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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1969

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Array -^  !.V,'is
Canadians
must make 'a
conscious
decision to
reduce their
reliance on
the U.S., says
economist
Mel Watkins.
See page 3
w    4
-david bowerman photo
Under the covers
Senate election results   p. 3
Vietnam war moratorium   p. 3
Motherhood and maple syrup?  p. 5
SFU: the strike goes on  p. 15
Shop teachers still pay $15   p. 17
THE U8YSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 11
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY) OCTOBER 17, 1969    "^HH**4
228-2305
Law student says
AMS is illegal,
misuses funds
By NORMAN GIDNEY
A second-year law student has
filed a formal complaint with the
UBC senate that the Alma Mater
Society is illegal because
membership in it is compulsory.
Sheldon Goldberg of
Downsview, Ont., distributed his
five-page, mimeographed brief to
senate at its last meeting, Oct. 8.
"The misuse of student funds
by the AMS in my period of
attendance at UBC has reached
such dimensions that to put up
with it for a longer period would
[      To page 2: SEE SUPPORT
—dirk visser photo
MISSING YOUR CAR? Maybe ifs under lock and key in the traffic
office car pound. (See story, page 2)
GIBSON IMPEACHMENT IMPENDING: PAGE 3 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  17,  1969
COP'S  DILEMMA
What shall we do
with the cars?'
By DAVID KEILLOR
Anyone missing a 1949 Skoda or a Suzuki motorcycle?
If you are, chances are it is in the compound at the UBC traffic
office.
There are presently seven impounded cars with licence plates
dating back to 1965 in the compound.
The problem now facing the university is that the traffic offices
and the compound have to be moved within 2 months to make way
for the construction of new student residences.
"Wc know we have the legal right to auction the cars but their
value isn't worth the half day I would have to spend with a lawyer,"
said S. C. Potter, the purchasing agent in charge of the matter.
Potter said the fate of the cars was still uncertain but they
would probably be moved with the traffic office to its new location.
"Some people just say to hell with it. Their wreck isn't worth a
parking fine," said traffic and parking supervisor R. S. Liddell.
The impounded vehicles arc there for two reasons: either failure
to pay fines or abandonment on the parking lots.
Beach road plans finalized
but project awaiting funds
The Beach Road (or foot path if you prefer) is still going ahead.
"There is no change in the plans for the Point Grey foreshore,"
said parks board superintendent Stuart Lefeaux Thursday.
'The city is now seeking funds from the provincial government
to start construction," he said.
Grad pres goes east to confer
Art Smolensky, graduate student association president, will be a
UBC delegate to the annual conference of the Association of
Universities and Colleges in Canada next month.
He will present a brief to the AUCC detailing the function of
UBC departments as producers and employers of Ph.D degrees.
In other grad news, a study has been made by the GSA on how
grad students get financial support.
The results of this study will be used to try convincing the
government and the university that tuition fees should be waived for
teaching assistants and that scholarships for first and second class
marks should be awarded to graduate as well as undergraduate
students.
Support for politics
'not majority interest'
From page 1
be a gross irresponsibility on my part," Goldberg said in his brief.
Goldberg argues that according to the Societies Act of B.C., a
member of a society" means a subscriber of the constitution and
bylaws .,. . and includes every other person who agrees to become a
member..."
"Inherent in this definition of member is the freedom of
agreement to become a member," Goldberg said. The AMS thus
contravenes the Societies Act and is illegal, he argued.
He cited three specific grievances where he felt AMS funds had
been misused:
"The use of student monies to support the activities of political
groups;
"Sending delegates to a Canadian Union of Students convention
this year on student funds when last year the students voted to
withdraw from the union;
"Distribution last year of 'extra' AMS cards to non-students"
which resulted in the extra expense of printing new cards and the
theft of books from UBC's libraries".
The first grievance refers to the estimated $3,500 the AMS
executive authorized for the political campaign last August to elect
Dell Valair in Rossland-Trail riding, which education minister Donald
Brothers holds.
Senate referred the complaint to its lawyer Darrell Braidwood,
QC, for an opinion. Braidwood refused to comment Thursday, saying
"I can't discuss a client's business with you."
Ben Trevino, lawyer for the AMS, said AMS president Fraser
Hodge had sent him a copy of the brief last week and his legal opinion
of it will be in the AMS's hands this afternoon.
Goldberg also claimed the annual $15 per student levy to pay
off the $4.5 million debt on SUB is illegal because the Societies Act
stipulates no member of a society "in his individual capacity shall be
liable for any of the society's debts."
The last paragraph of Goldberg's brief asked clarification of the
administration's policy on the points he raised and "if possible", the
affirmation of a student's right to registrar at UBC without
compulsory membership in any organization he objects to.
He also asked removal of any fees which UBC has collected in
the past "whose use as funds of the AMS appear to be illegal."
A partial search of senate meeting minutes over several decades
has failed to turn up any resolution formally recognizing the AMS as
the official agent of students.
AMS external affairs officer Mike Doyle termed Goldberg's
gambit "a cheap trick that seriously throws the legitimacy of the
student government into question."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sam Spoils close contender in senate elections
By BRIAN McWATTERS
On the backs of some of the 555 spoiled ballots for
the senate election were the words "farce", "tokenism",
and "undemocratic".
Only 2,803 students cast their ballots Wednesday in a
campus-wide poll to elect five students to the senate.
Excuses such as "poor foresight in choosing a date"
and "failure of candidates to advertise" were cited by
Alma Mater Society treasurer Chuck Campbell as reasons
for the poor turnout of voters.
The five students elected were Peter Ladner, arts 4,
with 1,386 votes, Peter Brock, law 1, with 1,304 votes,
Thomas O'Brien, eng. 4, with 1,166 votes, Ken Waldman,
science 3, with 1,078 votes and Jim Davies, arts 4, with
1,000 votes.
Brian Debeck, grad studies, received 957 votes, Stuart
Bruce, commerce, 4, had 832 votes, John Cherrington,
arts 2, had 710 votes and Morley Jacobs, science 9, had
562 votes.
Alan Dobrey, education 4, was elected education
constituency senator by acclamation.
"The fault for the poor turnout does not lie
completely on the shoulders of the AMS," Campbell said.
"The candidates are  also to blame for the poor turnout
because they did not campaign early enough to let people
know who they were and what they stood for."
Ladner, who led the election in 10 of the 17 polls,
agreed with Campbell.
"The election is a king-size farce because there was
little chance for anybody to know the candidates," he
said.
"I'm not enthused about the number of people who
voted for me, because 1,300 votes out of 20,000 students
is hardly good support."
Spokesmen for the Campus Left Action Movement
said the large number of spoiled ballots "represented
one-fifth of the voters rejecting the undemocratic nature
of the senate."
Last year's senate election had 10 per cent of the
ballots spoiled.
"This shows that a significant portion of students are
questioning the role of students on the senate," the
CLAM spokesmen said.
"Those people who consciously spoiled their ballots
should become involved in student structures as course
unions to get a really effective change on campus."
Campbell said the spoiled ballots were produced by a
combination of the election vote being overshadowed by
the industrial education referendum and the students' lack
of knowledge of any of the candidates.
"I'll go ahead with the things I said I would do: push
for a federated college system and encourage more
student participation in running UBC," Ladner said.
He said the most important thing for students to
realize is the significance of the senate long-range
objectives report.
"Students should read it and act on it," he said.
Said Brock: "The all-candidates meeting was a farce.
Nobody even knew about it until it was over."
"I am pleased that I survived the election farce,"
Davies said.
"I just hope that I can get the student into the power
structure of the university, At any rate the students will
be well informed through The Ubyssey as to what
happens on senate.
Election of five more student senators has been
postponed to Oct. 29.
The second slate election was to be held Oct. 22, but
only two students have so far been nominated for the five
constituency seats.
Eric Wood, eng. 4, is running for the applied science
seat and Bruce Wood (no relation), science 3, has been
nominated for the science seat.
-dirk vinar photo
THIS IS Joe. He is widening the doors of the library so that the academically-minded hordes can pour
in faster and not get bottle-necked until they reach the turnstiles inside.
Canada made puppet by foreigners
Canada had its last chance during the 1920s to
come to grips with the problem of foreign
ownership, economist Mel Watkins said Thursday.
