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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1970

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Array Page 2: Cupid, abortion, women's liberation.
Page 5;  That bomb again; a petition to sign.
"      Pago 9; Round and round wo go in the second
slate of AMS elections,
Paga 10: A now oppwoumh *» mortal health
at UBC. a
THE UBYSSEY
*£&
Vsl. LI, No. 33
VANCOUVER, I.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1970
ONCE AGAIN, the AMS has perpetuated itself, and so has the Hodge podge. VP Tony Hodge defeated
Chuck Campbell for AMS president. Happy Valentine. -cupid photo
English hassle still unsolved
By JAN O'BRIEN
The dean of arts' committee has taken two
months to not come to a decision on the tenure of
English profs Brian Mayne and Dave Powell.
"I'm frankly amazed, considering; the normal
efficiency of the university administration of UBC,
at the amount of time that the dean's committee
has taken to reach a decision," said Powell.
'There has been great tension and stress on the
families, the English department and the individual
while awaiting the decision," said Keith Aldritt, an
interested English prof.
"To the best of our knowledge no definite date
has been set for the decision.
"The longer it goes on the closer it gets to the
term ending and the less likelihood of students
becoming energetically involved
The Ubyssey understands the main issue is the
maintenance of Canadian values of teaching against
the imposition of an American system.
The American system stresses personal research
and publication over teaching.
Aldritt said prospects for new programmes such
as Arts I are lessened under a system where
publications are a premium. The professors have a
heavy work load and do not have time for extra
personal research and publication.
It is believed that Arts I was considered "the
same as publications because of research done in
setting up the new programme.
Hodge in
after weak
turnout
By BRIAN McWATTERS
The students of UBC will have yet another Hodge to
contend with next year.
In an astonishingly low voter turnout (only 3,721
ballots cast  out  of  a student population of 21,000),
current Alma Mater Society vice-president Tony Hodge
-received 2,805 votes to become next year's president.
His opponent, current AMS treasurer Chuck
Campbell, polled 713 votes
There were 203 spoiled ballots.
"The reason for such a small voting turnout was
because there was no tremendous campaigning done," said
Hodge.
"There was really very little for people to get excited
about in this election because Chuck and I were not on
opposite ends. Some of Chuck's ideas were much similar to
mine."
Hodge said many people probably did not expect an
election to be held so soon after last
week's voluntary union referendum.
When asked what his priorities
were Hodge replied: "The mistake too
many politicians make is promising what
they will immediately do. I won't say
what I'll do until I have heard what the
rest of the executive has to say."
"I didn't think I would win the
election," said Campbell,  "but I  ran
because I didn't want to see Tony in by acclamation two
years in a row."
CAMPBELL
Hodge was elected vice-president by acclamation last
year.
Elected to the position of ombudsman was Richard
Harrison, arts 2, with 1,854 votes.
His opponent, Don Sorochan, law 2, received 1,452
votes.
There were 347 spoiled ballots.
"The first thing I'll do is to get into the office and get
organized," said Harrison. "Then I'll speak to the
residents' council about their problems — and they have a
lot."
Harrison said he would try to arrange a form of
consulting system between* legal aid, Speak-Easy, and
himself (as ombudsman) to help people solve their
problems without receiving duplicated services.
'Prairie influx may tighten B.C. job picture'-Epp
By GINNY GALT
Once again, students will have trouble finding
summer jobs this year.
B.C. Union of Students' executive secretary Erwin
Epp said Thursday things look very bad as far as
unemployment in western Canada is concerned.
"The situation in Saskatchewan is the worst because
the province is primarily based on the wheat industry
and nti wheat is being sold at all this year" Epp said.
"I've heard estimates as high as 45 per cent student
unemployment there."
Epp said Alberta and Manitoba will also suffer from
slow wheat sates, so most of the prairie students will
flood B.C. in search of jobs.
"Student unemployment out here is bad and it has
been bad in the past, and because of Trudeau's binge on
cutting down on increases, this year's situation doesn't
look good," said Epp.
He called a Feb. 10 BCUS meeting at UBC a
disaster. The meeting of several B.C. employment
services was to discuss the feasibility of co-ordinating
activities of all placement agencies.
"At our two earliei meetings an ugicemciil was
reached that all the different gioups would work
together in finding jobs and aitempting to solicit tunds.
but Youth Employment services seems lu have forgotten
this agreement they have gone nut and started to
collect funds on their own." Epp said.
"YES is okay for a person who wants bicad money
for a few days, but not tor a |ub to pel a kid to
university."
Epp feels placement services in B.C. have a lot of
improving to do.
'Through the existing services students get low
paying jobs that don't last as long as they should," he
said
"Mint students go out and get fcibs like digging
dilcbvs. which is fine except that in B.C. there's a large
number of unskilled and semi-skilled workers. Students
should not cut into the incomes of the people who
depend on those jobs for a livelihood."
Epp would like to see a provincial government
program  where  students can get work in culturally
deprived  areas.   "Sort  of like   the   Peace  Corps   -
something that would do enough to fit the needs of
society and provide the student with a Irving wage."
l-.ducalion minister Donald Brothers has tentatively
jgri.'i'ij to HS'i't willi BCUS iincj listen ly Ihijii nninnwls
for a "more equitable method of student financing." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,  1970
A Valentine's Day protest
for control of our bodies
By VICKI GOODMAN
A three-month national
campaign against inhuman
abortion laws begins Valentine's
Day in Vancouver with a march
through the city and a public
meeting featuring Dr. Fetdkes,
medical director of the Royal
Columbian Hospital.
Guerrilla theatre will mark
the beginning of the march, at
1:30 in frontloffthe courthouse.
Persons posing as a hospital
committee will decide the fate
of a rich woman wishing an
abortion (of course she gets
one), a young girl ("it will make
a woman out of you") and a
poor woman (endless red tape).
Dr. Foulkes, who favors
changing the abortion laws, will
speak at the Hotel Georgia,
Saturday at 8 p.m. Admission is
free. Dr. Foulkes and other
speakers will answer questions
about abortion birth control.
Goal of the abortion
campaign, sponsored by the
Vancouver Women's Caucus and
women's liberation groups across
Canada, is to remove abortion
from the Criminal Code. The
human right of women to
control their own bodies must
not be limited in any way by
law.
No choice
Some 50 years ago, Margaret
Sanger, founder of the Planned
Parenthood Association, said:
"No woman can call herself free
who does not own and control
her own body ... no woman can
call herself free until she can
choose consciously whether she
will or will not be a mother."
Canada's recently amended
abortion laws continue to deny
women the right to make this
conscious choice.
Therapeutic abortions in
hospitals are available to only a
tiny percentage of women.  In
order to obtain an abortion in
B.C., a woman must have a
signed referral from usually one
general practitioner and two
gynecologists if the application is
on physical grounds. If it is on
•mental jjroiinds, a woman must
have referrals from a general
practitioner, one gynecologist
and one or two psychiatrists. ■
Thus a woman must degrade
herself before these men who
hold her future in their hands.
The attitudes of some of
these doctors are frightening.
Women's Caucus recently
conducted a survey of
Vancouver doctors regarding
their attitudes on abortion. One
doctor said, "I would favor
abortion if it were accompanied
by sexual sterilization." Another
said, "Broadening the (abortion)
law would tend towards
promiscuity."
Suicide?
The abortion law states that
an abortion may be performed
when there is a threat to the life
or health of the mother.
However, many women who
use the Abortion Information
Service, held every Tuesday
evening in the Labor Temple,
307 W. Broadway, are married,
with several children. They feel
they cannot afford another child
without endangering the health
and living standards of their
whole family.
These socio-economic reasons
for abortion are not considered
by hospital boards to be
legitimate, and so long as a
woman cannot prove that she
will commit suicide if forced to
complete the pregnancy, she will
be compelled to bear the
unwanted child.
The new law makes it
virtually impossible for poor and
working class women to obtain
safe abortions. Legal and illegal
abortions are available for those
who can pay for them Women
from Vancouver can go to
Britain or Japan for legal
abortions. A safe illegal abortion
in Vancouver costs almost as
much.
Laws made by men
The law makes abortion a
much more complicated
procedure than necessary. If an
abortion is performed during the
first twelve weeks of pregnancy,
it is not even a hospital
procedure. Yet the fact that the
requirements for abortion are
not clear, the involvement of
three or four doctors in the
application, and then the
hospital board, generally delays
the decision for several weeks.
Thus the woman who attempts a
legal abortion unsuccessfully,
gives up the alternative of an
illegal abortion because her
pregnancy has advanced too far.
Only five out of
approximately 65 women who,
in one month, requested
information from the Abortion
Information Service were
actually able to obtain a
therapeutic abortion.
According to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 100,000 illegal
abortions are performed in
Canada each year. There were
20,000 reported admissions to
hospital for post-abortive
complications last year and at
least 1,000 resulted in severe
disability or death.
Conservatively estimated,
12,000 women die a year from
illegal abortions in North
America.
Abortion laws are made by
men, not nature. Most societies
of antiquity practiced abortion
and records of an abortion
technique go back 3,000 years
before Christ in China.
It wasn't until 1869 that
Pope Pius IX decreed that all
abortion from the moment of
conception was murder.
He said, "The people
adhering to the worship of God
and our Saviour should daily
increase." (Casti commubii.)
This was in response to a
drastic drop in the birth rate in
France, resulting from
contraceptive devices, which
alarmed state and church who
had wars to fight and colonies to
populate.
Man-made laws which fall to
grant the choice of motherhood
not only condemn women to the
level of "brood" animals, but
deform the sanctity of birth
itself. Children should be created
as an achievement, not flung
into the world as disasterous
accidents.
We  can create laws forcing
women to bear unwanted
children but we cannot ensure
that they will not bear
resentment toward the children.
The provincial government is
also responsible for the
desperate situation of women
for it authorizes hospitals to do:
abortions. Local hospital boards
and municipal governments have
actually set quotas on the
number of legal abortions to be
performed.
Inhumanity
The growing movement of
women for control over our own
bodies and over our own lives
has already begun to win
victories. Rulings in the U.S.
now declare abortion laws to be
unconstitutional, because they
limit the individual human right
of each woman to decide herself
whether to continue pregnancy.
Throughout this campaign,
women will be organized to
confront the medical profession
and government on all levels
against these inhuman laws.
On Mother's Day, women
across Canada will join a
cavalcade, with a casket
symbolizing thousands of our
sisters deaths from illegal
abortions, to confront Ottawa
and demand the immediate
repeal of all abortion laws.
Going Skiing
Over the Mid-
Term Break?
GET YOUR CAR TUNED-UP NOW .. .
by the specialists  .  . .  Volkswagen,
Mercedes, Volvo . . .
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP   GUARANTEED"
P.S.-HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY  .  .  .  HANS
Indian education:
self
awareness
"I'm just as good as anybody
else... I want to be known as a
person first, not as an Indian ...
I'm proud to be an Indian . .. I'm
just happy to be alive ..."
These were the sentiments
expressed by speakers at a seminar
on Indian education in east mall
annex 117 Thursday.
Dan James, who spent 9
months in the Indian Post-Release
Centre, decided drinking, the pen,
and skid-row were "stupid" and
has been doing something about it
ever since.
In the two houses he directs on
West Fourth, Dan has a program
designed to fight the Indian
tendency for booze through a
program of group therapy.
Bob Davidson, from the Queen
Charlotte Islands, lived on the
reserve for the first 18 years of his
life. Since he came to Vancouver
to finish his Grade 12 he has
begun to discover his "self and
asks, "Who am I, as a person?"
Indians are being given the
choice between the reserve and
the white society and both sides
have their good and bad points.
Approximately 60 per cent of
the Indians go to public schools.
In Canada there are only 250
Indians going to university out of
aa population of more than
230,000.
"We're not economically
equipped for university,"
explained one speaker. "Indians
are the bottom of the totem pole
as far as jobs go".
When asked about integration,
especially in the schools, Davidson
replied, "It should work both
ways. An integrated school!
would give the children on both
sides a better outlook."
A comment from the floor
summed up the whole seminar,
"We're all in it together, the
Indians are in it more because
they're a minority.
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
VACATIONS
* OWllMlVUl-
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
685-7929
(FOR FREE INFORMATION) Friday, February 13,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—dave enns photo
hmmmm . . . what a luvly day . .. bzzz to poke holes in these donuts with
this horse .. . hmmmmbzzzzzzz.
Sparse voter turnout kills
second fee referendum
The industrial teacher's referendum has failed
again.
The referendum calling for the elimination of
the $15 SUB capital fee levy was defeated
Wednesday because not enough voters turned out at
the polls.
In order to pass, the referendum needed a
two-thirds majority with a minimum of 20 per cent
of the students voting.
The referendum was held because students at
the industrial teachers training centre in Burnaby
are paying for SUB but are not getting any use of its
facilities because they have no reason to come to
the campus.
The students in Burnaby feel they should be
exempt from the capital fee levy as are the students
in third and fourth year medicine.
Only 3,711 students out of a student population
of 21,000 voted, returning 2,575 favorable votes,
1,049 unfavorable votes, and 83 spoiled ballots.
"It is evident that students want the
referendum to pass, but just not enough people
went to the polls," said Alma Mater Society
treasurer Chuck Campbell.
"We (the AMS council) sent the money to the
students in Burnaby earlier this year, but it would
be nice to get this referendum through."
AMS secretary Ann Jacobs said the referendum
will run again with the second slate election
Wednesday.
Blood turnout shrinks
There are 2,000 more students at UBC than last year, but
the Red Cross blood clinic here got 400 fewer pints of blood this
year.
"For some reason or other the amount of blood we have
received at UBC has dropped off over the past few years," said
Red Cross director T. W. Mitchell.
Last year the Red Cross got 2,602 pints compared to 3.000
pints several years ago. This year the figure was 2,423.
'The decrease isn't due to a lack of publicity, the forestry
students did an excellent job of advertising," said Mitchell.
However, the Red Cross is not dissatisfied since they had
expected to get 2,000 to 3,000 pints of blood.
Despite the fact that 93,000 pints of blood are needed in
the province every year, Mitchell said there is no shortage at this
time.
'Female academics
a rare phenomena'
By ROBIN BURGESS
When you talk about women
academics you're talking about
something as rare as unicorns, Dr.
Margaret Benston told students
Wednesday.
Benston, the second speaker in
a series of educationals sponsored
by the women's liberation group
on campus told students in SUB
125 the hard facts about women
in the universities in her lecture
"Always a lecture, never a head."
"I'm one of two women out of
25 faculty members in the
chemistry department at Simon
Fraser University," she said. "This
proportion is incredibly high.
Even a token woman in a
department is the exception
rather than the rule."
Most women professionals are
teachers, nurses or social workers.
But even in these "accepted"
occupations, she said, women are
shoved to the bottom of the
income ladder, with almost no
hope of advancing to a good
administrative position.
According to Benston, women
university graduates receive an
average income of $4000
compared to an average income of
$8900 for men.
"Of the women in the
professions according to US
statistics, about one quarter of
one per cent of engineers are
women and nine per cent of
registered scientists," she said.
"Girls who express an interest
in medicine are channelled off
into nursing; girls that express an
interest in science are told how
difficult it is."
In university women who are
still   determined   to   enter   the ,
"taboo" professions are reminded
over and over again that they'll
never be able to get jobs.
"If you survive all these things
and make it into grad school you
run into the first overt
discrimination. Some grad schools
just will simply not accept
women," said Benston.
She described some of her own
encounters at grad school while
studying for her doctorate in
theoretical chemistry with
professors who felt training
women was "a waste of time"
because they only get married.
"It is nearly impossible for a
Benston  .
"channelled off"
woman to combine a normal
marriage and an academic career,"
she said.
Generally women who try to
combine the two have no children
or else only begin their academic
career after their children are
grown, she said.
Women PhDs who marry other
PhDs generally sacrifice their
careers for their husbands'.
Many universities will not hire
married couples," she added.
Vietnam war increasing racism, poverty in U.S.'
By LINDA HOSSIE
The U.S.-Vietnam war is the dominant factor
worsening the conditions of all working people in the U.S.
and Canada, an international peace conference in
Vancouver stated last week.
The conference also said the war is directly
responsible for the increased racism, poverty and
repression in the U.S.
It was agreed by the conference that the attacks on
the Black Panther party, Chicanos (Mexican-Americans)
and others were the precursors of similar attacks on all
groups resisting war and oppression.
The participants in the conference called for amnesty
for all political prisoners and victims of repression in the
U.S., and for support for several days of protest coming
up in February and March.
Attending the conference were delegates from more
than one hundred and twenty-five peace-oriented
organizations from the U.S. and Canada and a delegation
from the World Peace Council.
Although the conference claimed to represent a
cross-section of the peace movement and concerned
committees, the only Vancouver group to be invited was
the Communist Party.
Young radical groups in Vancouver such as the
Young Socialists and the Progressive Workers did not even
know the conference was taking place.
Honoured participants in the conference were a
three-man delegation of North Vietnamese headed by
Tran Cong Tuong, member of parliament and
secretary-general of the Lawyer's Association of North
Vietnam.
Krishna Menon former defence minister of India,
pastor Martin Niemoller were guest speakers.
The conference supported actions planned in the U.S.
on April 15th, such as work stoppages, demonstrations
and other forms of protest against the war in
Vietnam, racism, poverty and repression.
It also endorsed the demonstrations planned for late
spring against corporations producing war materials.
The selection of Montreal as a site for this summer's
commission of inquiry hearings into war crimes was also
endorsed.
The conference agreed to support efforts to give the
Vietnamese direct material aid being carreid on by such
organizations as Canadian Aid for Vietnam Civilians and
the American Friends Service Committee.
The conference recognized that war and the
preparation for war is a major factor in the pollution of
the human environment.
Efforts to eliminate this source of pollution, such as
opposition to the U.S. anti-ballistic missile system and
the halting of shipments of lethal gases from Okinawa to
points in the U.S. were called for by the conference.
The conference also recommended opposition to the
genocidal nature of modern war as exemplified by the war
in Vietnam. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 13,  1970
m wsstY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 13, 1970
What we got
We suppose we're expected to say something about
the election.
Well, there was a low turnout, for which our new
President Hodge has all sorts of excuses and
justifications. In the light of the heavy turnout for the
referendum on compulsory fees and the defeat of the
voluntary union idea, none of these excuses stand up.
The fact is that UBC is simply not a very lively
campus, not a very concerned campus, not a very
interested campus. The people are basically
conservative: they would rather maintain, indeed they
will fight to maintain, the status quo rather than cause
any disturbance.
The referendum reaffirmed the status quo. The
election was of no consequence to most people because
everyone knew that Tony Hodge and Chuck Campbell
are part of that status quo and that nothing drastic was
likely to happen, whichever one was elected.
At the same time, those opposed to the AMS as a
compulsory union, and they number in the thousands,
saw no point in voting and legitimizing the structure.
So those in favor of calm and non-interference
don't vote because there is no threat and those in favor
of change don't vote because the structure is repellent
and the choice is non-existent.
Not a very pretty situation.
Nevertheless, it exists and we have to cope with it.
We have tried initiating change and we will probably try
again, no matter how futile it seems and no matter how
much the majority of students don't care. Why we will
do this, we really don't know.
And we can hope that perhaps a personality, an
intelligent power in the executive will at least get
things done within the illegitimate structure so that our
money will not be totally wasted on idiot political
campaigns, incomprehensible concert bombs and
ridiculous questionnaires.
In other words, Tony, don't fuck up.
Poems
This week The Ubyssey and Page Friday move into
the league of major literary magazines with publication
of a poetry issue.
