems that University policy
also prohibits liquor
advertising of any sort. All
attempts to employ legal
angles to overcome this
problem (i.e. printing "Full
Adult Facilities" on tickets
and posters) were vetoed as
illegal for several groups
were being hassled for
previously using these
techniques.
It appears that there is
no possible way of
informing the public about
liquor facilities, except by
word of mouth. What kind
of laws are these?
Ed. note: When buying
UNDERCUT '70 tickets,
please ask about liquor
facilities. If this is also
illegal, I refuse to believe
any of this bunk about
Freedom of Speech.
GOD HELPS TREES
I think that I shall never see
A  sight  more  sickening than a
tree,
A  tree   that takes up so much
space
Where   cheese-box  homes   could
stand in place,
A tree that looks at God all day
While God is the N.H.A.,
A tree that houses only birds
On land I'd like for human herds,
Upon whose trunk my men cause
pain
With   great   bulldozer  and  with
crane,
Homes are built by swine like me
And e'er I'm through God help
the tree.
Soybeans, when cooked,
provide all nutrient the human
body needs for life except one, an
amino acid which is found in rice.
1 In 1969, the F.U.S. consumed
;"    8 quarts of Grape Jack, 38 cases
_»    of beer, and 13 26'ers per man . ..
Woods at war,
Gyppos unite
Gyppo is a rare variety of the
human species. Many years ago,
however, this was not the case,
when Gyppo could be found
throughout British Columbia,
more specifically in the
transitional zones between
standing forests and cut over
areas. Gyppo is a nomadia
creature, following the retreating
forests. Gyppo is a creature of
destruction.
In the early part of this
century many small colonies of
Gyppo could be found doing their
thing. The ideals of Gyppo are
clearly defined — clear-cut the
forest and get out. As previously
mentioned, Gyppo is now quite
rare. This decline in numbers is
due to a few of the character
traits of Gyppo. Homo Sapiens
var. Gyppo carries out his
activities, namely logging, on a
budget consisting of a shoestring,
usually broken and knotted many
times. Several individuals of var.
Gyppo have been known to exist
without such a shoestring. This
state of affairs makes it quite easy
for several individuals of var.
Gyppo to band together and unite'
shoelaces, dominate other
individuals of Gyppo and act as
one member of Homo Sapiens var.
Gyppo. This trend has continued
over the last few decades and at
this date the numbers of var.
Gyppo are quite small indeed.
This variety of Homo Sapiens is
on the brink of extinction. The
threat of the extinction of Gyppo
really should not bother us when
one considers the damage to the
forest crop, for which Gyppo is
responsible, in years past. One
may say that the loss of Gyppo
will be a blessing for the few
remaining forest stands. Two may
even say that!
It seems that another variety of
Homo Sapiens is appearing to fill
the space left by var. Gyppo —
var. Big Company. Although var.
Big Company is a grouping (is that
the way to spell it, Randy?) of
many individuals of var. Gyppo
the singular is commonly used.
With the dominance of var.
Gyppo by var. Big Company we
no longer have to stand for the
wholesale rape of the forest by
var. Gyppo There is, however, one
problem encountered. In British
Columbia there are about one-half
dozen (ie. 6, ie. half-sack, ie.
$1.31) of var. Big Company, each
consisting of many individuals of
var. Gyppo. The ideals of Gyppo
(as outlined in paragraph 2, for
the benefit of those who cannot
follow this intellectual discussion)
are still in practice — not on the
small scale as in the beginning, but
now on a large scale with many
thousands of acres of forest land
cut and burned each year.
There is no need to despair,
though — Homo Sapiens var. Big
Company does not get out right
after clear-cutting and burning; he
must first plant one seedling for
every tree he cut down.
Think abput it.
"NOW JUST HOLD ON THERE, Garcia - This isn't what we
meant by loggers' sports ..." . "
UNDERCUT TICKETS
On sale at—all Forestry Functions
—booth in SUB
12:30-1:30 all this week
—Forestry Draggin' Waggin'
(Omar—the Green Machine)
—Any true Forester
Ed Note—only 200 left as of printing date, so get yours now and
have a hell of a good time. Tuesday, September 29,  1970
AMS
Budget
70 -'71
... here's how
the AMS
proposes
to spend
student
dollars
THE      UBYSSEY
STATEMENT OF ESTIMATED NET REVENUE
AND PROPOSED EXPENDITURE
YEAR ENDING MAY 31. 1971
(with comparative figures for 1970)
Proposed Allocation      Allocation Actual
 1971  1970 1970
Revenue
Alma Mater Society Fees $444,000          $448,000 $466,318
Undergrad Society Fee Levies         11,779                 7,515 9,002
Interest Income           8,000                 3,800 10,838
Sundry Income                  —                        — 402
Total Revenue    $463,779          $459,315 $4761560
Allocation of Fees Collected
Non Discretionary (Schedule 41    	
Student Union Building                           $277,500          $273,750 281,010
Accident Benefit Fund           1,850                 1,825 1,873
B.C.U.S               -                 3,650 3,626
S.U.B. Art Fund           1,500                 1,500 1,500
S.U.B. Management Fund        9.250                  9,125 9,367
Undergrad Society Fee Levies          11,779 7,51 5 9,002
$301^879          $297,365 3061577
Distretionary
Students'Associations (Sched. 11  ....       6,000                 8,355 6,187
B.C.U.S. (Note 1)   	
Intramural Fund        7,000                 7,500 7,800
Open House 1973        1,000
Radio Society (Note 2)                   -                    200 1,300
W.U.S.C. (Note 3)      - 600 600
14,000 16,655 15,887
Expenditure ~~~
