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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1965

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Array MYSTERY MAN SPEAKS AT 1:30 IN ARMORY
The campus man. of mystery reveals himself today.
Maybe.
President John B. Mac-
donald, who might appear to
some students more like a
shadow than a real-live university president, will speak
in the Armory at 1:30 pan.
This is the first time President Macdonald has addressed the students-at-large
in what is officially termed
a welcoming speech.
The president will speak
only in the last half of the
two-hour lunch break.
In view of this time ar
rangement, termed peculiar
by one Alma Mater Society
official, it is not expected
that a question period will
be allowed.
•   •   •
Macdonald came to UBC
in 1962 from Harvard, after
an academic career in dentistry. He plunged immedia-
ately of what came to be
known as the Macdonald report on higher education in
B.C.
UBC students, supporting
Macdonald's call for more
aid to higher education
launched  a  massive   "Back
Macdonald
VOL XLVIII, No. 3 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1965 CA 4-3916
—don kydd photo
FACING FEE FIGHTER are 4,000 students who rallied Wednesday noon at the Cairn to
listen and talk about the fee increase. The four speakers included two students, an
alumnus, and a faculty member.
Outsiders' vote chance:
enumerators here today
By AL DONALD
UBC students from outside
Vancouver have a chance to
vote here in the Nov. 8 elections—if they were qualified
to vote in their home riding.
Alma Mater Society second
vice-president Peter Braund
met Wednesday and arranged
facilities for interviews and
enumeration of students on
campus today.
Students qualified to vote at
home should see interviewers
at the following places and
times:
• Lower Mall men and Totem  Park  men   and  women
from   5   to   7   p.mu   in  the
lounges and dining rooms of
their residences.
• Lower Mall women from
12    to    12:30   pan.    in    the
lounges and dining rooms of
their residences.
• Fort Camp women should
UBC hits high mark
of 16,200 students
The total number of students attending UBC this
year is expected to reach an all-time high of 16,200.
By Friday, the last official day of registration, 15,658
students had been registered and another 462 people were
registered Monday and Tuesday.
of these 462 students, a large percentage were grad
students. In addition to these postgratuates, regisrar J.
Parnell said: ''There could be up to 200 people paying a
late fee of $25 and $5 for each successive day.
see their dons who are compiling lists of students to be
interviewed.
• Acadia Camp women
from 6 to 7 p.m. in the dining area.
• If any residents, including
Fort Camp men and off-campus students, feel they should
be on the voters' lists they
should contact Peter Braund
at the AMS office in Brock
Hall before Saturday.
Those students who are interviewed but not eneumerat-
ed will have law students
from the UBC Liberal Club
take up their cases individually.
Such students should contact Alan Gould, UBC Liberal
president, at the AMS office.
Braund said the cases would
be fought on the grounds that
students who have certain
qualifications are entitled to
call their university living
quarters their permanent ad-
year;
Mac" campaign in the spring
of 1963.
The partial implementation of the Macdonald report
by the provincial Social Credit government led to the establishment of Simon Fraser
Academy, and the granting
of university status to Victoria College and Notre
Dame.
Macdonald's call for regional colleges is being implemented locally this year
with the establishment of
Vancouver City College.
Similar ventures are projected for the interior — at
Kelowna, for example.
Peter  Braund  before   Saturday.
They publicized the plight
of the province's institutions
of higher learning by circulation of petitions throughout B.C.
Since 1963, Macdonald's
speeches have been mainly
off campus, or else to small
groups such as at symposiums and conferences.
•      •      •
AMS officials said Wednesday they hoped an orderly meeting today would be
the breakthrough to better
student-president relations.
Piloto says
most profs
for fee fight
By GORDON
TJBC's faculty supports
remove tuition fees.
Faculty association vice-president A. E. Piloto told 4,000
students at the Cairn Wednesday: "Fees should not be increased, they should wither
away."
"It is folly for students to
work. If a student meets the
standards, he should not have
to prostitute himself to continue. Most members of the
faculty share my view," said
Piloto.
Piloto was one of four
speakers addressing the Alma
Mater Society-sponsored fee
fight rally.
"The public must be educated and it is our responsibility to undertake the task,"
he said.
AMS first vice-president Bob
Cruise said university education and all forms of post-
secondary education should be
available to students regardless
of their economic position.
"University accessibility is
our aim. We wish to remove all
barriers to higher education,"
said Cruise.
Cruise said 25 per cent of the
university population borrowed an average of $672 last year;
"this is a $2 million dollar
debt for those students."  .
"Bursaries are inadequate,"
said Cruise. "They are a type
of deodorant sprayed around
the community to quiet the
screams of the students."
"This is a crisis in student
financing," Cruise said.
Vaughn Lyon, at the Pacific
Press Co. and a UBC graduate,
said, "This is not a time for
fees to increase, nor a time for
extension and correspondence
courses to be cut back."
"We live in a market milieu,
a competition for attention.
The availability of a university
education must be widened,"
Lyon said.
Lyon said the percentage of
young people attending university is not growing fast
enough.
"With increasing living costs,
people  are  unconcerned  with
the increase in fees. You must
carry the fight to the legisla-
(Conlinued on Page 2)
SEE: RALLY
Mclaughlin
the students  in tile  fight  to
Chairman
'maybe af
Mac meet
President John B. Macdonald may have a chairman for his noon hour
welcoming address today
and then again, he may
not.
•
No one, including the
proposed chairman AMS
president Byron Hender
knows for sure.
"I haven't been officially informed yet," Hender said Wednesday night,
"but everyone says I am.
•
"I don't even know if
I'll be a chairman, or if I
am just supposed to introduce him."
Asked what he would
do in the event of any
trouble he said, "Nothing.
"It's Macdonald's meeting." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1965
'MAC ON RECORD'
You pay if gov't
won't —' Banham
If the governement doesn't meet the rising costs of
education, students must foot the bill, said UBC information
officer Jim Banham.