The poems presented in the issue are not drivel,
sentimental slop or amateur musings: they are poems of
the highest quality, some by some .of the most respected
poets on the continent, others by younger poets whose
material appears in the top literary journals of North
America, England, Europe and Australia.
We believe this is important. We believe that poetry
should not be by-passed in favor of politics, petty
squabbles and inconsequential events. Some of the most
important things being said are being said in poems.
Read  them.  And  read them again.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News      Paul  Knox
City   Nate Smith
Managing  ._   Bruce  Curtis
Photo       Pave  Enns
Wire     Irene  Wasilewski
Sports    Jim Maddin
Senior    John Twigg
Ass't News —  Maurice Bridge
Ass't City       John  Andersen
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
The Danish Prince blorged under
city desk today along with most of the
rest of the staff as Uncle Ben became
first choice for next year's editor.
Birthday girl Sandy Kass put out a Dig
feature to celebrate while Brian
McWatters and new people Helen Ohrt
and John Butler were towers of
power(s). Jennifer Jordan was nice.
Dave Keillor and Ginny Gait waited for
stories that didn't come but the AMS
did (sort of) with its annual elections
orgasm. Phil Barkworth covered that.
Linda Hossie and Jim Davies worked
and Fran McGrath CLAM rapped.
"MMMMMMMM," said Robin Burgess.
Dave Enns became hed fotog while
David Bowermen and Maureen Gans
drooled. Brett Garrett and Keith
Dunbar also snapped shots. Dick
Button, Tony Gallagher and Scott
McCloy braggied jocks and Peggi Selby
flew in from Edmonton to help
celebrate Peter Ladner's 21st today.
Society destroys words
of the revolution
The following is a collective statement by the
Campus Left Action Movement.  A  CLAM rap.
session on this topic will be held at noon today in
SUB 212A.
When you see the word "revolution" do you
think of a new underarm deodorant or of social
change? When you think of a "liberated" woman is
she politically conscious or has she just used a new
type of lipstick? When something is real is it a
genuine experience, or merely a soft-drink that has
been around for the last four decades?
In Orwell's 1984 some men are constantly
employed by the party in changing the language, in
destroying and erasing from the memory such words
as freedom. By destroying the word they hope to
destroy the the thought behind the word. While this
is clearly impossible, for people would find a new
word for thought that arose from their daily
experience, it is certainly possible to manipulate the
thinking of a great many people by the use of
certain words and the "destruction" of others.
Our society destroys words too. And it destroys
precisely those words that express what threatens it
the most: revolution, liberation, reality. One way to
destroy a word is to use it in a context which
completely confuses its meaning. If a new anti-sweat
spray is a revolutionary change in our lives then
what do we call an event that sweeps away an old
way of life and changes the lives of millions of
people? If liberation means simply on which
product do you choose to spend your money then
what do we call the act of eating away old ideas and
old systems?
The other method of word-destruction is
simply to discredit a word, to label anyone who
would use such a word a fanatic, a misguided dupe.
Such a word is imperialism. The word accurately
describes a system for which there is no other word:
a system under which millions must suffer
throughout the world so that a priveleged few in
North America can continue to rule them. But
imperialism destroys the word which defines it and
thereby hopes to deny its own existence. As people ~
now hear the word they shrink away or smile
knowingly at hearing it rather than discussing what
is means and what it represents in the world.
Unfortunately some "left-wing" groups also
contribute to this process. By putting labels on
everything and everybody, by calling anyone who
disagrees with them a "fascist" or an "imperialist"
agent, they too destroy words. The unfortunate fact
is that there are fascists in the world and that1
imperialism exists all around us controlling our
entire lives. Precisely because this is so we must be
sure to talk about these things in a way that will
help people to an understanding of the real situation
and not confuse things even further.
Frats—what to know
By BROCK TULLY
The following are some personal reflections by
a fraternity member.
"People in fraternities are insecure." Maybe
some are. But maybe they like people around;
maybe they like to get to know people with
different interests and to cooperate and work
together with them towards common goals. The
whole point is that people that are in fraternities
enjoy them, otherwise they would get out and do
something else. Is it wrong that they are doing
something they enjoy because it isn't what you
would enjoy? I believe that everyone should do
what they want as long as it doesn't hurt others.
We realize there are weaknesses in fraternities
but we are always trying to do something about
them It's the easiest thing in the world to sit back
and criticize but why don't you bring your
disagreements to us. We should either be able to
answer them, or show you that we've been trying to
do something about them, or that if your criticism
is a just one we are, I hope, open-minded enough to
do something about them.
Like many others I don't agree with rush at the
beginning of the year, but we haven't as yet found a
better way. What do you suggest? Everybody that
rushes will be able to join a fraternity, but it may
not be the one he would like to join. You can't just
let everybody into one fraternity because it takes
away one of the purposes of a fraternity - and that
is a closeness between people which a large group
doesn't permit. It also doesn't seem to work to let
people in who aren't willing to share in the work as
it is discouraging for the few who do work.
"Complaints about fees - about $125" - we
are not trying to make money. All the money goes
towards something that has to be paid for. It's not
good that people who want to join can't join
because they haven't got the money. It's too bad
people can't get their education because they
haven't got the money; join a golf club; etc. Again
what can you do? The money is a necessity
unfortunately.
Things   in   a  fraternity   that   you   may   know-
about:
* Songfest - teams from each fraternity
practice for months in preparation for a
performance at the Q.E. Theatre.
* Mardi Gras - a fund-raising event for charity
which is trying to be improved upon - it is Greek
sponsored but is not composed entirely of Greeks
but any club can participate in the bazaar and any
person can take part in the floor show.
* work parties for the maintenance of the
house.
* intramural sports - organized and with
people you know.
* events where fraternities from the states
come to Vancouver and vice versa and exchange
ideas and thoughts.
You can cut this article to pieces if you want
but if you really want to find out what fraternities
are all about and what the people are like in them
we will have an open discussion on Wednesday,
February 18 at 9:30 p.m. at 2140 Wesbrook Cres.
Everybody is welcome and we will discuss whatever
you feel like talking about.
Have a look, question, discuss, be open-minded,
and choose for yourself whether a fraternity is good
for you or not. Make up your own mind. Do what
you want, not what others say you should do.
Would anyone who has had
strange, weird, amusing or
dangerous experiences while
hitch-hiking or while driving a
hitch-hiker please come to The
Ubyssey office in SUB at noon
Monday.
The editor is researching a
radio program for CBC and
would appreciate talking to
women who have had trouble
with male attackers or:
exhibitionists, males
approached by homosexual
drivers or anyone who thinks
they might have something
interesting to say about
hitch-hiking.
Interviews will be on tape
but speakers will not i be
identified. Any help would be
appreciated.
LETTERS
Women
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I write this in reply to the
"comment" by Vancouver
Women's Caucus member Ellen
Woodsworth, in the Feb. 6 issue
of The Ubyssey.
From a woman, a human being
who considers herself "free," to
all who consider a "gear-weak"
stunt as an "overt display of their
low regard for women."
I feel sorry for you. Lady
Godiva was doing her job. She got
paid for it. The "gears" were not
expressing contempt for women.
They were pulling a stunt.
Therefore, it is ludicrous to hurl
ultra-feminist   invective   at   the
UBC engineers who you seem to_
feel    represent   collective   man^
"who is so insecure that he must
try    to    bolster    himself   by
manipulating women."
Like you, Miss Woodsworth, I
am also glad to be a woman. May
I request that you exclude me
from the ranks of "every woman"
who "knows and thinks and feels
about what happened on
Wednesday," because I am afraid
that some of us have
misunderstood. What will a
woman be after she is, as you pur
it, "liberated?"
AN ENGINEER'S SNAKE.
P.S. Would you rather the
"gears" were overt in expressing
their contempt for women? Friday, February 13,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
 PETITION	
WHEREAS, The Government' of the United States has evidenced its intention to detonate a
further powerful nuclear device in the Aleutian Islands.
AND WHEREAS, There exists even a minimal possibility that such a blast could cause serious
damage by way of earthquake, tidal wave, the escape of radio active particles, or other, as yet unknown, effects.
AND WHEREAS, The justification for such blast is claimed by way of need for an effective
nuclear deterrent.
AND WHEREAS, The Government of the United States has previously admitted possessing
nuclear strike capability sufficient to totally annihilate the earth's population.
AND WHEREAS, The President of the United States has recently shown at least verbal concern for Man's reckless desecration of his own environment.
We the undersigned, implore the Government of the United States to cease such conduct
which we deem to be unjustified by any rational standard, potentially dangerous to the Nationals of
this country and contrary to the interests of humanity:
NAME
ADDRESS
STUDENT NUMBER
Boxes will be placed in strategic locations around campus to receive these petitions. In the meantime, return them to The
Ubyssey's office, room 241-K, SUB."
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Across from Admin. Building
+
Any day 7:30 a.m.—11:00 p.m.
Sunday 10:30 a.m. Worship
DON'T MISS THE ACTION!!
PROFESSIONAL INDOOR
MOTORCYCLE
RACES
EXCITING
ACTION!
7:30 P.M.
SAT. FEB.
14th
CLOVERDALE FAIRGROUNDS
JUST 20 MILES FROM VANCOUVER
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE $1.00 WITH CARD
EUROPE
ON A Mlh|l BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS —SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For Full  Information &  Dates.  Etc., Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  13,  1970
•      i
Davies
Ravies
Serious paraphernalia
By JIM DAVIES
I am usually relatively happy.
However, at this time I thought
that I would try to make people
think instead of laugh. This is
what's happening . . .
At West Point, the U.S.
military academy, any candidate
that does not attend chapel is
subject to judgment by his
superiors. Offenders are liable for
punishment of 44 hours of
marching and two months of
confinement.
John Sinclair, American white
panther leader was sentenced to
nine to ten years for giving two
joints to an undercover agent.
Two stories in the same issue
of the Dallas Morning News told
of an 18 year old youth sentenced
to 30 years for selling 12 dollars
worth of marijuana to an
undercover agent (a first offense)
while another man was sentenced
to five years for a shotgun murder
of a man who he claimed had
been dating his wife.
Former mayor of New York,
R. F. Wagner illustrated the
sentiments of many politicians
towards poverty when he stated;
"The gathering hostility of that
one-fifth of our population has
the capacity of dealing shattering
blows to our stable social order.
This is a danger what we face; a
danger we must meet."
Said James Baldwin: "The
Negroes of this country may never
be able to rise to power, but they
Davies
are very well placed indeed to
precipitate chaos and ring down
the curtain on the American
dream."
According to the text, Urban
America; "The Vietnam war costs
$150,000 a minute."
According to Billboard, the
bible of the rock followers, Sugar
Sugar by the Archies was the
number one song of 1969.
James Call, 23, of Vancouver,
recently spent 13 days in Oakalla
for jaywalking.
A new "second deodorant" for
men, Braggi, to be used in the
groin area, advertises, "If you
think you don't need it, you're
kidding yourself."
The age restriction has been
lifted, permitting J. Edgar Hoover
to continue as head of the FBI.
The age limit has also been
removed to permit Walter Gage to
remain administration president at
UBC.
Elsewhere at UBC, only six
candidates contested the four
AMS positions, attracting only
one in five students to the polls.
Said AMS president Fraser
Hodge at the time of the "big
referendum": "I am not one given
to low level mudslinging.
However. . . (on.Carey Linde) the
child found he could get all the
attention he wanted by rattling
the playpen and smashing his toys
against the wall.. . (on John
Cherrington) were you playing to
the Socred ministers in Victoria,
or was it merely a plot to get your
name in the Vancouver Sun?"
Economics prof and UBC
senator, A. D. Scott said: "The
university should not accept
direction from the surrounding
community as to what its research
should be." There was general
agreement among other senators.
Said American army deserter
Jim Shearer: "In the field they'd
cut off the VC's ear, or penis and
put it in his mouth. Sometimes
they'd tear off their First Cav.
shoulder patches and stab in his
head with a bayonet."
This is what's happening. As H.
L. Mencken said, "Nobody ever
went broke underestimating the
intelligence of the American
public."
New centre counsels young people
The Youth Action Service
(YAS) is an organization offering
free aid to young people.
So far, YAS has been helping
young people with legal aid,
information    about    drug    use,
discussion groups and talks with
parents and young people about
the problems they face.
The Jewish Community Centre
at Forty-first and Oak is the home
base for operations and is only
one of many such agencies being
established all over the city.
If you have problems or would
like to help out, phone 266-2396
from Sunday to Wednesday
between 7 and 10 pm.
COMING
FEB. 17
See Page Friday 11
""       MEEk     DAY ATMR-
DAY IS      VM MIKE'S
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Goodtyme Sound
has the NEW
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8:00 on Sundays
THE SENSES
COME TOGETHER
FEBRUARY 25
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
G.S.A.-A.G.M.
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February 25
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LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville ot Pender Since 1904
Notre Dame accepts
early  applications
Notre Dame University in Nelson has approved a policy
allowing B.C. grade 12 students to apply for admission as soon as
Easter examination results are known.
"Students will be accepted on the basis of their grade 11
and grade 12 marks," said registrar E. D. Baravalle.
He said early registrations would ease a lot of the pressure
that occurs with the full registration rush.
Students not qualifying under the new policy because their
marks are not high enough could continue to apply for admission
on receipt of their official transcripts after the June exams, he
said.
Simon Fraser University, the University of Victoria and
UBC will have the same type of admissions procedure this spring.
UBC gets cyclotron
The UBC]J cyclotron came one step closer to completion
Tuesday with the awarding by the UBC board of governors of a
$1.94 million contract for the fabrication of the cyclotron
magnets.
Cyclotrons are capable of accelerating subatomic particles
to high speeds so that their high energy causes fundamental
changes within the particles when colliding with other particles.
The TRIUMF cyclotron will primarily be used for
experiments within the nucleus. There is particular interest in the
meson particles which are involved in the transfer of forces which
hold the nucleus together.
The first beam of subatomic particles is scheduled to pass
through the cyclotron in 1973.
<^>
JW
Sat., Feb. 14, 105.7 Mcs.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
Plesctibtioti Optical
Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU Friday, February 13,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Ecologist campaigns for Royal Bank
By FRAN McGRATH
The Environmental Crisis
Operation is now involved in two
projects that give students an
opportunity to express concern
about their environment.
Ecology grad student George
Calif is organizing a campaign of
support for the Royal Bank of
Canada, which has published
newsletters   on   pollution   and
environmental quality. This
contrasts with the Bank of
Montreal's ad which says:
"Canadian businessmen attack
this planet with everything they
have got."
Calif wants people to shift
their bank accounts to the Royal
Bank from March 15 to April 1.
"We believe that concerned
individuals    should    support
corporations like the Royal
Bank," Calif said.
He wants people who switch
their account to write letters to
the presidents of both banks
affected by the transfer.
"The letter to the Royal Bank
should tell them to put their'
money where their mouth is," he
said.
In an interview Thursday, ECO
Ontario U fights inflation
TORONTO (CUP) - Ontario
University professors have agreed
to do their bit to aid the federal
government in its latest assault on
inflation: they will drop attempts
to obtain mid-term salary
increases this year.
Charles Hanly, executive
vice-chairman of the Ontario
Confederation of University
Faculty Associations, told a press
conference Tuesday that
professors have agreed to
"voluntary constraints" outlined
in a submission to the prices and
incomes commission at Ottawa.
Last year, Hanly said,
professors at the Universities of
Western Ontario, Ottawa and
Waterloo got mid-term raises of
from 4 to 8 per cent.
This year, he said, some
universities — including the
University of Toronto, York
University and UWO — had agreed
to re-open negotiations during the
year if revenue from government
grants was higher than
anticipated.
The professors also agreed to
reduce salary demands for next
year by approximately 15 per
cent. Faculty associations at 15
Ontario universities are seeking
pay increases averaging about 20
per cent.
Average salary at the
University   of   Toronto,   where
professors are seeking pay
increases of 22 per cent, is
$16,000 for all ranks. York
professors, asking 20 per cent,
average $13,000.
The OCUFA represents about
90 per cent of faculty members at
Ontario's 15 government-financed
institutions.
Prof goes berserk
PHILADELPHIA (CUPI) - A previously quiet mathematician,
thwarted in his attempt to earn a doctorate, took out his anger in a
burst of gunfire inside a University of Pennsylvania lecture hall here
Feb. 12, wounding two other professors and then fatally shooting
himself in the mouth.
Police said Robert H. Cantor, 33, an instructor at Temple
University and a former Penn graduate student, stormed into a
mathematics colloquium and opened fire with a .45-calibre
automatic.
He fired five shots at his former adviser, Walter Koppleman,
and former mathematics department chairman Oscar Goldman,
wounding them both.
Koppleman and Goldman were in the   front row on a six-tier
' row  of  seats  listening  to  a lecture  on  "Technical Advanced
Mathematics"   when  Canton   entered.   The   rest   of  the   dozen
professors in the room ducked and ran for cover when Cantor
opened fire.
Dear Speak Easy,
"An afternoon a while ago, I didn't have any
classes so decided to go shopping near where I
live. I had just turned onto Broadway when a
police car pulled up along side and hailed me. I
went over and they asked for identification. I
showed them my driver's licence and they jotted
down my name and address.
"I asked them why they were taking my
name down. They said it was a vagrancy check
and I got mad and said you mean you can stop
anyone you like. They replied they certainly can
and went on to say if I gave them any trouble,
they'd give me lots of trouble.
"I now got quite scared and decided I'd
better be cool and polite or they'd find
something to charge me with. After a few more
words   they   pulled   away   leaving   me   quite
depressed — the pleasant afternoon had been
shattered.
"I still get upset when I think about it. Is
this legal? Can the police make  this demand
when you're not breaking any law?"
Hassled
Legally   the   police   cannot   ask   you   for
identification without giving you a reason, unless
you are in an automobile. However, they can
always say it is on suspicion of vagrancy and that
is   grounds   enough   to   force:   you   to   show
identification. In general, being polite and cool is
probably a good idea. To put it mildly, the police
have, beside legal powers, considerable power of
harassment, we would be interested in hearing of
experiences people have had with police.
THE HISTORY
GRADUATE  PROGRAMME
Sir George Williams
University
The History Department of Sir
George Williams University offers
Graduate instruction leadtng to the
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in European. Canadian, American, and
Asian and African History. Next
year two distinguished professors of
European History, George Rude and
Lionel Rothkrug, will join the departmental   staff.
Application's for the Graduate
Programme are now being accepted. A limited number of Teaching
Assistantships are also being offered.
For further information,
write to
The Director of Graduate
Studies
Sir George Williams
University
Department   of   History
MONTREAL   107   -   CANADA
LUCKY   LARRY
Larry Bryce Donaldson
(Comm.-2) of 126 E. 35th,
Vancouver won Canuck's
tickets for two in the
February 6th draw of the
UBC Students Only Home Oil
Contest. More winners every
week — could be you! Turn
to page23 for details on how
to enter.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick Geerdink
612 4th Avenue
New Westminster, B.C.(Corr
No. 2 Dinner for Two at the
Grouse Nest
William G. Callaway
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
Hy's
George R. Heinmiller
8018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, B.C. (Co
i-2)
No. 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Bunn
207, 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.       .(Educ-4)
No. 5 Evening for Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Howatt
4612 West 9th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C. (Comm-6)
. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126 E 35th
Vancouver 5, B.C. [Comi
. 7 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Joe D. English
109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.{Science-4)
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
400 One  Bentoll Ctr.,  505  Burrard, Vancouver  1,  B.C.
member Paul Pearlstone said
'This campaign is a experiment in
group pressure.