Watkins, recently known as the initiator of the
controversial manifesto calling for an independent
socialist Canada, told an audience in the SUB
ballroom that two-thirds of the primary industry in
Canada is owned by foreigners, four-fifths of which
is American.
Foreign control has lead to the "emasculation
of Canada's native business class," he said.
"We can see in the late 19th century there was
a move to produce a native business class. In the
1920s this class failed to stand up, and committed
itself idealistically to American big business so this
is the position Canada is in.
"The group that continues to dominate the
country is the capitalist class which no longer has
any commitment to this country."
"No country comes close to Canada in the
extent of foreign ownership," said Watkins, an
economics prof at the University of Toronto.
'The consequences? If you live in a country
that is largely controlled by the private sectors and
the private sectors are controlled by foreigners that
is a political consequence.
As well as the now famous Watkins Report on
foreign ownership in Canada the Toronto prof has
written many articles and given lectures on the
subject.
From his viewpoint as an economist he outlined
a policy that could be pursued within a liberal
framework to put an end to foreign control.
"One policy government could pursue would be
to define certain sectors as key sectors and protect
those areas fof the citizens of Canada," said
Watkins.
Watkins pointed to the rapid rate of economic
growth of Japan, a highly protectionist state, as
proof the argument that a laissez-faire policy is vital
for economic growth has no basis in fact.
The kind of economic reliance Canada has on
the U.S. means serious restraints on our
independent political action, he said.
"Look ~ at the recent election of the NDP in
Manitoba. While American corporations listened
anxiously, Ed Schreyer at his first press conference
announced that no one had to fear anything in
Canada but fear itself... Manitoba is like Canada,
heavily reliant on imports of American capital."
More important that the inflow of American
capital in dominating our economy, he added,
however, is foreign control of domestically formed
capital.
"If we want to have a more independent
Canada it will have to be by a conscious national
decision," said Watkins.
In a question and answer period following the
lecture the Toronto economist agreed the U.S.
would probably take strong military action if
Canada were to go socialist in a radical way.
Law rep asking
Gibson to resign
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Dave Gibson, Alma Mater Society public relations officer, is in
danger of losing his job.
A motion of nonconfidence against Gibson will be introduced
Monday in council by law rep Dell Valair.
Part of his motion will ask for Gibson's immediate resignation.
"If the motion is passed by council and if Gibson is realistic he will
resign," said Valair.
If Gibson decides not to resign a petition will be circulated by
council asking that Gibson be recalled. The petition needs 500
signatures to recall Gibson.
The motion was first drafted by AMS ombudsman Sean
McHugh. "As a member of the executive, Gibson has done nothing
and I personally am very aware of the situation."
"The motion originated several weeks ago and is now out of
date. I admit I haven't done as much as I could have in the past but all
that has changed," replied Gibson.
According to McHugh, Gibson's job is to inform the AMS about
the various issues they deal with, and to inform the students of what
the AMS is doing.
"As has been shown, he simply hasn't been doing this but has
only been providing news releases," said McHugh.
Gibson said the main complaint of the AMS executive against
him "is that not enough has been done about the adverse publicity the
AMS executive receives from The Ubyssey.
"This however is no longer the case because starting this week a
weekly press release will be published in The Ubyssey to explain
various AMS positions."
Large moratorium rally
shows student dissent
By JOHN ANDERSEN
We don't like that war.
UBC students demonstrated this Wednesday like they never
have before as 4,000 of them participated in the largest rally to date
against U.S. involvement in Vietnam.
Nearly 3,000 gathered at noon on the south-west corner of SUB
to hear speeches about the war as part of a continent-wide protest
moratorium.
UBC anthropology prof Bill Willmott told the rally: "Military
analysis indicates the U.S. has lost the war in Vietnam.
"In response to this defeat, the American command has
responded by escalating the technological level of the war as they
attempt to reduce their own personnel with token withdrawals
designed to appease public opinion at home.
"This policy will only prolong this dreadful war."
Campus Left Action Movement spokesman Ralph Stanton said
the rally was evidence of the end to the apathy about the war.
An estimated 1,000 students saw films on the Vietnam war and
heard poets and folksingers in a continuous program in SUB 207.
The rally at UBC was held in conjunction with the moratorium
in the U.S. in which millions protested the Vietnam war.
The UBC rally is seen by its organizers as being one of a series of
building actions for the anti-war march Nov. 15.
This year there will be two demonstrations, one which will be a
silent procession in the form of a funeral starting from the south end
of the Granville Street bridge.
The other demonstration will be of the regular placard carrying
variety and will begin at the Canadian National Railways station on
Main Street. Both marches will converge at the Vancouver courthouse.
A benefit dance in support of the anti-war march will be held in
SUB at 8 p.m. Saturday. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1969
THEUmSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER 17,1969
Au revo/V, Dave
A few years ago, the ubiquitous prophets of this
university had this idea that if students got seats on
senate, the good ol' revolution would at last be on the
road.
Indeed, in 1967, when four students running on
'radical' platforms were finally elected to the senate,
banner headlines in The Ubyssey screamed the victory
and the political gnomes ran about making great plans.
Things seemed to have changed.
Wednesday we saw about 2,800 students on this
campus of  21,000 get out and vote for candidates
running for no less than 12 student senate seats,
nothing new at UBC. We expect it. Old politicos figure
35 per cent an average turnout.
But 2,800 is not 35 per cent of 21,000, especially
when more than 500 of those deliberately spoil their
ballots. Something went wrong.
It couldn't be that the election was not an
important one, if we are to believe the clamor that went
on to get just a few students on senate.
It couldn't be that the CLAM campaign against the
election had any effect on the number of voters,
because CLAM specifically asked students to go to the
polls but to spoil their ballots.
We must assume, therefore, that many students did
not even know the election was taking place.
Now who, do you suppose, is responsible for
informing students of the business of the Alma Mater
Society?
Well, according to that almighty document, the
AMS constitution, the internal affairs officer shall "be
responsible for the Public Relations of the Society."
The internal affairs officer is named Dave Gibson.
This, is the same Dave Gibson who was responsible
for the incredible lack of Lower Mainland advertising
that resulted in the pointlessness of Dell Valair's
campaign in Rossland-Trail.
This is the same Dave Gibson who was responsible
for advertising the conference on student
government two weeks ago, the conference that drew a
whole 10 or 15 people, most of whom were student
councillors.
This is the same Dave Gibson who campaigned last
year with the statement: "Public relations must involve
on and off campus communication. Besides improving
student news services, the AMS must campaign to
convince the people of the province of the economic
and social value of higher education."
And this is the same Dave Gibson who students are
now attempting to recall through petition.
Undoubtedly, Dave will now go to council and tell
them of his personal problems and how he now means
to turn over a new leaf and do his job properly. It's too
late, Dave.
Bye-bye.
Editor: Michael Finlay
 Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire  Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert.Ruebsaat
"The year has officially begun,"
cried Irving Fetish, "We've had a
resignation."
Life went on as Glbbs rode off into
the sunset, vowing "I shall return, one
of these days."
Christine Krawczyk seduced SFU
profs, fervently competing against her
mother, Ann Arky and Jim Davies (?).
Sandy Duke did tween classes, while
would-be world traveller Norm Gidney
dropped in to bid farewell.
Phil Barkworth forgot he had a
second assignment and Leslie Minot's
story was too late to be used today.
And then there were Robin Burgess,
John Anderson, Brian McWatters,
Elaine Tarzwell, Dave Keillor and Fran
McGrath.
Of course we can't forget Shane
McCune (try as we might), Robert
Bennett, Leslie Plommer, Sandy Kass,
Ginny Gait, Jennifer Jordan and Urve
Torva.
Those who labored tirelessly In the
sports and photo departments must
remain mane less because Maddin and
Stout once again forget to turn In their
names.
Twigg wanted his name at the bottom of the masthead (something about
helping out on city desk).
Another of those action-packed editorial board meetings today at noon.
Did you vote?
GOVERNMENT GRIPES . .  .    .  .  . BY  CAREY UNDE
Buried in the red tape
The future of the central,
campus-wide AMS student
government is seriously
threatened by existing situations
on campus and in the AMS itself.