Campus Activities & Events (Sched. 2)    .     26,065               30,425 43,540
Publications (Schedule 2)   31,100               22,100 23,588
Registration Photographs     '    5,250                 5,450 5,254
University Clubs Committee          4,000                 4,300 5,142
Admin. & Gen. Expense (Sched. 3)   ....     59,285               59,550. 60,359
Student Union Building  - -     15,859
$125,700          $122.325 $153:742
Total Allocation & Expenditure     .$441,579              436,345 $476,006
Margin    $ 22,200          $  22,970 $       554
$463,779           $459,315 $476,560
Schedule 1
STATEMENT OF PROPOSED DISCRETIONARY ALLOCATIONS
YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1971
(with comparative figures for 1970)
Students' Associations and Proposed Budget   Allocation   Actual        Balance
Undergraduate Societies: 1971 1970 1970    May 31, 1970
Agriculture     150 245 245              (645)
Architecture (Note 4)     50 50 (170)
Arts      750 750 750                   51
Commerce      - - -                 888
Dentistry (Note 4)      - 150 150                 315
Education     650 450 550              (790)
Engineering  — - —             2,212
Forestry     - 30 30              1,275
Grad. Students'Assn. (Note 4) . . - 85 85             2,514
Home Economics     — 150 150                 469
Law Students Assn  . — — —                   49
Librarianship (Note 4)      - 100 100                   57
Medical (Note 4)  - 40 40              (703)
Music (Note 41      - 155 155                   99
Nursing    - 15 50                 549
Pharmacy     - " - 43                 493
Physical Education     - 195 195                 748
Rehabilitation Medicine     — 90 90                   52
Science     500 500 500           (.1,621)
Social Work Students Ass'n .... 225 — -               (135)
Undergrad Societies Comm  — — —              5 671
Mai-Sir,      825 860                 850	
$3,100 $3,855           $4,033         $11,378
Subsidiary Publications:
Anti-Calendars      1,500 1,500 525                    -
Special Editions  900 1,500 944
Sundry Others      500 1.500 685 (6.727)
$6,006 $8,355           $6,187 '$4,fel
Undergraduate Society Fee Levias:                 ~~
Agriculture     630
Dentistry      2,700
Engineering  1,429
Forestry     800
Home Economics     506
Law Students Assn  1,644
Medical     2,215
Nursing     441
Pharmacy     880
Rehabilitation Medicine      534
$ 11,779
Schedule 2
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS PUBLICATIONS
YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1971
(with comparative figures for 1970)
Page 7
Proposed Budget
1971
Budget
1970
Actual
1970
Campus Activities & Events
'c>-Abortion Liberalization Programme
aJ-Academic Activities   	
sl-C.U.S.O	
cl-C.I.R.A.P	
c)-Community Visitations    	
f)-Conferences    	
s)-Cultural Programmes   	
al-De-Canadianization Research   	
c)-Educational Accessibility   	
!c)-External Affairs   	
!a)-Frosh Orientation    	
!c)-High School Visitation   	
a)-Human Relations & Sex Ed	
!s)-Information Centre    	
!a)-Lecture Series C.I.R.A.P     	
icJ-Open House 1970    	
!al-Orientation 1970   	
!f)-Performing Arts   	
!c)-Post Secondary Ed. Planning   	
' Seakers Committee    	
f)-Special Events    	
c)-Special Projects   	
[s)-Student Information Service    	
c)-Student Loan Fund
Feasibility Study    	
f)-Subsidiery Symposia    	
[a)-Tenure Investigation    	
Ic)-Trek Week   	
1,200
3,735
6,000
1.000
160
95
1,300
1,000
1,150
1,400
50
2,765
4,000
2,000
100
60
1,200
1,000
500
1,000
500
2,000
4,100
2,025
9,300
$26,065
(a)-academics; (c)-community; (f)-finance; (s)-services
Publications:
Start   	
Student Directory   	
Sundry Publications    	
Tuum Est    	
Ubyssey (Note 5)    	
1,500
$3o!4«
417
637
12,264
299
1,304
2,088
9,110
3,766
11,864
431
152
1,208
$43:540
1,600
(1,400)
1,400
500
29,000
SSllToo
(2,000)
700
1,900
21,500
$22!100
11,152)
1,494
2,233
21,013
$23;S88
STATEMENT OF PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE AND GENERAL EXPENSES
YEAR ENDING MAY 31. 1971
(with comparative figures for 1970) Schedule 3
Students Association                                   Proposed              Budget Actual
Undergraduate Society Fee Levies:              ^97^                    1970 1971
Office Salaries    $36,310             $33,500 $35,827
Student Government Expenses   	
Executive Salaries        6,850                 5,575 5,859
Dinner Meetings              150                    600 962
Entertainment            1,000                    500 785
Travel              500                    450 858
Elections & Gen. Meetingss            2,000                 1,950 2,498
Council Committees           800                    800 880
Other Expenses            2,000                 2,000 2,634
,   Miscellaneous Salaries .              —                2,500 1,333
Stationery & Office Expenses           2,000                 1,000 353
Honoraria, Gifts & Donations           2,500                 2,900 2,686
Insurance               75                         75 75
Telephone & Telegraph           1,000                 3,000 451
Postage               750                    750 352
Audit & Legal           2,000                 2,000 2,500
Machine Maintenance               500                    450 564
Public Relations      850 1,500 1,742
$59,285             $59'650 6u?i59~
COMPUTATION OF NON-DISCRETIONARY ALLOCATIONS
Student Union Building $15.00 per year $277,500
Accident Benefit Fund     $00.10 per year 1,850
S.U.B. Art Fund     Fixed at $1,500 per year 15.00
S.U.S. Management Fund     $.50 per year 9,250
Undergrad Society Fee Levies    Calculated at
last years Enrolment 11,779
$301 879
Note 1—B.C.U.S.—No grant at this time. 	