"The question is, if an
institution such as a bank has its
concern rammed down its throat,
will it change its policy?"
He said the group felt the only
real difference between the banks
was in their publicity.
Pearlstone said if the response
to the campaign was good the
group plans to present the bank
with a petition prepared by
specialists suggesting specific
actions it could take to have its
investment policy follow its
publicity stand.
"We are receiving a lot of
support from groups such as
Pollution Probe in Ontario."
He said if people supported the
campaign but did not want to
transfer their account they could
write letters to the banks.
Meanwhile, lower mainland
anti-pollution groups are
organizing a "festival for survival"
on March 21.
Pearlstone said interested
people would gather at the
courthouse and travel to
Lumberman's Arch in Stanley
Tark.
COMING
FEB. 17
THE     ?     ?
See Page Friday 11
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY- 224-1720
4450 W.  10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS  TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
10062   Kin.i   George   Hwy,   —   588-2727
2052   Kingswdv   —  874-3622
Goodtyme Sound
is DYNACO Warranty
Call 732-0114
OVERSEAS
AUTO PARTS
Sports Car Accessories
Abarth - Cosmis - Dunlop
Amco - Kowl - Weber
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736-9804
2780 Alma (at 12th Ave.)
Ill CLASS
OF 1970
don't forget the
GENERAL MEETING
ON FEBRUARY 26 AT 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
On the agenda is the presentation and' ratification of the class budget, election of honorary class
president and vice president, class valedictorian,
poet, prophet, will writer and historian.
Class gift ideas must be submitted to the grad council,
Box 41, SUB by February 19 in order to be considered at
the general meeting. Final decision on the gift will be will
be reached at the meeting.   "
CYVR SPORTS
THE VOICE OF
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
PRESENTS
UBC vs. SFU BASKETBALL
Saturday Feb. 14 - 7:45 p.m.
Live and Direct
From the Pacific Coliseum
Semi-Final Playoffs also on the air
Feb. 20-21 at 7:45 p.m. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,   1970
Lower standard of living
to  combat  pollution'
By SANDY KASS
A lower standard of living may be the only
solution to the problem of environmental pollution.
According to zoology grad student Don Ware:
"mankind must work together to fight the far-
reaching and damaging effects of pollution in our
environment."
Speaking to a handful of interested people in
the International House Thursday, Ware, along with
ecologists Dr. Edward Hoffman and Dr. Bill Rees,
cited a lower standard of North American life as a
necessary means to combat world wide pollution
of our natural resources.
"North Americans produce 30 to 50 times as
much pollution as Asians do," said Rees.
"Ours is the society to which world
development is geared, and if this is the kind of
example we are setting, then we have no business to
be in this kind of position."
He cited the automobile as one of the main
causes of the air pollution problem we face today.
"In Vancouver alone, 33 per cent of land use is
devoted to the automobile. It has been predicted,
that by the end of this century, all agricultural land
in the Fraser Valley will be turned into urban
sprawl. Then what sort of a problem are we going to
have?" he said.
"From the 70 million cars operating daily on
North America, an impressive amount of definite
and potential pollution is produced. The results of
this are only now becoming obvious. Besides an
insult to our nostrils, it is a very real danger to our
health."
According to Ware, the most important thing
we should be thinking about, is what we want from
our environment.
"An attitude exists that we have not shaken off
from our frontier past. All along we've been looking
for some place to get away from it all. Well, the past
is catching up with us — there's no place left to go,"
he said.
"We have never considered the fact that our
environment may not have an infinite capacity for
absorbing punishment," said Rees.
"Modern    technology    couldn't    be    more
primitive at this stage."
Hoffman cited cost as the major opposition to
the restructuring of the automotive industry.
"The price of cars running on non-pollutants
such as steam or electricity would triple at
minimum, and people just don't want to pay that
much for an everyday convenience," he said.
While he said the industry may take on the
initial cost increase, no present changes are being
considered.
In a question period, the speakers were asked
about the conflicting views on the heating or
cooling of, temperatures as a result of air pollution.
"I have to admit, we still don't know enough
about it," said Ware,
"Solar heat is kept from radiating back into the
atmosphere by the concentration of carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere, yet this same concentration of
particles keeps a good percentage of solar energy
from reaching the earth in the first place."
When asked about enforcing population
controls as a means to combat pollution, Rees
replied: "many problems have emerged this century,
their roots being in over-population.
"Pollution by definition is garbage. Technology
produces this just as much as the people that run it.
When there are more people, there is more technology
to supply their needs.
"We haven't yet learned how to functionally
reconvert this garbage into usable material.
"If we can't mobilize technology to do this,
then we're going to be buried in our own garbage."
In his state of the union address, U.S. president
Richard Nixon called for a re-allocation of funds,
allowing for a comprehensive program to combat
the problem of environmental pollution.
In Canada, there has as yet, been no such move.
At a B.C. pollution control board meeting
Wednesday, representatives from various cities made
their concern known.
They expressed a desire to enforce any
provincial legislation concerning air, land or water
pollution by local by-laws in the various areas and
making violation of these laws a criminal offense.
"We've got to recognize that the earth has real
limits," said Rees.
First there was darkness
. . . then there was light,
and behold sound filled the
silence.
FEBRUARY 25
Goodtyme Sound
has KLH speakers
exclusively
Call 732-0114
LISA'S FLORIST
6570 VICTORIA DRIVE
Flowers For
All Occasions
FREE DELIVERY
Bus. 321-1411
Res. 434-1423
"THE BRIDE & I"
In   Mandarin  with   English   and
Chinese   subtitle
SHOWN ON
Feb. 17 & 18 - 7:30 p.m.
0LYMPIA THEATRE
2381 E. Hastings
Student $1.00
You talk a lot
about the problems
of this world.
Do you really want
to help solve
some of them?
You're a high school student.
Sooner or later you're going to have to stop just talking about
the problems of the world and start doing something about them.
Are you ready to? Are you ready to accept a meaningful
position? Earn your own income? Be responsible for your own
future security?
If you are, you're ready to see us about our Regular Officer
Training Plan. It leads to an officer's commission and a degree in
Arts, Sciences or Engineering.
For more information contact your local military career
counsellor.
m
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST., VANOUVER
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
PERSONAL
ATTRACTIVE    MAN    32,   good
job, wishes to meet attractive lady
25 to 35. Please send photo. Box
35.
RETI
RED
BUSINESSMAN
would
like
to
meet     mature
woman.
Object
companionship.
Box 72
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
11 run in second slate elections
There are 11 people running for four
positions in the second slate of the Alma
Mater Society elections Wednesday as
compared with only six people who ran for
four seats in the first slate elections.
The four positions being contested are
those of vice-president, treasurer and
internal affairs and external affairs officers.
Til Nawatzki, law 1, is running for three
AMS offices: vice-president, treasurer and
internal affairs officer on an anti-AMS
stance.
"There is too much personal rivalry in
the AMS," he said.
Student senator Peter Brock, seconding
Nawatzki, said a vote for Nawatzki is a vote
against "the administration, establishment,
motherhood, apple pie and the clean
beaming middle-class faces you usually see in
the AMS offices." Nawatzki is also running
for treasurer and internal affairs officer and
^id if he won office he would like to win
the office with the most power.
Vice-president candidate Christine
Krawczyk, arts 2, said next year will be
critical for the AMS and it is time the AMS
proved itself to the students.
"The AMS should become involved with
the research centre started by former Simon
Fraser University prof Mordecai Briemberg,"
she said. The centre is concerned with
sociological research on the community and
how it operates.
Krawczyk also wanted to see students
attending AMS council and executive
meetings and thought some students should
be found to research on specific UBC
organizations like the bookstore.
Kelvin Beckett, arts 4, is running for the
vice-presidency on the platform of more sex
on campus.
"I feel prostitutes should be brought on
campus for boys who want them and for
boys who have girls we should set up rooms
equipped with beds and the rest. For boys
with no girls we should set up coin operated
masturbation machines."
The fourth candidate for the
vice-presidency is George Gibault, arts; 3.
Gibault listed these priorities for the
AMS: support of the Native Youth
Federation, support of anti-pollution
campaigns, separation of the job-training
aspects of UBC from the intellectual aspects,
guaranteeing to Canadian grad students of
jobs, and operation of research and teaching
by faculty.
The fifth candidate, David Welsh, arts 4,
was unavailable for comment.
Besides Nawatzki, the other candidate
for treasurer is the present treasurer assistant
Stuart Bruce, commerce 4.
Bruce said he thinks the treasurer's job
is extremely powerful and complex and that
he is the only candidate suitable for the job.
Bruce listed these specific proposals: more
lounge facilities in SUB, investigation of life
insurance plans for students, no fee
increases, expansion of cafeteria facilities
and support of co-op housing.
The candidates for internal affairs
officer are Nawatzki, David Schmidt, arts 2,
Sue Kennedy, home economics 2, and Alex
Murray, arts 2.
Schmidt said it is time the AMS did a
job. The AMS is becoming too much of a
service union and should concern itself more
with what students want, he said.
He suggested a page of The Ubyssey
dedicated to AMS news and suggestions by
individuals about what the AMS should do.
Alex Murray said more money should
go to The Ubyssey and CYVR and the AMS
should better organize student housing
projects.
Susan Kennedy, the other internal
affairs candidate, was unavailable for
comment.
The candidates for external affairs are
Clayton Vogler, arts 2, and John Zaozirny,
law 1. Vogler would like to see provincial
cabinet ministers visiting the UBC facilities,
classes and SUB so they can see for
themselves UBC's problems.
Specific problems Vogler listed were:
size of classrooms, lack of ventilation in
buildings, apathy of students, and the fact
that The Ubyssey is printed only twice a
week.
Zaozirny was unavailable for comment.
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Science week ends Friday with a lecture by
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Research   psychologist  John   Krumboltz   will
lecture on "Counselling and the New Morality" in
Hebb theatre at 8 pm Friday.
Krumboltz will also head the sixth annual
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Saturday.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,  1970
Goodtyme Sound
has the only Anechoic
Sound Room in Vancouver
Call 732-0114
Goodtyme Sound
Gives Special Discounts
to Students
Call 732-0114
THE EGRET And The HAWK
A Programme of Nu & Yeats
Directed   by  MOYRA  MULHOLLAND
FEBRUARY 17-21—8:30 P.M.
in the new SOMERSET STUDIO
Tickets:  Room 207-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
STUDENTS: $1.00 ADULTS: $1.50
STEAK   BREAK!
Winner of the weekly dinner
for two at Hy's Steak House
is George Heinmiller
(Comm.-2) of 8018 Cambie
Street, Vancouver. You could
be next! Enter the big Home
Oil UBC Students Only
contest' Details on page'23.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick Geerdink
612 4th Avenue
New Westminster. B.C.(Comm-3)
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
George R. Heinmiller
8018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, B-C.(Comm-2)
No. 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Bunn
207, 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. (Educ-4)
No. 5 Evening tor Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Howatt
No. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126 E 35th
Vancouver 5, B.C. (Comm-3)
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Tickets for Two
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109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.(Science-4)
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Mental Health
Ubyssey reporter Sandy Kass visits the psychiatric ward
partment and finds a modern approach to the problem
A dedicated team of workers is paving the
way for a modernization of psychiatric care at
UBC's new psychiatric hospital.
The unit, which opened at 2250 Wesbrook last
March, is part of a future health sciences hospital
and is not to be confused with the present
Wesbrook hospital.
The new centre embodies many principles to
combat the "out of mind — out of sight"
philosophy surrounding many psychiatric hospitals.
The basic idea for the new centre came from a
1964 national committee on mental health which
recommended several changes of conditions in
Canadian hospitals.
The committee recommended localization of
services so that more persons could be reached by
them, as well as an integration of medical and
psychiatric services.
"This unit is, in effect, an effort to embody these
principles," said unit head Dr. James Tyhurst.
Not only are services localized, but they are
available 24 hours a day with a resident psychiatrist
on call at all times.
At present, just under 200 patients are serviced
by the hospital:
• 60 in-patients who live in the unit; 60
out-patients who live at their homes, but come to
the unit once a day or once a week for therapy of
office visits;
•, 47 day patients, who live in their own homes,
but come to the unit every day for a full schedule of
activities;
• five night patients who work at their own jobs
during the day but live at the hospital at night,
rather than at their homes.
However, it was not until last year that such a
program was possible.
Service for all
In March, 1969, the provincial government
decided to support out-patient services within the
framework of in-patient care.
The provincial and federal governments split the
hospital's expenses, making the facilities free to
anyone who needs them.
"This is another step in dissolving the myth that
only the rich can receive psychiatric care," Tyhurst
said.
However, according to resident psychologist Bob
Crosslan, the financial situation surrounding the
unit is not good.
"The government sets down a certain amount of
money to pay operational costs, but in reality, our
operational costs go beyond this amount," he said.
"The university administration has taken o'
the deficit, but the situation that exists is far fror
comfortable one."
"We prefer to receive patients who are refer]
to us by a qualified phsician, but we will i
hesitate to accept anyone that comes here need
the kind of services this unit can provide," s
Tyhurst.
Except in emergency cases, a waiting list f
admission is in effect, but Tyhurst would i
specify its length.
Patients are admitted from the age of 14 i
depending on the individual's maturity.
"In several instances, UBC students have co
here while on a bad acid trip, or when they're afr
to go to university administration run centre
Tyhurst said.
"The nature of the program is to normalize
environment — that is, to minimize hostile textu
and influences. An institutional environment can
nothing but create hostilities," he said.
"The place feels quiet — people can live in it."
No strait-jackets
The hospital is almost luxurious in appearar
It's finished in natural colors, carpeting, and nati
wood panelling, creating a non-institutio
environment.
The unit is staffed by highly qualified person]
including professional and resident (in traini
psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, social work
and occupational therapists.
"We try to form interpersonal relationships
treating people with people and by not be
phony," Tyhurst said.
There is a great difference between custodial;
therapeutic treatment, which Tyhurst feels is"
basis for the revolutionary program of psychia
care at the unit.
"When a person loses control of himself,
don't want to throw a strait-jacket on him, or 1<
him up; we try to get people around him, or at le
tranquilize him, and help him regain his ability
function," he said.
A new method of tranquilizing disturbed patie
has begun, with the use of drugs injected into
person when all other non-violent tactics fail
control him. Previously, this method was never u
on a professional scale.
While the staff-patient role is maintain
patronizing influences are kept to a minimum.
Staff and patients relate to one another oi
strictly first-name basis, and no uniforms are wi
at any time. Poetry
/
/ <&£ '<'
'-i-i'.i'
>*m
fljurfude
The presentation herein is one view of contemporary B.C.
poetry. It is not intended to be all-inclusive, nor is it unbiased.
In the opinion of the two people who compiled this issue the
following pages represent some of the best directions in B.C.
poetry today. These directions are international, both in scope
and influence.
Many fine poets have been omitted, and many forms, styles
and poetic cliques have been by-passed in order to present a
clearly defined and unified point of view.
This is not to say we are deaf to the ideas of others. We
invite comment and submissions of poetry for publication in a
future issue.
—Frederick T. R. Cawsey
—D. Michael Finlay DINNER   WINNER!
William G. Callaway
(Grad. Studies) 1668
Kilkenny Road, North
Vancouver... won dinner
for two at the Grouse Nest in
the UBC Students Only
Home Oil Contest draw on
February 6th. Have you
entered? See page 23 for
details.
UBC STUDENTS ONLY CONTEST
FEBRUARY 6th PRIZE WINNERS
Trip to San Francisco .  . .  Nick Geerdink
No. 1 Trip to San Francisco
Nick Geerdink
612 4th Avenue
New Westminster, B.C.(Con-
No. 2 Dinner (or Two at the
Grouse Nest
WHItomG. Callaway
1668 Kilkenny Road
North Vancouver, B.C.(Educ-O)
No. 3 Dinner for Two at
Hy-s
George R. Heinmiller
8018 Cambie Street
Vancouver 14, 8.C.(Comm-2)
■   No. 4 Evening for Two at
The Daisy
David A. Bunn
207, 1972 York Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. (Educ-4)
i  No. 5 Evening for Two at
Oil Can Harry's
Peter Howatt
4612 West 9th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C. (Comm-6)
No. 6 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Larry Bryce Donaldson
126 E 35th
Vancouver 5, B.C. (Comr
-3)
No. 7 Canuck's Hockey
Tickets for Two
Joe D. English
109-1928 West 2nd Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.(Science-4)
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held
as follows:
2nd Slate
Vice-President
Treasurer
Internal Affairs Officer
External Affairs Officer
Nominations have closed
Advance Polls for 2nd Slate
1. Education — Today —■ 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
2. Residences-Education  —  Tues.,  Feb.   17  —  5:00
p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
3. S.U.B. — Tues., Feb. 17 — 11:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Regular Polls for 2nd Slate
Wed., Feb. 18 — 10:00 - 4:00 p.m.
COMING
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THE BERKELEY   ?
See Page Friday 11
EAT IN • TAKE OUT- DELIVERY*
'3261 W.'Broadway   736-7788
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Publishing
Where and how
Poetry isn't poetry unless it is published.
Or perhaps it just doesn't exist unless other people than
the poet can see it in black and white.
In any case, the person who wants to write poems has got
to publish and the ins and outs of the game are nothing to be
trifled with. And the situation in B.C. is no exception.
The starting point is in magazines, and in this province
there are basically three periodicals that matter: Prism
International, The Malahat Review and The West Coast Review.
Prism International is UBC's contribution to the literary
spectrum. Begun in 1959, it publishes some of the finest poetry,
drama and fiction in the world. Editor Jacob Zilber, a creative
writing professor, explains its origins:
"In 1959 there was no literary magazine in Canada west of
Toronto. There was no magazine at all devoted strictly to
original creative writing and no magazine accepting drama. That's
why we started.
"In 1964 we changed the name from Prism to Prism
International to project an international image There were no
magazines" printing translations of original foreign material. We
started looking particulary for translations."
Since its beginnings, Prism has maintained a policy of
judging all submissions on their merit, disregarding geography and
nationality. It's a policy that seems to have worked, for the
periodical has been among the first to publish Canadians Alden
Nowlan and Margaret Lawrence long before they became known
and has published original work by such international literary
figures as Jorge Luis Borges, Michel Butor and Ernst Barlach.
And while the emphasis of the journal is on quality and
excellence, it is by no means to be disregarded by local writers
who might believe it too prestigious to accept their work. Prism
has published many local writers, including dozens of UBC
students.
West Coast Review, which began at Simon Fraser
University in 1966, takes a slightly different approach.
Editor Frederick Candelaria says the review aims at
presenting all forms of creative art and does not restrict itself to
things strictly literary.
"We like to publish poetry, fiction, drams, photographs,
drawings, music, whatever is happening in the creative arts," he
says.
West Coast Review, like Prism international, is an
international journal, though perhaps not to ;he same extent.
The magazine publishes work by people throughout North
America, including local writers, and has recently included
writing from the Orient and the Aztec culture,
Candelaria accepts the approaches of virtually all
periodicals dealing in literature and can only hope that more
magazines  will establish themselves.
The third big magazine in B.C. is The Malahat Review which
comes out of B.C.'s third university at Victoria.
Begun in 1967 and edited by Robin Skelton and John Peter,
Malahat has won a reputation as a very prestigious publication,
publishing both international and local writing.
Apart from the magazines, there are the new publishing
houses, the places where you might go when you get to the point
that you have a book ready to come out.
Prism International Press is thee book-producing arm of
Prism magazine and operates on the same principles as the journal.
So far it has published The Price of Morning, translated poems by
Walter Bauer, Bill T. O'Brien's fine first novel Summer of the Black
Sun, and will be bringing out another book later this year.