"President Macdonald is on
McGregor
Double our
salaries
- McGregor
By ART  CASPEHSON
Tuum est?
Yes, according to Dr. Malcolm McGregor of the classics
department.
No, according to Wolfram
Taylor, from the debating
union.
And 150 students attending
a debate in Brock Hall Wednesday agreed with Taylor
that it really isn't so.
•     •     •
"It belongs to you. It means
it's all yours," McGregor said,
taking the affirmative.
"The staff are your servants.
And you choose your own curriculum."
He said that since the university belongs to the students
they should pay for it.
"Naturally you will be very
anxious to keep your servants
happy," he said. "I suppose that
your immediately double their
salaries."
"IProfessors should not have
to go to lectures. The students
can read books."
•    •    •
"Not so," said Taylor, taking the negative.
"We are not challenging the
motto as a motto. But when
the opposition tries to present
he motto as a truth of life we
must challenge it," he said.
"If our opposition truly believes Tuum est I would like
them to tell us how we can
chose our parents next time
around."
Other debaters were Dr.
Harold Norden of zoology, for
the affirmative, and Jim Taylor from the debating union, for
the negative.
record as being opposed to the
rising cost to the student of
getting an education, but he is
up against the fact that to serve
the rising enrolment we must
have more faculty, and this
takes more money," Banham
said.
He said government grants
at all levels have not met these
cost increases.
He also said he can't figure
out where AMS 2nd vice-president Peter Braund obtained
his figures on the university's
losses due to non-payment of
second loan fees.
• •    •
"There  isn't  a way  to  tell
how many students pay both
fees together, so there's no way
to compute loss, if there is any
loss at all.
"If I had a crystal ball, as
Mr. Braund seems to have, I
wouldn't be here. I'd be out
making a million dollars."
Banham said he isn't opposed
to the student campaign to
fight fee hikes. "I think the
university is glad to see anything informing the public
about rising costs of education."
• •    •
However, he said he is concerned with the way the students are handling this.
"They seem to feel the
Board of Governors and the
president just arbitrarily raise
■vhenever they feel like it, not
realizing the administration
can't control the government
and can control the students.
"It's not like the Back Mac
campaign, which was merely
to inform the public about the
rising costs of education. That
one succeeded, and it wasn't
trying to lower fees."
• •    •
Banham refused comment on
the government's ommission of
their promised higher grants to
the universities.
The administration point of
view will be spread today at
1:30 in the armory, when President Macdonald welcomes the
students.
PROFESSOR    EMERITUS    J.
Pred Muir has been appointed acting dean of the
faculty of applied science.
Prof. Muir joined the UBC
faculty in 1939 and headed
the civil engineering department from 1950 until his
retirement  last  year.
Prof. Muir will serve until
a successor is found for
ex-head Dr. David M.
Myers, who now heads
La Trobe University at Melbourne.
SEPT. SPECIALS
Clearance-
of New,
Used ft One
of A Kind
Specials
Zeiss Contaflex $59.00
Leica W/3.5 Elmor ._ 65.00
Agfaflex S.L.R.    109.00
Leica m Synced ..._103.00
Retina Reflex S 129.00
Rolleicord V   49.00
Praktica IV 59.00
Yashica  C  _-.- 37.00
Konica FP <new) -_._125.00
29c
(Till Sept. 30th)
Jumbo Prints
From Slides
we have one of the largest selections of Tape &
Tape Recorder Supplies
in Kerr.
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 W. 41st Av. AM 6-2622
"%    UBC Students
Introductory Offer
SAVE UP TO 40% ON
SPECIAL OVERNIGHT RATE
Any Car In Our Fleet
MUSTANGS - PARISIENNES - VALIANTS
COMETS - METEORS - CONVERTIBLES
$5 & 5c per mile
Make Your Reservations
In Advance
You Pay Only For
The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
RALLY
(Continued from Page 1)
ture; to open the doors of the
university without a means
test."
Canadian Union of Students
western representative Ed La-
valle said, "It is the duty of
those in institutions to work
to remove inequality. You, as
a pressure group can carry the
idea in this election."
Lavalle pointed out that a
survey at the University of Toronto showed that 30 per cent
of the students came from
homes with an income of more
than $10,000 a year, while only
10 per cent came from the
$3,000 income bracket.
"Universal a c c e s s a bility
means the reduction and elimination of fees, and the education of a vast area of social
and economic classes," Lavalle
said.
New Location
1058 Alberni
Phone
685-0536
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
Level   -  Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Recltallct. 682-1096
redacted
\gets
suspended term
redacted
UBC student |	
^g 20, charged Sept. 3 with
breaking and entering a Vancouver home, was given a
two-year suspended sentence
Tuesday.
Hwas   released   on
$2subona!
He was discovered in the
home of Q^^^H^3606 W.
26th AveT^wnenCaaman re-
d home Sept. 11.
came to Vancouver
from Chase, B.C., to attend
UBC.
YOUNG MEN
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATtHG SCHEDULE - 196S-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
(Beginners & Pre
school Children)
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS 3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 pjn.**
SATURDAYS 3:00—5:00 pan.
7:30—9:30 p.m.*»
SUNDAYS 12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
* Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons — Students .35* Adults .60*
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The  Centre will be closed all day Christmas Day
and Good Friday.
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
ALEXANDER and AXELSON
Wish UBC. Students
A Successful Term and
Invite You To See
Our Complete Selection of
* Classical   * Popular   * Folk
and    * Jazz Recordings
also
Radios Record players
Tapes and Tape Accessories
COMPLETE REPAIR SERVICE
AVAILABLE TO ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
r Discount with Presentation
0 of Student A.M.S. Card
Serving U.B.C. Students
for Over 20 Years
ALEXANDER and AXELSON Ltd.
