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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1970

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Array Student wife doesn't qualify for Acadia housing
By SHARON BOYLAN
A family of four was evicted last week from the
married housing quarters in Acadia Park.
Technically the expulsion occurred because
second year science student Liv Beck, mother of two,
does not qualify as a "student" under housing
administration rules.
Basically though, the family was kicked out
because Liv is a woman.
She first signed a three-year lease with housing
on May 15, 1968, as single parent of year-old twins.
A year later she and George Beck married and
housing transferred the lease to her husband's name.
George was then a student.
George began teaching this year for $200 a
month. Rent of $125 a month, including heat, was
too high, so the Becks applied to transfer to one of
the married students' huts on campus.
Rent plus heat there would be about $70 to $80
per month.
Housing then discovered that George was no
longer a student.
It is clear from housing regulations that the
husband is technically considered 'head of the family'
under all circumstances.
"The husband's student status (graduate or
undergraduate) will determine the couple's category
for family housing," the housing ruling states.
On Sept. 8, housing replied to the Becks' request
for transfer to a campus hut.
The Becks were asked to give notice and be out
of Acadia Park by the end of October.
The family left last Wednesday, however, and
their new place costs almost $200 a month. They are
able to pay this only because George's parents have
agreed to chip in some of the money.
Liv has tried twice to see administration housing
head Les Rohringer, but has only been allowed to see
his assistant, Ken Hutton.
Hutton told her she could stay in campus
housing if she and George got a legal separation, Liv
says.
Les Rohringer supported the housing policy in an
interview with The Ubyssey:
"1 could send my wife to take a few courses and
move in and save money on it," he said.
This still leaves Liv wondering about the basis of
the ruling.
"Do they (housing authorities) assume that
women can't possibly earn as much money as men
and so married men students need housing more than
I do?" she said.
"Or don't they care because obviously the man is
more important?
"I think they should determine UBC housing on
the basis of financial need."
Bruce Yorke, organizer of the Vancouver
Tenants' Association and COPE aldermanic candidate
said the university would find it hard to evict the
Becks if they refused to move.
Liv could fight the eviction on the basis of sexual
discrimination, Yorke said.	
7
Vol. Lll, No. 7 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,  1970
228-2305
''' '* -"' "'t.Y1*:-',  \ V
—darryl tan photo
FORESTRY FREAKS do homework Thursday in Empire Pool. Two students practise skills taught in
Log Rolling 100 class by competing in Forestry Week's log rolling competition. This may not be the
way to get to the top of MacMillan Bloedel, but could J. V. Clyne do as much?
Page 3: New national student union proposed.
Page 3: Smolensky quits course evaluation cor
Page 8: Arts I experiment still ;;live.
People are dying'
in Jerico hostel
By GINNY GALT
A young man, sobbing hysterically, wants to kill himself.
He isn't freaking out on drugs or booze. He just can't take
this kind of existence any longer.
Young people are shuffling around aimlessly in bare feet,
coughing.
A boy is sitting and staring through dope-red eyes, stroking
a cat. He looks about 16, but it's hard to tell people's ages when
they're run down.
A few people are sweeping the floors.
That was Jericho hostel Monday, three days after the
official closing date. There were still 180 residents.
"No, it isn't adequate. People are dying here - mentally, if
not physically," said staff member Marty Smith.
Doctors have found widespread throat and chest ailments
among Jericho residents. Germs spread quickly when you have so
many people living together.
But are the alternatives any better?
Smith doesn't think so.
"There are no long-range alternatives at all - just
temporary stop-gap measures," he said.
Staffer Valerie Angell said people were afraid to leave the
hostel if it meant just another two or three weeks of shelter.
"It could be that in two week's time, most of the original
350 Jericho residents are out on the streets again," Angell said.
Smith said hostel residents couldn't expect any help from
the city welfare department. "They won't even give out food
vouchers. They tell us to go to the other hostel to get food."
He said food facilities at Alexandra House and the Pacific
hostel were inadequate, "so we have to rely on the Inner City
feed-ins. And how much longer can they last?"
Angell said some of the residents would stay and fight for
Jericho, "poor as it is."
But local justice department official T. E. Jackson, acting
for the secretary of state - who is responsible for the hostel -
said the residents are living "on borrowed time now."
Jackson said he expected that Jericho would come to a
peaceful end, "but if it comes to the point of people simply
refusing to go, they might have to be ejected."
Only 22 of UBC's 21,000 students offered displaced
Jericho residents a place to stay.
"People are afraid to help these kids. They do some pretty
weird things — self-destructive things," Smith said.
Best blood-let yet
A total of 2,149 people left pints of their blood in SUB last
week.
It was the biggest turnout in many years, said a spokesman for
the civil engineering club, sponsors of the five-day Red Cross blood
drive.
About 400 bleeders showed up on the first four days and more
than 500 turned out last Friday.
There will be another blood drive Oct. 29 for those who missed
last week's action, the spokesman said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 6,  1970
TAs form association
to protect own interests
UBC teaching assistants have
formed a union-like association to
protect their interests.
About 40 TAs met last week to
form the assocation for TAs, lab
assistants and sessional lecturers.
The    major    aim    of    the
association is to get from the
administration a clear-cut policy
of hiring, firing, grievance
procedures, wages and working
conditions.
Said Dr. Ian Cowan, dean of
graduate studies:
AMS commits itself
The Alma Mater Society has committed itself to supporting
course unions.
The AMS council last week passed a motion in favor of the
unions, which act as student lobbies for changes in curriculum.
Students wishing to start such unions will now be able to apply
to the AMS for financial aid.
There will be a meeting for all students interested in forming
course unions in arts courses Thursday in the Buchanan Lounge at
7:30 p.m., arts undergrad society president Don Palmer said.
He said plans arc already underway for course unions in English,
sociology, anthropology, history and political science.
Candidates meeting
re-scheduled today
The Alma Mater Society
vice-presidential all-candidates
meeting advertised for Monday
will be held today at noon in SUB
conversation pit.
The meeting was postponed
because of candidate Kelvin
Beckett's failure to appear
Monday, and because of technical
difficulties with the sound
equipment, AMS secretary Anne
Clarkson said.
Candidates for vice-president'
are Kelvin Beckett, arts 4 and
John Mitchell, education 4.
The Ubyssey regrets somewhat
its inability to print statements of
candidates for AMS vice-president. However, The Ubyssey also
points out that the printing of
such statements would be greatly
facilitated if they were to be
turned in.
VICE-PRESIDENT
John Mitchell is a fourth year
education student, majoring in
counselling and guidance. In the
position of vice-president he plans
to co-ordinate academic activites
such as senate liaison with the
AMS executive, course evaluation
and content, and to promote
among other things, accredited
student involvment in the
community (learning  by  doing).
John has been active in various
community programs; working
with NOW and Crisis Centre,
managing Youth Employment
Services, and working as a youth
counsellor for the Vancouver
Board of Parks and Public
Recreation. On campus he was
one of the initial co-ordinators for
Speak-easy for 1970. He is also
serving on the Educational
Undergraduate Society, the
Inter-Professional Education
Student Council, and the
Thunderbirds Rugby executive.
From all these activities both off
and on campus, he hopes to bring
a practical, objective viewpoint to
the job of organizing the office of
the vice-president.
John plans to make extensive
use of student backing for
different representatives, such as
those in the senate to gather
information and prepare research
for the three specific projects of
the vice-president's office. John's
idea of student government is
based on student participation.
Seconder
Kerry Bysouth.