Note 2—Radio Society—No grant required.
Note 3-W.U.S.C-No grant this year.
Note 4—No budget requests submitted.
Note 5—$7,500 increase due to printing costs increase.
i
BLEED FOR LIFE
BE A BLOOD DONOR
CAMPUS BLOOD DONOR CLINIC
SUB 111
TODAY THRU FRIDAY
»
Give The Gift of Life
Free Coke & Refreshments
THE ORIGINAL
MANDRAKE
THE MAGICIAN
And His Nightclub Show
<+*+++++**+++++»*++**++++** f—+m*0f*+*»++*+*++» w»*i>'
1
TOTEM PARK
TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
8 P.M.
RES. 50c
NON-RES. 75c
::
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< >
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HQURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave.
- Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
■ Just outside the Gates
PEOPLE
I
An Experience in Human Relations
and Human Sexuality
I
The Directors of "PEOPLE - An Experience in Human
Relations and Human Sexuality" (formerly Sex-Education)
require seventy seminar leaders. Commitment involves the
applicants' participation in a course on group leadership and the
dynamics of group interaction. The first meeting is scheduled for
12:30 Wednesday, September 30th, in Room 125 SUB. (N.E.
corner of cafeteria). For further information:
Office of Interprofessional
Education, Tel.: 228-3081,
Wesbrook Bldg., Office No. 301
or
Sean McHugh
Rob Newmarch
Jim White
Roz Cowley
732-7934
266-4346
261-1076
872-1933
CLUBS DAY
1970
S.U.B.
SEPT. 30 & OCT. 1
All Day Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29,  1970
Security plan for meeting
Isn't necessary'says Hodge
By ROBIN BURGESS
A plan devised to ensure that
only Alma Mater Society
members vote at today's general
meeting has been rejected.
Friday,- AMS activities
co-ordinator, Hanson Lau
proposed to AMS president Tony
Hodge that members of the Arts
Undergraduate Society be asked
to form a human barrier around
the SUB plaza during today's
general meeting.
Non-students could speak but
only card-carrying members of
the AMS would be allowed inside
the barrier and therefore to vote,
explained Lau.
The idea of such a plan, he
said, was to allay the fears of the
conservative students who are
concerned non-students from
Jericho Hostel will pack the
meeting and affect the vote.
"You've got to understand
these students' point of view.
I've had students come to me and
Budget open to ideas
From page One
money left over from previous
years to cover their budget needs.
Topping the list in undergrad
allocations is the arts faculty
which is slated to get $750 from
the AMS. It is followed by
education with $650 and Science
with $500 Bruce said the reason
for these allocations is that the
largest faculties generally have
difficulty in generating their own
funds -- sizes and problems or
organization have traditionally
gone hand in hand.
This is in marked contrast to
faculties like commerce,
engineering and forestry whose
high level or organization has
made them comparatively
self-sufficient.
The budget also earmarks
$1,500 for work on a
campus-wide course evaluation
program, which will presumably
end with the publication of a UBC
anti-calendar.
Under allocations for the
internal use of the AMS is an
increase of about $1,000 in
executive salaries.
Bruce and president Tony
Hodge receive salaries for full-time
AMS work over the past summer,
in linwith the AMS tradition of
paying the treasurer and president
to stick around and run the show
over the summer.
Internal affairs officer Sue
Kennedy, Lau, acting
vice-president Christine Krawczyk
and Zaozirny will also recieve
salaries for one month of summer
work.
This budget is a set of
proosals, not yet sanctioned by
student council vote. Students are
now expected to let the AMS
know if they have gripes or
suggestions on this year's
financing.
say 'why the hell should I go to a
general meeting when
non-students will be voting
anyway?'."
After consultation with
vice-president-elect Christine
Krawczyk, Hodge vetoed the
proposal.
"It's not necessary," he said.
"Maybe the Jericho people can
get 100 or so of their own out to
vote. But what of it? Why should
that matter to us?"
The decision is out of his
hands. It's Hodge's responsibility
now, said Lau.
"If he wants to take the
responsibility that's fine," he said.
SKI
Instructors' Training Course
at
GARIBALDI'S WHISTLER MTN.
Sats. and/or Sundays    Oct. 10th — Nov. 15th
Any parallel skier can join - Instructors jobs available
for information phone:
JIM McCONKEY, General Del., Alta Lake B.C.
932-5422 or 926-1034
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and  Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare  or  Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
tr At it!
EAT IN •TAKEOUT' DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. &Sat. 3 a.m.
COMING NEXT WEEK
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
CHESTER-ANGUS RAAASGOOD
A Van. Made 16mm Color Feature
RUSH TICKETS SUB AUDITORIUM
Oct. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 (12:30, 3:30)        Oct 6, 7, 8 (7:30, 9)
We Respect
Their Right to Live
DOES THE UNIVERSITY HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY?
The university clearly has a responsibility to the
community! Is the university responsible for
providing shelter to people who need it?
ORDINARILY NOT but others have not
stepped forward. In this situation, the university
and in particular we through the AMS can help
and we should. This is reason enough.
CAPABILITY IN THIS INSTANCE DEMANDS
RESPONSIBILITY!
WHO ARE THEY?
People-moving across the country, looking for a
home, looking for a job, looking for meaning.
"But there are jobs". Is that really true?
Unemployment in B.C. as of Aug. 22 was over
7% of the labor force. Further, the Jericho
youth come from an educational system that has
left them without skills. They live in a country
where the government policy is more concerned
with inflation than dealing with unemployment.