Both the O'Brien book and the forthcoming volume by
Charlie Leeds involve the co-operation and financial assistance of
November House, a new company opened by former Prism
business manager Chene Smith. Presumably November House will
eventually bring books out on its own.
The Sono Nis Press was founded m late 1968 by UBC
poet-in-residence J Michael Yates who remarks- The idea came
from knowing that Jack McClelland (and Stewart) will only publish
your third book and if that sells like crazy, then he 11 do the next
two. The small presses have started mainly as an attempt to break
McClelland's neck "
Sono Nis puts out very high quality books, both in a literary
sense and in appearance. In its first year, the press put out Yates'
book of fiction, Man in the Glass Octopus, Michael Bullock's
fiction, Sixteen Stories as they Happened, Andreas Schroeder's
poems, The Ozone Minotaur, Rainer Schulte's poems, The Suicide
at the Piano, and Michael Bullock's poems, A Savage Darkness.
Forthcoming are the anthology, Contemporary Poetry in
British Columbia, Songs of the Sea-Witch, poems by Victoria poet
Susan Musgave, and Neopoems by John Robert Colombo.
Says Yates of the small presses: "Authors know we'll
promote their books a lot harder because we're a lot hungrier."
But before the books come the magazines and before the
magazines have got to come the poems. If you think you've
got some poems worthy of publication, stick five or six
together, neatly typed, attach a cover letter saying who you are
and listing any credits you might have, and put them in the mail.
But from the beginning, remember: you can't make a living
at it, but there's no harm in trying.
-D.M.F.
•pt 2WO-
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,  1970 Poems
Sandi
They phone and say
you've been exposed
and then no sound. I tighten things. . .
The silver in your nails begins to drift
through rusting wood .. .
and then
no sound.
Uncovered voices, that have dried.
I nail the night against the roof.
You rustle, overgrown with wind,
The trees lie down and cover themselves
with leaves. ..
and then
no sound.
You suddenly grow voices;
We are grinding up the sun
you say.
I see the colors that have died,
The rustling links that disappear
into the back of night,
And I outside, my arms around
the roof that guards me from the wind . . .
And then you leave,
wild, like a man
in the skin of a bear that is
not yet killed.
—Andreas Schroeder
(Andreas Schroeder is a poet, short story writer, translator,
film-maker and critic. His works have appeared in periodicals
throughout North America and Europe. TheCB.C has broadcast
a number of his radio documentaries. He has a book of poems out
(The Ozone Minotaur) and his first book of short stories is soon
to be published by the Sono Nis Press.)
The Orange Room
The night had come back. The slow vessels were sliding
along the distant aqueduct, just visible through the treetops. The
waterlogged trees, that splash our windows. The rain is a bad
drummer.
In the orange room, the dust had ceased to gather. The
atmosphere had begun to glow, like a large cube of quartz. The
firescreen concealed a long grey tunnel, paved with moist tiles.
From it gusts of air drifted over the long bed. There were hordes
of dark balloons hanging in the clouds and a drop of water
entered the room. The windows become fragile, under pressure.
You were quite naked in the orange room. There was only a
little darkness between our curved spaces. The arc-lamps of the
slow vessels patterned our orange walls, which the bottles of the
glass genitals began to soften and melt. A spark is discharged
between the brass spheres at the foot of the bed. It is often very
bright in the orange room.
—Paul Green
(Mad Paul Green's poems and reviews have appeared widely in
England and North A merica in journals and on network radio.)
Poem
The Juggler
I danced down the street
carrying God in one hand
and a green rattle
in the other.
The rattle was filled
with the frozen spit
of angels:
it made the sound of sand.
Covering the corners of buildings
were my neighbors,
their faces
polished into grains
blown by the wind.
I danced, and shook
my instrument
at the empty spaces of their eyes,
until a pulse leaped
in their arms, their joints.
They followed me, tossing
pennies, and God
snapped up each coin,
putting it
neatly
In the cold snow of madness,
When only the night
Has thighs and mouth
Wide enough,
I scream imaginary beasts,
And wait for my voice
To return
With handfuls of prey.
-Randy Tomlinson
(Randy Tomlinson is a UBC graduate student whose poems have
been accepted by many North American periodicals and are
forthcoming in Prism International)
into a purse of mud.
-Stanley Cooperman
(Stanley Cooperman teaches English at SFU. In 1967 he
published two books: World War I and the American Novel, and
The Day of the Parrot and Other Poems. In 1968 he published
The Owl Behind the Door, from which The Juggler is taken.)
The Twelve Angels
Twelve black angels on a drifting bough -
their burning wings flutter under the overhanging leaves
as they journey to the sea
and dissolution,
waving fans of silk
and clattering rusty tins
to scare away demons.
They will be lost and not return
to the wooded island in the middle of the river.
The drifting bough will rot beneath their feet,
grubs will emerge and desperately head for the shore.
But twelve angels will go on towards the sea
following a trajectory down towards the bottom.
Wedged in the sand their flesh will leave them,
their bones become monuments
to a descending age.
The twelve angels will only be remembered
as lights that showed the way between the banks.
—Michael Bullock
(Poet, playwright, fiction-writer and translator, Michael Bullock
has translated well over a hundred books from German, French
and Italian, He has published five volumes of poems and one
book of short stories. The Twelve Angels is from his latest book,
A Savage Darkness.)
■pf 3hree-
Friday, February 13, 1970
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Translation
Canada's
shame
It is an undeniable, if embarrassing fact that Canada's
translation industry, such as it is, is one of the most
under-rated, under-financed and overlooked areas in the
Canadian arena of letters. The reasons for this are probably
directly attributable to the over-emphasized regionalism which
is taught, bare-facedly or by implication, in the secondary and
collegiate educational institutions in most parts of Canada.
Such "regionalism" can take any number of forms. The
most gross tends to be an emphasis on English language
literature to the exclusion of an international literature, this
approach apparently based on the curiously inane supposition
that literature written in the English language forms a
self-sufficient body of work and therefore stands as an island
unto itself. Another form of such "regionalism" is the fact that
Canadian students of literature (though they are certainly not
unique in this respect) are by and large notoriously poorly-read
in foreign language literatures; an ignorance which does not
appear to perturb many of them in the least. From two such
factors alone, it is easy to see that a virtual paralysis of
translation activity is not only unavoidable but necessary.
When Canada's Centennial, Montreal's Expo and Pierre
Trudeau fizzed together to produce that hyperthyroid
condition now labelled "Canadian nationalism", I must admit I
had hopes that bi-lingualism as a condition and Quebec
Separatists as a catalyst would instigate the long-awaited
interest in translation, if only to. get Quebec Libre pamphlets
into English Canadian homes without the necessity of an
attached glossary. I don't know what happened (or rather, what
didn't), but the few token translations ventured by the odd
brave (as often as not small) press are hardly what I had in
mind. Even the Canada Council hasn't budged on its policy of
non-recognition of translation as a legitimate and bona fide art.
In short, the situation is as embarrassing as it ever was.
When Germany publishes its catalogue of writers (766
pages of densely-packed entries) each year, a full 25 per cent of
the entries concern translators - artists who qualify for
government grants and arts bursaries just like any other writer.
The result is, quite naturally, that Germany is blessed with one
of the best (and fastest) translation programmes afloat. On a
recent visit to Germany I found a surprising number of
French-language books in German translation which I hadn't
even been aware of in the original. A case in point was a
translation of two Nathalie Sarraute radio dramas which no one
in Canada has even heard of as yet. Joke or not, it is a
compliment to be told that if they quickened their translation
programme just a little more, Germans would be publishing
translations before the originals had even been thought of.
In view of Canada's limping position in this matter, it
may become a little clearer why a translation programme such
as the one headed by Michael Bullock (UBC's Creative Writing
Dept.) is not only necessary but absolutely vital. The fact that
it is the only department of its kind in a Canadian university
only high-lights this fact. What we have here at UBC is not only
a group of translators, but a team of artists straining to pull the
Canadian ostrich-neck out of the sand.
In this connection it may also become a little clearer why
a magazine like Contemporary Literature in Translation is so
important. Like UBC's translation programme, it also is a
one-of-a-kind phenomena in Canada, echoed only in the U.S. by
the National Translation Centre's Delos. And with the NTC on
the rocks this year for reasons of a Ford Foundation grant
which didn't materialize, Delos will in all probability collapse,
leaving C.L.I.T. to hold the bag in the entire North American
continent. Though many small literary magazines publish
occasional translations among their featured originals, none do
so exclusively. The only magazine which even approaches
C.L.I.T.'s focus is a little mag published out of Ohio entitled
"Steppenwolf', which features the long poem and a fairly
steady diet of translations.
I quote these facts not to plug a specific concern or a
specific department, but simply to document an idiot vacumn
in Canadian letters which has remained barren too long. It goes
without saying that it is a ridiculous state of affairs when we
have to wait until someone from another country deems it time
to translate for our benefit what we should have translated
years ago. It is equally absurd to see an entire nation fast
asleep, its head drooped uselessly over a clamouring bevy of
self-evident facts.
-ANDREAS SCHROEDER
(Andreas Schroder is co-editor of Contemporary Literature in
Translation. See note, pf3.)
•pf 40U*a
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  13,  1970 Poems
St. Alice
Driving
The chairs in this car
pretend to go forward
as if that is the way we are going.
The talk mesmerizes
like predictable bundles
from the binding machine;
(we have made our hay
and now, we must eat it.)
I am pointing the car
into the turning world,
that whines
the illusion of motion.
The sun is less than
the head of a pimple.
There will be no sunset.
The sky like litmus paper
turns to remark
our basic mood.
And your teeth.
And your teeth when you smile
are white and regular as
petrified chicklets.
We are driving faster
than the road will go,
but it does not do
because there is gravel
in our hubcaps;
therefore we cannot surprise the horizon.
The dashboard nags us
with sensible numbers.
Old passengers have left
their postures behind.
On your lap; maps
that did not refold
as they once unfolded.
The mirror shows yesterday
smaller than a snapshot
and
there is
a black sedan
Evening. Block and tackle below the sun.
An industrial edge
Between the mountain and the sea.
Most men work here.
An intimidation of Indians
Patrols between the doors of the bar
And the door of the Men's.
Black tackle: evening water.
Watered silk walls.
No women work here.
Cobalt-eyed old men with rawpork faces
Piss often. Their hands are sausages
Left in the warm too long.
Yellow light at sunset:
A white-haired erection at dawn:
The St. Alice bar.
gaining.
-Jeremy Newson
(Jeremy Newson is a UBC theatre student and has had two
one-act plays produced in the Freddy Wood Theatre. Driving has
been accepted for publication in Prism International)
-George Payerle
(George Payerle will receive his Masters degree in Creative Writing
at UBC this Spring. His poems have appeared in many periodicals,
and his first novel will be published in October by House of
Anansiin Toronto.)
The Cat in the Window
He owns
a very wise cat that hears nothing approach
and opens one eye.
It has stolen the poses of peace
with a slow yawn.
He watches it;
how it stretches in the sun's heat,
being aware of no sun,
or watches the street through its reflection;
its minutes are neither long nor short.
The cat dances well with a broken spine;
although it speaks in bloody syllables,
he carries it under his coat
and will not let it die.
—Janie Kennon
(Janie Kennon is a graduate student in Creative Writing at UBC.
Her poems and short stories have appeared in Prism International
and other periodicals. The Cat in the Window appeared in the
Spring 1969 issue of Prism.)
An Unloading in
Puerto de La Paz
His body creaks between the sheets.
A thumb punches his thorax.
And practiced fingers grip the coil.
Tough fibres spray rust
From the winch-wheel at the top of the shed.
But no ship docks. Nothing unloads.
Frayed ends of hemp lie
Like tendrils of anemone
Against the pier.
And a late wind ruptures
The cornea on the water.
—George McWhirter
(George McWhirter is a graduate student at UBC. His poems have
appeared in many journals in North America.)
■pf sive.
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Friday, February 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY Hunter
The animals approach too near now.
A final hunter sheds his human scent.
I wish sometimes I might have wished
To walk upwind all of my days.
(From Hunt in an Unmapped Interior.)
Poet
Resid
It Hardly Matters
It hardly matters now.
Now that the ring
Of bright blue
Violet fire — horizon —
Has gone out.
It hardly matters now
That the hedge of flame
I called "horizon" is gone,
That things that have always
Mattered have never mattered.
That is hardly matters
Now and now and now
Is a golden animal
That glows almost
In this tightening dark.
The Ice Rider
Inside me
At the shore of the frozen lake
They are still talking.
We shouted, shouted,
Waved our dim lanterns over the snow.
I feel him riding through the darkness over the ice.
They say
The center is a deep unfreezing maw.
Beneath the horse the ice mumbles and moans.
The hag scratches and suspects.
Through her vague snow of remembered
disappointments,
She curses him laughing in a warm room up the shore.
Won't he go 'round, the boy began.
Eyes like frozen lakes with dark centers
Stopped him short.
This is one
Of many many villages
Snowed apart around a frozen lake.
In the spring
Gone are ice, ice village, eye-like frozen lake.
And ice riders riding over the ice through the dark.
Maria
Within her purple goblet,
Maria swims.
Outside the world condenses.
She doesn't miss anything anymore.
Events turn on the crystal curve
Or escape altogether her senses.
Things are too much without us,
I said,
Just over the sill of sense.
She went.
My words went after her.
Darkly. In waves. Like a plague of insects.
Half the next afternoon
I watched a poisoned ant
Reel along a table-edge.
Dreadful to see time passing in the distance.
Worse: to see nothing,
Hear its whistle. Only.
A tear slid
Between her eye
And sight.
I thought all along
She was one of those women who pass through a cloud
Through your life a bird through space.
Memory, my old egg,
Broke upon my head,
Dripped into my eyes.
My mind's reach groped for her
A hand in the dark
For a key before a door.
Unable not to stand her any longer
I came with the murderous vengeance of a child
And a madman's innocence.
When I race my wet finger
Around her goblet-lip,
She - or the glass itself - sings like a violin.
Titleless
In the blood-colored cage
Behind my ribs
The lion circles.
In his chest
Turns a silhouette of slow rage
Like a man with a lion in his chest.
(From Spiral of Mirrors.)
J. Michael Yates, ,
the most accomplished
America.
In 1960 he won l
Poetry Prize; in 19
Broadcasting Awards;
A ward for poetry andc
His first volume of
in an Unmapped Inte,
published in 1967 and
book of poems. Cam
1968 a book of fictio
was published by the
fiction, translations, es.
in Poetry (Chicago), 7
Artium, Expression (E,
The Wascana Review i
Canada, England, th
Europe.
Forthcoming   a
Meditations - a book
this year - and Pari
photographs by Bob Fl
Radio dramas by
produced widely in Ca
have been done in tra
France and Belgium.
Yates is co-editor
Translation, poetry ed.
a contributing editor tc
He is an associa
Writing department at
»( 6fe
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 13,  1970 Canto 1
Canto 7
nee
The old wound a glacier ground,
Darkness, rainbow, glazes of fever:
1 have come to destroy the world.
A strong woman will teach a man to love
Or wean him from love in some final way:
I would coincide with animals.
In space the foreground is clear.
In time, the reverse of this.
Only a madman would reverse these.
These are these almost-faces in the stones.
I won't enter into that yesterday; it hasn't
Any weather and I'm full of the urge to forecast.
I didn't love her all day long,
Nor even every day; there are times
I'm more alive than at others.
The thing not to fear:
That soon I won't care
That there isn't anywhere.
Between this present I cannot see
And that past I cannot remember,
I foresee no beginning and remember no end.
How much do the instincts dare absorb?
God was an incomplete sentence and
By and by the wilderness came over me.
Only evil genius cannot admit
All genius is evil. Silence after music is
A road grown-over a god walked once only.
Doors which held her out once, hold her in.
We pass through the stations of everything once.
Nothing is never left beliind.
Mind is that highway of time
From coast to coast
Mind races back and forth upon.
Not whether suicide, but which.
Within the bearskin is the body
Of an over-developed man.
I'll have forgotten more soon
Than done: it's a hard way up to the sheep,
But there is no cover there.
If she can be her own, let her belong to
No other. Animal shapes along a highway:
Pavement is paved of these.
Tongues of the continent soak in stagnant water.
Light opens like a claw of an eagle toward
The completely collapsible portable man.
Plunging into web-filled space,
We slow, grow mummified, and slow -
The aurora, that luminous china wall.
(From Canticle for Electronic Music.)
^-jy*?*4****1
The Great Bear Lake Meditations
34
i*a«S
ISaySk...
»*«j%jr. *.
t*5V
is recognized as one of
lergetic poets in North
versity of Kansas City
I 1962, International
>64,   Major  Hopwood
Spiral of Mirrors/Hunt
two-book volume, was
hat same year his third
' Electronic Music. In
i in the Glass octopus,
Nis Press His poems,
I reviews have appeared
wrack Review, Mundus
The Southern Review,
vs of other journals in
A.,  Australia and  in
:   Great   Bear   Lake
is scheduled for release
book of poems with
ihael Yates have been
> theCB.C. and several
n in Israel, Germany,
temporary Literature in
°rism international and
isArtium.
ressor in the Creative
22
The wolves say to the dogs what the
madman of me says to the citizen.
I need to go fishing until I need to
return.
72
This is my receipt for death:
I'm swimming hard in arctic water, moving
away from all shores, diving deep to feed and
rising less and less often for air.
I've copulated in open water and seen
all the seal islands and migrated here and there
with the herds that move mindlessly and bleed
a single blood when slaughter comes in ships
full of clubs, when death comes through the
maw of a very white bear.
I'm swimming hard in arctic water: then
a fleet of kayaks behind me. In them: eskimos
of a sort that perhaps never were — creatures I shall
have to imagine.
Then a good chase and a good harpoon, then
to drown in fathoms of my own making.
And nothing shall be wasted: the oil to be
poured over dry-fish, fur for clothing,
bones for fishooks and jewelry. My
heart and eyes go as prize for the first harpoon.
And the head: thrown to the waiting dogs.
I persist in a little fabric between me
and the world.
This is the sleep inside a tent on
an airless, sunstung afternoon.
The sleep beyond mosquitoes and black
flies that close in and in upon the beast
that ceases to stir.
This is the orange sleep that seeps
and clings like mire. The muskeg and the clear
streams are going away.
The wet sleep comes for me like water on
the rise. Snow-caps in the distance are burning.
Somewhere in the extinguishing light, the
plume of a crowning forest fire.
Whatever will enter this canvas crypt can
have me. Nothing comes, and I cannot rise.
The tick of a clock somewhere beneath things
diminishes with the last fly that circles outside
like a plane coming from the horizon to rescue the
lost in sleep.
The mouth of flat blackness is closing.
Sleep stiffens through me to the bayous
beyond dream. I shall die here in this uncertain
growth. Seams of the tent will give, canvas and
skin will sink beneath the ash of the fire that
has been burning toward me forever.
The wind changes.
The fire goes green.
This is the sleep of mastadons and mammoths,
not the sleep of winter bears I've buried beneath
cornices of words.
On the surface of the tar pit, stillness
over the blackness signals the stop of a monstrous
metabolism.
The undergrowth is zombied in the thin stutter
of heat.
The coming destruction.
The roads I followed here are washing away.
This is the Lazarus who returned with no more
to show than a yawn, the taste of dying in his mouth,
vague hunger, thirst, and no recollection of awakening
at "an earlier dawn.
This was the sleep within the tent that I sewed.
I entered, shut out the weather, and went to sleep for
darkness' sake.
The afternoon and the insects have waited.