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
CHESTER-ANGUS RAMSGOOD
A Van-Made 16mm Color Feature
TODAY and ALL THIS WEEK
12:30, 3:30, 7:30, 9:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
"We regard these people as
apprentice scholars and are keenly
interested in doing everything
possible to help them.
"I would be very unhappy if it
was called a union."
Peter Beyer, an English TA said
the association is presently
compiling grievances and
standards from various
departments.
Beyer said TAs from all
faculties are urged to attend ■ a
meeting noon today in Bu. 202 to
form a steering committee, a
constitution, and to see what
immediate action can be taken on
grievances.
Chem  110
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
FIRST OR SECOND YEAR???
Opportunities exist to become
an OFFICER in the Vancouver
NAVAL   RESERVE
in the ROUTP programme in
HMCS Discovery.   For more
information, come to HMCS
Discovery, Stanley Park,    on
Tuesday from 7:30 to 9:00pm.
Film Society
presents an
English Department
Course Film:
Ben Jonson's
VOLPONE
Thurs., Oct. 8
12:30 & 6:30
Old Aud
100 mins.
Upper Tenth
Barber
4574 W
EXPERT HAIRSTYLING FOR MEN
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NOW — a complete line of hair pieces for men!
Appointments Telephone 224-6622
10th AVE.
Film Society
presents an
English Department
Course Film:
Ben Jonson's
VOLPONE
Thurs., Oct. 8
12:30 & 6:30
Old Aud
100 mins.
E & B RESTAURANT
Open 24 Hours
4423 W. 10th Ave.
FOR ALL UBC STUDENTS
15c OFF ON THE DOLLAR
THANKS TO THUNDERBIRDS
& GOOD LUCK NEXT TIME
WELCOME TO
THE MUSIC
RESOURCE GROUP
Contemporary Music of
Worship and Celebration
EVERY THURSDAY
UNION COLLEGE - Rm. 105
Singing   and    Playing    (Bring   your
instrument) 4:30-5:30 p.m. (Soup,
Sandwiches and Coffee — 5:30)
Resource    Workshop    —    Develop
Interests— 6:00-7:00 p.m.
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Fill in and return this coupon or phone today. No obligation. No salesman will call.
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Residence
Address   -
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Occupation   _	
Phone: Home   Office 	
City  Prov.
Age     Male □   Female □
Married □    Single □
Date first licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accident in last 5 years,
(circle dates ot those accidents which were not your
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in the last five years has your
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Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Oart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
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One way driving distance
Is car used in business
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Give number and dates
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Date current policy expires
This   coupon   is   designed   solely   to   enable   non-policy
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tfl
tfl Tuesday, October 6, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Smolensky quits AMS course evaluation committee
Art Smolensky has resigned as
chairman of the Alma Mater
Society's course evaluation
committee and recommended a
full-time employee be hired.
In a letter to AMS president
Tony Hodge, Smolensky said he
has been forced to resign,
effective Oct. 9, because of other
academic and non-academic
committments.
He said a full-time paid
employee should be hired to
co-ordinate    all   facets   of   the
—kevin perrins photo
ROLLER SKATING will take place every noon hour this week in
the Fine Arts Gallery in the library basement. Students are
invited to bring skates and head downstairs from the Fine Arts
division, west library entrance. A demonstrator from a local roller
rink will give a hand to students looking for a free lunch-time
activity.
Dope Day changed
National Dope Day has been postponed from Oct. 15 to Oct.
28.
Alma Mater Society acting vice-president Christine Krawczyk
said the date is being switched due to "lack of time" to organize the
event.
On National Dope Day universities across Canada will hold a
referendum asking students to vote 'yes' or n0' in favor of the
legalization of cannabis.
The results of the referendums will be sent to UBC. All results
are expected to be in by mid-November.
If Canadian students vote in favor of the legalization of
cannabis, said Krawczyk, a letter will be sent to Health Minister John
Monro and Justice Minister John Turner asking them to initiate a
moratorium on convictions for cannabis and hashish under the
Criminal Code.
evaluation — which will culminate
next spring in the publication of a
campus-wide course evaluation
pamphlet.
At the very least, a part-time
employee should be hired to
co-ordinate the necessary student
surveys, Smolensky said in the
letter.
"We're very concerned that
this is not just a one-shot affair,"
Smolensky said in an interview.
He said Hodge is currently
considering replacements for the
position of chairman of the
committee.
Saanich mayor Hugh Curtis
was not asked to comment on
Smolensky's resignation. It is
understood Curtis is not
interested in the position.
He said it currently appears
that most of the assistance for the
technical handling of the surveys
will come from the
administration's academic
planning office, which has offered
its services.
The six-member, all-student
committee met periodically
throughout the summer and sent
out 200 questionnaires asking
students  what  form   the course
evaluation shouL take.
The publication will be
distributed free to students and
faculty.
About 150 questionnaires have
been returned, but not yet
processed by the committee.
"We found that making
questionnaires is very difficult,"
Smolensky said.
The committee is currently
planning to evaluate all courses on
campus, but more questionnaires
have to be developed before the
actual form of the evaluation
scheme can be decided, he said.
"When considering the
philosophy of how a course is
taught for example, it is just
impossible to evaluate English on
the same level as applied science
or chemistry.
"This disciplines are just too
different and different criteria will
have to be used to evaluate each
one accordingly," Smolensky said.
The committee is placing an
emphasis on individual profs
rather than on courses in general,
because, he said, each prof cannot
help but differ in his individual
interpretations of material
covered.
He said the final questionnaires
will be collected through
undergraduate societies to relieve
the pressures of handing an
unfavorable evaluation to a
professor.
"Canadian content of a course
will also be a major concern," he
said.
Several course evaluations are
now being formulated by various
departments and faculties, and
will continue on their own unless
those involved wish to join the
campus-wide scheme.
Financial help will be sought
by the committee of all sectors
of the university community,
Smolensky said.
"Students, administration, and
the general public should be
interested in the kinds of courses
and methods of teaching them at
UBC," he said.
But the first job of the
committee will be to create an
"aura of credibility" around the
entire evaluation.
"If students cannot take this
thing seriously then we might as
well not even begin," Smolensky
said.
Student union proposed
WINNIPEG (CUP) - The establishment of a
new national student union will be one of the topics
under discussion when student union presidents
meet in a special caucus meeting in Winnipeg,
beginning Oct. 30.
The caucus is being arranged by Israel Lyon,
president of the University of Manitoba students'
union, prior to the annual meeting of the
Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada
on Nov. 2.
Lyon sent invitations to the student union
presidents of all Canadian universities two weeks
ago. Among the topics he suggested for discussion
were employment, tuition fees, the role of student
unions, drug laws, and tactics for the AUCC
meeting.
The travel expenses for the presidents would be
paid by their university administrations because
they would be coming as delegates or observers to
the AUCC meeting.
"We are interested in the  idea of a political
union," Lyon said. "We want the whole thing
discussed."
Lyon also said that some student unions in the
western provinces had already expressed their
interest in re-establishing such a union.
The unions which have already indicated their
intention to attend the caucus at the University of
Manitoba are: Queens, University of Saskatchewan
at Regina, Waterloo, Lutheran, University of
Western Ontario, St. Thomas University, Acadia,
Trent, and Glendon College.
UBC student president Tony Hodge said
Monday he would represent the AMS at the caucus.
However, he said he does not feel a national
student union is necessary and that he would
oppose the formation of one.
"It's a bunch of crap," he said.