Thus they have become a political football, used
by many groups. It is hard to hold your life
together in this situation.
WHAT    DO    PEOPLE    HAVE    TO    DO    IN
ORDER TO BE ALLOWED TO LIVE?
We Are Convinced That We Can Provide
Our Collective Help In This Situation.
ARE WE LETTING THE FEDERAL GOV'T. COP-OUT?
If we do nothing but provide shelter, yes. If they
are put out of Jericho and have no place to go,
they will disappear from public concern, and in
dispersing will lose a chance of helping
themselves. Do we really think the govt, is going
to act just because they are out on the street
when it hasn't acted in the rest of the country?
If they can stay together and we work with
them, we together can influence the govt, to
provide food and shelter for every human being
in need in Canada.
OFFERING SUB IS A BEGINNING.
IS SUB A SUITABLE PLACE?
It was not designed to house people, it is true.
But it is all we can offer. It is a last resort. We
can offer it, try to make the conditions human,
and search for a long-range solution. We can
share and it is important that we make a strong
and concrete stand in favor of the Jericho
youth.
PEOPLE NEED PEOPLE SUPPORT.
Support The Offer Of SUB To The Jericho Youth
sponsored by the U.B.C. anglican-united campus ministry.
C. P. Anderson
V. Embree
D. Robinson
W. Crockett
P. Fribley
P. Delsey
C. Johnson
D. Blakely
M. Shields
R. M. Clarke
S. Faser
C. Shoemaker
B. Campbell
D. Hayward
W. Dyer
V. Ohedkoff
J. Bentley
C. Palmer
M. Clark
M. J. Faser
B. Shields
G. Campbell
G. Hermanson
P. Dyer
D. Patterson
H. Dempster Tuesday, September 29,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
LET IT BLEED at the Red Cross blood drive continuing 'til
Friday. Monday saw 400 UBC students exchange their precious
bodily fluids for refreshments and a clear conscience. The drive
aims at getting 300 pints per day on the campus to supply the
needs of Canadian hospitals which give blood free to patients.
Bleeding takes place in SUB room 111 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.
'Deadly force' at Kent
WASHINGTON (CUP) - The
shootings of six students at Kent
State University in Ohio and
Jackson State College in
Mississippi by law enforcement
authorities last May were
"completely unjustified", two
members of the U.S. president's
commission on campus unrest say.
James Ahem, 38, police chief
of New Haven, Conn., and Joseph
Rhodes Jr., 22, a Harvard student,
were interviewed Sunday.
The commission conducted
investigations into the four
deaths at Kent State and the two
at Jackson State.
The findings were "a
remarkable, incredible lack of
concern for the human life of
black people" among the police in
Jackson, Rhodes said.
Testimony concerning the
shootings by National Guard
troops at Kent State was
contradictory, he said, but "we
found that in both cases the use
of the deadly force that was used
was completely unjustified."
The commission will make
public its full report later this
week.
The BOOKFINDER
NEW & USED
TEXT BOOKS
STUDY GUIDES
We also sell text books
on consignment
4444 W 10th
2 blks from gate - 228-8933
CHARBROILED STEAKS
Oysters — Shrimps
Mike Burgers — Chopped Beef
STUDENT'S SPECIAL
LUNCHEON STEAK
SANDWICH
BAKED POTATO - SALAD
Between 11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
with Presentation of Student Card
4489 W. 10th at Sasamat
Ubyssey classroom report
This is the first in this year's
Ubyssey classroom reporting
series. It's purpose it to open up
the classroom at UBC. If you have
a class you think deserves
coverage — for whatever reason -
leave a note in the classroom
reporting box in The Ubyssey
office in SUB. Or write something
yourself and leave it with us.
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Although many medieval
concepts were subsequently
attacked by Renaissance and
Reformation thinkers, students
should not be fooled into
accepting a simplistic analysis of
medieval man.
Don't fall into the trap of
thinking that later groups were
necessarily more intelligent and
skilled than men of the 12th
century, assistant history
professor Christopher Stocker
warned History 109 students
Monday in Buchanan 106.
Stocker, who teaches a course
labelled Europe in Transition,
went on to chart the rise of
science, reason and logic in the
12th century.
He said the difference between
medieval thinking and that of
later periods reflects merely the
change in views of different
historical periods, and. not
necessarily that later thinkers
were more intelligent.
Stocker was lecturing to a class
of approximately 100 students.
The students did not ask any
questions during class time, and
Stocker did not pause to ask for
questions.
Stocker dealt with the rise of
logic as "an intellectual
instrument" but said this
phenonemon didn't just occur —
it was actively sought by 12th
century man as he went beyond
trying to preserve inherited
knowledge and moved into
evaluation of this knowledge.
Stocker cited attempts at
introducing uniformity to church
law and doctrine.
He also said that "to 12th
century man, science — that is to
say reason — meant one person:
Aristotle."
Stocker proceeded to deal with
Gothic art and architecture as
offering a high-medieval view of
reality.
During the last few minutes of
class, he showed slides of Chartres
cathedral in France to illustrate
some of his points.
With their usual politeness,
students began to pack up their
books before class time had run
out, and while Stocker was still
speaking.
For the greater part of the
lecture, Stocker spoke on the
basis of a written outline of notes,
but his comments on the Chartres
slides showed he is a good speaker
without any aids.
He spoke clearly and was
well-organized,       though      his
SKI INSTRUCTORS
Training & Employment
Phone GROUSE MTN.
985-0478
monologue was sometimes tinged
with academic pomposity.
"I haven't figured out what
he's talking about, but he's as
good as anyone out here," one
student commented.