4558 W. lClI.
Phone 224-6811
. Thursday, September 23, 1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—bert mackinnon photo
AFFLUENT STUDENTS enjoy a pleasant lunch in front of Brock Hall Monday noon.
While about 200 picnicked, 4,000 others heard speakers on the fee hike issue at a
rally at the Cairn.
—bert mackinnon photo
UBC CHEERLEADERS are hard at it again this year. Here
Liz Field, (in blue) and a cheerleader who's name our
photographer can't remember practise for appearances at
Thunderbird football games this Fall.
75 dolls
set for
frosh bash
It's going to be a royal evening at Brock tonight.
Fifteen attractive candidates
for frosh queen will highlight
Frosh Night which starts at
7:30 pjn.
The 15 co-eds will be chosen
today from a list of 34 candidates who had entered the contest by Wednesday.
Also on the agenda is outspoken radio commentator
Jack Webster who will take
part in a semi-serious discussion with the Alma Mater Society's vice-presidents Peter
Braund and Bob Cruise.
The topic will be "Is university a waste of time?"
Entertainment, apart from
the co-eds, will be provided by
rhythm and blues singer Tom
Northcott.
Admission is free and everyone is welcome.
McGill head
blasts students
Presidents' demands
called dangerous
Dr. H. Rocke Robertson, principal of McGill University, today called steps taken by the McGill student union
to combat a one hundred dollar fee increase "unpleasant
and hazardous".
He was referring to an appeal by Sharon Sholzberg, the
union president, that the students pay their fees in two
instalments.
The request was made so
that negotiations to fight the
fee increase of last March at
McGill can continue.
If no solution is found to the
fee problem by January, students will be asked to withhold $100 from payment of
the second instalment.
Dr. Robertson charged that
the union was taking unfair
advantage of the administration recerit removal of the five
dollar extra charge for paying
fees in two instalments.
He said he found the union's
tatics dangerous because it advised students to deliberately
disobey the university regulation demanding payment of
both instalments.
Pickets had been stationed
at various points on the McGill campus to acquaint freshmen with the situation.
The McGill delegation led
the Free-education forces at
the recent congress of the Canadian Union of Students.
The CUS motion demanding free education with the
elimination of tuition fees as
the first step was moved by
McGill. The resolution in
favour of a national student
day of action to dramatize this
demand was strongly supported by McGill.
On Guardian!
The Manchester Guardian is
available to UBC students.
The weekly air mail edition
of the Guardian, one of Britain's leading papers, is offered
at a rate of $1.10 for ten issues.
Students wishing to subscribe should take their money
to the history office in Bu 3270
before Oct. 1.
Freshmen
on run
again
One hundred and ten frosh
will attend a retreat at Camp
Elphinstone Oct.  1-3.
Doug Reeve, co-chairman of
the frosh retreat committee,
said the retreat will help freshmen to adapt themselves to
the university environment.
He said frosh would have
an opportunity to discuss university problems with senior
students and faculty members.
Speakers at the retreat will
be Dr. Malcolm McGregor,
head of the classics department, and Dr. John Norris, of
the history department.
AMS 1st vice-president Bob
Cruise will speak on his education in action program.
"There is also a discussion
program and a debate on the
Saturday evening," said
Reeve.
"The informal atmosphere
of camp provides a good opportunity for conversation," he
said.
One purpose of the retreat
is to interest freshmen in student government.
"It will inform students of
the AMS structure and get
them involved in freshman
government," said Reeve.
Frosh elections will be held
Oct. 14.
First-year students interested in attending the retreat
should apply at the AMS office
in Brock before Sept. 29.
The bus will leave from the
front of Brock Friday, Oct. 1,
at 5 p.m.
Cost is six dollars a student.
Whoops!
— we goofed
The Ubyssey wishes to
correct a statement made
in the Sept. 21 issue.
The statement, concerning a teach-in at the University of Toronto, Oct.
810, said Jean-Paul Sartre,
Paul Martin, Howard Green,
and Tommy Douglas were
to lead discussions.
These four speakers have
only been invited to attend
and so far none of them
have acecpted.
The text of the teach-in
will be wired to UBC to
coincide with a simultaneous seminar here.
TAYLOR GIVES INSIGHT ON FRAT LIFE
Fraternity member Gordon Taylor presents the first in a series
of columns dealing with fraternity
life. The first concerns itself with
the typical pledge's introduction to
frats.
So 1 decided to rush.
So a greek phones me up
asking when he can deliver
an   invitation.
•    •    •
An invitation? Two of the
members of the fraternity
come over and give you a
piece of paper inviting you to
their first function. After that
we sat around and talked
about rushing.
A function? This is the first
gathering of the prospective
pledges and the members of
the fraternity.
A pledge? Pledgeship is a
time to familiarize the pledge
with the general history of
the fraternity. A pledge must
learn the fraternity songs,
help improve the house, perhaps even stay in the house
for a week.
On Monday the greek picks
me up and takes me to his
"house".
Improvements and renovations planned—I like a rec
room, new dormitory wing,
hi-fi and stereo combination,
and landscaping.
•    •    •
I know what I'd be doing as
their pledge—putting in a rec
room, building a new dormitory  wing,  installing  a hi-fi
and stereo combination, and
a   little   landscaping   on   the
side.
I got a name card and stood
around stunned while they
greeted each other.
To look busy, I grabbed a
pizza and a Coca Cola.
•    •    •
Joined a group talking
about the homecoming sports
car rally.
Sounds more like a sports
car club.
Moved on and. discussed
sailing with some others —
maybe it's a sailing club.
Grabbed another Coca Cola
and joined a new group.
The next group was discuss
ing the coming election.
And another was discussing
a trip down to their other
houses in Washington and
Oregon for the Thanksgiving
weekend.
Finally I got smart. I cornered an active and had him
show me the house.
He said social life included
exchanges with the sororities
and the nurses, a formal
dance, and weekend parties.