"I don't think an organization witli a
bureaucracy and a central office would solve
anything," Hodge said.
He said a loose coalition of student unions
meeting annually would be more feasible.
Power study series begins
Who controls the university?
Does it exist for the benefit of us
or for the benefit of the
corporation?
The relationship of the
educational system to the B.C.
power structure is examined
Wednesday noon in the SUB
ballroom and 7 p.m. in the club's
lounge.
The presentation is the first in
a series on the B.C. power
structure and is presented by the
community education and
research centre in co-operation
with the Alma Mater Society.
The program will examine the
backgrounds of the men who
hold power over the educational
system as well as the economy —
H. R. MacMillan, John Liersch
and others — and determine to
what extent education is used to
further corporate values.
For example, Liersch, now
chairman of the UBC board of
governors, was a member of the
Chant commission on education
several years ago.
The commission stated that
competition encourages effective
learning and "should be accepted
as a normal feature of the society
in which we live."
Says the education and
research centre: "Competition is a
market place value and the men of
the Chant report are industrialists
and    controllers    of    the    B.C.
economy.
"The values of the market
place and the control of the men
of the market place make
education in B.C. what it is
today."
Joni, Phil to sing
Joni Mitchell, Phil Ochs, and Chilliwack will be giving a concert
Friday, Oct. 16 in the Pacific Coliseum.
Proceeds from the concert will go towards the purchase of a
ship to sail to Amchitka, September 1971, to protest the planned
nuclear test explosion in the area.
The Don't Make a Wave Committee that is sponsoring the
Amchitka excursion hopes to raise $20,000 to $25,000 from ticket
sales.
Jerry Stanleigh, Law 3, said the committee plans to sail a ship
full of students and reporters into the test area off Amchitka, to force
the U.S. to cancel the test.
Tickets for the benefit concert are on sale at $3 each at the
Vancouver Ticket Centre and the AMS business office.
Apology to EdUS pres
The Ubyssey regrets any embarrassment Friday's front page
story may have caused Education Undergraduate Society president
Rod Gulmans, who was incorrectly named as responsible for herding
education students out of their lounge last Tuesday.
The man responsible for the action was not Gulmans, but an
unknown student who identified himself to our reporter as Rod
Gulmans.
Sorry Rod, but it wasn't our fault. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 6,  1970
THE UBYSStY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 6, 1970
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Charity carnival
It's United Appeal time again.
Yes, folks, it's time for the annual carnival that
parades the poor like sideshow freaks and provides
many others with the opportunity to indulge in a little
painless paternalism.
For the next few weeks, the downtown
newspapers fill be filled with tear-jerking stories about
how the United Appeal supplies the money to keep
little Mary's iron lung working.
We'll be treated to almost daily bulletins about
which corporation has "loaned" what rising junior
executive to the big fund drive.
There will even be scorecards or graphs or clever
drawings by which we can watch the appeal climb
toward its appointed goal.
It doesn't matter that a large chunk of the money
collected goes to various administrative and public
relations cost.
It doesn't matter that the appeal's $4.3 million
target, even if reached, will come nowhere near meeting
the needs of the myriad organizations that maKe up
United Community Services, or that many other
worthwhile organizations won't receive a dime.
For most of the people behind the appeal, the
whole thing becomes a game. "Let's really push this
year and beat our goal. Then we'll really be able to show
up those Toronto guys at the next Chamber of
Commerce convention."
It gives the corporate types a chance to fill their
"community service" requirement (which is reported to
be mandatory for admission to the Vancouver Club and
can be fulfilled either by working for the United Appeal
or becoming a director of the Pacific National
Exhibition).
Unfortunately, it also cons thousands of
well-meaning contributors into thinking they are really
helping to do something about serious social problems.
It attempts to treat the symptoms by throwing a
few crumbs to the poor, but never concerns itself with
the causes of poverty. (The latter course would
probably be cheaper in the long run, but of course
would be much harder work and certainly isn't the kind
of thing you can hold cocktail parties for.)
It raises money for the sick, but not nearly
enough, and in its partial effort gives the government an
excuse to ignore its own responsibility.
Finally, it perpetuates charity in its worst
nineteenth century style. People deprived by social or
physical circumstances over which they have no control
are reduced to beggars, robbed of their remaining self
respect and forced to depend on the benevolence of the
rich.
The United Appeal does not provide the poor
with jobs or with the slightest opportunity to live
meaningful lives.
It only strengthens the chains of the
charity-welfare trap and helps ensure that there will be a
reason for another United Appeal next year.
Sorry, fellas, we gave at the office.
Editor: Nate Smith
News - Maurice Bridge
City     John Gibbs
Wire        John Andersen
Sports    Scott McCloy
Associate     John Twigg
Ass't City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Managing        Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Perhaps it was Maurice's typewriter
who most eloquently summed up the
blorg's frustration and disappointment.
Only hours Into the press day, the
spirit of ol' Underwood — he's been
dead a full week now— hung along the
ceiling and shat on the entire
newsroom like a runaway laxative ad.
Slipping and sliding in his prose, but
trying  their  best,  were:   Jan  O'Brien,
Sandy Kass, Josephine Margolis, Tom
Harrison, Bruce Dubblestyne, Phil
Barkworth, Jinny Ladner, Mike
McCaffery, Elaine Tarzwell, Sharon
Boylan, Caroline Woodward, and the
suction-shoed Steve Lucas and Shane
McCune.
Ginny Gait fought illness with one
hand and shovelled lucidity with the
other into the bowels of the slimy rag
where laboured: David Bowerman,
Dave Enns, Kevin Perrin, Darryl Tan,
Thorn Wescott and Maureen Gans. And
then there was Don Gardner and Bob
Wicks.
Also wallowing in the septic tank
were Maurice's 20th birthday (last
Saturday), Andersen's desire to swim
(doomed), Mike Finlay's attempt at
toilet paper (not good enough), and
Quigley's belly button  (worse yet).
-v>.
The tortoise and the hare
DAVIES RAVIES
UBC.
BY JIM DAVIES
Messing around  in AMS
Because of the decidedly
relevant nature of the Alma Mater
Society, an interview with some
of the council heavies seemed
appropriate.
So . . . Monday, I set out to the
carpeted region in SUB where I
suddenly encountered what
looked like a melted fudgsicle
flanked by two jelly beans.
A second look assured me that
it was indeed AMS president Tony
Podge with his two trusted
members of the flying circus —
treasurer Stuart Juice and
internal-affairs officer Sue
Henpecky.
I was just about to start asking
them some meaningful questions
when they burst into a heated
discussion.
followed this unfortunate
statement.
Juice: "Listen, Podge, 1 don't
like the way you let your porridge
dribble down your leg while you
eat."
Podge: "Big deal, I know you
drink your ovaltine through a
flavor straw."
Juice: "So? You put silicone in
your malteds to make your
breasts harder."
Podge: "If that's English
Leather cologne you're wearing,
it's off Lord Beaverbrook's saddle
at the Battle of Aragon."
This last insult was just too
much for either lad, and they
both broke into tears.
"Why don't you boys kiss and
make up," said Henpecky.
"You're right," said Podge.
"I'm dreadfully sorry," said
Juice.
Podge: "Could I fluff your
pillow or rub your tummy with
liniment, Stu baby?"
Juice: "Sure Tone. By the way
have I ever told you that you have
a nicely turned pair of ankles and
lovely ears."
Podge: "Yes, you have, and
don't neglect my nubile shoulders.