Most students seemed to have
little trouble catching Stacker's
meaning, but the student who
indicated he was in the dark could
have meant that Stacker's
explanations and vocabulary are
sometimes overly complex.
This is clearly a class which has
fallen prey to the sleep-inducing
lecture format, but this probably
is as much the fault of the silent
students as Stocker.
Classes take place Monday and
Thursday at 10:30 in Buchanan
106.	
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Several sienna blorgs were
observed recently erecting
elaborate pavilions in the great
hall of the royal palace. Rumor
has it that this is in preparation
for a great celebration to be
known as Klumps Day
commemorating four brave
grimph blorgs who will attempt to
make an impression in the city by
jumping out of mystic mechanical
birds.
ENGLISH 100
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
Now, we also have Delivery Service
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
COME
TO
PASTOR-
REV. R.J. GRAHAM
Phone
224-1031
DUNBAR HEIGHTS
BAPTIST CHURCH
17th AVENUE AND CROWN
WE HAVE A TOTAL PROGRAM
SUNDAY    9:45 a.m.-Campus & Career Group
11:00 a.m.—Morning Service
7:00 p.m.—Evening Service
8:30 p.m.-T.N.T. (Come and See)
OUR SPECIALITY-PEOPLE
a SUB FILM SOC PRESENTATION
CASTLE KEEP
with Burt Lancaster
Friday 2 & Saturday 3 - 7:00 & 9:00 - Sunday 4-7:00
Students 50c — Others 75c — SUB Auditorium Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29,  1970
AMS
TODAY 12:30
SUB PLAZA
AGENDA
1. Amchitka
or to sit
upon an atom bomb
2. Pit
or to smash one's
head against a brick wa
3. Youth Hostel in SUB —
or? SPOR TS
Birds consistent
lose their third
rage iI
The UBC football Thunderbirds captured sole possession of
last place in the Western Canada
Intercollegiate Conference with a
21-0 loss to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies.
Once again the Birds killed
themselves with their own
mistakes. They allowed two
blocked punts to be returned for
touchdowns, one for 45 yards and
the other for 51 yards. They were
also penalized nine times for 70
yards.
As usual, UBC stuck to their
rushing attack. They gained 162
yards along the ground, with Dave
Corcoran carrying 15 times for 80
yards. Al Larsen, who was forced
into action because of injuries to
Gord Diewert and Chris Balzer,
went all the way for the Birds at
quarterback. He completed only
four of 14 passes for 65 yards,
with one intercepted.
But the offence should not be
entirely blamed for the shutout. A
poor kicking game and a leaky
defence continually gave the Birds
poor field position.
Saskatchewan was held to only
eight yards passing, but rambled
for 229 yards along the ground.
They were led by fullback Archie
Thomson who gained 115 yards
on 21 carriers and halfback Barrie
Radcliffe, who rolled up 112 on
seven carries — one a 63 yarder.
This Thursday, the Birds will
play a noon hour game against the
University of Manitoba, last year's
Canadian intercollegiate
champions. Game time is 1 p.m.
Manitoba will be led by the
conference's top quarterback, Bob
Kraemer. His passing will be
complemented by a good running
attack, led by their quick
scatback, Henry Lodewyks.
Because of their outside speed,
Winnipeg will probably run a lot
of sweeps.
On the other hand, UBC coach
Frank Gnup is thinking of
scrapping his I-formation in an
effort to get his backs outside
where they can find some running
room. Hopefully, they'll be able
to establish some sort of a passing
attack so that their running game
will be more effective.
One bright note occurred on
the weekend when the UBC
Jayvees murdered the B.C.
Chargers 39-14.
In that one, SalGiamcommoni
scored three touchdowns for UBC
- one an 85 yard kickoff return -
IF YOU WOULD LIKE to sit in on a non-protest rally, then the annual UBC sports car club rally is for
you. The entries are limited to 125 cars and all applications must be in October 22. The rally will be run    *
entirely in the Fraser Valley starting at the Brentwood shopping centre. For application forms go to the
sports car club room downstairs in the south-west corner of SUB.
and quarterback Glen Hara passed
for two touchdowns.
FOOTNOTES: The spirited
UBC Engineers will provide the
half-time entertainment at
Thursday's ' game. They've got
something; special planned but
they're not saying what it is . . .
Coach Frank Gnup hasn't been
very pleased with the performance
of some of his veterans. They'd
better start producing if they have
any thoughts of beating Manitoba
. . . JavVee quarterback Glen Hara
may be moved up the varsity
because of the injury situation.
Women's
Athletics
Basketball - Thunderette
practices only. Monday nine
o'clock, new gym; Tuesday
five-thirty, new gym; Thursday,
four-thirty, Memorial Gym.
Tennis — Monday five o'clock,
Wednesday nine p.m. All practices
will be held at the Armouries.
Swimming — Empire pool.
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at four-twenty.
Intramurals — Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday from
four-thirty to six-thiry.
Volleyball — Monday, six-thirty at
new gym A; Wednesday,
four-thirty at new gym B.
Intramurals
One member or representative from
each cycle drag team is to report to
room 211 War Memorial Gym on Sept.
30 for a briefing, before the race on
Oct. 1.
Swim Meet qualifying heats are on
Sept. 28th and 29th at Empire Pool. The
finals are on Oct. 1, 12:30 to 2:30.
Curling and Soccer preliminary
schedules are to be posted Tues. 12:30.
Football schedule starts Wednesday,
Sept. 29th. Please check.
PRE SEASON SKI SALE
TO CELEBRATE
Grand Opening of Ivor Williams Sporting Goods
New "SKI DEN"
SALE LASTS 3 DAYS ONLY OCT 1-2-3.