•    •    •
Did I enjoy myself? Looking forward to the second
function? I'll say. I met some
tremendous people.
Me? Sure, I'm anti-greek.
But you- can never tell. THtumw
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the univertity
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office. CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 21, 1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction" -Wm. Blake.
Humbly, proudly
We're all going to hear President John B. Macdonald speak at 1:30 p.m. today in the Armory.
We are going humbly; aware that this is the first
time he has consented to speak to all the students at
once in the three years he has been here.
We are going a little proudly, because as you know
the president is a very busy man, and can't possibly
get to know us all individually, and yet here he is taking
time out from his busy round of affairs to speak to we
students.
It makes us feel humble and proud all over that he
is going to speak to us today.
He has spoken at the cairn ceremony before — to
assembled Frosh, faculty, visitors and students. He has •
spoken in a debate in Brock, and to small groups of:"
students at conferences and in the residences. '
But this is the first time, says the university information office, that the president has called the general^
student body together to hear what he has to say.
They understand it to be a speech of welcome to
UBC.
We don't know exactly what the president is going;
to take time out from his busy round of activities to.
speak to us about.
But the humbleness and pride we feel at his taking
the time out from his busy round of activities drives the
question from our minds.
We are just humble and proud that he is going to
speak to us at all today.
Perhaps the president will mention in his speech
something about the rising fees.
Perhaps he is going to explain why although UBC's
request for funds was officially cut by only $210,000 by
the provincial government, the administration saw fit
to raise the tuition fees enough to bring in about
$870,000.
Perhaps he will answer charges that this tactic
was used because the president decided to submit a bid
for funds to the provincial government that already
took into account a substantial fee increase.
Instead of asking for what we needed without a fee
hike.
But perhaps the president will not talk about fees.
Perhaps he will avoid the issue and talk instead
about something else.
That is all right with us.
We will listen humbly and proudly. There will be
no incidents. There will be no stunts which would be
in poor taste, no slogans shouted, no motion of any kind.
We shall listen reverently.
Nice Day
The weather? Yes, the weather.
We hope nobody is too wrapped up in the first week
of classes and the fee fight and all not to notice the glorious fall days we're swinging through.
Getting back to essays, labs, and the rest of the
half-familiar daily whirl is all very well after the
summer away.
But keep your eye on the sun and the sky and the
mountains. It'll help you keep your feet on the ground.
EDITOR: Tom Warms*
News .  Ron  Rlter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City       Richard   Blair
Photo     Bert   MacKinnon
Sports :    Ed Clark
Ass't News   Dan  Mullen
    Janet   Matheson
Ass't City  Al  Donald
Page Friday   John  Kelsey
Managing ._    Norm   Betts
Features   Mike Bolton
CUP _ -    Don  Hull
Workin types for this great edition were Teri Brown, Ann Ratel,
Bill Davidson, Gordon MacLaugh-
lin, Robin Russell, Terry Brooks,
Kathy Hyde, Sue Gransby, Don
Kldd, Lizzie (Greensleeves) Field,
Gordon (Frat) Taylor, David L.e-
vine, Art Casperson, Petrina Greg-
son, John Sluff, Stuart Gray, Carol
Ann Baker, Ann Balfe, and Ian
Cameron. A thousand apologies if
the city editor has forgotten anyone.
let them eat cake."
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
FEE ON FEES
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Can the-- average student
afford the present level of
tuition fees? Yes, I say!
Take a look about you. Not
many of these poor students
are going about in rags. Not
many pairs of shoes have large
holes in the soles from walking.
Take a look in the parking
lots. Every other car is either
a large American model or an
imported sports job. Not that
the car costs much but the
owner puts out $150 a year on
insurance.
The graduate student earns
more than the average Canadian. It is his duty to pay for
the education that allows him
to earn the bonus.
The student loan funds give
him the opportunity to pay
off the education in the years
when he is productive.
A Student Taxpayer.
LETTERS
The Ubyssey welcomes let-
lets to the editor.
Naturally, we reserve the
right to edit for clarity, grammar, and cleanliness so keep it
short and sweet.
Letters should be : dropped
off at The Ubyssey office,
North Brock basement. Or,
they can be mailed in via
campus mail; no stamp necessary if mailed on campus in
one of the campus mail slots
around.
Europe? Take another look
By  DANNY  STOFFMAN
Some people, like Lorraine
Shore, who gloated in these
pages Tuesday,  have chosen
Europe over UBC this year.
Lorraine is taking a year
out, she says, to relax  and
* ponder   and
have   fun.
Lorr aine
and the rest
of this year's
w a nderers
won-'t    be
d i sappoint-
ed, says this
returned na-
tive   who
11   months
bumming about Britain, the
continent and North Africa.
They'll see much of what
they've been studying come
alive before their eyes.
They'll dip into cultures that
seem to know a bit more
about the crazy business of
living   than  we  do   in   this
STOFFMAN
spent   the   last
rich,   primitive   place   called
B.C.
But do you really think
you'll get away from that
old thing called "'phoniness,"
Lorraine? Sure, you'll meet
plenty of real people in the
sidewalk cafes on Boulevard
Saint Michel and on the Costa del Sol and even in the
mail line at American Express — unworried, unpretentious people, brilliant, haunted people.
But you'll also go through
a variant of the following
ritual at least 732 times a
day:
"Where're ya from?"
"Where are you . . ."
"I'm from Canada."
"Canada? Oh really? Canada. Well."
"I met two girls from Canada in Dusseldorf. Two Canadian girls. They were from
Toronto. They liked Dusseldorf.   They   thought  Dussel
dorf was very nice. Did you
like Dusseldorf?"
"I wasn't in Dusseldorf."
"Myself I didn't like Dusr
seldorf.   Sort    of   dreary,   I
thought. Where else have you
been besides Dusseldorf?"
"Well, I was in Spain and
»i
"I loved Spain. I didn't like
the people, though. The
Spanish people. But I loved
Spain."