Oh, by the way, Stu, shouldn't we
go out and have some fun so we
can forget our cumbersome
duties?"
Juice:   "Right   Tone,  let's go
out and roll a crippled newsboy."
Podge: "Great idea Stu. Then
Treasurer
"I have a new idea for our
council policy," Podge was saying.
"Let's take the best ingredients
from The Guiding Light, Amos
and Andy and Hollywood Squares
and combine them with the
over-riding tone of Spiro Agnew's
moratorium speech."
Podge was immediately
censured by Juice.
"We've already tried that,
Tony," he said.
"May a green beret drive a
half-track over your soft white
underbelly," retorted Tony,
obviously not pleased by Stuart's
rebuke.
A    wild    series    of    insults
President
go    mount
some
fig
we    can
newtons
"You guys are a bit much,"
said Henpecky.
Podge: "Thut-up!"
Juice: "Ya, whadyathinkya
are?"
Podge: Lithten Thue, How
would you like Thtuart and me to
grab you by the ankleth and
make a with?"
Juice: "Ya! And don't forget
we know you worked in Planet of
The Apes.
Podge: "And for peanuts!"
Juice: "And you could tell the
world that you go both ways with
your pushmi-pullyu!"
With that, Stu and Tone
trotted off together arm-in-arm
singing 4-H cookie baking songs.
. . . and I missed another
relevant meaningful AMS
interview.
Janis and Jimi
When people warned Janis Joplin that her intense,
grinding blues voice would be gone in a few years if she
didn't take it easy, she used to tell them that she'd be
dead in a few years anyway, so why not give it all she
had?
We don't know, but we guess Jimi Hendrix would
have used the same words to describe his commitment
to his art.
And the deaths of Janis and JJmi scarcely a week
apart, at the zeniths of their careers, can only remind us
of the essentially destructive nature of culture in a
decaying society.
Janis and Jimi went the same way as Billie
Holliday, Bessie Smith, John Coltrane, Brian Jones and
other prophets of the alienated in an earlier time.
As artists, they sought a way of life free from
alienation in a modern technological society. But as
objects of profit, in the world of entertainment, the
only response was the total negation of self that led to
their untimely deaths. -Paul Knox Tuesday, October 6, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART THREE
A sense of humor is your only defense against
the boot camp system of brainwashing.
Perhaps a better term would be a sense of the
ridiculous, as there is very little in the military that
is genuinely humorous but quite a lot that is
ridiculous.
The first hint you get of this is when you pick
up your first uniform. As you step up to each
station in the line you are supposed to yell out
"sir!" and give your size, then sir again.
Working your way down the line you discover
that every item except the shoes is already on the
counter and invariably the wrong size. However, if
you just reach out to take it, the animal behind the
counter pulls it back and screams "What size,
puke?"
A classic example is the ritual of personnel
assignment. This is done on the basis of a series of
intelligence and aptitude tests given during the first
week of boot camp.
Apparently the idea is something like this. If
the tests show that you're so dumb you'll probably
end up shooting yourself they give you a nice simple
job like pay clerk or intelligence analyst.
I'll never forget Yaw, the big, lovable Arizonan
in our platoon. The first time I noticed him was
when were sitting around writing home and he came
-    out with, "Hey fellers, how d'ya spell 'was'?"
He stayed perfectly in character for the next
two months. Everyone in our hut was approached
at least once, "Say, Ah got a letter from mah gurl.
.   Kin ya read it fur me?"
*s.       By the time the assignments came out we were
in the
classroom
pretty well used to the stupid things the Marine
Corps was doing but none of us was quite ready to
find out he was assigned to radio repair school.
One of the all-time greats of military cartoons
deals with this subject. It shows two assignment
clerks sitting at a table with a multi-million dollar
computer in the background. One is saying to the!
other, "I forget, which cooking school do we send
electronic engineering graduates to?"
It is funny if you don't get hung up trying to
figure out out how many of your electronic
engineering friends could tell the difference between
an  oven  and a  sink.
Every morning in boot camp you spend the half
hour just before breakfast walking around picking
up scraps of paper, cigarette butts or anything else
lounging loose on the ground. When you get a
handful you drop it in the huge enclosed garbage
bins called "dipsy dumpsters." You never quite get
used to finding six guys crammed in there sneaking
a smoke.
Speaking of smoke: two weeks in the middle of
boot camp are devoted to range where they
teach you how to shoot a gun.
To do it anywhere near accurately you have to
do certain things to your back sight so that the
sights will point to where the bullet is going to hit.
This particular ritual is called putting on your dope.
Our drill instructors got pretty upset when they
found out that half way through the course a
quarter of us were still trying to shoot without
doing it.
That night they took us all out and had us
running, pushing up and crawling through the dirt
chanting, "Sir, we are the no dope platoon, aye, aye
sir!"
Until they came over and stomped on my
fingers I was having a good laugh at the thought of
anyone trying to score some smoke in boot camp.
But if any one thing stood out as being
ridiculous it was a discussion I overheard one night
while I lay exhausted in my bunk. Two of the
fellows were seriously debating whether the cooks
really put saltpeter in the mashed potatoes. But
then they were probably just too tired to think
about sex.
Crayola graffiti
rocks physics 115
By LESLIE PLOMMER
There's nothing like a physics
class on centrifugal acceleration to
heat up students to fever-pitch
emotion on Monday and
Thursday mornings at 11:30 in
Hebb theatre.
Associate physics prof Dr. J.
• McMillan teaches just such a class
to well over 200 students in
section two of physics 115.
The course includes two
lecture hours and one tutorial
hour per week.
Some comments from three
students in McMillan's class:
Ubyssey: What's this profs
-name?
Student: I don't know his
name. Really.
Ubyssey: Is this prof any
good?
Student: I don't know. He goes
off the track of lot of the time.
Ubyssey: How much do you
get from tutorials?
Student; Tutorials are pretty
good. You learn more there than
you do here (Hebb lectures). Here
you just take notes. In tutorials
you learn how to use them.
McMillan, whose voice
sometimes dropped too low to
hear over the high noise level in
the class, announced "today we're
gonna talk about a car on a race
■ track. A banked race track."
McMillan proceeded to analyze
the forces at work on the car as it
barreled around the track, using
~an  overhead  projector  to show
calculations and diagrams.
People who draw diagrams of
problems aren't "sissies,"
McMillan said.
The second problem under
consideration was calculating the
speed and period of an earth
satellite moving in a circular orbit.
McMillan established a
mathematical expression for
relating periods and radii of
different projectiles in orbit.
"This is a beautiful
relationship. Great," he said.
On the projector screen he
wrote "great!"
General titter amongst
students.
"If I could digress for a
moment," he said..
"Digression," he wrote on the
screen. Titter.
No questions were asked in the
class and we are left to conclude
that either all questioning takes
place in tutorials, or students are
intimidated by class size, or
McMillan handles many callers in
his office, or that Physics 115
students understand everything in
the course.
MEET ME AT
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
10
EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway
736-7788
Weekdays to 1
a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Film Society
presents an
English Department
Course Film:
Ben Jonson's
VOLPONE
Thurs., Oct. 8
12:30 & 6:30
Old Aud
100 mins.
ORIENT
ROUND TRIP
S.F. - TOKYO $385
S.F. - TAIPEI $385
S.F. - HONG KONG
$407
Jet     Charters
f385l
connecting
flights to
Si ngapore,
Manila, Bangkok, Seoul and
Calcutta.
FOR INFORMATION CALL
OR WRltE
Flight Committee P.O. Box
2549 Stanford,
Calif. 94305 Tel.