Many students view the
impending collapse and peaceful
withering away of the AMS as a
needed and correct situation.
Others feel there is a role for a
central student government but
that it has never been realized.
The ineptitude of the present
AMS executive poses perhaps the
most serious threat to the future
of the AMS.
This writer is one who thinks
there are very real needs to this
campus that can only be met by
an effective student government.
There is also a much greater role
to be played by the undergraduate
societies. The AMS must alter its
priorities—which in effect means
it must merely pick a priority in
the first place.
With    the    undergraduate
faculties now able to' raise their
own fees, within the next 18
months this campus will realize a
radical shift in campus student
political emphasis.
The present AMS's inability to
realize what the future holds,
their inability to salvage even the
concept of student government,
coupled with the complete failure
to make the Student Union
Building an enjoyable place for
the majority of students, means
that when the AMS falls SUB will
go with it.
As dull as SUB now is, in the
hands of the administration it
would be worse. The most
unappealing part of the whole
building is the food service area,
presently controlled by the
administration.
The students should not give
up control of that building. But
the real pity is that students have
no cause to NOT give it up. It
serves the purposes of so
few—excepting the hungry who
merely want some lousy food to
eat.
The past six months have been
plagued by a series of hassles in
the administrative bureaucracy of
the place. The negligent failure on
the part of the student council to
demend of the executive that the
business office and management
side of the AMS and SUB be
updated is the crowning touch of
doom. The red tape gets longer.
The out of date philosophies and
ideas are strangling council's
changes of ever getting above the
red tape into the areas of real
student concerns.
Leaderless and with a defeatist
gloom, the AMS seems
determined to ride the Titanic to
the bottom. Perhaps it is best for
all concerned. Like the Phoenix, a
new and more relevant concept
and reality of student government
might develop out of the ashes.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Geared grad
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
An Open Letter to All
Students Graduating in 1970
Did you know that the first
Graduating Class meeting was held
on Friday, October 10th, at 12:30
in SUB? Well, the engineers did!
The following is a detailed
description of the opening five
minutes of that meeting:
Brian Hodges, eng 4, was
elected president by acclamation.
Then followed the nomination
and election of secretary, social
convenor, and vice-president (all
eng 4, all by acclamation, all by
calculation). We must admit that
there were two candidates for the
position for treasurer (both eng
4), one of whom admitted in a
brief campaign speech that he was
a dummy candidate.
Apparently the engineers had
not heard of Robert's rules for
elections procedures. Neither the
introductory chairman nor Brian
Hodges asked the required three
times for nominations from the
floor; general approval was not
sought for the cessation of
nominations. The engineers
railroaded their own candidates
through without allowing time for
thoughtful    nominations    by
anyone else.
WE PROTEST! This is our one
and only graduation. Where were
all you non-engineers?Looks like
this grad will be an engineerd
success. We hope they have a great
time spending our $7 grad fees. If
you are not really interested in
having graduating activities, why
not cancel them altogether and
demand refund of our $7?
Do you know when the next
Grad Class meeting is? If you find
out, please let us know. We didn't
hear because we walked out of
this one in disgust.
VELMA MAY
educ 4
BEVERLEY PILLAR
educ 4
Who's biased?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In view of the obviously biased
nature of some of your articles,
e.g. Krawczyk on SFU joint
faculty meeting, Oct. 10, I think
it only too fair to let the reader
know the author's background, so
that the reader can assess the
degree of bias or knowledge with
which the author writes. A simple
statement such as by C.
Krawczyk, PSA Students Strike
Committee", or whatever, would
suffice.
B.LOW
grad studies
Background: Christine
Krawczyk, arts 2, 3-5033680,
Ubyssey staff reporter. "As for
bias, I'm sorry I didn't reproduce
the Vancouver Sun version, but I
thought I'd try something
different ."-C. Krawczyk.
Watch your slurs, Mr. Low,
you   ill-begotten   meathead.—Ed.
Ashamed
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I fear that Mother Nature's
delicate ecological balance is
perhaps too sophisticated a
concept for the primitive
American mind to grasp. But any
wit knows that the correct moral
decision is essential to the
eventual conquering of Heaven.
I am truly sorry about the
bomb . . . and war . . . and
hunger ... and stupidity ... and
... and ... and ...
SUSAN CUTTING
arts 2
an American
sickened. Friday, October  17,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Ladner reports
Belshaw plans still indecisive
By PETER LADNER
Second of a series by senator
Ladner on the Belshaw report on
long-range university planning.
"The road to long-range
objectives is crawling with
meaningful dialogues, committee
reports, dangerous koerners, final
drafts and relevants, my son.
"You've got to plan your trip
in advance if you ever want to
reach your objective."
With this advice in mind, the
report of the senate's long-range
objectives committee starts at the
beginning: "What should be the
main academic goals at this
university?"
First they get motherhood and
maple syrup issues out of the way.
Two of the university's main
goals should be to "preserve and
extend knowledge," and "develop
the individual." Knowledge, and
developed individuals, like
motherhood and maple syrup, are,
of course, ends in themselves.
Before it passes on to the other
main goal of the university, the
report unwittingly hands out
some heavy ammunition to
student power types.
"(The)   university    influences
the development of students in
many ways," the report says.
SERVING WHOM?
"In the very act of allocating
current and capital funds, the
board of governors, acting on
recommendations from the
president, his senior advisors and
the senate, is affecting the
physical and academic
environment of students."
They follow up with the
reminder: "Nothing in what we
have said is intended to minimize
the responsibility of the individual
for his own development..."
"However, this is the last we
hear of this.
The controversial and longest
section on the university's goals is
spent trying to untangle the third
goal: "serving the needs of the
people in society."
The obvious questions are
then: What people? What needs
and to what extent?
Some say that if students are
taught enough skills and research
technique, the society benefits.
Striding meaningfully down
the centre of the road, the report
proclaims the duty of the
university is to teach not only
techniques, but also theories and
principles. Any over-emphasis on
techniques the authors blame on
overspecialization caused by
faculty preoccupied with their
own research.
By now two of the villains who
come up for trial later in the
report have had their masks
removed: over-specialization, and
lack of general courses on theories
and principles.
The board of governors is
explicitly cleared of any blame for
designing a university that doesn't
serve "the needs of society".
"Control of the curriculum
rests with the faculties and the
senate, and these are dominated
by faculty members," not the
board.
At this point, the debate
centres on what is an adequate
amount of training. Having said
that too much training is bad and
too little training is just as bad,
the authors come out in favor of
some "training aspect".in every
subject.
Then the crucial question of
how much training the university
should do and how much is better
learned outside the university is
ignored.
This problem "continues to be
a subject for debate."
The rest of the chapter
examines three criticisms of the
university: on "political, practical
and cultural grounds."
One group of "political"
critics—who want the university
to train its students in democratic
citizenry —are rebuffed. "An
emphasis on preparation of
students for political participation
should not be a main feature of
instruction."
The other "political" critics are
those who want the university to
take political stands, blasting
premier Bennett's education for
example. These too are rebuffed.
FUTURE CONFLICT
Individuals get politically
involved, according to the
committee, but different groups
in the university should not get
involved because it would destroy
academic freedom.
The "political" critics—who
want the university to act on
pressing "relevant" issues:
overpopulation, poverty,
pollution—are rebuffed.
"We believe that society gains
by allowing the university to
choose for itself what constitutes
relevance." Or, each to his own
research and academic freedom
forever.
Finally the report answers the
"cultural" critics who want the
university to promote more
appreciation of fine arts and
music, and less love for Hogan's
Heroes stuff. The university
doesn't do much about uplifting
our cultural level because most
faculty members would rather
teach and do research, the report
explains, and then leaves the issue.
Having established some goals,
the report plants a crucial seed
that could blossom into a juicy
point of dispute.
It proposes that the senate
indicate priorities in its
recommendations to the board of
governors. This means senate will
have to start looking at finances,
which  are  legally  the  exclusive
Parnall invites student
feedback on senate report
Students will not be able to get
personal copies of the senate long
range objectives report because
the university information office
claims it doesn't have the money
to print them.
The purpose of the 132-page
report is to determine where the
university is going in the next five
years, and how it's going to get
there.