HEAD KILLEY800
HEAD 260
HEAD 720
HEAD 320
ROSIGNOL STRATO
Reg. $215.00
Reg. $155.00
Reg. $195.00
Reg. $170.00
Reg. $159.00
ROSIGNOL CONCORD     Reg. $130.00
Now $160.00
Now $129.00
Now $155.00
Now $135.00
Now $135.00
Now $100.00
JACKETS 50% off
SKI PANTS 50% off
LOTS OF POLES Reg. $6.95 Now $4.95
THERMAL Socks Reg. $3.50 Now $2.50
SKI SET SPECIAL!
Fisher Wood Skis,
Kofix Base-Tyrolia 1-2-3 Harness
Pistol Grip Poles Complete $64.95
150 PAIRS OF HUMANIC BUCKLE BOOTS AT BELOW DEALERS COST!
Example-HUMANIC Competition Reg. $140.00, Now $85.00 - HUMANIC Ladies Reg. $100.00, Now $65.00 - HUMANIC Men's Reg. $85,
Now $55.00
SPECIAL—Any person who purchases a pair of skis which retails over $100.00 will get $20.00 deducted from any harness of his choice — included in this offer are 1971
models of Heads — Rossignols and Fisher skis.
See you Thurs.
sat at   IVOR WILLIAMS
Sporting Goods
SKI DEN
2120 - W 41st Ave. - 261-6011
Open Daily 9-6 Thurs. & Fri. 9-9 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 29,  1970
Quebec GM refuses French: (JAW asks intervention
MONTREAL (CUP) - The
number one company in
automobile manufacturing,
General Motors, is causing
headaches for the Quebec
government.
GM has refused to accept in its
collective agreement with the
workers that French should
effectively be the working
language of its 2,300 Quebecois
employees in Ste. Therese, Que.
The United Auto Workers, an
affiliate of the Quebec federation
of labour, have recently
demanded that Robert Bourassa,
Liberal Quebec premier, intervene
promptly in the dispute by going
over and "sweet-talking" his
friends in GM.
The union also asked the
government to take legislative
action so that other workers in
Quebec would not be pressured
into striking to win their case on
the question of French as the
working language in Quebec.
Negotiations at Ste. Therese
have not shown any important
progress since the strike began a
week ago.
According to Maurice Vassart,
TUESDAY
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP   SOCIETY
General meeting in Buch. 216 at noon.
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
w        Important   meeting   in   SUB   207    at
noon.
CROSS   COUNTRY   TEAM
Newcomers welcome to meeting in
Memorial Gym at noon in room 216.
CANOE CLUB
MeeUng and slide show at noon in
SUB  125.
PRE-MED.   SOCIETY
Meeting in  Wesbrook 201  at  12:30.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Ian and Sylvia and Great Speckled
Bird in SUB Ballroom at 7:00 and 9:30
p.m. $1.75 and $2.50 at the door. $3.00
for non-AMS. Advance ticket discounts
until 5:00 p.m.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
General meeting at noon in SUB 211
or 213.
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
ATHLETIC-BADMINTON   TEAM
Men's try-outs in gym "B" at 7:30 p.m.
Next to the ice rink.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Visit the display in the south alcove
of SUB on Wed. and Thurs.
T-BIRD  MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting in  SUB   105A  at noon.
WEST   SIDE   STORY
Auditions  from  Sept.   30  to  Oct.   2.
Sign up in SUB 210.
SIMS
Introductory   talk   on   Transcendental
meditation in Buch. 104 at noon.
NON-FACULTY  TEACHERS'  ASSOC.
Very important meeting for all non-
fac. teachers in Buch. 202 at noon.
EAST   ASIA   SOCIETY
Movies on traditional Japan in Buch.
100 at noon.
COMMERCE   SEMINAR   COMMITTEE
Three speakers in panel discussion on
business ethics in Ang. 212. All
welcome.
UBC  ROWING CLUB
Introductory meeting for those interested in joining the team in
Memorial Gym room 211 at noon.
PLACE   VANIER  CULTURAL  COUNCIL
Discussion on New Arts One with Dr.
Malcolm McGregor and Dr. Walter
Young in the Place Vanier Commons
Lounge at  8:30.
FRIDAY
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK CLUB
All interested in joining the club
welcome to meeting in SUB 105B at
noon.
E.I.C.
Guest speaker: Roy Haynes, Secretary,
B.C. Federation of Labour in Civil
Bldg. 201.
PHRATERES
All-Phi and Pledge sign-up in Buch.
104 at noon.
JUDO CLUB
General meeting in SUB 213 at noon.
SQUASH CLUB
All interested people can turn up at
practices in the courts at the Winter
Sports Centre. Players can phone
Karel  Kuun  at  929-3286.
FILM SOC.
Burt  Lancaster  in  "Castle   Keep"  in
SUB theatre.  Fri.  and Sat. at 7 and
9:30; and Sun. at 7:00.
FLYING CLUB
General meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
UBC KARATE CLUB
Meeting on Oct. 5 in SUB Ballroom
at 7 p.m.  New members welcome.
EL  CIRCULO
Orientation   meeting   and   flim  in  International 402 at noon on Oct. 5.
MYSTERIOUS MEETING
Tuesday in front of Sedgewick on the
grass. Everyone invited.
Fine Arts 125
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
Chem  110
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
V
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
Hear  Ye!   Hear  Ye!
[The  Alma  Mater  Society  of  the
[University of British Columbia is pleased to announce openings
on the following committees: .ELIGIBILITY COMMITTEE .. .