(415)   968-2571
NAME   	
ADRESS   	
One Way Flights are Available
PUNJAB
RESTAURANT
Open 7 Days -5 P.M. to 11:30 P. M.
Finest Foods of India — Full Facilities
Complete Curry Dinner
$3 — Non-Vegetarian -  $2 — Vegetarian
796 Main St. Near Georgia Viaduct          688-5236
OVERSEAS STUDENTS
AND WIVES
who would like
FREE ENGLISH COACHING
should come to International House any weekday from 9-4
p.m. to register for assistance. There are still a number of
Canadians who have volunteered to coach and now we need
overseas students!
KEV'S AUTOMOTIVE
WE
SPECIALIZE
IN IMPORTS
#y%
TWO FULLY LICENCED MECHANICS
COMBINING 25 YEARS OF BRITISH AND
EUROPEAN SPORTS CAR EXPERIENCE
TRY OUR FRIENDLY SERVICE
16th & Macdonald
Ph. 732-6212
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
AVAILABLE
END OF THIS WEEK
Last Chance To
Save 25*
Buy Your Pre-Sale Ticket
TODAY
Only 75*
AT THE BOOKSTORE
AND SUB
THE UBC's "WHO'S WHO"
BIRD CALLS Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 6,  1970
TUESDAY
SAILING   CLUB
General meeting and slide show in
Buch.  104 at noon.
DANCE   CLUB
Relax,   eat  your  lunch,  and  learn  to
dance in SUB party room during the
noon hour.
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
Meeting in  SUB  209 at noon.
UBC   ANTI-WAR   COMMITTEE
Zane  Boyd   on   "The   Canadian   Anti-
War Movement." SUB 211 at noon.
GERMAN   CLUB
Free coffee and doughnuts for everyone in Int.  House 400 at noon.
PRE-MED   CLUB
Dean McCreary speaks at  meeting in
Wesb.    201    at    noon.    New   members
welcome.
THE    UBC    NON-FACULTY
TEACHERS'   ASSOCIATION
A very important organizational meeting in Buch. 202 at noon. All eligible
are urged to attend.
UBC    PROGRESSIVE    CONSERVATIVES
Meeting  in SUB 207 at noon.
UBC-NDP
Executive meeting for all members
in SUB 212A at noon.
CANOE   CLUB
General meeting and planning for a
trip in SUB 125 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
UBC   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
New   members   welcome   to   meeting
in SUB 105A at noon.
UBC   CYCLING   TEAM
Meeting to determine eligibility and
purpose of the club at noon in Mem.
Gym 211.  Newcomers welcome.
'tween
classes
PBC   TEAM   CLUB
The  Electors  Action  Movement.   New
members   are   welcome   to   hear  Aid.
Walter   Hardwick   speak   in   SUB   215
at noon.
PRE-LAW   SOCIETY
Organizational   meeting   in   Ang.   414
at noon.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
Aquarium     whale     trainer     Klaus
Michaelis speaks in Ang.  24 at noon.
CUSO
Meeting in SUB  207 at noon.
PHYSICS   DEPT.
Anthroposophical lecture at the Rudolf
Steiner   Center   at  3201   W.   4th   Ave.
at 8:00 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Karl Burau and Tony Hodge on Student Government and Natural Law.
All welcome  in  SUB 213  at noon.
THURSDAY
V.O.C.
New members welcome to meeting in
Hebb   theatre   at  noon.
THUNDERBIRD    WARGAMERS
Organizational meeting in SUB  115 at
noon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED    CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Discussion  on  "Religious  Experience"
and  dinner at 5:30 p.m.  in the  Lutheran  Campus Centre.
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
Meeting   and   speaker   in   SUB   209   at
noon.
VARSITY   ROD   AND   GUN   CLUB
General meeting in SUB  105B  for all
interested persons.
N.V.C.
First  general  meeting in SUB 207  at
noon.
FRIDAY
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK   CLUB
All welcome to hear Chief Probation
Officer Richardson speak in SUB
105B at noon.
FOLK   SOC.
Hear the sound of the Saturday
Afternoon Matinee at noon in the
SUB Ballroom. Admission only 25
cents.
MISCELLANEOUS
L'ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
French conversation and free coffee
every Fri. at noon in Int. House.
Hike on Sun., Oct.  18.
HOCKEY
Graduate  students interested in playing intramural or recreational hockey
can   come   to   practices   at   the   UBC
Arena every Wed.   at 10:45 p.m.
LEGAL   AID
Every   Mon.,  Wed.,  and  Fri.   at   noon
in SUB 228 and 232.
SIMS
Room for meditation at International
House room 406. Monday to Friday,
8-11 a.m. Tues., Wed., Fri., 3-6 p.m.
Thursday, 4-6 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD   SKI   CLUB
Dry land ski conditioning program
for all university skiers every Tues.
and Thurs. evening at 6:30 and Sat.
at 1:00 p.m. Apparatus room, bottom
floor of War Memorial  gym.
EAST  ASIA  SOCIETY
Two films on Japan, "Art of the
Swordsmith" and "Expo "70". Buchanan 104,  Thursday noon 12:30.
CHARBROILED STEAKS
Oysters — Shrimps
Mike Burgers - Chopped Beef
STUDENT'S SPECIAL
LUNCHEON STEAK
SANDWICH
BAKED POTATO - SALAD
Between 11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
with Presentation of Student Card
4489 W. 10th at Sasamat
ENGLISH 100
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
Math    100
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
ELECTIONS:
Did you know we're going to have a new AMS
Vice-President?
We know you want to vote so we're making it just a little bit easier
for you by giving you a list of times and places.
Advance polls will be held from 11:30 - 3:30 Wednesday October
7th in S.U.B. and the first floor Education building. Residence polling
will run from 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. on the same day.
Voting day polls will be held from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Thursday, October 8th in all of the following locations:
1. Barn 6.
2. Buchanan 7.
3. Bus Stop 8.
4. Education 9.
5. Engineering 10.  Woodward Library
All it takes is five minutes to cast your ballot. Do It!
Main Library
Sedgewick Library
S.U.B. 1
S.U.B. 2
APPOINTMENTS:
There is a position open for Cultural Programme Co-Ordinator.
(1) To co-ordinate the activities of the:
S.U.B. Art Committee
Special Events Committee
Fine Arts Gallery
Brock Art Collection
and other "culturally oriented" groups on campus
in    developing   a   comprehensive   cultural    programme   of   activities
centered in the Student Union  Building but encompassing the whole
University community.
(2) To appoint an assistant to work closely with the participating
party and Building Manager in physically setting up the
"displays".
All applications should be given in writing to Anne Clarkson, AMS
Secretary, S.U.B. 248 by Friday, October 16.
Hanson Lau needs you!
Three Deputy — Co-ordinators are needed to assist the Co-ordinator; of
Activities in executing devious Chinese tactics. See Hanson (S.U.B.
Information Desk) for further information and apply for the positions
through Anne Clarkson, AMS Secretary, S.U.B. 249. Nominations close
Friday, October 16th.
SENATE ELECTIONS:
Are you willing to accept the challenge of a position on the
U.B.C. Senate? If so, it will be your duty to participate fully in the
research, discussion, and decisions of the senate and its committees,
taking into account the interest of the student body and the university
community as a whole.