Registrar Jack Parnall said only
a few hundred copies of the
report will be printed. These will
be sent to a select few on campus.
He said they will be distributed
among the various faculties and
departments, the library, the
Alma Mater Society office and
The Ubyssey office where they
will be on display for students to
look at.
It will be at least a week or two
before copies are available.
Printing more than a few
hundred copies will run into too
much money, Parnall said.
Parnall said students should
send their recommendations to his
office. These will then be
considered by the senate before
its next meeting Nov. 1.
WmnXh*jLiml^lm0m*JM
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000   GARMENTS  TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full   Dress (Tails)
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BLACK & LEE
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\andpiperS    are Coming.
SEE PAGE 14
International House
CAFETERIA
LUNCH:
| Mon. to Fri. 11:30 to 3 p.m.
SPECIAL:
West Indian Food
On Mondays
COFFEE SHOP:
19 a.m. to 5 p.m. Weekdays
domain of the board.
In the past, whenever the
senate couldn't make up its mind,
on what to pass and what to
chuck out, it just sent all its
recommendations   to   the  board.
They had to limit them according
to where  they wanted the funds.
to go.
From here, we launch into
Admissions policy. Standby for
the next exciting installment.
Personalised
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The
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"HOT CURRY" lunch every
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3934 Main St.       879-7236
EAT IN    -    DELIVERY   -    BANQUETS
Notice to Graduating Students in
ARTS
A meeting will be held in Room 106, Buchanan Building
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21   at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
LITTLE BROTHER SAUL
BLACKEST SOUND
IN THE NIGHT CITY
Little Brother Saul's
Solid State Soul Show
TONIGHT
CBU
690
MIDNIGHT
PLUS 10 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  17,  1969
McGill paper censored
MONTREAL (CUP) -Administrators at McGill university have
forced their own newspaper to drop an issue devoted to former
political science professor Stanley Gray, who was fired last year for
political activity on the campus.
A 288-page issue of the McGill Reporter, an administra-
tion-finariced paper established as a counterweight to the student-run
McGill Daily, was scheduled to appear today.
It had included an interview with Gray—now a member of the
independentist Front de Liberation Populaire in Montreal—a
chronology of his dismissal, essays on civil disobedience and academic
discontent and comments on McGilFs future from graduates and
faculty members.
But the McGill senate's committee on the communication of
information, chaird by vice-principal Robert Shaw, informed Reporter
editors the paper would be dissolved if the issue appeared.
"Wc have to find a new way to get across," said associate editor
Stuart Gilman. "Official reactionary feelings at McGill are legitimate
now that they're rid of Stan."
It's the second time the Reporter has gotten into hot water over
Gray. The first occurred over the crisis around the lecturer's dismissal
last March, when the paper criticized the administration for a lack of
dialogue in the case.
Trek  Week  organizers
pushing   involvement
"Involvement" is the magic word as Trek Week gets underway
Monday.
"Wc want to involve students in promoting the image of the
university and publicizing the crowded conditions and lack of money
at UBC." said Bob Frasef co-chairman of Trek Week committee.
Trek Week was convinced as a comemmemoration to the 1922
Great Trek in which students demonstrated against the government's
freeze on university construction.
A speech on education and the university Monday at noon hour
and an evening UBC-SFU football will highlight the first day of Trek
Week.
Teach-ins Tuesday and a symbolic reconstruction of the 1922
Trek Wednesday arc among other events planned for the week.
Friday is fun day with concerts by the New Breed and the
Sandpipers in the SUB ballroom and Saturday the Thunderbirds take
on the Victoria Vikings at 2:30 p.m. in the stadium.
Protest
extended
world-wide
WASHINGTON, D.C.
(CUP) -liven though, U.S.
president Richard Nixon had
already lold them he wouldn't
listen, millions of Americans took
time off Wednesday to let him
know one more time that they
want an end to the Vietnam war.
The Vietnam moratorium,
originally planned as a student
protest, mushroomed into the
biggest civilian protest in the
history of the United States, with
thousands of demonstrations
occurring where organizers had
merely hoped to see thousands of
people.
London, Rome, Paris and
Tokyo were expected to go ahead
with demonstrations in their own
cities to show sympathy with the
American effort.
In one of the first
demonstrations, approximately
1,000 students of Georgetown
University Tuesday night filed
three-abreast through the streets
of Washington.
All across the States, flags were
lowered to half-mast and
protestors marched or attended
teach-ins, forums, candelight
processions, prayers or the
readings of the names of Vietnam
war dead.
In Canada interest was
sporadic.
At Waterloo, more than 1,000
students and faculty participated
in a teach-in which ran into the
evening.
Over 900 McGill students
attended a teach-in in the main
university lecture hall, where all
classes were cancelled for the
moratorium.
Surrealism
Soul
Little
Brother
Saul
Midnight
CBU 690
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CHINESE FOODS
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(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber   Shop)
WE   SERVE   GOOD   CHINESE   FOOD
AT     REASONABLE     PRICES
For   Take-Out   Service   Ph.   224-6121
OPEN   TUES.  -  TO   -   SAT.
11:30  A.M.  TO  10  P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 5 TO 10 P.M.
A andpipers   are coming.
SEE PAGE 14
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Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Chem. 250
Wednesday, October 22 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
The New Clubnight
STARTS THIS SATURDAY
AT THE
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
LIVE PIANO MUSIC
MUSIC AND BAR - 9 - 12 P.M.
For All Grads Every Saturday Night
BUT...
CAN YOU PROVE IT?
Sure, you can show a driver licence, a Social Insurance card and a
birth certificate but these may have been borrowed or found. When you
wish to cash a check or buy an alcoholic beverage you need POSITIVE
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I.D. card with your photo and thumbprint. Your plastic-coated card will
be accepted without question. Made in 20 minutes for only $5, plus tax.
Bring this ad with you before Nov. 2 and  save 50c.
Evening appointments available for groups.
CANADA IDENTIFICATION BUREAU
774 Denman St.
Evenings 985-5716
OPEN  10 a.m. to 6  p.m.
Bus. 685-5443
Mr. M. Klause, Director
MON. thru SAT.
T-BIRD DAY
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Pre-Game Show at 7:45 p.m.  PARAMOUNT PICTURES
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Gates 7:00 —Show 7:30 p.m.
The Beatles' new album, Abbey Road
(Apple SO-383), has been in town now for about
two weeks. Its price has fluctuated from $4.89 at
The Bay (once) to $5.29 at other discount stores.
The retail price of the album is $7.29, about as
much as an imported record from Germany.
There is only one reason for the price, as one
record store spokesman said, "It's because they
know it's going to sell."
When I first heard the album was coming
out, I expected something pretty terrible which I
would crap all over with great gusto. Surprisingly
enough, it's pretty good. In fact, I think it's their
best album since Rubber Soul, though whether
or not it's better is still a problem.
The new album will undoubtedly send the
rock intellectuals into ecstacies finding hidden
musical and literary meanings in the songs. (This
trend started with Sergeant Pepper which
produced some really heavy academic
profundities, some of which are to be found in a
Vintage paperback, The Age of Rock.)
Profound statements soon to be uttered will
be like " 'I Want You' is a purely musical
extension, of the intensified ending of 'I am the
Walrus and the extensive length of 'Hey Jude'."
The truth (?) is more likely that the song is a
put-down for all the people who will get stoned
with the intent of digging its white-noise finale.
Just think of the way the song gets more and
more intense and then cuts off completely in
mid-phrase. (FREAK-OUT!!!)
Aside from all that heavy tripping, the
album is enjoyable for nostalgia combined with a
mastery of the particular Beatles' studio sound
which started to develop on The Beatles, the
two-album set released late last year.
It isn't really nostalgia as such, though, but
the sort of feeling which photographer Jack Dale
described to me the other day. He said that
hearing Abbey Road made him feel like listening
to the collection of old 78s he had stored in his
attic.
If Abbey Road can make people do that,
expand their musical horizons as well as their
general outlooks, then it's good. But for most
people, they'll I probably let it pass in one ear
and out the other, and they'll lip-synch the
words as they drive to classes in the morn and
the music pours out of their car radios.