"I thought the people . . ."
"Do you miss Toronto?"
"I've never been to Toronto."
'''You haven't? Oh, What
part  are you from?"
"Vancouver."
"Oh, yes, Vancouver. Man,
that's a long way. You must
have come over Japan."
"No I didn't come over
Japan, I . . ."
"Ooops, sorry, I have to
run. I'm catching a ride with
two Finnish people in a Bent-
ley to La Spezia." Thursday, September 23,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
WHAT?
WHO?
WHY?
4/WS minutes yield
ed action mandate
This is the war >* looks officially: council's minutes
from last Monday night formally adopting a philosophy
for student action on education reform.
A certain quality of wordiness is inevitable, as a Canadian Union of Students presentation, but the adoption
of these phrases firmly commits UBC to join the fight
for a better deal for Canadian education.
The movers and seconders
of these motions at our council are listed below. Local
CUS committee chairman Ed
Lavalle — also western regional CUS chairman—made
an eloquent address to council Monday supporting them.
At the CUS congress in
Lennoxville, Quebec, this fall,
the resolutions were put forward by McGill, UBC, Victoria, Saskatechewan (Re-
ginal), and King's.
Here's a number of council resolutions The Ubyssey
felt were too important to allow them to become lost in
the usual bumpf processing
of council's doings.
This gives every student a
chance to see what a small
step the fight for tuitionless
education is in the overall
scheme — albeit idealistic —
for education action.
Moved AMS first vice-
president, seconded Grad
Students president George
Wooten:
"Whereas equality of opportunity is a fundamental
principle of our Society;
"Whereas  the  sole  deter
minant of the undertaking of
post-secondary education
should   be   academic   qualification;
"Whereas there exist today social and financial barriers to post-secondary education;
"Whereas the elimination
of financial barriers would
represent a major step forward in the democratization
of post-secondary education;
"Whereas the decision to
pursue post-secondary education is often obscured by
financial obstacles;
• •      •
"Whereas   earnings   foregone   represent   a   real   and
most serious cost;
"Whereas the fullest development of its human potential is an economic necessity
for Canada;
"Be it resolved that this
Council adopt the principle
of universal accessibility to
post - secondary education.
Universal accessibility means
the abolition of all social and
financial barriers to post-
secondary education;
"Further be it resolved
that student's council adopt
as the first priority of the
student council, the abolition of all these social and
financial barriers, and that
as a first step, this Council
seek the elimination of tuition fees."
Carried unanimously.
Moved Cruise, seconded
Wooten:
'"Whereas this council has
endorsed the fundamental
right to an education free
of financial barriers on. all
levels; and
'Whereas   this   council
has recognized that the barriers to education are social
as well as economic;
• •      •
"Be it resolved that this
council present to all students of Canada the following suggestions of immediate
steps which may be taken by
provincial or regional bodies
acting to remove the economic and social barriers to
post-secondary education. At
the discretion of the provincial or regional organizations,
these steps may be coordinated by the CUS Secretariat in a national campaign."
A. Elimination of economic
barriers.
1. demonstrative    manifestation  of UA8   (student
council minute above with
objective of increasing national public awareness
2. a m e n dment,   utilization,
and improvement of existing student aid schemes
3. continued study of student
summer employment possibilities and earning
power
4. maximum utilization of
both public and private
sectors! of university finances
•      •      •
d. study of economic implications of free education
6. optimum use of political
pressure to achieve these
objectives.
B. Elimination of social barriers
1. mandated study of motivation factors
2. regional and national conferences on motivation designed to encourage a dialogue among opinion leaders
3. accelerated high school
liaison programme
4. community conferences on
education
5. comparative socio - economic studies of rural and
urban communities
•      •      •
6. student participation in
social welfare programmes
7. studies in related areas of
social concern, e.g. cybernation, labor movements,
religion, etc.
Carried unanimously.
Moved AMS second vice-
president Peter Braund, seconded   interim  Frosh   president Kim Campbell:
"That this council endorse
the participation of the Alma
WORSHIP
ON CAMPUS
ST.  TIMOTHY   LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Hut 0-16 • West Mall
11  Bjcn. Every Sunday
CA 8-8166
GUITAR
All Prices — Fine Guitars Handmade in Spain.
LESSONS:  Classics,  Flamenco,  Folk, Popular  and   Banjo
— Fine Repairs —
Music - Strings - Accessories - Records
The MEDITERRANEAN SHOP
4347 W. 10th Ave. Phone: 228-8412
GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
STUDENT LOANS
For Full Information
See Our University Branch at
Western Boulevard and
Western Parkway
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
Over 1800 branches to serve you
Mater Society in National
Student Day on Wednesday,
October 27, 1965." <pi
Carried.
Moved Commerce president Rick McGraw, seconded
Music president Cliff Noakes.
"That a committee to be
called the Education Action
Programme Committee be
struck to implement the programme of education reform,
and that it be co-chaired by
the two-vice-presidents and
that a report to prepared outlining the committee's structure, programme and tentative budget to be submitted
to   student   council   by   Sept.
27, 1965, or the next student
council meeting."
Carried.
BOB CRUISF
. . . mover
Dean's Welcomes Back
U.B.C. Students
TRY OUR TAKE HOME SERVICE
OsanA <RsL&JtmUiani and (Dining dfoom
4544 West 10th
Phone 224-6919
FASHION SILHOUETTE :X
in SLIMS, SWEATERS, SKIRTS by
Glenayr
You'll jump for joy when you
wear this perfectly matching
"slim" outfit by Kitten! The
cardigan is medium-weight
Shetland and mohair, has
full-fashioned raglan shoulders,
cardigan facing with roll collar,
in stunning new Fall colours.
The. perfectly matching slims
are 100% Pure Wool Worsted
woven from superfine English
Botany and perfectly match
all Kitten Botany sweaters.