Nominations are now open for the following positions:
I.  Senators-at-large — 2 positions open
II.  Constituency Senators
a) Education —1 position open
b) Applied Science —1 position open
c) Arts —1 position open
d) Graduate Studies —1 position open
Nomination forms can be obtained from Anne Clarkson, AMS
Secretary in S.U.B. 248. The closing date for nominations is Thursday,
October 15th at 12:30 p.m. The election will take place Thursday,
October 29th.
S.U.B. Management Committee:
Two of the 4 vital members-at-large positions are open — vital
because the other 5 positions are filled by Council nominees. This is
your chance to help establish the Student Union Building policy to
protect your SUB furniture and help allocate SUB management funds
which are 50c per student per year. Help handle the money and the
problem. Nominations close Friday, October 9th at 12:30 p.m. Please
apply in writing through the AMS Secretary SUB 248 to Hanson Lau,
Chairman, SUB Management Committee.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & CTub-3 Lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial-3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
AUTUMN DANCE: SAT. OCT. 10th,
International House. 8:00 p.m.-l:00
a.m. Twin bands. Girls 75c, Boys
$1.50. Tickets at l.H. or dr. Drinks.
Greetings
12
TO SHARE A PERSONAL INSPIR-
ation or problem tune in Radio
CJOR 600, Sundays 9:15-10:00 a.m.
and 11:30 p.m.-l:00. Or drop in and
chat with Sunday Line Moderator
Chaplain Bernice Gerard Wednesdays at the Lutheran Student
Center, Tuesdays — Chaplain's Office, S.U.B. For appointment call
266-9275.
Lost & Found
13
LOST WALTHAM WATCH NEAR
J.O. Pavilion, Oct. 3, during field
hockey. Ph. 224-9768, Rm. 650, was
gift,   reward.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
STUDENT NEEDS RIDE TO KEL-
owna Oct. 9,  share expenses.  224-
 9031, Room 9.
NEED RIDE PROM S E A F A I R
area, Richmond, every day, phone
Bernd, 277-4707.
Special Notices
15
REMINDER— CANADA STUDENT
Loans. To maintain interest free
status on previous loans, Confirmation of Enrolment, Schedule
2 must be completed and delivered
to the Bank prior to 30th November 1970. Not required if you
have already obtained a new loan.
Courtesy, Bank of Montreal, SUB.
JOIN THE MUSIC RESOURCE
group in contemporary music of
worship and celebration every
Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Union College,
Room 105. Singing and playing.
Bring your instrument.
REDUCED PRICES ON HAIR-
shaping and jetstyling at U.B.C.
Barbers  (In  the Village}.
Travel  Opportunities
16
SAN FRANCISCO. OCTOBER 10-17,
bus transportation and accommodations for only $55 return. Miss
only 4 days of lectures, 228-4628 or
987-4625 and mention the 'Field
Trip'.
CHARTERS     U.K.,      CONTINENT,
Africa,  other distinations,  1-ways.
Mick,   687-2855 or 224-0087.  106-709
Dunsmuir St.  Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
LONDON    RETURN   $199
also   other   destinations   —   1-ways.
687-1244
224-0087
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
Automobiles For Sale
21
'67 VOLKS 1500 DELUX SUNROOF
AM/FM radio, overhauled, rear
defogger, ex. cond. Offers, ph. 261-
7713.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS
TO
VOLVO, MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
• Factory trained mechanics
• Fully Guaranteed Work
• Reasonable Rates
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Art Services
31
CREATIVE GRAPHICS — UNIQUE
poster and display artwork; precision publication and scientific
graphics; photography. John, 224-
4146.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
fidelity graphs maps, text-book
illustrations, formulations and advertising. Phone 980-2928.
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND
guys: free 9000 word essay on Vancouver gay life from graduate student 22, Box 8969, Station H, Vancouver 5. Phone 683-4864. Over 750
copies sent already.
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EFFICIENT      ELECTRIC      TYPING
my home: essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317
ON-CAMPUS TYPING, FAST, Accurate, all types of theses, texts,
essays, IBM  selectric,  224-9183.
FAST~ ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter, my home.
325-2934.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche   —  437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
GUITARIST WANTED: ELECTRIC,
own equipment and willing to
work at joining present group.
Lee or Al,  872-7301
FRIENDLY OUTGOING GIRDS TO
sell flowers evenings. Can choose
hours. Commission. $10.00 to $20.00
for evening. Phone now, 684-2618.
Car is asset but not necessary.
TOPLESS  DANCERS NEEDED
Two   References  Required
One  on Each   Side
GULF CLUB
48  E. Hastings
Interviews from 10:30 p.m.     684-3838
INSTRUCTION 8c SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
LESSONS IN PIANO, CLARINET,
Recorder, Helena Sandler (B.Mus.)
McGill in your home. Call 684-3587.
THE MEDITERRANEAN
GUITAR SHOP
instruments * lessons
repairs
* fine imported strings
hand built Spanish guitars
(10% discount with AMS card)
77 Powell St., right in Gastown
687-2328
Special Classes
63
CHILDREN'S CREATIVE ART
class. 9-12 years. Thursdays 3:30-
5:00 p.m. Child Art Centre, Acadia
Road South. $8.00 fee, materials
supplied. Information and registration,  ph.   Mrs.   Henshaw,   228-2J.41.
Special Classes    (Cont.)
63
SPANISH CONVERSATION, THE
shorter way to speak. Prof. Pareja
(Colombia, Argentina & UBC) will
tutor $3 hr., individual, no groups,
M to S, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 12
hours minimum paid in advance.
Limited number. 1405 Cypress (nr.
Cornwall)   738-5692.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
PRE-SALE TICKETS - 75c
at the Bookstore and
AMS  Publication!   Office
TWO ELECTRIC RAZORS, ONE
car radio, one TV, heavy duty
shock absorbers-fit any car, call
731-0725  after  6:30.
ROSSIGNOL STRAWS 210 G.S.
Used 1 season. $100. Also many
pairs of Toni Sailer Comps., all
sizes.   926-4789,   after  6:30.
QUALITY USED CLOTHING,
very reasonable prices. Sonia's
Dry Cleaning, 957 Denman, near
Stanley  Park,   688-5814.
SONY 350 3-HD TAPE DECK $140;
AM/FM component stereo phono
&  speakers,   $140.   738-0994.
PRAKTICA NOVA CAMERA FOR
sale. Just overhauled Kits Cameras.
Lens 2.8, Auto Tessar $75. 224-0670
9-11 p.m.
SKIS: 1 PAIR ALLAIS MAJOR 215
cm Nevada binding 1 yr. old. $130;
1 pair Fischer metals 195 cm Solomon binding $75; Men's double
breasted leather coat. Size 38. $60.
224-0942  or 926-4789.
E FLAT CLARINET $50. SKI
boots, press size 11. $55. Ski poles,
$10. Alt excellent quality and condition. See at old Extension Annex.
Room B3.
RENTALS It REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
•ELEGANT"—UBC AREA—GIRLS
sharing—Point Grey Estate. P.O.
Box 4234, Station D, Vancouver 9.
COUPDE(S) OR GUYS. ALL
house facilities. Kits. Quiet and
roomy. Doubles. Phone 738-0784.
Please ask for Paul.
ONE ROOM—MADE STUDENT $45.
Share bathroom. Private entrance.
Phone. Breakfast extra. 3945 Puget
733-0462.
Room & Board
82
WANTED ROOM, BOARD —
Mother, two year old. Exchange
for babysiting evenings plus $30.00.
Preferably near Byng School.
Have babysitter. 261-7603 after 6.
Ask for Marsha.
MEN
Room & Board avail, at the D.U.