But then who really gives a damn? We'll all
buy the album anyway, just like the chick at the
record store said. The commercial mystique of
the pop star prevails in the end.
* * * *
Student symphony-goers may have a bit of a
problem this year if they want to get in to
concerts at ultra-reduced rates. Grumbles were
heard two weeks ago when there weren't any
Musical
Murmurings
by Mysterious
Michael Q.
dollar tickets available at the opening VSO
concerts.
Symphony manager Victor White explained
the situation as follows: Subscription ticket sales
have been abnormal high (over 4,000), so for
each regular symphony concert this year, there
are only about 800 unsold seats, most of which
will be bought by people who go to one
symphony a year. But, said White,if there are any
tickets left at 25 minutes after the hour before
the concert, "they will most certainly be sold at
student prices."
Don't count on any such situation this
weekend. Guest artist is Julian Bream, well
known for his ability to sell out the QueeniE
with just a solo recital.
Hell be playing a Vivaldi concerto for lute
plus Malcolm Arnold's Guitar Concerto. Also on
the program, featuring returning conductor
Meredith Davies, is Mozart's Symphony No. 29
and Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra.
Best get your tickets for these concerts now,
if they aren't already sold out. Even if you have
to pay outrageous ordinary prices, you can still
get 20% off the price if you flash your AMS card.
#Cz&
Friday, October 17, 1969
Julian (Cool Hand) Bream
THE     UBYSSEY
After listening to CKLG-FM regularly for
several months, I'm getting reasonably fed up
with their announcers who utter pseudo-poetry
between records and on most other occasions.
That's not because I hate poetry (I really do,
but that's out of ignorance), but when I turn on
the radio at one in the morning, I'd like to hear
somebody talking who radiates a sense of"
security instead of artsy-fartsyness.
As well, I wouldn't mind learning the names
of some of the albums which are played.
I suppose I could phone up the station and
ask (the number's 685-1138), but I did that
once. The announcer told me he doesn't like
talking to people because (a) of the inane calls he
gets like "Let me hear something off the Led
Zeppelin album" (an extension of the calls on
the LG-AM Boss Line—I can sympathize with
him for that.) and (b) because phone calls
interfere with his "musical space."
Now that's probably quite nice, but it seems
he's shirking a certain amount of responsibility
to his audience. And the fact that CKLG, one of
the most listened-to media in Vancouver, with an
estimated listenership of several hundred
thousand, is not as responsible to its audience as
it could be has always been a rather frightening
fact to me.
FM has a much freer format than the
insidious AM with its Formula Radio techniques,
and I've always considered that FM could
develop media-audience relations fairly well.
Mumbling little poetic sentiments doesn't
help except as serving as mind-fodder for the
"really stoned" audience. (Is the poetry an
attempt at being sophisticated or hip?) For the
others, including myself, it's boring and
infuriating, adding a little more frustration,
paranoia, and confusion to a world which is
already filled with enough such crap. (Heavy,
eh?) <fhe
revenger's
TRAGEDY
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
A catacomb: the somber-lit crypt, I was supposing,
of some abandoned, now decaying church.
A profusion of hooded corpses litters the set, as
divine Justice, always present, takes wrathful vengence
on a decaying world. The play ends.
" Tis a heavy season."-an aged, lone survivor, takes
the talisman of power. For an age of order which is
gone.
The tragedy of human revenge, the bloody chaos
which ensues when sinful, secularized man takes justice
into this own hands was a favorite theme of Jacobean
drama. The Rennaissance glorification of man was
replacing the sacred order of the Middle Ages; man came
face to face with his own deceitful vileness. And much
evil ensued. The "Dance of Death" lurked threateningly
within the blooming courtier.
The turn of the sixteenth century saw a desparate
concern with the vile, sneeky problem of good and evil.
The Revenger's Tragedy, by,Cyril Tourneur-whicb
was written in 1607-opened at the Dorothy Somerset
Studio on Wednesday evening-the M.A. Thesis
Production of Jana Veverka, with the set by Michelle
Bjornson.
"An network of ironic illustrations of villany
hoisted on its own petard, and of divine vengeance
contrasted with human." Man, in his vileness, cannot
judge, cannot govern himself. The black within only
turns outward and destroys.
"I am hired to kill myself, writes Toureur (as
Vindice) with bloody irony dripping from his pen.
The dramatist is fascinated with the macabre. His
images are the hood, the flashing dagger, and centrally,
the Skull. The skull which is the black inside, the skull
who's poisoned, bony lips sleezily offer the kiss of
death.
Imagine any kind of sin-including mother-rape and
father-kill-andTourneur has put it in. Imagine a world
(the satanic crypt) defined by its suspicion and distrust,
where only the most deceitful will survive-for a while.
Were't not for gold and women, there would be
no damnation.
Hell would look like a lord's great kitchen
without fire in't
But 'twas decreed before the world began,
That they should be the hooks to catch at man.
Everyone, every character (all are basically figures
of vice) in the play is damned deterministically from the
beginning—the atmosphere drips with death.
The power of this play—which is more tragic
melodrama than tragedy—lies in Tourneaur's
compressed, heavily ironic language.
And the student cast of Jana Veverka's production
handled the heavy blank verse extremely well. The
language of deceit: Dermot Hennely was terrific as the
eel-like Vindice, and so was Jeremy Newson as the
doomed Lussorioso.
And Wayne Robson "doth his age belie," as the
eighty-year-old lecher Duke.
"My hairs are grey, but yet my sins are green."
A finely-controlled production, a fine set, and very
fine lighting. The whole evening was beautifully
macabre, and once in the rythm of the thing, one could
laugh-laugh hard and blackly.
After all, the theme, the moral, the whole mood, is
not tremendously difficult to get into. In our times.
The play continues tonight and Saturday at 8:30
p.m.
Trying for the Sun
I am nevertheless amazed how much theatre
goes on in the theatre.
Last Friday evening, downtown, we all
witnessed The Season Opener, featuring the
Playhouse Theatre Company, and guest starring The
Royal Hunt of the Sun. It was a kind of "play
within a play" type situation, presented annually,
by way of initating our village into the kultural
winter. I had not partaken of the Ritual before, and
was duly impressed.
And interest and support for the theatre—for
the "Arts" generally—is growing tremendously in
Vancouver. And season-ticket sales have again risen
graciously this year. Kultural monies are being
invested, to document our fresh-blooming
sef-consciousness and respect. Etc.
On the exterior, the "lobby-level", the action
moved ritualistically as the "public" re-enacted the
theatre-going process of its collective forefathers.
Local important personages were well-represented.
Tom Campbell displayed years of professional
experience as he cooly mastered the part of Mayor.
And Mrs. Campbell—reflecting the open-mindedness
of her representative position at the mayor's side
with a subtlely daring pant-dress—successfully
projected the cute loudish part of leading lady.
People came to see, saw, and were seen.
Promenading; loose procession in ceremonial dress
befor curtain time on the inner stage. One
exchanged pleasantries-lines dead from
over-rehearsal. One talked of what was to transpire
late, what a great thing art was. And one beamed. It
mattered.
Late, David Gardner, as the Artistic Director,
acted more subdued, seemed honest. He received
and entertained the chorus of gaudily-dressed
oldish-west-van-theatre-ladies with just the right
nuance of becoming modesty. The
"spotlight-vibrations" were affecting him less
blatantly than the others. Which I found appealing.
The supporting cast of thousands milled in a
loosely choreographed easy manner—although
somewhat stiff at times. (Opening night
tension ...?) One saw the Critic—appropriately
attired in the far-outness of his intellectual
function—because he was obvious.
The array of somber, solid, black-suited pillars
of society formed an approving, nodding, backdrop
as their lowers performed. And the children—hip
sophisticates, west-end swingers, and boutique
flower children—dressed loudly, giggled, talked
intellectually, and shone in their elders' beaming
approval.
And theatre unfolded itself in a pageant of
formalism, ritualized dialogue and easy movement.
And all partook, smiled cheezily, and felt complete.
A hymn to art; a dance to that finer human
institution, the Theatre; a display of publicness.
I was surprised, bewildered and annoyed
(slightly). I had been unaware of the extent to
which Vancouver wanted to, considered itself to be,
sophisticated, cosmopolitan, "just like in New
York". Theatre becomes respectably
institutionalized, secularized, demo-beaurocractic
myth, and the market-place of vision.