I dream I only dream I am awake.
■pf 7even-
Friday, February 13,  1970
THE       U BYSSEY Booh Reviews
I
owa
In a very impressive first book, Richard Geller,
who teaches English at UBC, has distilled and refined
his observations of a year in Iowa into a brilliant
work. The book is really one long poem and its title
— not surprisingly — is Iowa.
It is hard to take the poem down into its
component parts as it deals with seasons and their
changes, and people and the land as parts of one
whole environment which he looks at with a very
discerning eye. I was immediately impressed with
Geller's control — the ease with which he carries the
reader from one place to another — and with the
power and hardness of his language.
It is a poem of one man's interaction with or
reaction to his immediate environment and to the
individual people and things that make it up. A poem
of this length and scope is difficult to sustain but
Geller has done it, showing great ability and
understanding of language.
The book itself is a masterpiece of hand-set
typography; a numbered limited edition of 300, the
first ■ 50 set on Rives paper and the rest set on
Shinsetsu paper. It is indeed a very pretty, if
expensive, book. An auspicious beginning for a
talented young writer.
-F.C.
(Iowa, By Richard Geller, Cummington Press)
Suicide
Rainer Schulte tries to capture those rare
moments which are beyond words and then tries to
make poems out of them That is what seems to be
the problem in his first book of poems, The Suicide
at the Piano.
Of course these moments rarely, if ever, can be
crystallized in words, and that's where the paralysis
sets in in Schulte's book. Even with his penetrating
and hard-wrought metaphors Schulte cannot
reproduce these moments of extreme isolation; at
best only hints at them.
What comes through in these highly specialized
poems is the sense of aloneness which he must have
felt. So, although he cannot reproduce that special
level of consciousness - which transcends poetic
consciousness - he does refine the essence of the
isolation.
His battle with the piano and music, and with
time itself, is not something readily accessible to the
sensibilities of non-musicians and Schulte must bring
.it home to them if he is to succeed. Unfortunately he
doesn't quite bring it off, and although he presents
glimmers of awareness, his attack seems to lack the
organization necessary to lay bare the insides of his
vehicle.
-F.C.
(The Suicide at the Piano, by Rainer Schulte,
The Sono Nis Press, $5.)
Savage Darkness
Michael Bullock's latest book, A Savage
Darkness, is an energetic combination of linear and
prose poems. Bullock writes in and about the state of .
surreality, where reality and dreams unite, or at least
confront each other, and given this premise, one
might expect from this author a serving of exotic
imagery. Happily, this is precisely the case with A
Savage Darkness and Bullock has woven his fantasy
with a sometimes delicate, sometimes terrifying,
always colorful thread.
Although I found the diction a little dated at
times, the vitality of the book sustained my interest
throughout.
A peek into Bullock's work is like turning a
corner and finding a mad carnival of weird events
where you expected to find your home.
I particularly liked the second half of the book
which contains the prose poems. Here Bullock seems
to find a vehicle with which he can play out his
fantasies in a fuller sense, bringing together elements
of the real and imagined world.
Here again the diction is sometimes bothersome,
but Bullock's imagination and use of form are truly
delightful. He is off in a good direction.
-F.C.
(A Savage Darkness, by Michael Bullock,
The Sono Nis Press, $5.)
.pf Sight.
Contemporary
Poetry
Every once in a while someone comes up with a
truly great idea for a book. The results of'one of
these ideas is soon to be available to all those
interested in contemporary poetry in B.C.
Last year, J. Michael Yates decided that an
anthology including major established B.C. poets and
young, up and coming poets would serve well as a
guide to the evolvement of poetry in this province.
Yates says: "B.C. happens to be a place very rich
in good poets, and the premise of the book will be to
establish a selective encyclopedic picture of the
evolvement of poetry in B.C. via an anthology which
we hope to revise every two or three years.
"This is volume one, and volume two will include
new work by writers who appeared in volume one if
they continue to write well, and work by new poets."
The anthology includes work by John Newlove,
Dorothy Livesay, Earle Birney, Lionel Kearns,
Stanley Cooperman and Robin Skelton, as well as
work — very important, says Yates — by bright young
poets such as Susan Musgrave, David Summers,
George McWhirter and Andreas Schroeder.
It's not usual to review a book before it is
published — this will be released for sale early in
March — but Contemporary Poetry is an unusual
book, and one everyone interested in poetry should
have. The poems it contains are all recent works by
the authors and cover a broad spectrum of style and
form. Having seen the book in manuscript and galley
proof, I can safely say it is a book that must be read.
It provides highly-charged, diverse material, and, if it
is anything like the other Sono Nis books printed at
Morriss Printing Co. in Victoria, it will be a
good-looking book as well. As one other publisher
put it, Sono Nis and Morriss Printers are putting out
the best looking, highest quality books in North
America. -F.C.
(Contemporary Poetry of British Columbia, Volume I,
ed. J. Michael Yates, The Sono Nis Press, $7.95.)
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS
BUREAUCRACY!
AMS ALL CANDIDATES MEETING
Monday, Feb. 16 -12:30 - in S.U.B. Partyroom
HEAR CANDIDATES FOR:
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 13, 1970 Poems
The Words
In the pool, in the otter's cage,
I saw my words a thousand times.
I saw the beast
swarming naked
through its element. I thought, all
by myself, no longer
seeing anyone stand beside me, It won't
hurt you, it doesn't care that much.
—John Newlove.
(John-Newlove lives in Prince George with his wife and
two children. His poems have appeared widely throughout
North America and in several privately printed books. He has
published Black Night Window and The Cave, from which this
poem is taken, with McClelland and Stewart.)
The Mercenary
I have just talked to him.
He is home on leave from the jungle to marry.
He is afraid of fire, he said,
and human sounds,
especially those he didn't hear.
But he threw Molotov cocktails at 12,
bayonets at 20, and napalm at 40.
Yet he had killed more than these.
He had shot the sons
of the fathers he'd fought with,
and bombed the villages he'd lived in.
It was his litany of containment.
He had also eaten rats and snakes for breakfast.
-R. W. Stedingh
(R. W. Stedingh's poems have appeared in journals
throughout the U.S. and England and are forthcoming in Prism
international, The Tamarack Review, The Far Point and
Canadian Forum. He is a graduate student at UBC.)
Thermolayer
I shall go tonight.
Before the perfect mold of the statue embraces the twilight,
I must be gone. Let the perfection crumble by itself in the
used air. I will not satisfy by being witness.
I have been gathering for days. From streets, from rooms, from
bowels, from mouths. Now I am all here and you know because I
am sticky on your fingered faces.
The sun warms into the sea. Soon ... with my mind in crevices,
my tongue shall upon the snow body of the Himalayas.
-Gyorgy Porkolab
(George Porkolab is a UBC undergraduate, translator and
free-lance broadcaster whose poems have been accepted by Trace,
The Fiddlehead, Canadian Forum, The Far Point, Red Cedar
Review and Contemporary Poetry of British Columbia, as well as
broadcast on CBCAnthology.)
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Friday, February 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY AMS CHARTER
FLIGHTS 1970
for students and faculty
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UBC9S
Creative
Writing
Department
The department began as a single course given by Earle
Birney which he initiated in 1946. By the end of the fifties the
single course had become a program within the Department of
English where workshops in the three major genres were
sponsored. Quite natural tensions between English Studies and
Creative Writing (English Studies are analytic and Creative Writing
is based in synthesis) eventually led, in 1964, to the program
being split off from English. For that year Jake Zilber acted as
Steward and a Dean's Committee was set up to decide what
should be done about writing on the campus. On July 1st, 1965,
the Department of Creative Writing and its B.A. Degree were
given official sanction by the Board of Governors, Robert Harlow
was made Head, Jake Zilber transferred from the Department of
English, Douglas Bankson was hired from the Drama Department
at the University of Montana and Dorothy Livesay came for one
year to replace Earle Birney, the department's progenitor, who
retired from UBC that year. The following year, in 1966, J.
Michael Yates was brought on staff as poet, and in the next year
an M.A. program was inaugurated. In 1968, the department began
its Translation Program with Michael Bullock, who came as a
Canada Council visiting professor and stayed on to chair the
program as of July 1st, 1969. The department now offers 21
undergraduate and graduate workshops and tutorials in the three
genres, the media and in translation. At last count there were 219
enrolees, about one per cent of the student population, a
percentage figure that has remained constant since the
department's birth.
The department is less interested in specific styles, theories
and schools than it is in individual students who, taken as a
group, would span a wide segment of the writing spectrum. A
look at the long list of publications by students during the past
five years will confirm this. Therefore, as nearly as possible,
instructors work with students instead of the reverse. The student
attends workshops, is given reading lists, and does as much
writing as he can, but the real heart of the program lies in the
tutorial. Thus the process.
The benefits of the process are, ideally: a rendering-out of
the student's juvenillia so that he becomes familiar with himself as
a writer and achieves poise as a craftsman; an ability to read as an
author and not only as an analyst, and therefore to be able to
participate in the literary experience, which is at least as
important as the "real" experience everyone is so anxious to
have; and a sense of humility and humour about the
impossibility of the whole thing and therefore of its being the only
way to go or live, depending on how you look at it.
Acknowledgements
The editors would like to thank Bob Harlow, Jake Zilber
and Fred Candelaria for their valuable assistance in the publishing
and creative writing articles; Andy Schroeder for his sharp
analysis of translation; and Jose' Fraser for her excellent cover
design. Further kudos to that UBC poet-destroyer of large cities
— and jive Englishman Paul Green for his inspirational seances
with the muse. Mr. Green will give a performance of his dazzling
poems next Wednesday at 8:30 in Buchanan 106. —F.C.
-D.M.F.
__^—^—pS 10LU ^
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 13, 1970 obtuse, obscure - but bonzo9
Coups of History
By K. TOUGAS
Great Coups of History, a Vancouver film made by Jack
Darcus (playing at the Varsity), is fascinating in its original
structure. With a nucleus of documentary-style footage exposing
the experiences, techniques and philosophy of an aging woman
who has lived off of men for many years of her life, the film
engages in two additional paths: immediate adventures with her
latest candidate, and a parallel exposure of her young
daughter . . . While not entirely successful, the latent impact of
the film lies in the generation of cross-commentary between these
three levels.
The pathetic truth of the woman's monologue is qualified
and heightened by sequences with her latest male acquisition,
which serve as a re-enactment making tangible the emotion
originally only suggested verbally. Yet as she describes her life, a
sort of archtypal absurdity hovers about her person and in turn
captured by the ludicrous humour surrounding her new affair
with a jelly-fish anthropology professor. . . On the other hand,
the daughter is the resultant of the twosome's ambulant life from
man to man .. .
Vancouver   celluloid   sorcerer   Jack   Darcus
makes good at home at Varsity on Thursday.
The crucial flaw is that these planes rarely intersect
successfully. Any relevant relationships between characters and
between documentary/representational/factual levels are sparse
and ineffective. Attention dwindles and only comes to life with a
return to this woman's unsettling monologue on life.
Thus as two separate tales, the mother and the daughter's
lives are equally valid and interesting. When presented
simultaneously however, the dramatic narration of the mother
quickly effaces the daughter's simple nature, and even probing
into the young waifs amorous adventures becomes simply
irrelevant and tedious. In fact, by omitting the cluttering excess,
it become evident that within the film lies a gem of a short,
perhaps half as long.
With such a wealth of material and far-ranging possibilities
in structure, the film is cheated by its lack of style. Undermined
firstly by photography reminiscent of newsreel footage of an
industrialists' dmner conference, the overall preciseness and
control of material and pacing demonstrated in the opening cameo
sequence vanishes minutes later by the time titles and credits have
passed on the screen-
So unfortunately, we will have to wait for his next feature
to discover whether or not Jack Darcus can actually direct a film,
but in the meantime, while Great Coups of History is by no
means great certainly the electric lead role as played by Delphine
Harvey makes this an interesting experiment worth observing.
By LESLEY MINOT
"I feel sorry for all of these make-believe
artists" — comment on the recent exhibit, FOUR
ARTISTS, in the UBC Fine Arts Gallery
"This has got to be the biggest pile of
garbage that I have seen since the last display
here — and the one before that — and that, etc.,"
the critique continues.
Close by it are comments such as "great
show", "almost crazy", "juvenile and obscure",
"obtuse and ambivalent, but bonzo", "it's all
neo-Nihilism" and, inevitably, "I dunno — I liked
it - signed, Bob."
All four artists in the show — Tom Burrows,
Duane Lunden, Jeff Wall, and Ian Wallace — have
attended UBC, and according to Ann Pollock,
assistant curator of the gallerey, the only other
link between the four is their concern with the
"art of poverty." She describes the
characteristics of the "art of poverty" as, "the
use of ordinary, low, or inexpensive materials; a
tendency for the works to disappear into or
become part of the landscape or environment; a
lack of concern for the buyer or collector with
no attempt to make the peices saleable; no
concern for creating pieces that will last."
"The art of poverty encourages new and
different ways of looking at art, the placing of
art in a new context and rejects the traditional
manner of regarding art as a sacred, finished
object exhibited in a sacred place,"" The
comment book adds,, "The tendency of the artist
is to destroy his medium. OK, now what?"
Duane Lunden and Jeff Wall talked Friday
about exhibition. Said Lunden, "I don't make
things understandable to other people. I make
them understandable to myself. I'm involved in
my own kind of work. It's not art anymore. The
whole idea of making the thing better and more
beautiful is not in the work. It's not successful in
an exhibition. It's not art and it's not beautiful.
It's only work."
Jeff Wall's major exhibit is his book
Landscape Manual. It is inscribed "from and for
a work in progress", and sells for a quarter. Part
of the work is called "two car rides". It "is aimed
at encouraging the participant to recognize his
essentially metabolic relationship with the
totality of his environment — a condition the
awareness of which he might never have had in
his conscious life."
An astute student who uses the nom de
plume of "French Fried" has written an
instruction to the artists in the comment book,
which, unfortunately is not on sale. It is
inscribed "To the Worst Bores Since Mondrian,
Mohal-Nagy and Shadbolt," and reads "I believe
the show should immediately be moved to the
fifth floor of the Bay and opened in the "art"
department." The comment includes a suggestion
for an "art of poverty" piece: "This show
reaches the heights of hyper-banality and I think
that this mega-obvious foppery need be exposed
and exhibited at a pro-pollution convention then
photographed and sent via telecommunications
equipment to some isolated field and urinated
upon by five thousand decadent Mannerists
dressed in pseudo-science-fiction costumes, hence
Pf s Lesley Mi not looks at the Fine
Arts Gallery show and collects
comments.
arriving at the paranoic-critical activity not
commonly associated with post-Kantian
conceptual imperatives."
Recognition of the essential metabolic
relationship with the totality of the
environment? Like Bob, I dunno, but beneath
French Fried's suggestion someone has
commented that it's "better art than the
display," and another comment reads "art is
what you fake it."
"You have to speak to yourself in terms of
yourself back to yourself," said Lunden. Asked
what he inteds people to get from his works he
said, "1 don't know," and later added, "I haven't
admitted that I have to communicate with other
people." However, Lunden did give a few hints
about his works. "The total is outside the work
completely. As a person you can take it upon
yourself to discover about works — take your
own initiative."
"The direction of interchange between
observer and the work is two-way," said Jeff
Wall.
"It's not two-way — it's a thousand-way,"
said Lunden.
Lunden and Wall emphasized the process in
their art rather than the end-product. "I got
involved in trying to find solutions to the
processes I had started," said Lunden. He seemed
confused about the motive in his form of art.
"Sometimes I don't have any It's sort of a
doodly process. Sometimes I'm just doodling."
The comment book has many doodles. "This
paper feels so nice — I had to write on it."
"We'd like people to stop asking questions
like 'is this art?' and start asking questions like
"what is it?'," said Lunden. Referring back to the
comment book:
"I feel sorry for most of the people who
write here. They will get ulcers if they don't start
looking and stop condemning."
"Art? You must be having us on. Biggest
hoax of the term!"
One student who asked 'what is it?' instead
of 'is it art?' got a little bit misguided and came
up with a review that was full of praise — though
not for the exhibition.
"I thought the 'Ground Plan of the Gallery
for Four Artists Show' was very well thought
out. The contrasting colours reveal the weakness
of the exhibits" (at this point, carried away with
praise, the critic allowed his writing to become
illegible). "I do wish the printer would sign his
name to this exquisite masterpiece. The rest was
aweful (awful)."
While reading the comment book a girl
walked out of the gallery and asked me "Do you
know where the art gallery is?" I told her that
she had just come from it. "You're kidding", she
said walking into the gallery again, "this is all
there is?" She then turned around and walked
out of tthe building.
May I  suggest signs?
ipf lllevem
Wear
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Watch tor Final Concert In Series -— Mar. 10 — Vern & Ray, Authentic Kentucky Bluegrass
Friday, February 13, 1970
THE      U BYSSEY Open House shows
what's happening
March 6 and 7 the University of British Columbia will open its
door to you! It's Open House '70 presented by the faculty and
students of UBC to show the public what's happening at the
university.
Open House '70 will offer lectures, demonstrations, films and
displays by most faculties and clubs. There will be guided tours of
the campus and opportunities for visitors to taste foods from far-off
lands. Open House promises to have something for everyone.
The Chinese Varsity Club, one of the many student
organizations involved in Open House, is building a full-size Chinese
pagoda and tea house. The pavilion will have a wide range of
Oriental displays including vases, chinaware, paintings and writing
materials. A fashion show and an Oriental dance will also be on the
agenda. The display will be one of the highlights of Open House '70.
One of the faculty displays which should prove interesting is
the one being put on by the university's geography department. The
exhibit will explain some of the studies of contemporary B.C. which
have been undertaken by the department. Visitors will be able to
view B.C.'s potentialities and decide for themselves where B.C. is
headed and what the important geographical factors limiting its
future are, through an extensive series of diagrams and slides.
Open House happens once every three years. It is your
opportunity to see what is happening at the university. UBC will
open its doors on Friday, March 6 from 3:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and.
March 7 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Ubyssey expands
-oaorga allan aerial photo
The Open House Edition of
The Ubyssey will roll off the
presses on Friday, March 6. This
special edition will be a total of
32 pages with all the information
you will need to get around to the
various exhibits during Open
House.
The editorial board of this
edition will be a combination of
present Ubyssey staff and Open
House staff. The overall editor
will be Eva Rathgeber.
Late breaking news will be
published on the special pages
given totally to The Ubyssey. The
rest of the paper will solely be a
presentation ofthe Open House
Committee.
If you have something you
want in this issue contact Eva
Rathgeber in the Open House
offices.
If you wish to advertise in this
issue call the Publications' office,
228-3978.
What advertisers should know...
about the OPEN HOUSE ISSUE
CIRCULATION: A minimum of 50,000 copies for students,
faculty and visitors.
DISTRIBUTION: On both March 6 and 7.
DEADLINE FOR ADS: 11:00 a.m. - March 3.
Classified section to be omitted from this issue.
For further details call 228-3978
Faculty, staff and students
symbolically co-operating
* One out of every four students
at the University of British
Columbia is going to be involved
in making Open House 1970 the
biggest event of the academic
year. And working with them will
be a large percentage of the
university faculty and staff.
Student chairman for Open
House '70 is Gordon McNab. A
fourth-year chemical engineer, he
was appointed to his post last
summer and has spent the past
few months in organizing an
enthusiastic executive to assist
him in the job of planning the
two-day campus-wide event.
Vice-chairman for Open House
is third-year engineer Dave
Duthie. His position on the
student staff has put him in
charge   of all  protocol  for  the
occasion. He's also devoted a large
portion of his energies to ensuring
that Open House will bring a
number of interesting special
events to the campus.