At all fine shops everywhere!
538/692
K
Without this label
it is not a genuine KITTEN. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1965
BANK OVERFLOWS
Loan flood plugs
UBC brain drain
Next to coffee, Canada Student Loans are the most
popular things on campus this year, dean Walter Gage said
Wednesday.
Ubyssey wants
your  body
"We formulated a new permanent form for applicants and
at this moment we are at least
four months ahead of last
year," said Gage who is the
head of inter-faculty student
affairs.
He refused to say how many
UBC students have applied for
loans this year.
The UBC Bank of Montreal
branch had to expand to hut
A6 to handle the flow. Ted
Hoskinson, director of the student loan program, said: "We
were simply too congested in
the bank building.
"Many students were not
prepared. They should first go
to the bank and obtain an eligibility form before showing up
in my office."
Hoskinson also emphasized
the role of student budgeting.
"It's hard to imagine how
many persons come in here
with the idea that money they
will need next spring is going
to fall magically out of thin
air.
"Craftily enough," said Hoskinson, "We're doing our bit to
stem the brain drain."
To be eligible for the loans,
students must state on the application that they intend to
stay in Canada after graduating.
"And please," said Hoskinson, "Please don't use the
money to buy a sports car. It's
not very fair, you know."
If you've never seen a real
newspaper office then come
down to The Ubyssey office.
If you do come down you'll
be expected to work. There's
lots of room for photographers and sports reporters and
friendly (ho ho) city editor
has a never-ending appetite
for new reporters.
These hallowed halls (actually North Brock basement)
of The Ubyssey have produced a great crop of alums:
Pierre Berton, Eric Nicol,
Jack Wasserman and Les
Bewley are just examples.
Theatre gets
scholarship
A scholarship to pay the fees
of a graduate student in the
theatre department is being
stablished to honor department
founder Miss Dorothy Somerset.
Miss Somerset retired this
year after more than 28 years
service to theatre productions
on campus.
The scholarship will come
from income from a $10,000
capital fund being established
through contributions from
fheatre lovers and Players Club
I alumni, said scholarship chairman E. L. Affleck.
DR. S. WAH LEUNG
. . . growing fatuity
Dentists get
new teeth
in faculty
The dentistry faculty at
UBC is getting more classrooms.
A new dentistry building is
under construction in the
medical complex, across from
the Memorial Gym.
The modern structure,
which will cost $2 million, is
expected to be ready by the
fall of 1966 .
Two professors have recently been appointed to the
faculty.
They are Dr. David C. Gardner of the University of Indiana, and Dr. Trevor J. Har-
rop, of the State University of
Iowa.
Both are Canadian citizens.
The Faculty of Dentistry
is one of the smallest on campus, with a total registration
of 22 students.
"FOR THE FINEST         |
IN FLOWERS"             1
CALL                                    I
STRATHCONA FLORAL     1
CO.                     1
5555  West   Blvd.          I
AM  1-7271                I
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.  8th  (at  Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Pearn,
Minister
SUNDAY, SEPT. 26th
11.00 a.m. 'Changing Power'
7.30 p.m. 'Exploring Life'
8.30 p.m. KAIROS
Young Adults in the Church
and the World
A Warm Welcome
To All Students
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
-
presents
THE HON. JEAN USAGE
Tuesday Sept. 28 12:30 p.m.
The Armoury
Come early to hear the Premier of Quebec as seats
are limited.
Coming Soon
Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee
and on
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th at 12:30 p.m.
THE THREE D'S
CAPITOL RECORDING ARTISTS
Brock Hall                                                 25c
Your UBC B
III
KSTORE
Now has a NEW
REBATE POLICY
University of British Columbia students will get a 5% rebate
on all items purchased at the Bookstore beginning September    1.
All registered students, including GRADUATE and UNDERGRADUATE students in regular attendance at the winter and
summer sessions, will be eligible for the rebate.
To obtain the rebate students will save their CASH REGISTER
RECEIPT SLIPS and present them within 12 months of the purchase
date. Normal rebate dates will be April 1 to the last day of exams
for winter session students and August 15 to August 20 for summer
session students.
Students presenting their Alma Mater Society card or Summer
Session Association card with accumulated CASH REGISTER RECEIPT
SLIPS will receive the five percent rebate in cash.
STUDENTS ARE REMINDED THAT POSITIVELY
NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES WILL BE MADE
WITHOUT PRESENTING THE  CASH   REGISTER  RECEIPT  SLIPS.
Obtain ALL Your
TEXT BOOKS AND
STATIONERY SUPPLIES
with ease and at a saving
at the University Operated Bookstore
All Text Books Except
Medicine
Law
Rehab Medicine
Architecture
Pharmacy
Dentistry
Social Work
Librarianship
AT THE FIELD HOUSE
(NEXT TO BROCK HALL)
FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER
HOURS: 8:45 • 5:00 MONDAY TO FRIDAY Thursday, September 23,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
PROF. ANTHONY SCOTT
. . . back from USA
UBC grad named
economics head
A 42-year-old faculty member has been named the head
of UBC's department of economics.
Professor Anthony D. Scott,
a Vancouver native, has replaced Professor John H.
Young, who resigned Aug. 31
to devote more time to teaching and research.
Scott received his bachelor
of commerce and' bachelor of
arts degrees at UBC, and M.A.
at Harvard, and a Ph.D. at
the University of London.
Applications due
for arts retreat
Deadline for applications to attend the arts retreat at
Ocean Park, near White Bock, is 2:30 this afternoon.
Applications for the three-
day retreat, to be held this
weekend, are available in Bu
182 or the Alma Mater Society
offices in Brock.
Over 40 students from all
faculties have now signed up
for the retreat at a cost of $6
a student for food and bed.
The retreat will feature
speeches, discussion groups and
a hootenany.