House! Convenient, reasonable,
and the best food on CampuB!
Phone the house manager at
224-9841 or drop by at 5780 Toronto Rd.
Furnished Apts.
83
FURN. STUDIO UTILITIES. ALL
appliances. Priv. ent. Kits. Phone
738-2622 after 3 p.m. Singles only
please.
WANTED MALE STUDENT TO
share furnished apt. $50 month.
Call  731-0205  after 4:00.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.
86 Tuesday, October 6, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Football Birds have honor of 0-4 record
By DON GARDNER
The UBC football
Thunderbirds now have a win/loss
record of 0-4 and have the
dubious distinction of being the
only club to have lost a game to
every other team in the WCIAA.
This is rather ironic as the
Birds deserted the conference
several years ago because the
competition wasn't tough enough.
The other teams are glad to have
them back as the Birds have
assumed the role of the patsy.
It's not so much that the Birds
have gone downhill. It's just that
the other teams have made
noteworthy improvements.
One bright spot for the Birds
this season has been the play of
fullback Dave Corcoran. This has
been mentioned many times
before and sounds redundant, but
after all he's been about the only
bright spot.
Coach Frank Gnup calls
Corcoran "the best football player
I've ever had."
Corcoran is not only an
excellent running back but is also
a ferocious blocker. In the last
game he flattened at least four
Manitoba defenders. One
defensive lineman for the Bisons
looked like he spent the whole
second half trying to stay out of
Corcoran's way.
This summer Corcoran has a
tryout with the San Francisco
49ers. But the 49ers are loaded
with talented running backs and
with a total of 55 rookies in
camp, the odds were definitely
against him.
After receiving his release, he
was given a look by the B.C. Lions
but, as Corcoran says, "I just
stood around holding my helmet
80 per cent of the time."
Corcoran, who can run the 40
Rugby men post second
win in as many starts
The Thunderbird Rugby team managed their second win of the
season in as many starts over Vancouver Rowing Club Saturday at
Brockton Oval.
Rowers obviously feared the speed of the Bird backs and
concentrated on a spoiling game in the first half.
Ray Banks began the scoring for UBC with a penalty goal early
in the match. Outside-centre Barry Legh added a try minutes later on
a good individual move. Banks converted giving the Birds a 8-0
half-time lead.
Rowers changed tactics as the second half got under way and
relying on their strong, experienced scrum notched a penalty goal and
drop goal to narrow the score 8-6. A lapse by the UBC
three-quarterline resulted in a converted try and Rowers took the lead
11-8.
Good team play provided several opportunities for UBC to
retaliate, but carelessness nullified these until winger John Mitchell
showed fine rugby play with a high downfield kick which he gathered
ip himself to score untouched, tying the game. The convert was
missed and the score remained at 11 all.
Pre-season conditioning seemed the margin of victory as
continued hustle by the Bird fowards made for a loose^ scrum on
Rowers goal line setting up Mitchell's second try. With the pressure
off, Banks converted the try and finished the scoring, UBC over
Rowing Club, 16-11.
UBC's second team, the Braves, provided the promise of good
rugby in out-hustling the sluggish Rowing Club 2nds, 1-3. Again
giving away weight and experience the young pack demonstrated
excellent handling to set up a first-half try and scrum-half Dennis
Quigley caught the Rowers napping with a 40 yard sprint to notch
another in the second half. D. Williams converted both and widened
the gap with three penalty goals for a fine personal afternoon.
Both teams put their undefeated records on the line at Wolfson
fields this Saturday against the league champion Vancouver Kats.
Game time, 1:15 and 2:30.
in 4.8, has the speed to play pro
football and will probably be
given another shot with the Lions
next year. His chances of making
the team will be enhanced by the
fact that he will be with them
from the start of training camp.
Dave Corcoran will probably
trample over some more people
this Saturday in a bid to help the
team end their losing streak when
they host the University of
Saskatchewan at Thunderbird
Stadium.
Fine Arts 125
MOVES TO
The Hotel Georgia
Oct. 19
Film Society
presents an
English Department
Course Film:
Ben Jonson's
VOLPONE
Thurs., Oct. 8
12:30 & 6:30
Old Aud
100 mins.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. 224-6121
EL-SID CLEANERS
AND DRESSMAKING
EXPERT ALTERATIONS
- INVISIBLE MENDING-
DRYCLEANING - LAUNDRY
Free Pickup and Delivery
Family Business
Lc " Over' qyls     Better Prices
4370 West 10th 224-6822
ATTENTION CURLERS
UBC Curling Club has openings
until Fri., Oct. 9 in the
following leagues:
- Tuesday (9:30)/Wed. (6:15) Mixed
Alternating Days, Curl Once Per Week
- Thurs. (9:30) Mens
- Enter individually or as a Team
For Further Information and Entry
Phone 266-6624 after 6.
ATHLETIC NOTICES
Intramurals: In case you
haven't heard men's
intramurals is sponsoring a
cross country race and
awarding Thanksgiving
turkeys. Remember, anyone
can win as UBC track team
members are ineligible.
Lady Golfers: Whatever
qualifications, whatever
handicap, the women's golf
team is interested. For
further information phone
Holly Botham at 224-871 or
leave your name at the
women's athletic office.
EAT IN .TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Film Society
presents an
English Department
Course Film:
Ben Jonson's
VOLPONE
Thurs., Oct. 8
12:30 & 6:30
Old Aud
100 mins.
PROFESSOR FRED HOYLE.
One of the world's outstanding astronomers and a central figure
in the continuing debate on the origin of the universe, will visit
the University of B.C. to give two Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
on October 13 and October 14. Prof. Hoyle will speak in Totem
Park Residences at 8:15 P.M. on Tuesday, October 13, on
"Stonehenge,"the prehistoric monument in England which is now.
thought to be a primitive astronomical observatory and
computer. On Wednesday, Oct. 14, Prof. Hoyle will speak in the
Frederic Wood Theatre at 12:30 P.M., on "The Present State of
Cosmology," the branch of astronomy dealing with the origin of
the universe. Admission to both lectures is free.
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
- to all members of the 1970-71 Grad Class
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
The first meeting of the Grad Class will be held on Friday,
October 9th in SUB room 125 (back of cafeteria) at 12:30.
The purpose of this meeting is to elect the executive for the
coming year, which includes the following positions:
(A) President
(B) Vice-President
(C) Treasurer
(D) Secretary
(E) Social Convenor
(F) Public Relations Officer
The executive take responsibility for all major grad class
activities including such things as:
— Baccalaureate Service
— Congregation Ceremony
— Graduation Ball
— Allottment of grad Fees
(Come on Arts. Don't let the Engineers rule again!)
INDOOR TENNIS IN THE ARMOURY
Students and members of faculty are invited to join the
University Open Tennis Club. A membership fee of
$2.00 for the academic year 1970-71 entitles the
individual to reserve a court for one hour periods by
telephoning 228-4452 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday thru Friday. Membership cards may be
obtained from Mr. Howard Tyndall, Room 101, in the
Physical Education Building in Thunderbird Park (South
Campus).
THE     HOURS    FOR    OPEN    PLAY    ARE    AS
FOLLOWS:
MONDAY
TUESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
&:30p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. to   8:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m. to   5:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 6,  1970
UBC Experiment... Arts I, II.
"Modern universities, at least in North America, seem
to fail most spectacularly with their freshman students."
That is the opening sentence of a booklet written by
one Ian Ross in January, 1967, Its purpose was to outline
an experimental program, called New Arts I, to combat
this failure.