One of the busiest men on the
Open House staff is Ken
Crompton,   in   his   capacity   of
faculty co-ordinator. A second
year commerce student, Ken is in
charge of the 100 faculty displays
that will be specially erected for
Open House.
Treasurer, Gordon Mulligan,
Science 4, has been juggling the
Open House budget for the past
few months. He has $16,500 to
divide among approximately 120
clubs and faculties that wish to
put up displays.
And that's not all. Other
students    on    the    executive
committee of Open House include
secretaries Nora Mitchell and
Diana Millen, guides co-ordinator
Emily Reid, traffic control man
Peter Cooke, food services
co-ordinator Rob Forbes, high
school tours co-ordinator Ken
Nelson, public relations director
Gordon Ashworth, and Eva
Rathgeber, editor of the special
Open House edition of The
Ubyssey.
The student group has been
working closely with a steering
committee made up of university
faculty and staff members. That's
one of the things which makes
Open House such an important
event. It's symbolic of the fact
that students and faculty can still
work together on a constructive
event geared towards the interests
of the public.
150,000 expected at UBC
The University of British
Columbia will be throwing its
doors open on March 6th and
7th for its eighth triennial Open
House.
Open House 70 is planned to
introduce the public to the
workings of the university. Most
faculties and clubs will be
presenting their subjects in very
interesting and different manners.
The displays will vary from film
presentations to lectures and
demonstrations. Open House will
have something for everyone.
One of the highlights of Open
House will be a display by the
Chinese Variety Club which will
feature a Chinese Tea Garden.
There will be chances for visitors
to try and beat the computer and
many    groups   will   have   film
presentations. Over 4,000
students are working to make this
year's event a tremendous success
and indications are that more than
150,000 persons will attend.
The university will be open
Friday, March 6th from 3:00 p.m.
to 10:00 p.m. and on March 7th
from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Dr. Walter Gage, President of
the University of B.C. and Gordon
McNab, Chairman of the Open
House 70 committee extend to all
residents of B.C. an invitation "To-
Come and Join Us" at Open
House 70.
What you should know...
Where is it? At the University of British Columbia.
When is it? Open House will be happening on Friday, March 6
from 3:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and on March 7 from
10:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m.
What is it? It's a joint effort put on by students and faculty
to show the public what's happening at UBC.
Who is invited? YOU and your family and all your friends tnd
anyone else you'd like to bring.
pf Hwelve
ADVERTISEMENT    FOR    OPEN    HOUSE
Friday, February 13,  19,0 Friday, February 13,  1970
THEE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
new directions
UBC's health sciences de-
mental health.
Group therapy, as well as individual discussions,
s a major step in psychiatric rehabilitation at this
init.
"The purpose of this type of therapy is to try to
educe the symptoms which led the person to
)ecome a patient in the first place," said group
)sychologist Gerald Beroldi.
The "therapeutic communities", as they are
:alled, enable patients to relate to others with the
ame problems as themselves.
Besides the standard group therapy, several
'sensitivity groups" are run by medical staff.
The largest group handles family problems such
is the dependency problems of housewives and the
problems of young people with soft drugs and
jre-marital sex.
There is a non-verbal group to teach people who
;an't express themselves in words to express
;hemselves through actions, and a psychodrama
'roup for people who can express themselves in
vords to free pent-up emotions.
The standard group therapy consists of a series of
discussions and talks which work toward
:stablishing a bond of mutual trust between staff
ind patients. Often, these talks are taped and played
sack to the patients, enabling them to see
:hemselves from another's point of view.
"Fifty per cent of all medical problems are
anotional and this type of therapy helps to release
iny hidden emotions a patient might have," said
psychologist Crossland,
A group is usually made up of persons from one
ward.
There are three wards, each with three to five
resident psychiatrists and each is devoted to its own
technique of group and occupational therapy.
Releasing emotions
Patients are put in the ward which is most suited
o the kind of difficulties that the individual is going
hrough.
Occupational therapy is also a vital part of an
n-patient's rehabilitation program.
"Patterns of the patient's ability and progress are
issessed as part of a treatment to integrate them
nto functional society," said occupational therapist
banne Stan.
"We try to get the patients to individualize as
nuch as possible," she said.
Activities such as weaving, copper and leather
vork, sculpture, sewing, cooking, painting and
:arpentry are set up to give the patients release for
>ent-up emotions.
As well as the group facilities, the hospital is
equipped with several lounges and game rooms with
television, ping-pong, and other leisure pastimes.
"We have gone to a great expense to provide such
facilities. The initial outlay is great, but we feel it
will be worth while in the long run," said Crossland.
On top of everything else, the hospital is a centre
of psychiatric research.
A staff works full time studying clinical,
psychological, and distribution patterns of mental
illness.
Research is also being done into the use of drugs,
a problem which Wesbrook hospital psychiatric
service head Dr. Conrad J. Schwarz feels is lessening
every day.
"It is only the publicity in this field that is
growing," he said.
Deal with students
The psychiatric centre in Wesbrook hospital is
the oldest of its kind on a Canadian campus,
founded in 1939.
"We see about 450 students each session, the
common complaint of whom seems to be the
impersonality of university life," said Schwarz.
Psychiatric patients may live at the hospital and
continue to attend classes at the same time.
According to Schwarz, the university
administration has no control on the psychiatric
services of the hospital.
"They just pay the bills," he said.
"We find it easier to deal with students. We're
familiar with the nature of most of their problems,
whereas a private psychiatrist sitting downtown may
not know what to do."
Despite claims that Wesbrook hospital is the
major source of psychiatric treatment on campus,
the new centre several blocks away has proven its
popularity in its new approaches to an old subject.
"We don't want to make big promises — we just
want to demonstrate what we can do," said
Tyhurst.
"We can't say we're doing the best thing in the
world — we're just doing the best we know how."
—photos by maureen gans
PSYCHIATRY HEAD TYHURST
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PLUS EXCITING  EXTRA PRIZES EVERY WEEK:
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GET YOUR FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
Fourteen wooden beads on a leather thong. Anti-uptight baubles
to get you through daily disasters. Free in the mail when you
apply for your special UBC Home Credit Card.
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
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*!f you now have a regular Home Credit Card, phone our Credit Dept,
685-9131  — we'll make arrangements to make it eligible.
Complete this application form (please print) and mail it to Home Oil.
We'll rush your special Credit Card to you, plus your free Worry Beads.
SURNAME
CHRISTIAN NAMES
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS (if different from above) Show Street
No., Town, etc.
REGISTRATION NO.
FACULTY YEAR Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,   1970
Prof awaits deportation
FREDERICKTON    (CUP)
Norman Strax, the former
University of New Brunswick
physics professor is currently
awaiting deportation procedings
by the federal government.
The deportation procedings,
initiated by the federal
department of immigration, were
unexpectedly    delayed    last
Thursday when bad weather
prevented the arrival in
Fredericton of D. M. Parent,
special inquiry officer for the
immigration department.
The move to deport the
beleaguered physics professor first
came November 5, when Strax
emerged from a 14-day stay in
Fredericton    city    jail,    for
Free beer tokens
for new Pitters
By JIM DAVIES
The Pit, UBC's campus pub, is
making a concentrated effort to
better serve the university's beer
guzzlers.
"We have made several changes
lately, but we still have a long way
to go," said newly appointed Pit
manager Dale Berry.
"Ideally we could be situated
in one of the basement rooms in
SUB with sawdust on the floor,
dartboards and posters on the
wall, beer mugs,and a genuinely'
informal atmosphere," he said.
However, the Pit has to take one
step at a time."
Even though the membership
rate remains at $2.50, all new
members will receive three free
beer tokens with the
management's compliments.
Women will now be admitted free
of charge when accompanied by a
member.
Members and their guests will
be served free coffee during the
first hour or two of each day's
operation. Free popcorn will also
be available for those who wish to
chew with their brew.
Entertainment will be "played
down" under the new
management. It was felt that the
budget of the Pit was insufficient
to bring quality entertainers in on
a regular basis.
Many members complained of
poor entertainment during the
first term, so Berry has returned
to playing records with intentions
of hiring superior entertainment
approximately every second week.
His ideas for diverse
entertainment include a Bavarian
Beer singing group, a steel band
and a Hawaiian combo.
"When we have live
entertainment, I think it is
essential that we encourage
audience participation," he said.
"I know that people resent
paying a membership fee at the
Pit, however, the archaic liquor
laws we have in B.C. demand it,"
said Berry.
If people are willing to pay this
price, the management is willing
to work to make the Pit a really
great place on campus where
people can relax, have fun, and
enjoy a few drinks in a congenial'
atmosphere."
THE PRE-MED SOCIETY
PRESENTS
ILLEGAL ABORTION
Tues., Feb. 17, 12:30, Wesbrook 201
THIS  IS  THE   FIRST TOPIC   IN   A  SERIES  OF  EXCITING   EVENTS
CONCERNING    DIFFERENT    PHASES    OF    MEDICINE
UPCOMING, WITH THE AID OF FILMS, SPEAKERS, FIELD
TRIPS AND SEMINARS WILL BE OTHER MEDICAL FIELDS
SUCH AS PATHOLOGY, POISON CONTROL, AND THE UNWED
MOTHER.
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measure
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OF ALL KINDS
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SUITS
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SKIRTS   MADE  TO  MEASURE
Pantalones
654 Seymour Tel. 681-8621
Opposite The Bay*
Mon. to Sot.
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
The space age
adventuress
whose sex-ploits
are among the
most bizarre
ever seen.      >
obstructing of a police officer.
Strax, witnessing a downtown
arrest for drunkeness, said he felt
the arresting officer was being
"unduly rough" in his treatment
to the offender. Strax began
taking pictures as the man was
herded off to the police station,
and was arrested.
Without prior warning, Strax
was greeted by police and a
warrant from the immigration
department upon his release
Strax has been an
embarrassment to various sectors
of New Brunswick society since
his dismissal last year from UNB
for supporting a student protest
over library privileges.
Strax's deportation is
ostensibly being sought for his
arrest on the obstruction charge,
but Strax believes the move is
simply designed to rid Fredericton
of his presence.
"The offense is too trivial for
deportation, but the decision will
be made on a political basis," he
said.
Goodtyme Sound
LALENCO
TURNTABLES
Call 732-0114
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out  Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m. to  11:30 p.m.
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY - 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS  TO 3  A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
10062   K.nq   Georqe   Hwy.   —  588-2727
5052   Kingswav   —   874-3622
q film society presentation;
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7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 7:00
FIB. 13, 14, 75 - SUB AUDITORIUM
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50c
1970 E.U.S. FEE REFERENDUM
January 30
"Are   you   in   favour   of  the   Registrar   collecting   a   $3.00
Activity Fee in September,  1970?"
YES: 386
NO:  94
SPOILS:  6
TOTAL:  486
%Eng. students voting: 43.4%
1970 E.U.S. Fee Referendum passed by a 79.5% majority
HOW WOULD YOU
LIKE TO BE
NICK GEERDINK?
Nick Geerdink (Comm.-3) of 612 4th Avenue, New Westminster,
was the big winner of the February draw in the Home Oil UBC
Students only Contest. Linda Cochran, C.P. Air Stewardess makes
him comfortable.
He won a week-end for two in
San Francisco, including air fare,
meal and hotel allowance for
two days for himself and friend.
The next winner could be you!
Turn to Page 23 for details of
The UBC Students
Only Contest
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The Black Plague
EDITION
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-george alien aerial photo
SUS begins work to save beach
'brute force solution7 not used
For many problems there is more than one solution.
Solutions can often be divided into two categories, elegant
and brute force. For example, the brute force method of
crossing 1st narrows is to fill the whole thing in and build
a road over the rubble. The Lions Gate bridge was a more
elegant solution. Similarly, the Park's Board solution of
the UBC beach cliff erosion problem — a multi million
dollar road and sea wall - certainly deserves classification
as a brute force approach. Is there an elegant solution?
One suggestion is the placing of beds of artificial sea
weed to dissipate the power of the incoming waves.
Science students have consulted geology profs who are
looking into the feasibility of the idea. We plan to
undertake a pilot study, to actually plant one of these
beds and observe its action.
Such a bed would disturb the beach ecology very
little, certainly less than a road and seawall or a pumped
bed of sand and grave. The university beach is used as a
research area by ecology and botany students, either of
the schemes above would impare or destroy its usefulness.
There is more to the university beach erosion
problem and its methods of solution than is immediately
obvious. The brute force solution has been the only
solution to most of our problems for far too long. We
have chosen to work against nature rather than with it. To
solve problems with minimum damage to our environment
.has never been given majorpriority. The beach road is just
another example of a general policy which includes strip
mining, massive logging without reforestation, turning
rivers into open sewers and countless other desecrations of
our environment. That a parks board should be
attempting to destroy our last natural beach is ironic to
say the least.
Our current plans are for a test bed 150 feet long to
be located in the little cove to the left of the guntower in
the photo. The bed will consist of strands of plastic with
floats on their tops anchored to a cable. The cable itself
will be attached to pipes driven deep into the seabed.
This is where we need your help. To prepare the bed
is going to take a fair amount of work and we need help.
Interested science students are asked to sign a list posted
in the SUS common room, Hut 0-7 behind Education.
This is the first SUS research project — whether there will
be more depends on how this one turns out. We plan to
send a copy of our results to the parks board. The beach
road is not the only answer to erosion; help us provide an
alternative.
Twelve bottles, twelve corks,
one sink and one glass etc...
Dedicated to L.W. & W.C.
I had twelve botles of whiskey in the cellar, and my
wife told me to empty the contents of each bottle down
the sink or else. I proceeded with the unpleasant task. I
withdrew the cork from the first bottle and poured the
contents down the sink, with the exception of one glass
which I drank. I extracted the cork from the second
bottle and did likewise with the exception of one glass
which I drank. 1 withdrew the cork from the third bottle
and poured the contents (whiskey) down the sink. With
the exception of one glass, which I drank. I pulled the
cork from the fourth sink, and poured the bottle down
the glass, which I drank. I pulled the bottle from the cork
•of the next and drank one sink out of it, and threw the
rest down the glass. I pulled the sink out of the next glass
and poured the cork from the bottle, then I corked the
sink with the glass, bottled the drink and drank the pour.
When I had everything emptied, I steadied the house with'
one hand, and counted the bottles, corks, glasses, and
sinks with the other, which were twenty-nine. Ans as the
house came by again, I counted them again. I finally had
all the houses in one bottle, which I drank.
I'm not under the alcofluence of incohol, but thinkle
peep I am. I'm not so thunk as you might drink. I fool so
feelish. I don't know who is me, and the drunker I stand
here the longer I get. Page  26
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,   1970
The Black Plague
Published once a year by the Science Undergraduate Society of
the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not necessarily those of the Science
Undergraduate Society or the university. The Black Plague is
sometimes blue and sometimes black, but never read. City editor
228-2360, news editor 228-2360, advertising 228-2360,
editor-in-chief 228-2360.
Editor: John Thompson.
Contributors: John Frizell, Alvin Berke, Rich Adams, Gordie
Richmond, Vince (You-Dot) Manis, Marion Chapman, and Jessie
Ried. Special thanks to Alan Jay for his help.
New science degree
In response to a growing demand for training in
Computer Science, the Department of Computer Science
will introduce undergraduate Majors and Honours
programs for the session 1970/71. Presently there are 597
students registered in C. Sc. 210 and 179 in C. Sc. 300.
Some of these may be able to register in one of the above
programs for the coming year. The new programs have
been designed so that students may enter them in the first,
second and third years. In exceptional circumstances a
fourth year student may be able to satisfy the
requirements.
The two programs will be the same in the first two
years. There will be three units in Computer Science, nine
in Mathematics, nine restricted and nine elective. In the
second and third years of the Majors program there will be
fifteen units in Computer Science, six in Mathematics and
nine elective. The Honours program for the third and
fourth years will involve twenty-one units of Computer
Science, nine units of Mathematics and six elective.,
To accompany the new programs some courses have
been restructured and new courses have been added. In all
there will be fifteen undergraduate courses listed for the
coming session, although a few of these may not be
offered. The present C. Sc. 300, 'Advanced Programming
and Data Processing', will be replaced by two new courses;
C. Sc. 319, 'Advanced Programming and Data Processing'
and C. Sc. 311, 'Programming Languages'. Other new
undergraduate courses are C. Sc. 402 'Numerical
Computation II', C. Sc. 494 'Introduction to Information
Retrieval', C. Sc. 405 'Simulation and Optimization', C.
Sc. 411 'Compiler Design', C. Sc. 421 'Introduction to
Formal Systems', C. Sc. 422 'Introduction to Artificial
Intelligence' and C. Sc. 448 'Directed Studies in Computer
Science'.
No major acquistion of equipment is likely in the
coming year. Rather, there will be a development and
further use of the equipment and software presently
available.
In Graduate Studies the present Masters program will
continue with a larger number of graduate students. The
graduate courses have been restructured on a one-term
basis. In all, twenty-two graduate courses will be listed. A
Ph.D. program is also under consideration and may be in
operation soon.
The staff of the Department is expected to grow by
three or four members. Qr j  g peck
My teacher is so very nice,
I always take her good advice;
She's just as soft as bunny fur-
I think I'd like to sleep with her
The Song of IO-   What-  The
Should you ask me whence these programs
Whence these listings and these records
With the ring of truth (the right ring)
With the bits and bytes of data
With the flippancy of flip-flops
With the crushing reams of printouts
With their frequent iterations
And their input, output, throughput
Not to mention downput, upput
I should answer, I should tell you.
From the wells of honey (Waltham)
From the IB empty spaces
From the land of Univacuums
From the land of controlled data
From the burrows of Paoli
Where the coder, called programmer
Feeds among the reeds (and writeouts)
I repeat them as I HEARD THEM
Memories from Glitchee-Kludgee
Father of all new computers
Also grand and great-grandfather
(Depending on their generations)
Should you ask where Glitchee-Kludgee
Found this output wild and wayward
I should answer, I should tell you
In the little town of Kingstown
In the little town of Bluebell
Near the highway called one two eight
In the bedlam of Bethesda
Should you ask me what the point is
Thus assuming that there is one
I should tell you that there is none
I should answer, I should tell you
END: computus interruptus
Let us finish, let us finish
Stay and read this rude inscription
Read this song of I/O-what-the
In a room with air conditioned
On a false floor (one below it)
Stands (or sits) our Glitchee-Kludgee
All around him are peripherals,
Not to mention stray programmers
Mention also operators
(Having done that, let's forget them)
One more mention — keypunch ladies
Taking up with stray programmers
Here amidst this grand confusion
Sits (or stands) our Glitchee-Kludgee
Sits (or stands) and thinks — or does he?
Thoughts programmed by stray programmers
Maybe thinking random thoughts by
Random-punching keypunch ladies
Sits and thinks (or stands) and wonders
Who will tell them the story
Who will tell of his beginning
Tubes of vacuum — cards with round holes
How he looped and how he halted
How he shifted, stored and added
How he did and called and went to
That the tribes of men might prosper
(Not to mention stray programmers)
Will he someday find his Boswell
Will someday a fellow (long one)
Write his story - Tom Tom fashion
Beating out on drums this legend
Using disks for more mass stories
Tape-recording software sagas
Holy punched cards! Hollerith-ms!
Maybe someday we should answer
Maybe one day (Never'n someday)
Glitchee-Kludgee, not realizing
That his thoughts are being printed
In the subroutine of someone
(Probably a sub-programmer)
Said programmer can't debug them
Sends them in to Datamation
Thus deport our I/O-what-the
Not to mention Glitchee-Kludgee
In the back of Datamation
Back among the tempting want ads
With the agencies employing
With the agencies imploring
Back with advertisers' index
And the bore-um of the Forum.