But maybe this is inevitable, and, not even
necessarily bad. Maybe.
Meanwhile, and slowly, the transition into the
inner sanctum, the place of actual, formalized,
composed drama was performed. And,
superimposed onto the previous public enactment,
in extreme counterpoint to it, was the vision, the
structured recreation of the religious belief, of
confrontation between the man and his god.
The play within the theatre on -Friday
night-Peter Shaffer's The Royal Hunt of the
Sun—was an epic pageant, a historical chronicle of
the Spaniard Pizzarro's conquering the Inca Empire
on November 16, 1513. It dramatizes the clash of
two cultures: one western, mythless, and brutally.
aggressive; the other native, mystical and sublimely
simple.
Shaffer's play is a traditional, classically
composed drama. (Although written in 1963.) It
Larry Foden and Rona Altrows strike subtly
symbolic pose.
THE     UBYSSEY
bears all the trademarks of art that in time comes to
be seen as timeless and immortally true. A narrator
centralizes the story as the action moves easily
between frantic mass scenes (beautifully ■ stylized
by choreographer Norbert Vesak) and formalized
tabloids of dialogue. Pizzarro, is the archetypal epic
hero, interacting with his world in terms of long
monologues and discoursive dialogues, as he openly
grapples with the timeless universal dilemma of
existence.
(The representative individual, the metaphysical
level is far removed from the social patter in the
lobby. A reality-jump-flip, and I have the feeling
people sit quietly because they are obedient. )
Pizzarro, the tragic western man, cast
sceptically adrift from his decaying society, hater of
institutional belief, fights in desperation for fame.
He must achieve a semblance of immortality by
personally conquering the Inca Empire. This
potential catastrophe of a man confronts
Atahuallpa, the mystical, implicitly faithful Inca
Emporer. Atahuallpa is unity, he has no doubt; he is
belief and action without dilemma. He is,
simultaneously, spiritual and secular leader of his
simple people.
While the Incas are massacred, and Pizzarro's
men paranoically stuff themselves with gold, the
two leaders find each other. Atahuallpa-conquered,
beaten, humiliated—remains unconquered. He,
through total belief, is "the Son of the Sun", and
thus immortal. The spiritually barren Pizzarro is
mesmerized, bewitched by this encompassing,
unrelenting presence. Atahuallpa presents, finally, a
desperate hope for faith. Instead of gold-hunting, he
goes God-hunting.
Pizzarro's rootedness in his own western
tradition finally becomes his destruction however.
He cannot perform the ritualistic Dance to the Sun;
nor can he (in his , rationality)! accept Atahuallpa as
divine. The sceptic demands concrete proof—the
Inca must physically transcend death (as Christ so
conveniently did) before the Spaniard will believe.
The Sun is life. The Sun is energy. The Sun is
spirit. For Atahuallpa, and the Incas, it is
unquestioned reality: Pizzarro however, can find
real relief finally, only in the corporate—and thus
must die, as many have died.
David Gardner presents this play royally, with a
spectacular, moving set and brilliant costuming. And
Jack Creeley, Alan Scarfe and August Schellenberg
were superb in the three leading roles of narrator,
Pizzarro and Atahuallpa. A safe, but solid arid
complete opening performance for the Playhouse
season this year.
And I wondered, as we moved out of the inner
stage and back into the "public arena", if I had not
in fact seen two separate plays. At the "Reception
Ceremony" around the bar in the Playhouse, I
wondered if they were at all. related, if there was any
interaction...
Friday, October 17, 1969 SCM and VANCOUVER COMMITTEE TO END
THE VIETNAM WAR
invite you to the
ANTI-MASSACRE DANCE
SUB BALLROOM - SAL, OCT. 18
8 P.M.
-$1.25-
Meke Beddoes' "GINGER BOX" and
"SANDAL SPRING"
- LIGHT SHOW -
A Repeat of Last Year's Sell-out
I
STUDENT NIGHT
with the
PLAYHOUSE
THEATRE  COMPANY
1
$12 season ticket includes six plays, in the Q.E. Playhouse,
free coffee and wide-open discussion with the director,
designer, members of the cast and YOU!
Oct. 28-THE ROYAL HUNT OF THE SUN
Canadian premiere by
Peter Shaffer
Nov.  11-THE SHOW OFF
by George Kelly
Dec. 9- COLOURS IN THE DARK
by James Reaney
Jan. 20-EVENTS WHILE GUARDING THE BOFORS GUN
by John McGrath
Feb. 24-THE SLEEPING BAG
by Arthur Murphy
Mar.   17—TANGO by Slawomir Mrozek
For Application Forms Call Mike Lewis, Playhouse Rep. at
U.B.C.—922-8916 or write 2005 Inglewood, West. Van.
Contact   $4Q.50
Lenses       ^ ^
Any Color - ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us... AND REALLY SAVE!
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SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS & FACULTY ON GLASSES
NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
Downtown
677 GRANVILLE          °PP- *he   Bay
681-6174
South   Granville
2987  GRANVILLE     At  14th
796-7347
Oakridge
5618 CAMBIE           at 41st
327-9451
North   Van.
1825   LONSDALE
98741264
675  COLUMBIA ST.
Opp. Army & Navy,  New West.
521-0751         a
763 FORT ST.
VICTORIA,   B.C.
286-7578
Irwin Silber is culture editor of The Guardian of New York. An
earlier version of this article appeared in The Guardian.
By IRWIN SILBER
Five years ago, the front cover of Sing Out! magazine
heralded the "topical song revolution" with a composite
photograph of half a dozen of the most vital and creative of the
new generation of song writers who were then revolutionizing the
folk song movement.
Naturally, there was Bob Dylan, baby-faced and not so
innocent, Phil Ochs, Tom Paxton, and Len Chandler. Mark
Spoelstra was there, and so was Peter LaFarge. A few months
later, Buffy Sainte-Marie and Julius Lester would have been
included.
What happened to those singers and the movement they
represented? Perhaps if we answer that question, we'll know
something about what has happened to America in these five
years as well.
We all know what happened to Dylan. After creating a
body of personal/political songs which become the anthems of
the "civil rights generation," he moved from obvious social
commitment ("The Times They Are A-Changing," "Masters of
War," "Death of Hattie Carroll," "Pawn in the Game," etc.) to a
new and intensely bitter commentary of man's relation to man in
the time of capitalism's ultimate agony. In 1964, the year of the
first major escalation in Vietnam, the year of Malcolm X's murder
and Birmingham Sunday, the year of Lyndon B. Johnson, the
answer was no longer "blowing in the wind." Bob Dylan
understood this before most of the rest of us. His newer songs
began to reflect the death of that naivete which led us to believe
that we could change this system without destroying it.
The most dramatic sign of this change was in Dylan's switch
to electricity, but it was in Dylan's new "message" that the
underlying content of the new mood could be understood. The
rejection of the system's values ("Ballad of a Thin Man,"
"Maggie's Farm'7; the growing sense of alienation ("Subterranean
Homesick Blues," "It's All Right Ma") and the romanticizing of
dope (Mr. Tambourine Man," "Like a Rolling Stone") were three
aspects of the same process.
Many of us who did not fully understand the dynamics of
the political changes that were taking place in America were quite
critical of Dylan's changes. We felt deserted by a poet who—we
had come to believe—cared. And Dylan did desert not us, but an
outmoded style of values which had become unequal to the task
of reclaiming America. "This land is not your land," Dylan told
us in 1965. But some of us-raised on the songs of Woody
Guthrie and Pete Seeger, nourished in the FDR years, inheritors
of a superficial "Marxism" based on diluted Leninism and
rationalized Stalinism were not ready to accept the revolutionary
implications of Dylan's statement. Because if we accepted them,
being political people, we would have to act on them! So long as
the diagnosis was chicken pox or mumps, we could think of
applying some new medicine for our social ills. But the poets
were telling us that it was cancer-throughout the system,
accelerating—and terminal.
Well, we learned. And for some of us older heads, the
D]
and c
The times th<
learning process was painful,
so many basic assumptions,
welcomed Dylan's "retreat"
their own elitism and des]
Grossman Enterprises and C
agony either.)