Making the speeches are classics head Dr. Malcolm McGregor, Dr. Barnett Savery of
the philosophy department and
Rev. Jack Shaver of the United
Church of Canada on campus.
Topics are the artisan and
his training, his frustation, and
his God.
Busses leave Broclf at 5:30
p.m. Friday and return at 3:30
p.m. Sunday.
Special Friday
The Ubyssey's Page Friday
special section begins regular
weekly appearances Friday for
the second (great!) year.
U of A grows
to 'adequate'
CALGARY (UNS)—University of Alberta in Calgary is
expecting an enrolment increase of 550 students, boosting this year's attendance to
3,250.
An additional 60 faculty
members have been hired,
bringing total academic staff
to 276.
We have adequate physical
have attracted some good
faculty member," said P. R.
Judge, assistant to the president.
Physical growth of the 558-
acre campus, which opened its
doors in 1959 with only two
buildings, is evident.
Value of buildings under
construction or contemplated
in the near future total $9
million. A $4 million residence
complex and dining centre was
opened this fall and other facilities are on the drawing
board.
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
THE COCKTAIL PARTY
a comedy by T. S. ELIOT
Student Performance—Monday Sept. 27—7:30 p.m.
TICKETS - 75*
Don't miss this rare opportunity to see Eliot's
most controversial play.
Tickets Available—Rm. 207—Frederic Wood Theatre
NOTE — Some tickets at 750  each will be  available for
Tues. Sept. 28, Wed. Sept. 29, and Thurs. Sept. 30
Support Your Own Campus Theatre
DANCE
TO
THE VICEROYS
AND THE ACCENTS
FRI. SEPT. 24
9-1
ARMOURIES
Pre-Sale tickets in Residences and AMS Office $1.50
Tickets at Door $1.75
Please  show your AMS  Card
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
Invites new students to come and see their
complete selection of Sporting Goods
for your Individual Athletic requirements
SOCCER - RUGBY
and BASKETBALL SPECIALISTS
North
WESTERN SPORTING GOODS
Ltd.
NOW UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
at 10th and Alma
A  COWBOY   STEAK   DINNER
AT A HIDDEN LAKE
in the foothills of the Garibaldi—is an option on our day-rides
on fine Western Saddlehorses. And whether you go out for
a whole day or for 2 hours, we offer a choice of romantic
trails under expert guidance.
For reservations: 112 892-5044
Also three Haywagons are ready for groups from 20 to 80
for the fun of a Cowboy-Roast in the wilderness.
Now is the best season to ride from
Paradise Valley Horse Ranch, Squamish
Just 42 scenic miles from Vancouver.
THE SALMON ARE SPAWNING NOW
at unique Paradise Valley Resort, Squamish, 4 mi. from the
Horse Ranch. Ready to serve you in our Restaurant, Coffee
Shop, Outside Terrace and in our fine Bungalow Motel with
heated Pool.   For Reservations: MU 4-1949 (direct line).
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Help Wanted
4 members needed for the Accident Benefit Fund
Committee — medical students or nurses preferred,
but representative sample of UBC students needed.
Apply in writing to the Secretary, AMS, Mailbox 54,
Brock Hall.
Grad Class
Membership: all students in the winter session who
are registered in the final year of a course leading
to a Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members
of the Grad Class.
— the constitution requires election of executive
within one month of the start of classes.
— posiions open are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convenor, Public Relations
Officer.
— a meeting of the Grad class (all graduating students for the first time on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER
6, at 12:30 in the AUDITORIUM.
— nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS,
postbox 54.
Winter Sports Centre Management
Committee
— one year term.
— meetings to discuss all policy with respect to the
Winter Sports Centre including operating, scheduling, and financing.
— applicant should toe familiar with the "layout" of
the arena.
— applications in writing to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall, no later than October 1st.
Charter Flight Director
— to manage AMS Charter Flight to Europe, summer
1966.
— require basic business experience for processing
of flight contract, deposits, etc.
— position will include handling pamphlets and information, etc., for prospective passengers.
— applications in writing to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall, no later than October 1st. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1965
'tween classes
Slapstickers meet today
All female stickslappers  interested in slapping  sticks
for the field hockey team ao-e asked to turn out at 1:00 p.m.
today on the main field behind Brock.
•    •    •
Potential hook shot shooters
and rebound elbowers for
women's basketball are to
appear in the Women's Gym,
noon today.
•    •    •
BOWLING TEAM
Anyone interested in joining the UBC bowling team
should attend a meeting at the
UBC bowling lanes in the Gym
at noon today.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Organizational meeting in
International House Music
Room at noon Thursday.
• •    •
CURLING CLUB
Organizational meeting in
Bu. 100 at noon today. New
curlers welcome.
• •   •
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Organizational  meeting Fri-
200,000 babies booming
onto Canadian campuses
OTTAWA- (CUP) — Enrolment at Canadian universities will total over 200,000 this year, the Canadian Universities Foundation predicts.
Last year's total was 178,238.
The big six—Montreal, Toronto, British Columbia,
Laval, Alberta and McGill—provided 54 per cent of the
full-time  enrolment at Canadian universities last  year.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
Meetings
12
13
Special Notices	
WOULD THE PERSON who phoned
277-6119 Sunday morning Sept. 19,
about supplying trans, from Williams & No. 4 Rd. please phone
again.	
WOULD LIKE TRANSPORTATION
during vacations to New Denver
or vicinity. Please contact Ed
Sutherland. Rm. 422, Union College   of B.C.   Ph.  224-5214.	
WATCH FOR NEWS of HARVEST
BALL.
ONLY SEVEN MONTH TO GRADU-
ation. Next Year's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office.
Transportation
14
LANGLEY COMMUTER wants passenger, or ride. Will go by either
Deas   or  Trans-Canada.   534-5783.
RIDE WANTED vicinity 45th and
Boundary. Two girls. Phone HE
4-0957.   8.30   Classes.