Ask me once more what the point is
Ask me once more if you care to
Even if you couldn't care less
I should tell you: I should tell you. Friday, February 13, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
Science armies
must begin war
—John kurtz photo
There is an inherent trap in
being asked to expound on the
obligation of the scientist in a
pollution-control environment; it
becomes very easy to use the
topic as a means of ignoring a
personal obligation in such
circumstances by placing the main
onus or responsibility on the
scientist's shoulders. But to
maintain a correct perspective,
any consideration of the
obligations of the scientist must
include a comparison with the
obligations of the non-scientist.
By virtue of his specialized
training and experience, the
scientist involved in the various
forms of, pollution-control has a
heavier responsibility in the
situation. Not only must he
actively practice pollution-control
outside the laboratory, as must we
all, but must also seek to control,
if not combat and overcome, the
apathy of the general public in a
polluted environment.
But the responsibility of any
scientist to create a pollution-free
environment, despite his
particular vocation, is no greater
than that which rests with
specialists in other professions.
This, however, does not prevent
those specialists from seeking to
Prices up  Distress sign
SPEC emblem
avoid their obligation by reverting
to the old cliche: "The scientists
are to blame, so why aren't they
doing something about it?" in
thought, deedand word.
When it comes to
pollution-control, the scientists,
just as they did in the initial stages
of the nuclear bomb, become the
scapegoats of a concerned society
- a society which chooses to
ignore that the initial
responsibility for successful
pollution-control rests within its
gates and not in the test-tube of a
scientist's laboratory. Because of
this, the scientist has become a
curer rather than a provider.
And being a preventer has to
be the limit of scientific
responsibility if only because
curing the apathy of
allegedly-civilized society has
often been tried, and has always
found to be impossible.
Nevertheless, a scientific
involvement in the fight for
effective pollution-control is
mandatory if the battle is to be
won. But the scientist should be
part of an army, not placed in the
position of a David fighting a
Goliath. Particularly when they
are supposed to be on the same
side!
Do you want to pay 75c
a gallon for gasoline?
There's a price for clean air,
that may be it. How about
35c a pad for paper instead
of 30cv is it worth it to
clean up mill effluent?
Clean air and clean water
were once free, they aren't
any more. Living in our
technological society we
demand manufactured
goods, and we want them at
the   lowest   price   possible.
If a pulp mill worth 70
million dollars is required to
add full effluent processing
equipment, it becomes a 73
million dollar mill. When
capital and operating
expenses go up, either prices
must go up or profits must
come down. No industry
will take a voluntary cut in
profits any more than a
working man will take a
cut.';
Our environment is being
increasingly polluted, in
B.C., in Canada and around
the world. To clean it up
will take money, billions of
dollars in labor and
machinery. To cleanse out
ennvironment on a global
scale will be a massive
undertaking, but to
continue as we have been is
suicide.
The following is an explanation
of the Black Ring, the symbol of
the Society for Pollution and
environmental Control (SPEC):
The Black Ring is a quiet
symbol of distress. It is a
declaration of one's personal
anxiety and sadness at the insane
poisoning of our world. Most
people think pollution means
dirty beaches and stinking rivers
and foul air. But these are the
least of our problems.
The terrifying fact is, that the
world is dying. The land and the
seas are becoming saturated with
deadly chemicals. The animals are
dying. The fish are dying. The'
oceans and the plants, which
provide us with the oxygen we
breathe, are simply losing their
ability to continue doing so.
The ecologists and
environmental experts are trying
to warn us. Some are convinced
the world will not support life in
twenty years. Some say fifty.
Others say we are already too late
to reverse the danger. But they all
agree that we are headed for a
total, terminal mass suicide.
Most people simpley will not
believe it. The consequences are
so horrible, that they don't want
to believe it. They cannot accept
the fact that their own children
are being born with an automatic
death sentence.
We ask you to hear this quiet
symbol of utter frustration, fear
and commitment. Talk to others.
Make them aware of the dread
end we face, and when they grasp
the terrible truth, ask them to
wear a Black Ring.
The ring is only a symbol, but
as its wearers grow in number, the
committed will know they are less
and less alone and the outcry
must be heard.
Because, maybe, if enough
people think enough, and talk
enough, and learn enough, and
understand enough, just MAYBE
someonw will get the message and
stop poisoning our children's
world.
The Black Ring is: a simple
ring of dirt. It is a parents
mourning band for his own child.
Or a child's mourning band for
himself, the result of our legacy.
IT IS ZERO.
-Reprinted from SPEC newsletter.
The Valentine's Massacre
SUB Ballroom 9-1
The New Breed Page 28
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,   1970
Power mowers
problematic
The power Cixiven mower is a
boon to shiftless suburbanites
whose lawnc are full of
dandelions, buc '.thorn, and other
weeds too tall for the reel type
conventional cutters.
The rotary mower, however, is
not an unmixed blessing. Unseen
rocks and sticks, tc say nothing of
unburied bones, will raise hell
with the blades. So will nails, bits
of wire, and other debris. But
these problems fade into
insignificance compared with the
unhappy results of this type of
mower over newly deposited dog
shit. Until you have had your
shoes shined with pulverized dog
shit, you cannot fully appreciate
the scope of the problem.
Now cat shit, to be sure, smells
worse, but cats, as everyone
knows, are more careful to cover
up their wastes than are dogs.
Moreover,- cats don't shit as much
as dogs unless you have a very
small dog or a very large cat.
There are a number of
approaches to the problem of the
rotary mower and animal excreta,
but unfortunately there is no real
solution. First, of course, you can
try to keep dogs and cats away
from your lawn. The only
effective way of doing this is to
buy a bigger dog than the other
dog   or   any   other   dog  in   the
neighbourhood. Train him to
chase other dogs off the lawn and
also to shit on the neighbours'
lawns. There are obvious
drawbacks to this method of
combatting the problem. Firstly,
there is always a chance one of
your neighbours will get a cow
and train it to shit on your lawn.
It has been estimated that a rotary
mower operating at a speed of
3450 RPM can hurl a normal cow
plop as high as your second storey
window and over an area of 500
square feet. Secondly, building a
fence is a possible solution, but an
expensive one. It is, in addition,
no good unless you can train your
wife and children to keep the gate
shut. Also some dogs can jump
fences even when full of shit.
There are various commercial
preparations sold mostly to
evil-minded old ladies which are
supposed to stop lady dogs from
screwing on your front door,
pissing on the shrubs, and shitting
on the lawn. These chemicals are
worthless since it is second nature
for a dog to screw and piss. A
dog's philosophy of. life is:
"Anything you can't eat or
screw-piss on it."
Thus as you can see within
present-day technology the rotary
mower will always have some
disadvantages.
WANTED: 1200 FEMALE RED
Goats.   Call  Vic  at 228-3818.	
WANTED: INFORMATION WANT-
ed loading to the capture of those
who removed partitions between
toilets in three buildings. Contact
Education, Chem. Engineering,
and  Angus.
POUND: ONE SCREWDRIVER IN
Chem. Engineering can. Call Rat
Patrol,   Zulu  3.	
ALEX: WHERE'S MY SCREW -
driver?? — Ray.	
WANTED: ABOUT 600 ENGIN-
eers for Unsanitary Landfill Project. No experience necessary.
Apply to S.U.S.  Hut 0-7.
©JC\
It's Happening TONIGHT
at the
»**£,
St. VALENTINE'S MASSACRE
Groove to the Fantastic
NEW BREED
TONIGHT ■ SUB BALLROOM
9-1
1.00 Per Person Friday, February 13,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 29
FRIDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Lecture on "What happened in
Biafra?" Friday at 8:00 pm at 1208
Granville St.
NDP CLUB
Model parliament caucus meeting, Friday  at noon in  SUB  105A.
UBC   WOMEN'S   LIBERATION
Dance, Friday at 8:00 pm,  137 Water
St. Bands and refreshments.
PRE   LIBRARIANSHIP   SOCIETY
Short  general  meeting,   Friday  noon
SUB 225.
BRUCE CURTIS FOR COD COMMITTEE
Meeting today noon in the Student
Union Bldg. Buttons on sale for $2.50.
Everyone welcome.
CLAM
Rap session, Friday noon in SUB 211
on  "The  Destruction of Language".
SPORTS CAR CLUB
T'Bird presentation party, Friday 8:00
pm-l:00 am. SUB party roon. All
members welcome.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, Friday noon. in
SUB 1056.
SNIPE
Objectivity and social research, Friday 2:30 Bu. penhouse. Discussion of
Myrdal's book by grads and faculty.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN    FELLOWSHIP
Dr.    Rennie,   Friday   noon,    ballroom
extension.
MORATORIUM   COMMITTEE
General meeting, Friday noon in
club workroom.
UBC  WOMEN'S  LIBERATION
Meeting re: abortion and re-education,
Friday noon,  SUB 226.
VARSITY OUTDOOR  CLUB
Open house party,  Saturday Whistler
mountain cabin.
NVC-CVC Valentine's dance Saturday,
8:30-12 30 am, SUB ballroom featuring "Soul Unlimited"
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Dirt bash, Sunday, 11:30 am dirt field;
SW Marine Drive at Tamath Crescent.
SUNDAY
SPORTS   CAR  CLUB
Gymkhana, Sunday, 10:00 am "B"
Lot.  Dpen to everyone.
MONDAY
VARSITY  DEMOLAY
Regular meeting, Monday, noon SUB
213.
LEGAL AID
Campus legal aid forums every Mon.,
Wed. and Fri. noon, SUB 237 and
237 A.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Special lecture by Father G. Mc-
Guigan, Monday at 8:00 pm St. Mark's
College Lounge. Topic — "Two Views
of Truth:  Religious  and  Academic."
TUESDAY
SPECIAL   EVENTS
The   Berkeley   Square,   Tuesday  noon
in SUB auditorium.
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY
Ethics of emergencies, Tuesday noon
SUB 130.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
Meeting Tuesday  noon  SUB  211.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY  OUTDOOR   CLUB
General    meeting    Wednesday    noon,
Chem. 250. Slides of CUSO in Africa.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Tour sign-up, Wednesday noon.
UBC   SAILING  CLUB
Lecture on racing, Wednesday, noon,
Bu. 203.
AND GOD SAYS
"LET THERE
BE  LIGHT"
FEBRUARY 25
Goodtyme Sound
Will Not Sell
Inferior Equipment
Call 732-0114
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DINNER & DANCE ORGANIZED
by M-SSA. Sat., Feb. 14, 7:00 p.m.
International   House.    $2.00   each.
GROOVE TO THE GREAT NEW
Sound of The Mantra (Soul Unlimited) on Valentine's Day Feb.
14 in SUB Ballroom. Action starts
at  8:30. 	
WINE AND CHEESE PARTY SAT-
urday Feb. 14 9-1 at Ponderosa.
Sponsored by Sigma Alpha Mu.
Tickets $5.50 per couple. Phone
261-7870   or  at  the  door.
Greetings
12
JUST BECAUSE T O U DON'T
want a baby right now doesn't
mean you can't exeprience pregnancy and childbirth (vicariously,
of course!) Queen E. theatre Feb.
25.   "The   Rose"	
DUE TO DEMAND. SPEAK EASY
is now open five days a week
Mon. - Fri., noon to 9 p.m. SJJB
Rm. 218, 228-3706 or write c/o
box  No.   115.   SUB.
Valentine Greetings
12A
TO TGGY OF TWO IGORS: BULKY
bedwarmers cheap this year.
Cheaper for you, free! H.F.V.
Love Moo P.S. Co-operation guaranteed.	
A VALENTINE'S WISH TO THE
three Roving Cavaliers and our
brothers an sisters luv the Glee-
some Threesome.	
TO DEL AND DOUG HAPPY VAL-
entine's Day. See you in your
dreams. Love, Raquel and Yvonne.
JAN, IF I LOVED YOU ANY-
more I'd be arrested. Only 89 days
until . . . ! Happy Valentine's
Day!   Rick.	
GREETINGS TO THE ANGEL
who has stolen this truck driver's
heart.   Happy   Valentines.	
SQUIRT! HAPPY VALENTINE'S
Day,   lover-type   wife.   Love,   Rob.
HERMAN, LUV: MAX THE
faithful is alive and doing his
thing. Happy Valentine's Day!
Priscilla.	
CONNIE, THANKS FOR THE
cards. Piggy bank will be full
May  16.   Happy  Valentines.  Keith.
HAPPY VALENTINES TO MY
darling Kathy. May Cupid keep
us  in  love  always.   Love,  Jak.
Lost & Found
14
COME AND CLAIM BELONGINGS
by Feb. 24. Items are being disposed of.
LOST: 1 GOLD LOOP ERRING.
Ph.   Pat 278-2481.  Reward.
LOST. GOLD FRAME GLASSES.
Phone 224-1577.  Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices
16
Afrsj>airMm.fcals oil .&
• tmeUr l.oc
Juice bajr
Sfe754L
BECOME A LEGALLY ORDAINED
minister. $2.00 donation appreciated. World Life Church, Inc.
P.O. Box 717. Ceres, Cal. 95307.
THE QUEEN E. THEATRE IS
free from atmospheric contaminants, residual pesticides, environmental collapse, and other 20th
Century pitfalls! See this miracle
on Feb. 25 at 8. Just $1.50. Prize
winning films will be shown too.
Tickets 683-3255. "The Rose."
BEYOND THE GREEN DOOR!'
Tickets on sale every Noon 4th
Floor Angus.	
THIS WEEK END JANE FONDA
dominates the screen in "Barbarella" Fri. Sat. 7:00, 9:30; Sun.
7:00. Sit in comfort in SUB The-
atre.   Still  only   50c.	
SO RESIDENCE GIRLS ARE
Homely? Check this lie out Sat.
Feb. 14 Totem Park 9-1 with the
Fantastic  Spectres.	
GROOVE TO THE GREAT NEW
Sound of The Mantra (Soul Unlimited) on Valentine's Day Feb.
14 in SUB Ballroom. Action starts
at  8:30.	
PERSONAL
INTRODUCTIONS
 879-3317	
AQUA SOC. BEER DRINKERS
Unite! SUB 215 Wed. Feb. 25 4-8
p.m.   Added  attraction—hot   doys!
100% BIODEGADEABLE SA8 DE-
tergent does the best job for less
$$. See Richard Hollins, 351 Sal-
ish.   224-9755.	
RIDE FOR TWO NEEDED MID-
term break. Kimberley area. Can
leave Wednesday 18th. Phone
Lynne  224-4674.
Special Notices  (Cont.)
16
SCUBA COURSE
* N.A.U.I. Certification
* Professional instruction
* All equipment supplied
* 35 hour—6 wk. course
* Internationally recognized
For  further  information,  course
brochure   or   registration
685-6017 (24 hrs.)
SUB - AQUA
International   Diving   School
Travel Opportunities
17
TWO   FEMALES   WANT   RIDE   TO
Banff.   Could   leave   Wed.   Feb.   18.
Phone  738-2541.	
NEED    RIDE    TO    FRISCO  - AND
back?   Phone   Doug   261-6810   mid-
term break.	
EUROPE   FOR   SWINGING
SINGLES   AGE   17-30.
meals,    accorrirnoda.tion,     tours    &
transportation.
3   weeks   $225.00
6   weeks   SJ330.00
DINERS   FUGAZY   TRAVEL   —
688-2545.
Miscellaneous (Cont'd)
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles  For Sale
21
1958 AUSTIN — EXCELLENT
mileage. $125.00 or best offer.
Phone   299-7652.	
1967 CUTLASS 30,000 MILES.
Radio P.S., P.B. Immaculate condition. Best offer takes. Call eol-
lect   532-1071.	
1963 NSU PRINZ. MUST SELL, $75
or best offer. 45 miles/gallon. John
224-5214,    Room    434.	
1961 RENAULT. GOOD CONDI-
tion. $260 or offer. Very economical and reliable. Phone 224-9720.
Paul   Rm.   428.	
FOR SADE 1965 VOLVO $800.
Phone  922-1053  after   6  p.m.	
1960 RAPIER IN CLEAN CONDI-
tion.   New  motor.   $300.   736-5217.
CAMPER SPECIAL! '64 FORD
Econoline Van. New parts — closest to $600 takes it. Jim WA 2-
2084.	
'67 MGB. TOP CONDITION. MANY
extras. $1800. Good mileage. Phone
733-6241.	
1960 VAUXHALL. GOOD, CHEAP,
transportation. Best offer. Phone
224-9742.  Ask for Tom,  Rm.  687.
1961 SUNBEAM RAPIER. EXCEL-
lent buy for $250.00. Phone Jim,
228-3898   Kay  or   228-9609  Eves.
'57 FORD, GOOD SHAPE, 6-STAN-
dard, Radio. "C" Lot Parking
Permit,   224-9460.	
1959 VAUXHALL STATION WAG-
on. Very good condition. Economical transportation. 278-6532
after  6  p.m.
'59 CHEV. 2 DOOR. NEW TRANS.
New  plates,   radio.   Good  for  stu-
dent  224-7594.	
1961   VOLVO   PV544.   RBLT.   ENG.
New clutch  assembly,  good  tyres.
$850,   offers?   263-9768
59  PONTIAC.   GOOD   CONDITION.
New     brakes,     recent     tune - up.
Phone  224-5351.	
22
Automobiles—Wanted	
WANTED:  MGA IN GOOD CONDI-
tion.   Phone   736-6273.	
Motorcycles 25
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Art Services
31A
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS-SPECIAL-
ists in Graphs, Maps, Text Book
Illustrations, Complex Formulae.
Scientific Displays Advertising.
Phone   733-4506.
Duplicating & Copying
32
GRAPHICOS SCIENTIFICOS — ES-
pecialistos en Diagramas, Mapas,
Tllustraciones por Libros de Textos
Y Formulas Complejas. Exhibi-
ciones Scientificos. Propaganda
Tel.   733-4306.
Miscellaneous
33
ARTWORK PHOTOGRAPHY POS-
ters call me and see if I can't do
it.   John  Kula  224-4146.
33
RESIDENCE DWELLERS! TRADE
4 claustrophobic walls for the
larger environment of the Queen
E. Theatre, Feb. 25 at 8. See the
prize-winning film of birth, "The
Rose" plus others. Only $1.50!
Tickets 683-3255 (Van. Ticket
Centre).
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
IS THE SUB SLOWLY COLLAPS-
ing? Protect yourself! Relax in
the sturdy concrete womb of the
Queen E. Theatre Feb. 25 at 8.
"The Rose" and other prize winning films. Tickets $1.50 at 683-
3255   (Van.   Ticket   Centre).	
EVER MADE LOVE ON A FUR
rug? Afghan coats double nicely
in a pinch. $80 (cheap) at Sas-
parilla and Blind Owl on 4th Ave.
Say   hello   to  the   nice  people?
THE SPACE AGE ADVENTURESS
whose sex-ploits are among the
most bizarre ever seen! That's
"Barbarella"   this   week   end!	
ZELDA SNICKLEFRITZ WILL BE
there 9-1 by Special Request at
Totem Park Sat. Feb. 14 for the
Fantastic    Spectre   Dance.	
BEDSIDE MANOR MEDICINE
can't be beat! Wine and cheese
party   for   friends   Sat.   Feb.   28.
COME AND HEAR THIS YEAR'S
election promises Monday at 12:30
Party   Room   in  SUB.