But Dylan is our poet-
we want to be touched—in. t
exposed places. And if he fa
not his.
Is Dylan political, anti
question is sillier than it sour
songs in Fayerweather Hal
Lincoln Park during "free
communicating where it coi
Dylan remained the emo
generation?
But what of the othei
remain two of the mc
ever-dimming folk song scei
Phil Ochs, if for no other i
abraisive personality for h
content. His politics are mes
singing his heart out in Chicj
as a publicity stunt for a ne
Kennedy's ill-fated bid for
action is, but consistently n
himself, the action.
His songs, like Dylan
once were. Now he too att*
But unlike Dylan who will
Ochs always seems to be h<
cynical detachment from h
ideas—and sometimes, as
Friends" or 'The Party" b<
THE HARBOR (A&M 4132
for the occasion. At the sai
political-military establishr
suitable subject matter. Hi
Boots Marching In a Yi
anti-Vietnam War songs pro
Buffy Sainte-Marie is
pity. That type of phony
artist needs. There were al
Sainte-Marie's songs: the so
on North American Indian
like "Universal Soldier." Ur
won out on her latest LP,
AGAIN (Vanguard 79280),
by the title, Buffy goes to ^
vapid naturalism of most
human intelligence, and oi
can continue to be dished
age of Dylan, the Beatles
some A & R man impresse
road to success—and for al
Friday, October 17, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
pf 401 Ian
[her folk
y have changed.
solving, as it did, a reappraisal of
f course, there were many who
jm politics as a substantiation of
■. (The bookkeepers for Albert
mbia Records weren't exactly in
: our leader. Poets touch us where
e pleasurable places and in those
to touch, the failure may be ours,
itical, apolitical, unpolitical? The
If they listen to and play Dylan's
tiring "liberation week" and in
ctions week," then someone is
. The question remains: why has
al  essentialization  of the  SDS
'hil Ochs and Buffy Sainte-Marie
important luminaries of the
3f these, the most interesting is
>n than that he has fashioned an
If in terms of both style and
al at best—and one may find him
organizing a street demonstration
•ord album, or supporting Bobby
/er. He is frequently where the
;es to project the idea that he is,
e not nearly as topical as they
: to deal in broader social values.
ently give us a piece of himself,
I something back, maintaining a
>jects. Ochs deals consciously in
Outside  of a Small Circle of
om his album PLEASURES OF
y seem contrived, manufactured
ne, when he turns his eye on the
his venom  seems  to  find  a
jps of the World" and "White
Land"  are  two  of the  best
in America.
a minor legend-and more's the
3iz imagery is the last thing as
two conflicting strains in Buffy
:aling with the injustices visited
the simplistic inanity of songs
lately, the inanity seems to have
DNNA BE A COUNTRY GIRL
ich, as you may be able to judge
le. There is something about the
try music that is an insult to
ders how this kind of molasses
id presumably absorbed) in the
Duntry Joe McDonald. Perhaps
y with the idea that this is the
w, it may be. But the process is
intrinsically phony, and all you have to do is hear Buffy
Sainte-Marie tear her guts out on "Now That The Buffalo's
Gone"—where she really sings from conviction and anger—and
you know how empty the rest is.
Many singers used to tell me what they were going to do
once they got the "exposure" of a big label record—the
statements they would make, the causes they would support. I
remember one left-wing manager back in the early 1950s
explaining to me how his group was going to be "bigger than
Robeson"-and then I'd really see something. Of course, this is
the oldest cop-out in the world—usually because by the time you
get that "big," your ideas are no longer so radical. (Yesterday's
radicalism is inveitably today's liberalism, as we've all had to
learn.) Apparently Len Chandler has no such illusions. He doesn't
.think he can launch the revolution from Columbia Records, but
he sings one of the strongest song he's ever written, "Genocide,"
on a Broadside release, THE TIME WILL COME (Broadside
BR-306) under the pseudonym of Zachary 2.
This is a neat little fiction with precedent among old-time
bluesmen who often recorded the same song for several different
labels ("all spades sound alike") to earn extra bread. In the
topical song field, Bob Dylan performed as Blind Boy Grunt on
an earlier Broadside record to avoid contract hassles with
Columbia, and on the current Broadside disc you can hear Janis
Ian performing her "Shady Acres"-a way of paying dues without
getting the big record labels on the muscle.
music?
Today, the topical song revolution is a memory—not quite
nostaliga yet, but an echo from another time which serves to
remind us of intervening battles waged and miles traveled.
Broadside magazine still publishes, but the volunteers are
fewer and the money is scarcer. Songs of social commitment still
appear in the pages of Sing Out!—but somehow the sense of
urgency is gone. The high-paid and high-pressured writers from
Newsweek and Time who used to haunt the folk music world in
search of new trends and colourful copy have all left to chase
amplified pots of gold. In their place has come a small army of
researchers and doctorate-seekers who are documenting this brief
period in our cultural history in hopes of being first in an area of
"scholarship" now sufficiently dead to lend itself to the
"objective" analysis in which our academics specialize.
Today's new songs are seldom "topical" in the sense of
being related to specific events or political issues. The best of the
new songwriters still aim for a degree of social relevancy, but this
has become so intertwined with the possibilities of a "career" in
the show-biz sense that it is sometimes hard to treat seriously.
The new swingers like Janis Ian, Leonard Cohen, Chris Gaylord
and Tom Parrott tend more to introspection and the
identification of self in a world beyond their capabilities for
change. Sometimes, though, as in Tom Parrott's "Groovy and
Linda" (from his album, NEON PRINCESS, (Folkways 31009,)
the old topical ballad tradition and the new level of involvement
mesh and the result is a song both moving and profound. But for
the most part, the stance of yesteryear is a painful anarchronism.
(The exception is Pete Seeger, who still manages to convey his
personal integrity and the depths of his conviction while standing
manfully astride yesterday's barricades.)
The most relevant expressions of today's world are now
heard, by and large, over the feedback of blast-level
amplifiers-when words can be made out of all, that is. But that
too is part of today's message.
An artist's consciousness of the purpose of his art and the
objective reality of that art are not always the same thing. Which i
is simply to say that sometimes the artist may be just doing his
thing with no intention of projecting a new social reality-but be
doing that nevertheless. Despite a small flurry of social
consciousness around the edges of the rock music scene, most
rock musicians do not view themselves as activists or even as
political people particularly. And some of those who did at one
time have found a new set of conscious values as the system's
rewards seem to become more possible.
The songs of the Beatles,   for instance, come out the the
same mood and view of the world that has shaped the students of
Paris, Berkeley, Mexico City and Columbia University. But in
their single "Revolution" (RCA Victor 276), the lads from
Liverpool are pretty up tight. Dig:
You say you want a revolution,
Well, you know we all want to change the world.
But when you talk about destruction,
Don't you know you can count me out.
You say you 've got a real solution,
Well, you know, we are doing what we can.
But if you want money for people with minds that hate,
All I can tell you brother-you have to wait.
You say you 11 change the constitution.
Well, you know, we all want to change your head.
You tell me it's the institution, •
You know, you 'd better feed your mind instead.
Okay? But don't rush out and trade in your Beatle records
for Country Joe and the Fish. After all, whoever said the Beatles
were revolutionaries in the first place? The record companies, the
press agents, the promoters, the managers—the whole greedy crew
of artful dodgers who figure you can pedtffe revolution along with
soap and corn flakes and ass and anything else that can turn over
a dollar-that's who! If we had any illusions that the Beatles—or
the Rolling Stones, or Dylan, or the Jefferson Airplane, or yes,
even the Fish and The Fugs—were revolutionaries, it's time to
clear those illusions away.
But—and its a bloody important but—just as the music of
The Supremes, Aretha Franklin and James Brown comes out of
the same experience and life style that has produced Huey
Newton, Rap Brown and Eldridge Cleaver, so does the new rock
relate to the realities which have produced SDS, Yippies and the
Resistance.