[responsible for reviewing election nominees, and possessing the
power to rule them ineligible for election if their qualifications do
not meet AMS standards. .. FINANCE COMMITTEE .. . making
financial decisions with regard to conferences, supplementary
grants, and providing financial advice wherever it is needed on the
t UBC campus.
Nominations for the above positions close Friday, October
2, 1970. Please icontactt AMS Secretary Anne Clarkson, SUB 258,
228-3967.
Come one! Come all!
Have a say in YOUR university!
leader of the Quebec UAW, there
are still two problems to be dealt
with:
"The company has refused to
allow grievances presented during
the   duration   of  the   collective
bargaining to be submitted to a
French-speaking arbitration
board.
"GM has refused to allow the
contract to recognize French as
the working language in Ste.
Therese."
The union says discrimination
works against unilingual French
workers for whom certain jobs are
inaccessible, while the company
itself names unilingual English as
foremen.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club-3 Lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial-3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
SAY HELLO TO THE GREAT
Speckled Bird and Ian and Sylvia
at 7:00 and 9:30 tonight in Ballroom. J1.75 Advance. $2.50 at the
Door.
ANNETTE: TOO LONG SINCE
the garden. Will you come at
noon? This place is big.  Bob.
13
Lost 8e Found	
LOST — UNIVERSITY OF B. C.
ring in Education Building. Blue
stone. Reward, 261-1230.	
MISPLACED ANATOMY TEXT IN
gym. At 1:30 the 25th. Phone Bill,
874-4362—Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
HAVE YOU EVER DRIVEN A
piano? Experienced gentle driver
needed to take small van to Toronto October 6 — Expenses paid.
Contact Burke Taylor,  687-4201.
HAVE ROOM FOR 2 MORE PASS,
from Kerr, to UBC. For 8:30
classes. Leave 3:30 except Thurs.
Phone   Sue,   261-8476.
Special Notices
15
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. WE ARE
open 6 days a week, located 2
blocks east of Memorial Gym.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS
B.C.'s largest selection from THE
GRIN BIN, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311. Personal Photo Blowups, Black
Lights, Gifts, Jokes, Post Office
(Opposite Liquor Store & Super
Valu). Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through   Friday,   Sat.   till   7   p.m.
JOIN A BAND!!! SENIOR BAND
has openings for interested players. Meets Sun. 1-3 p.m., Mar-
pole Centre. For more info., phone
Mary,   738-0063
CLUBS'   DAY?   COME   TO   S. IJ. B.
Sept.  30/Oct. 1 and find out.
TRANSCEND THE BULL! DO
something concrete for peace. ESPERANTO,   Box  32,   S.U.B.
MAKE IT MUSIC. JOIN THE
Music Resource Group. Union College, Thursday, Oct. 1st. 4:30.
Director Len Lythgoe. Sing Play
Learn.
IAN AND SYLVIA AND GREAT
Speckled Bird. Tonight 7:00 and
9:30   in   Ballroom.    $1.75   Advance.
$2.50 at the Door.	
DO YOU BELTEVE IN MAGIC?
SEE  FOR  YOURSELF
TOTEM PARK TONTGHT 8 PM
RUMMAGE SALE — LORD BYNG
High School, 16th & Crown. Oct.
1 & 2, 7 till 9:30 p.m. Furniture,
clothing,  etc.  Auction  every night.
HTTCH-HTKER   KINDLY  THANKS
person who returned handbag left
in their van Saturday, Sept. 19,
1970.
THIS WEEKEND, A GOOD FILM
in a good theatre "Castle Keep"
with Burt Lancaster Fri. & Sat.
7:00. 9:30: Sun. 7:00. AMS 50c.
Non-AMS   75c.   SUB  Theatre.
MANDRAKE
the  Magician
Full Evening Illusion  Show
Totem Park
Ballroom
Sept.  29
8 P.M.
Travel Opportunities
16
LOCOST CHARTERS UK EUROPE
Mexico, Japan, Australia, African
Safaris. Call Mick 687-2855 or 687-
1244.   Evenings  224-0087.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
1958 MERCEDES BENZ 219. RE-
Iiable city car in good condition.
Recent valve job. $350. 224 - 0534
evenings.
'64 . VALIANT V100. CAREFULLY
serviced, one-owner. Auto, trans.,
Radio, Studded Tires. Call weekdays, 732-7661 between  9 and 5:30.
'60 ALPINE. WHITE. EX. COND.
Must sell. W.W. & O/D. 40,000 mi.
•63  motor,   trans.  John,   299-2976.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
Motorcycle*
24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
calibre graphs, maps, text-book
illustrations, formulations, adver-
tising. Phone 980-2928	
CREATIVE GRAPHICS SPECI-
alizes in posters, scientific artwork,  photography.  John 224-4146.
CREATIVE PRE - SCHOOLERS'
day care. Play, paint areas, outings, Kitsilano primary teacher.
Phone 733-2184.
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND
guys: free 9000 word essay on Vancouver gay life from graduate student 22, Box 8969, Station H, Vancouver 5. Phone 683-4864. Over 750
copies sent already.
FREE ORGANS NOW ON SALE.
Today 12:30 WESB 201. Bring a
friend. We want you.	
SOME TRANSIENT YOUTH WENT
down to Jericho. On the way Jhey
fell in with hard times and vthey
were beaten and depressed and
left feeling half-dead. It so happened that the city government
came by and when they saw the
youth, they passed by on the other
side. So too the federal government. After seeming to cross over,
passed by on the other side. Then
U.B.C. happened down the same
road  .   .   .
COME FLY WITH THE GREAT
Speckled Bird — Ian and Sylvia.
Tonight in the Ballroom 7:00 and
9:30. $1-75 in Advance. $2.50 at the
Door.