DULCIMERS — FINEST HAND-
crafted. Try one at the Med Shop,
4339   W.   10th   Ave.   228-9061.
Tutoring
64
URGENT.   TUTOR    FOR    1ST    YR.
statistics.   Phone   596-7571.    North
Delta area.	
TUTORING IN MATH AND PHY-
slcs by graduate engineer. Call
Phil   731-1930.	
TUTORING IN MATHS — PHYS.
— Stats, by Ph.D. Instructor.
$5.00 per hr. Phone 733-6037 evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
 Please   call   224-6129	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc.  Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone  321-2102.	
TYPING SERVICE — MRS. GAIL
Symons, 224-6435. 3885 W. 12th
Avenue,	
COMPETENT TYPING (DOCU-
ments, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
page. Essays 30c page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317.	
WILL TYPE ESSAYS. ETC. IN MY
home. 738-9554 evenings and weekends.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR
your essays, reports etc. Reasonable rates. In my North Vancouver home.  988-7228.	
EXPERIENCED FRENCH — ENG-
lish typist. Thesis-Essays-Translations-Publications, any other
work. Contact: Miss Danielle Cou-
nord, office hours: 682-1878; even.
hours:   879-3568.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing — essays, thesis, etc. Neati
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone   321-2102.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
TO BE ABLE TO MAKE SOME
sort of intelligent decision in the
elections come to the All-Candidates Meeting Monday at 12:30
in  the  SUB Party Room.
71
PIRELLI SKI BOOTS SIZE 8,
poles, Vogg White Comet Mark II
72" skis $65.00. Phone Joan 266-
6669.	
ONE     PAIR     HEAD     360's     WITH
harness, poles,  canvas covers; 210
centimeters.   Phone   261-0394   after
, 6:00  p.m.	
SKI    BOOTS.    TYROL   LACE   SIZE
liy2N.    Worn    3    times.    Phone   733-
6050.	
NYLON FIBER SHORT'N CURLY
wig. Light blonde, pre-cut and
styled. Head included. $30.00.
Chris  224-3380.	
FOR SALE — FRENCH 10 SPD.
Racing Bike. Phone 253-7886 or
298-8237.	
PHILCO (FORD) SOLID STATE
stereophonic record player. Five
months old. Excellent condition.
$80.   Phone   224-5020.	
"HEAD" GIANT SLALOM SKIIS
200 cm. Two years new. $95.00.
Phone Shirley 224-9982, Rm. 208
after Feb. 15/70 and after 8:30
p.m.	
"BLIZZARD" SUPER EPOXI SKIIS
205 cm. Good condition. $90.00.
Phone Joy 224-9879 after Feb. 15/
70.
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookiiore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS IN CO-OP, 3857 W. 19th,
224-6844, couple two sharing Feb.
1   $45  and   $70.	
LIVE      ON     CAMPUS      CHEAPLY!
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5670 Toronto
Rd.	
BEAUTIFUL BASEMENT ROOM.
Private entrance, TV, stereo, telephone, rec. room plus liberal stu-
dent   landlord.   263-9609.	
ROOM $50.00. 3853 W. 35TH. LINEN
and Laundry facilities inc. Phone
263-8966.	
TWO SINGLE ROOMS FOR MALE
students in new house. Point Grey
area. Separate entrance and bathroom. Available March 1st. Phone
224-9319.	
FURNISHED ROOMS (WHOLE
house) heat, light, phone included
and all other facilities. All Guys.
Phone   738-0784.
Room & Board
82
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or   224-7843.
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
GIRL TO SHARE MOD. FURNISH-
ed West End apt. in Highrise.
MU  1-7707.	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished one bedroom apt. 10th Ave.
Near   Gates.   $55.   Phone   224-7035.
Unf. Houses  & Apts.
84
3RD GIRD TO SHARE LARGE
SUITE. OWN ROOM. $60.00. 3339
W.   6th  upstairs.
FOR'BEST RESULTS USE YOUR UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Page 30
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  13,  1970
Hoopmen finish
perfect season
—keith dunbar photo
GRIMACING DUKE MOLINISKI keepsi his eye glued to the
basket as he lays up another duce on the way to a 24 point
performance Thursday noon hour in the Birds game against UVic
which the Birds won easily 91-65. Molinski's big 24 point
performance still had trouble outshining teammate RonThorsen's
perfect field goal record as he went 10 for 10 from the floor. The
Birds now open their semi-final series against UVic next weekend.
Bird-chasers
rate highly
UBC's Mqrley Jameson gained the number two spot in B.C.
junior mens singles in badminton last weekend.
He was nipped by Mike Epstein of Vancouver 15-11 and 15-7
at the meet which was held in Victoria.
John Hetherington of UBC emerged as the doubles winner
from the meet as he teamed with Blake Kennedy of Vancouver to
upset the current Canadian junior champions Randy Bournes and
Chris Blaney also of Vancouver 15-12, 15-7 and then teamed with
Kathy Henry to take the mixed doubles 11-15, 15-5, 15-7.
Jameson and Hetherington joined Blaney and Epstein as four
man team that won the B.C. finals of the Pepsi-Cola national junior
badminton championships.
Now that the UBC Thunderbirds have cleared
up the rather bothersome business of the WCIAA,
the stage is set for their Saturday evening encounter
against the Simon Fraser Clansmen.
That unfinished business refers to the Thursday
afternoon victory over the University of Victoria
Vikings before a reasonable crowd of 2000
partisans.
The leader for the Birds in that particular
mismatch was shifty Bob Molinski who picked up a
smooth nine assists on his way to scoring 24 points
of his own.
But with a club of UBC's calibre one man never
does it all. Ron Thorsen was ten for ten from the
field to finish with 20 points and Derek Sankey
only had 11 points but wrapped up the conference
rebounding race by bagging 16 rebounds while
playing only half the game.
The Birds were aided in their efforts by what
might be classified as inclement shooting by
Victoria as they hit for only 28 per cent from the
field and were bombed on the boards 71 rebounds
to 34.
The Birds had considerable success in
penetrating the Vikings 1-3-1 zone defense as
Molinski, a master at such antics, did something he
will have to do if the Clan employ their 2-3 zone on
Saturday night.
The latest speculation concerning the Saturday
affair however is that SFU coach John Kootnekoff
will have his chargers come out in a man-to-man
defense and see if he can run with the Birds.
If SFU proves they are able to run, the Birds
are in deep trouble unless they shoot over 50 per
cent. With the front line of Wayne Morgan, Larry
Clark and Brian MacKenzie the Clan is equipped
with more size and strength than the corresponding
Birds.
The quality of the rival benches would
probably give the Birds a considerable edge as they
are able to call upon such shooters and Jack Hoy at
the forward spot and rookies Rod Matheson and Joe
Kainer at guards. The corresponding line-up for the
Clan is filled by the 6'4" San Francisco recruit Mike
Charles and Burnaby Central vet Glenn McKenzie.
The key to the game will doubtlessly be the
shooting percentages. If either team is hot while the
opposition is cold. They will calmly bomb the other
club out of the confines of the Coliseum.
In personnel terms, the same statement runs
like this. If Bill Robinson and Brian MacKenzie are
hot from the field and Sankey and Molinski are not,
the Birds will be buried early.
If Thorsen and the Birds are able to run more
effectively than the Clan and have the strength on
the boards to start the fast break, the Clan will exit
like bods from the local mortuary.
Another feature of the game concerns the idea
that SFU will be able to sit back on Burnaby
mountain and simply laugh at the CIAU if they win,
especially if the Birds go on to win the Canadian
championship.
Clan centre Wayne Morgan will be out to
impress upon Terry MacKay that he should have
been selected to the Canadian National Team rather
than the UBC centre.
One thing in favor of the Birds is the fact that
SFU have proven to be most ineffective on any
other court than their own. With the exception of
their early season victory over the Western
Washington College Vikings in Bellingham the Clan
have been most unsuccessful on the road.
The Birds on the other hand have lost four road
games but all against tough American competition
but on each occasion played extremely well. The
fact that both clubs will be on the road for this one
could mean a slight edge for the Birds.
After the SFU contest the Birds begin the
WCIAA playoffs Feb. 20 against the same team they
demolished yesterday, the UVic Vikings.
The winner on Saturday night will be the team
with the higher shooting percentage.
Cover-the-pool backers
show progress report
The university recreation
committees program to cover
Empire Pool is progressing
reasonably according to Sean
McHugh, committee chairman.
"We are working mostly at
raising the necessary money at the
moment," said McHugh
yesterday. "We have pledges from
the AMS and the Alumni
Association now and are looking
for others from the Grad class and
the Board of Governors."
The president's office has given
the committee over $1,000, the
amount they asked for to
complete the initial engineering
plans.
"Further to   that, we hope the
presidents office will support us
when we take our proposal
forward to the Board of
Governors early in March," he
added.
Initial plans appear to call for a
plastic type of bubble to cover the
existing facility.
Expansion of the dressing
room facilities is also proposed to
handle the expected crowds
during the actual school year.
Wrestlers  travel
Coach Paul Nemeth will take a team of eight wrestlers to the
WCIAA Championships in Saskatoon this week.
Representing the weight classes will be Steve White, 126
pounds; Bruce Grist, 142 pounds; Bill Duncan, 150 pounds; Bob
Grafton, 158 pounds; Les Burgener, 167 pounds; Taras Hryb, 177
pounds; Ken Mariash, 190 pounds; and Bob Ormond, heavyweight
class.
Burgener and Mariash won Western Conference titles last year,
while Taras Hryb is expected to perform well. He placed third in the
World Junior Championships last summer.
SALE - SALE - SALE
GAST0WN   EMPORIUM
49 Powell Street
FRIDAY   -   SATURDAY
SUNDAY
10 a.m.  -  5:30 p.m.
Goodtyme Sound
HAS THE
HI-FI ANSWER
Call 732-0114
BEHOLD
. . . there is light upon
the face of the earth, and
it is good.
FEBRUARY 25
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Find it all out
| or at least
learn to SPEAK
HIPPY
DICTIONARY
The latest Hip words and
sayings send $1.00 to
DOLLINA  DiSTRIB.
2136   Franklin   Street,
VaiiC,  B.C.
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry  Brownlee,  Prop,
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
Selkirk College
REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE ON CAMPUS
Mon. & Tues. Feb. 16th, 17fh
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mr. A. B. Dunn will be available
for consultation
in the Stu.dent Services Building
Social Hour in Room 215. S.U.B.
At 3 p.m. Tues., Feb. 17th THE      UBYSSEY
Page 31
Birds, Braves near
successful finish
The UBC Thunderbirds will
make the Western Intercollegiate
hockey playoffs this weekend and
the UBC Braves have clinched the
Pacific Intercollegiate Hockey
League.
The Braves had the most
productive weekend of any team
so far this year as they defeated
Selkirk Junior College 8-2 last
Friday and Gonzaga University
8-3 on Sunday. This leaves them
with a 10-1 record in league play,
9 points ahead of second place
Selkirk.
UBC has one game left and
Selkirk has three.
Frank Lanzarotta of the Braves
has moved into the league scoring
lead as his line totalled 27 points
in the two games. Bill Cartwright
counted   ten  points,  Lanzarotta
nine,  and  Bruce  Stevenson  got
eight.
Rod Silver, who has played
goal for ten of the 11 Braves
games, has a very respectable 2.4
goals per game record, while Fred
Masuch got a shutout in the other
game.
There will be a single playoff
game on March 6 in Trail, pitting
the Braves against Selkirk.
The Braves hope to have star
forward Rich Longpre back from
a four week sickness before their
final game of the season.
Meanwhile the Birds have been
getting into shape to tackle the
tough University of Calgary
Dinosaurs in the semi-finals. The
series, a two-out-of-three affair,
will start in Calgary Feb. 20.
Calgary narrowly beat the Birds in
both of their encounters.
Aqua men face Clan, Vikings
Coach Jack Pomfret's
swimming Thunderbirds take on
competition this weekend as they
meet two scholarship style
schools, Simon Fraser Friday
night and Western Washington
State College, Saturday.
"It will be a very tough
weekend," said Pomfret, "but our
boys are ready. They are
preparing for our WCIAA
championships next week and
both schools are preparing for the
American national
championships."
Pomfret is looking for diver
Bob Menzies and breaststroker
Phil Dockerill  to lead the Birds
against the Clan Friday night at
Percy Norman Pool, 6 p.m.
For Saturday's meet against
the WWSC Vikings the coach
expects more from his crop of
strong freshmen including Bruce
Hutchison, Jeff Wren and Andy
Keir.
After that for the Birds it is
home for the last weeks
preparation for the WCIAA
championships to be held in
Regina next weekend. For those
that qualify there, it means a trip
to the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union swimming
championships in Montreal.
UBC knows that they have a
chance, but will have to work for
it. Things have been going
inconsistently for the Birds lately,
but when they put a good game
together, they do it well, as they
did against Brandon last Friday
night.
The Birds now have brief
interlude in their preparations for
Calgary this weekend with an easy
game against UVic. The object is
not just to win, but to play well
and to clobber the Vikings.
Wayne Schaab is near to
winning the WCIAA scoring
championship, and should he
gather a lot of points this
weekend he could take the title,
and probably also a berth on the
first all star team. He has 32
points right now.
The two players he has to beat
are finished for the season. Ray
Brownlee of Brandon has finished
regular season play, and Herb
Pinder of Manitoba is sidelined
with a leg injury.
Barry Wilcox is also in good
position with 25 points, and has
to be considered as an all star
contender.
UVic athletic director Dr. Bob
Bell says that Victoria will again
compete in the WCIAA next
season, but it is not likely that
they will be competitive again.
The league as a whole is getting
stronger every year, and there is
little room for a doormat like
UVic. The scoring statistics tell
the tale on them, showing 23
goals for, and 137 against in 13
games.
They have also been allowing
over 60 shots per game, which
doesn't give a goaltender too
much of a chance. By contrast,
UBC has scored 73 and allowed
55 in the same number of games.
Track people
head for east
Six athletes from UBC have qualified for the Canadian
Intercollegiate Indoor Track and Field Championships to be held
this weekend in Winnipeg.
Those who qualified are Rick Wood, 2 miles; Ken Elmer,
triple jump and 600 yards; Don Craine, hurdles; Gordon Larson,
long jump; Sam Vandermeulen, high jump; and Ken French, mile.
The UBC team placed second in the WCIAA meet last
weekend which was won by the University of Saskatchewan.
Volleyball
goes this
By SCOTT McCLOY
The premier men's university
volleyball event of the season goes
this weekend starting at 6."30 this
evening.
Represented in the tournament
will be the Universities of
Saskatchewan at Regina, Calgary,
Winnipeg, Alberta, Manitoba,
Victoria, Lethbridge, and UBC.
It will be a round-robin event
with Saskatchewan vs UBC,
Calgary vs Lethbridge, Winnipeg
vs UVic, and Alberta vs Manitoba
in the first round at 6:30.
Then at 8:00 UBC vs
Manitoba, UVic vs Alberta,
Lethbridge vs Winnipeg and
Saskatchewan vs Calgary will be
featured.
Saturday morning the four
winners will go into a
championship round and the four
losers into a consolation round.
The final championship game
will be shown over national
television on CBC between 12:00
tourney
weekend
and 1:00 p.m. on Saturday.
The current defending
champions are the University of
Winnipeg but it seems unlikely
that they will grab the trophy for
a second year.
In a tournament in Calgary two
veeks ago the University of
lanitoba finished second, while
JBC and defending champs
/innipeg finished third and
fourth respectively.
According to Athletic Director
pus Philips there is no reason that
the Birds will not maintain their
previous status or improve.
In the thirteen year history
that the University of Manitoba
Alumni trophy has been played
for the Universities of Manitoba
and Alberta have both won the
crown five times each, while UBC
has won it twice and Winnipeg
once.
If you've never seen what high
quality volleyball looks like then
come out for a look. Admission is
free if you show your AMS card.
Goodtyme Sound
Can  Improve
Your Hi-Fi System
Call 732-0114
tSHELLj
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
10 YEARS IN THIS
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W  10th Ave.
224-0826
SALE
SKI EQUIPMENT
S 20% Ski Sets
A 20% Sweaters
V 20% Jackets
E 20% Discontinued
Models of Blizzard Skis
SKI SPECIAL
was now
HERZOG     $170.00 $127.00
Plastic
FIS $98.00    $86.00
Metal
FREE TYROL HARNESS
with purchase of skis
over $150.00
Only This Weekend
SKI PRO LTD.
140 LONSDALE
NORTH VANCOUVER
Phone 988-6220
Hrs.: 9:00-6:00 wk. - 9:00-9:00 Fri.
Let's Cover
the Pool
,.^
RAILPASS
Famous Eurail pass still a good buy. Available
for 21 days or 1-3 months of unlimited 1st
class travel in Western Europe. Only available
in N. America — preferably from us! Also
British   Passes.
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
HAGEN'S
736-5651
Hagen's   Travel   Service   Ltd. 2996 W.  Broadway
Get pledge from AMS ($6,000)
2. — Get pledge from president's office
3. — Hire consultant-engineer
4. -^ Get pledge from Alumni Association ($12,000)
5. — Get working drawings from engineer
6. — Get pledge from grad class ($6,000)
7. — Tender work out
8. — Go swimming
The committee now has to ask the grad class to match the
$6000 capital grant put up by the AMS. They also need many
more names on the petitions they are passing around ... so
please sign.
University Recreation Committee Page  32
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 13,  1970
Hi there, I'm your friendly
conscious agent of American
Imperialism.
And I'm here to show you a
foreign policy to protect you
and your loved ones.
It covers you and your
family in 3 ways..
1) Planned Perpetual Underdevelopment
If you're in the $40 a year bracket you sure don't want to risk that
paycheck for a revolution! By encouraging and financing safe
and sane military governments AMERICAN EMPIRE ©
provides law and order at a low resource and labour premium.
2) Cultural and Economic Control and Influence
If you're a country on the move, in the swing of what's happening and you just don't want to be bothered about all those little
icky budgetary problems like ownership, hand the keys over to
AMERICAN EMPIRE © For only a small drain on your
national resources we'll provide the kind of security and luxuries
you've become accustomed to having.
—or—
if you're in a hurry
• and these two are unsatisfactory
-try-
3) Napalm
Our latest development thought up by our researchers, in the
tradition of such past plans as the atomic bomb, germ warfare,
the M-l, and as far back as the Cavalry Charge and the Bowie
Knife. If you're the impatient type and can't wait the 50 or so
years it takes for AE's © other plans to work, then napalm
is what you're looking for. This coverage is the kind that sticks
with you and keeps on yielding effectively even if your home is
destroyed by fire or some other disaster.
So if you think that you're in line for our coverage and even if you don't why not see your conscious agent today? He's really not such a special guy. He probably lives next door, plays golf,
or football with his kids. Maybe he's your local cop, or teaches your kids. See him today. He's
real friendly.  Or drop into the friendly American Empire © office in your nearest country.
THE
American
Empire©
CANADA LTD.
**'*»» *****
Washington. Ottawa. London. Lisbon. Madrid. Rom*. Bonn. Bam. The Hague. Copenhagen. Brussels. Vienna. Oslo. Dublin. Canberra. Saigon. Manilla. Bangkok. Seoul. Rangoon. Kuala Lumpur. Taipei. New Delhi. Tel Aviv. Karachi. Johanessburg. logo*. Salisbury. BraxiKa. Buenos Aires. Quito.
Panama Gty. lima. Bogota. Santiago. Mexico Gty. Tegucigalpa. San Juan. Guantanamo. Paris. Vientiane. Caracas, and many, many more to serve
yiyou.
 thanks to the varsity, toronto

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