CAR POOL OR RIDERS leaving Oak
& Broadway 8:30's. Bob Walters
RE 8-5306.
3 LAW STUDENTS WANT CAR-
pool to Law School from 1st &
Alma   for   8:30's.    Phone   733-2533.
2 FEMALE STUDENTS 469 W. 19th
want to get into carpool. No car,
■will pay for gas. Phone AM 1-6462
or AM 6-4443 after 6 p.m.	
RIDE WANTED from Nanaimo &
Kingsway for 10:30 classes Mon.
thru Friday. Phone HE 1-3842 be-
tween 6 & 9 p.m.        	
RIDE WANTED vicinity of Renfrew
& Venables for 8:30 classes. Phone
AL  3-9685.
RIDE WANTED S.W. Marine and
Blenheim ask for Diana at AM 1-
9423.
RIDE WANTED vicinity Westminster and No. 1. ask for Bev at
BR 7-8576.
RIDERS   WANTED    9:30    lectures.
-- From 12th and Cambie.  No walking.   Grad.   lot   sticker.    876-2519
after 6.
WANT 3 DRIVERS around Kerris-
dale & Dunbar district for 8:30*s
male or female. Phone Leslie AM
1-B527. 	
RIDE DESPERATELY NEEDED
from S. Burnaby at Kingsway &
Edmonds.   Phone   Louise   521-9489.
Wanted
15
TEXTBOOK WANTED: "Practical
Physiological Chemistry" by Hawk
Olsen,   Summer.  733-8024.	
WANTED—USED   12-STRING  GUITAR.  Phone   Bill,   261-9740.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 VOLKSWAGEN, radio, snow
tires, ski rack, excellent condition-
AM 1-9436 after 5. 	
1958 PLYMOUTH PLAZA, 6 cyl.,
70,000 mi. Good operating condition. What offers? CA 4-4429.
1960 RENAULT DAUPHINE, W.W.,
radio, $475 cash. 224-9880, Richard,
rm.  7.
$750 CASH — '59 Zephyr, radio, w.w.
tires, back-up lite, seat belts, etc.
CA 4-9274.
'61 ALPINE, 3 tops, radio & heater,
extras. John, 435-5358 after 6 p.m.
'54 PONTIAC — must sell, leaving
country, $150 or offer. Phone CA
4-4560,   5 to  7  p.m.	
1952 ANGLIA, running well, $70 or
offer. Virer, 224-9088 (days), 224-
4470  (eves.).
1960   FIAT   1100,   $450   cash.   Phone
Peter,   255-6148.
1956 FORD, 6 cyl., 60,000 mi., good
condition, best offer takes. 738-
9431,   or   Room   428,   Chem.    Bids.
'61 AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE, new
clutch and generator. Must sell,
leaving country.  HE 3-1890.
WANT TO SELL OR BUY A CAR?
Get Results — Advertise in The
Ubyssey   Classified.	
Motorcycles
27
1964 HONDA C.B. 125, Super Sports,
like new, 4000 mi. Ph. 224-9069,
Hans,   Room 2.	
'64 HONDA CUB, perfect condition,
$160.   YU  8-1372.
'64 HONDA 90, like new with leg
shields and crash helmet. No reasonable offer refused. Phone 224-
9846.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Beauty Salons
31
Sewing—Alterations
40
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment availale to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Ker-
rlsdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
day at noon in Bu. 1221 and a
picnic at Mount Rainier on
Sunday starting at 7:30 a.m.
rain or shine.
• •    •
BOOSTER CLUB
The UBC pep band will
practice at noon today in Hut
L-4.
• •    •
UBC ROWING CREW
Want a He-man body? Join
the UBC rowing crew and
find out how to get one.
Important meeting Tuesday,
Sept. 28 in the Gym. Everyone welcome.
• •    •
FILM   SOC
Important meeting for all
those interested in the club at
noon today in Brock Extension
357.
Not enough
'buddies' at
Simon Fraser
Lack of overseas students at
Simon Fraser Academy prevents them from joining International House's "buddy" program.
Under the program, a Canadian student helps a foreign
'tudent feel more at home in
his new surroundings by providing information about this
area and campus life. He also
meets the newcomer on his arrival after making all necces-
sary advance arrangements.
Dr. Ron Baker, SFA academic planner said Simon Fraser
would not have a sufficiently
large number of overseas students in its first year to make
a special project feasible.
ATTENTION
MEDICAL STUDENTS
Research organization requires 2nd and 3rd year medical students, to conduct a brief attitude poll among
general practitioners. Students must be willing to devote
approximately 10 hours to interviewing during the first
two weeks of October. Payment will be based on each
completed interview; transportation expenses, etc. will be
reimbursed. If interested, please write no later than
September 24, 1965 to:
MR. ROBERT DAUPHINEE,
MRC LIMITED,
790 Laurentien Blvd.,
Suite 300
ST. LAURENT, QUE.
ACTORS - ACTORS - ACTORS
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
AUDITIONS FOR
MOTHER COURAGE
by Bertolt Brecht
To be presented in November.
These auditions are open to any student on campus
TODAY (Thursday) 3:30-5:30 pm.
PLACE: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE - ROOM 112
Discover Your Hidden Talents
ACTORS - ACTORS - ACTORS
%B
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.	
Rooms
81
ROOMS FOR RENT, 2 double and
1 single—male students only. Call
after 3- p.m., RE 3-3678, Kltsilano.
U.B.C. SENIOR STUDENT, female
—looking for same with furnished
apt,   to share.  733-4637.	
GIRL STUDENT wanted  to   share
modern furnished apartment with
same, close to Campus. Phone YU
8-1659.
FROSH NIGHT
TONIGHT!
TIME: 7:30 P.M.
PUCE: BROCK HALL
Meet the Frosh Queen Candidates
Special Guest: Jack Webster
ADMISSION - FREE
Everyone Welcome

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