If you are, or have ever been, like most first-year
students, you are probably familiar with the problems
Ross describes:
"... the alienation of the students; the flight from
first-year courses of experienced instructors; a course
structure which . . . bewilders students and fragments
their   view  of  the   world . . .  and  a  teaching program
By Shane McCune
and Steve Lucas
-photos by thorn wescott
consisting of a stultifying round of lectures, perfunctory
conferences, and statutory examinations which unnerve
students rather than prepare them for intellectual
advancement."
If you are among the adventurous arts students who
have taken the new Arts I course in the past three years,
however, you might well have a more pleasant outlook
on your first year at UBC.
Although the program us it exists was founded largely
by Ross, an associate professor of English, and philosophy
professor Bob Rowan, it owes much of its origin to
various deans and administration heads dating back to a
committee appointed by former administration president
John Macdonald in 1962.
Its format is largely derived from a similar program
conducted at Berkeley by Joseph Tussman. Rowan, who
chaired the New Arts I last year, is a "graduate" of this
experiment.
The basic outline of the system consists of three
lecture sections, each of which is subdivided into five or
six seminar groups.
The course is the equivalent of nine units of first-year
arts, but is conducted thematically rather than subject by
subject. The themes for each "large group", as the
lecture sections are called, vary from group to group and
from year to year.
Each large group meets once a week for a two-hour
lecture session, and each smaller seminar group meets
twice weekly for one and a half-hour sessions. In
addition   there   are   individual   tutorials   to  discuss  the
experiences they are used to being told what to do."
He also remarked that the staff at first had difficulty
getting organized and planning the course.
"Just the sheer joy of working in such an informal
setting, and getting to know your students," were his
principle commendations of the course.
Ian Slater is a second-year student who took Arts I
last year and liked it enough to take Arts II this year.
Slater is annoyed at the "misconception that Arts I is
a nine-unit course that is just like one course, only with a
degree of liberty that equals a licence to do whatever one
pleases."
"As far as an intellectual discipline is concerned, Arts
II has the most to offer."
But he admitted that it was far from perfect.
"Loafers have been a"ble to find haven here in the
past," he said. "And if you take a disliking to your
professor, it hampers discussion in the seminars."
However, in the view of Slater and most other
students who have taken Arts I, the people who have
decided to work in the experimental system are extremely
dedicated and for the most part amiable.
He praised the cohesive Arts I approach to "separate"
fields of study.
"Perhaps the outstanding virtue of the Arts I and Arts
II programs is that they develop your ability to express
yourself," he added.
But there are those who are less enthusiastic about
Arts I than Ross and Slater.
"Arts I is an unsound basis for a student who wishes
to continue his education."
This is the opinion of Dr. Malcolm McGregor, head of
the Classic:; department, a harsh critic of the program.
"I do not believe in creating courses of instruction
out of the contemporary issues in a faculty of arts."
"I'm suspicious of Arts I because it seems to me that
the subjects studied are invented on the spur of the
moment annually and that they do not deal with a
systematic body of knowledge as a faculty of arts ought
to."
"I think the reading lists are drawn up haphazardly
and the instructional staff, itself, is gathered
haphazardly." (i.e. they volunteer).
He also criticized the use of "non-professional"
lecturers.
"The beginnings of a good education must include a
where students, quite properly, devote the bulk of their
energy to the major or honours programs," he said.
He said that the low enrolment (about 70) into Arts
II this year is due partly to poor publicity and partly to
student apprehension about possible difficulty entering
third-year courses.
Arts II was not approved by the senate until last
spring, after classes had ended. Most students had already
registered before they even heard about Arts II, and many
still haven't heard of it.
informal Arts II lecture in Blue Room of Arts I building is opened by Bob Rowan, who is also head of the Arts II
program.
frequent essay assignments (there are no exams), and one
or more weekend symposia on specific topics.
There are generally 100 to 120 students in each large
group, and 20 or less in the seminars.
To keep "fresh blood" in the program, it is
customary for teachers to spend two years in Arts 1 and
then return to their regular departments. A few
exceptions such as Mary Eliot, Rowan and Ross have
spent three years in Arts I or its second-year equivalent,
New Arts II.
Ross, who has now returned to the English
department, admitted that the first year of the program
"was a little rocky."
"Students are sometimes slow to develop a
commitment,"    he    said.    "From    their   high    school
good lecturer, a specialist in his field, to supply you with
the facts."
He concludes: "Arts I is missing academic discipline."
Bob Rowan, who is chairing this first year of the Arts
II program, disagrees.
"Many people have a dim view or critical outlook
toward the whole program because of its non-disciplinary
character, but it seems to me that non-disciplined does
not mean without discipline.
"Arts I and II try, and succeed, in being disciplined.
We deal with serious intellectual matters with rigour,
critical faculties and appreciation.
"No one in Arts II has any argument at all with
disciplines, but we believe that they can best play their
central role in education in the third and fourth years
ADRIAN MARRIAGE and BOB ROWAN
■ • ■ seminar leaders for Arts II program
The faculty of arts and the senate will soon decide
whether Arts I will become a permanent fixture at UBC.
Said Rowan: "I'm very optimistic of approval of Arts
I on a permanent basis, and that approval will indicate
that the faculty of arts believes that in addition to normal
offerings available to first-year students, that a program of
this sort, with a somewhat different structure and
curriculum, provides a healthy educational alternative.
"The future of Arts II is less clear. This is the first
year we've conducted the program and we do not yet
know how successful it will be."
Mary Eliot, whose background is in classics, has been
with  the  program  for  three  years  and  is now Arts I .
co-ordinator.
With regard for the criticism of Arts I as a
"non-disciplinary", "slack" faculty, she points out:
"Easiness and laziness are connected with enjoyment. If
you enjoy what your doing, you usually don't feel you are
working hard." This is the case with many Arts I students,
she said.
"I've found Arts I has deepened my interest in my
own subject, has made it more "relevant", and made me
more competent to teach Greek and Latin literature."
"Students learn more about learning, teachers learn
more about teaching."
There are faculty meetings every week to discuss each
book as it comes up in the course of study, seminar
groups of four or five and each student meets with his
discussion leader "several' times throughout the year to
review each essay as it is completed.
In response to Malcolm McGregor's statement
concerning the "non-professional" quality of Arts I Eliot
argues: "With first year students if you're practised at
your material, you tend to pick up the ball and run away
with it.
"But in Arts I the students are exposed to senior
members of many departments of the arts faculty
regularly."
This opportunity to hear and speak with "specialists
of various fields" simply does not exist for the majority of
first year arts students in regularly scheduled classes. Two
professors or a professor and teaching assistant may share
the lecture and seminar duties but the variety is hardly
comparable with that which exists in Arts I.
Norman Epstein - who has a doctorate in chemical
engineering but is currently teaching Arts I course on
social conflict - agrees in part with Malcolm McGregor's
criticisms.
"The    whole    Arts   I program  is    based   on   a
non-professional approach. In the traditional sense, it is
not an acamdemic discipline," he said.
But, unlike McGregor, he believes it is "nonetheless, a
meaningful intellectual experience that cannot be wedged
into a category."
The whole new Arts I and II program is controversial,
expensive (it costs more per student than lectures), and an
organizational thorn in the faculty of arts. Why bother?
In the words of Ian Ross: "It is necessary at a
university of this size to develop new approaches to
teaching and learning.
"Institutions that commit themselves to orthodoxy in
educational programs will decay."
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