DOES MANDRAKE REALLY USE
Mass Hypnosis — See Tonight.
Totem Park Ballroom,  8 p.m.
RICHARD (EDDIE?) BE IMPETU-
ous. Come back to the jungle.
Susanne.
CAN BURT LANCASTER KEEP
the Castle? Find out in "Castle
Keep" Fri., Sat., Sun. in SUB
Theatre. Still the cheapest, always
the best!
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters  8c  Repairs
39
Typing
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter, my home.
325-2934.	
ON - CAMPUS TYPING, FAST,
Accurate, All types of theses, texts,
essays.   IBM  Electric,   224-9183.	
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING
my home: essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
Phone 263-5317	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche  — 437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SKI     INSTRUCTORS. GROUSE
Mountain      requires instructors.
Will  train  this  fall. Good wages.
Phone 985-0478.
GUITARIST WANTED: ELECTRIC,
own equipment and willing to
work at joining present group.
Lee or Al, 872-7301
FRIENDLY OUTGOING GIRLS TO
sell flowers evenings. Can choose
hours. Commission. $10.00 to $20.00
for evening. Phone now, 684-2618.
Car is asset but not necessary.
INTERESTED IN SELLING?
Then why not be an ad sales rep.
for the Ubyssey. The AMS Publications office needs one or two second
or third year business minded students preferably Commerce who will
work hard about 8 hours a week.
Transportation is essential. This is
an excellent opportunity to gain
worthwhile sales experience and to
earn commissions for part - time
work. Apply Publications Office after 2:30 p.m.
TIME IN — TIME OUT NEEDS
volunteers. Help run a free community children's program, 7-9
p.m. Alternate Fridays. Begins
October 2. Come with ideas to 1811
West 16th or telephone evenings,
261-1867.
COMFORTABLE JOB FOR UBC
student with car. Mondays and
Thursdays drive from UBC to 12th
and Maple to deliver copy for The
Ubyssey. Two runs, one at 4:30
p.m., one at 6:30 p.m. Each run
equals one buck in the bank. Contact B. Curtis, Ubyssey office or
22S-2301.
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
CHINESE   MARTIAL   ARTS
(Kung Foo) — Self-defence lessons.
Ancient   meditation  for  tension  relief.   Chinese   studies/languages.
For   inquiries   phone   872-1106
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
PRE-SALE TICKETS - 75c
at the Bookstore and
AMS  Publications Offico
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON — WE
sell, style and color, Wigs & Hair
Pieces at reasonable rates. Tel.
228-8942,  5736  University Blvd.
KODAK ENLARGER INCLUDING:
lens (50mm), extra filament and
three sizes of negative carriers,
$50 or best offer. Phone Dave at
224-7533	
APT. FURNITURE FOR SALE:
living room, bedroom. Call 683-2095
evenings. Address, 704—1110 Car-
dero  St.	
PHILLIPS STEREO (2502) CAS-
ette tape deck — 6 months old.
$40. Phone Bob at 922-1326 after
5 p.m.	
GOING TO AUSTRALIA: SELLING
8 track cartridge recording deck,
$175; and Wharf edale speakers,
$125  each.   224-5194.	
LARGE OFFICE DESK, $50.00;
worn brown leather chair, $15.00;
firescreen,  $4.00.   733-6447.
SURVEY TRANSIT, BELL-
Howell 8mm Movie Camera, Stereo
Port. Player, 3 way TV, amplifier,
6 intercom phones, antique b^ed,
sundial, 2 swords, marble clock,
18K Solid Gold Key Winder & R.R.
Watch, 2 Jade Rings, Rolex
Chronometer, 8 H.P. Boat Motor,
Winch, D.C. Clock 110V-AC Horn,
Teak Camphor Chest 40" x 24",
Music Cabinet, 4,000 Books (Lot
10c ea.), Dental Tools, Motor,
Cabinets, etc. Jewel Grinder, 2 Gas
Furnaces 90,000-190 BTU, 2 roll-
way beds, House & Ste. 2 lots
60' x 238' at Inlet Park, P.N.E.
Harbour View,  254-3080.
TRAYNOR HEAD AND CABINET
with two 15" speakers. Also elec.
guitar, $50; Shure mikes, cheap.
Jacques,   228-9325.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ALL STUDENT HOUSE GUY(S).
Heat, light, phone. All house
facilities. Kits. Double and s ingle.
Phone  738-0784	
TWO ROOMS, PRIVATE BATH
and entrance, $45, and $50 — 3945
Puget near 16th Ave.  Ph.  733-0462
ROOMS ON CAMPUS, $50. KJ.T-
chen privileges, large lounge and
TV room. Linen changed weekly.
Ample parking. Phone Bill Dins-
more, 224-4530, or 224-9660, or
come  to  5760  Toronto Road.
Room & Board
82
VERY SPACIOUS SUNNY ROOM
on main UBC bus route. All house
facilities. 738-1376 or 224-1705.
FREE ROOM, BOARD IN Exchange for help evenings with
children.   Near   Gates.   224-6192.
MEN
Room & Board avail, at the D.U.
House! Convenient, reasonable,
and the best food on Campus!
Phone the house manager at
224-9841 or drop by at 5780 Toronto Rd.
Furnished Apts.
83
FIRST YEAR TEACHER WANTS
3rd or 4th year girl to share
apartment. Furnished. $65 month.
Phone  731-1540.
WELL FURNISHED, PANELLED,
heated accom. Fridge, Sep. Ent.
Available immed. Non - smoker
(male)   224-3494.	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE LGE.
one-bedroom suite. In Kits. Rent
$68.  Phone  Anita at 733-6953.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86

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