If ever an art reflected the rejection of a society's most
sacred values, the rock music of the 1960s does. Here is the
torment, the brutalization, the anger, the cynicism of a
generation which hungers for faith-and trusts no one. This is a"
generation which has come to understand the nature of the
crimes committed in the name of intellect, logic, technology. If
your wars, your debasement of human values, your greed, can all
be justified by the twists and turns of your forked tongue and the
workings of your brain and your computers, we will reject words
and replace them with decibels, we will reject logic and replace it
with mind-expanding drugs, we will reject intellect and replace it
with the gut and the groin, we will reject technology and replace
it with the natural and the animal. And it is this that you must
first understand and second feel if ;youi are to relate to the music
of today's young.
Current rock would seem to be the music most suitable for
the disaster which is today's America. (Can you think of a better
music to bury a system by?) No it's not marching music—but
we're not marching yet, are we? And it's (despite the
protestations to the contrary) the "new life" music. But the "new
life" isn't here yet, either. That is a music for another generation.
p£ Sive
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,  1969 By ROON
Stone Session, as the ad states below, is indeed trying to
inject life back into the Vancouver pop music scene. After a
summer of many horrendous promotional bloopers we could do
with a little help.
The four directors of Stone Session are Mike Macdonald,
Matt Anttila, Douglas C. Trant and Andrew Telegdi. The most
important thing the group can do now in the opinion of
Macdonald is to regenerate some interest in the local music
situation. And interest is flagging, as poor gates at recent events
will testify.
Mike Macdonald puts it this way: "No one person can make
the Vancouver scene happen. It has to be the combined effort of
many people including disc jockeys and promoters. Most of all it
needs the participation of everyday people who simply dig
music."
The basic reason for Stone Session's existence is to get
people interested in music so they can develop the Vancouver
music scene. Once it is established, interested people can get
building proper dance halls and talk the money people into
bringing in big groups and presenting them properly as well as
presenting local talent properly.
"It would be kind of groovy to get into a space where more
people get together to bring in the kind of groups they want to
hear," says Macdonald.
Instead we have the situation which occurred recently where
a promoter brought in a group he dug but who bombed at the
gate.
The important ingredient, says Macdonald is people and the
problem is to get them involved.
That's where Stone Session comes in.
"The important thing about this is not whether we make
money but that 4,000 got involved and got together to do it.
There's no limit to the number of people that can be in Stone
Session.
"Eventually they could get together to hold a pop festival
presented by Vancouver (or a sizable portion of it) rather than by
individual promoters. It sounds like a good idea to me, if you can
dig it, join it. Get involved.
Gordon Lightfoo
MONEY RETURN—A special account is being set up with
City Savings for the purpose of depositing all money received
from Stone Session Members. This money can only be removed
with the signatures of all four directors of Stone Session.
This money will not be used for any purpose until there are
adequate no. of members to go ahead with the concert. The
receipt you receive is your guarantee of money return in case of
failure.
Membership can be pledged by calling 738-0351 or sending
$5 to 3076 W. 11th Avenue.
EXAMPLES OF GROUPS OFFERED
SEE and HEAR
THE SINGING
" NEW MEN "
of St. Luke's Episcopal,
Seattle
Mon., Oct. 20, noon
SUB PIT
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W.  HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
LOCAL GROUP
ALL CANADA
WEST COAST
FOLK
MEDIUM PRICED IMPORTS
HEAVY PRICED IMPORTS
- SEEDS OF TIME
- GUESS WHO, COLLECTORS
- BALLING JACK, FLOATING BRIDGE
- GORDON LIGHTFOOT
- BLUES IMAGE, SPIRIT
- LED ZEPPELIN, JEFFERSON AIRPLANE,
CREEDENCE
pfi 6ix
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W.  10th at Arbutus
Wanna Start Something ?
My name is Mike Macdonald. I am part of a promotional group called Stone
Session.
As many people are aware, Vancouver has acquired a bad reputation in North
America in the entertainment field. The main factor underlying this negative
reputation has been the numerous attempts by various individuals to promote rock
pop festivals strictly for the purpose of making money. Experience has shown that
this: approach often fails because the quality of the production suffers.
1 have a proposal for those people who are interested in the Vancouver music
scene and who would like to have a hand in choosing what they would like to hear
rather than having the choice made entirely by the promoter. Stone Session has
booked the Agrodome from December 26th to January 1st in the hope that there
are enough interested people in Vancouver to create an unforgettable concert. To
put on a production of the highest quality, we will need in the neighborhood of
$40,000.00. This breaks down into aporoximately $12,000.00 to pay for building,
advertising sound equipment, and salaries with $28,000.00 being allocated to
musical talent.
Our proposal is simple. We want 4,000 people to join Stone Session and put
up $ 10.00 toward the proposed concert. Your membership include the following.
(1) Give you a voice in choosing what musical talent will appear;
(2) Give you a voice in setting up the scene at the Agrodome for the concert;
(3) Give you a free entry to the concert.
If we can show North America that there are 4,000 people in Vancouver that are
together we can get almost any musical talent we choose.
But that isn't the only benefit to be derived from Stone Session. All members
will receive proper receipts for their $10.00 contributions as well as membership
cards, questionnaires about musical talent choice and regular news letters showing
disposition of moneys received.
Stone Session will work if you want it to work and will contribute your
support. For further information, contact Mike Macdonald, 731-1391.
The seating capacity of the Agrodome is approximately 6,000. If the
concert is successful and the Agrodome is filled every night, Stone Session will
collect $28,000.00. This comes from 2,000 people attending who are not members
of Stone Session are $2.00 per day times seven days. We would then have
$28,00.00 to put towards another concert.
Memberships available at
HIPPOGRYFF
SOUND OF OM
BLIND OWL
3 PENNY LANE
DEYONG SOUND
or    GEORGIA STRAIGHT
3076 WEST 11TH
Friday, October 17, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY Movies
dike'a (RsudaWMvd
By ROON
Alice and Ray are married, see. So Alice opens up this back
door restaurant in Stockbridge Mass . . . after they buy the
Church, that is. But Arlo knows Ray and Alice and so does
Roger. But Roger gets kicked out of some town where Arlo is a
student. On top of that there is this groupie who had balled with
some top performers who wants to ball Arlo because he's going to
be an album or something. (He refuses because she has a cold and
is only 13.) Then there is this middle aged chick who tries the
•same trick with Arlo because she once lent his old man, Woodie,
some money to get out of town. To round out the picture there is
Shelley, a motorcycle freak who is also a junkie who says he is
reformed. He isn't of course but we don't find that out until
later.
What you have just read is the basic plot line for Alice's
Restaurant, directed by Arthur Perm and starring Arlo Guthrie
and Pat Quinn. The movie is based on an 18 minute song by the
same title written by Arlo and which most of you have already
heard.
The problem is that Penn has elaborated the song into one
hour and forty minutes of film and therefore has had to milk
every angle available. The result is a rather naive film about
communal living (of sorts), flower children (of sorts), and life and
death (of sorts).
Penn has provided some very funny moments in the film,
mostly directly connected with the song. There are also some
quite touching scenes with Arlo and Woodie who is confined to a
bed with a nerve disease. But apart from these scenes much of the
film is embarassingly contrived and tends to make one squirm a
little.
In attempting to show what the "hip, super-cool" generation
is like, Penn comes on a little heavy with "hey man" and a lot of
the jargon commonly associated with the current pop drug
subculture.
If the film does have any saving grace it is in the way it
dissects the lives of Alice and Ray.
Pat Quinn, as Alice turns in a fine performance and almost
makes it all worthwhile herself. Alice is probably the only
multi-dimensional character in the film and I suspect it is largely
due to Miss Quinn's portrayal.
Alice's main problem, of course is Ray, who is a loudmouth
bullheaded cretin of questionable sanity. But Alice, who is both
sensitive and warm, is not without fault herself. She indulges in
emotional excesses, particularly over Shelley, who she makes it
with, that show her to be indeed human.
The breakdown of Ray and Alice's relationship can be
equated to that sick morning after feeling experienced when one
wakes up after a wild party to realize he has made a bit of an ass
himself. The characters in the film choose to live out their
fantasies about communal living and sexual freedom but in the
end are quite unable to cope with the ramifications of such an
existence.
Overall, though, the film is a disappointment.
While Arlo's song was excellent and to the point, the film is
over-indulgent and filled with too many tangents. After hearing
the song eleventy-leven times and digging it, I kind of expected
the same excellence of the film.
p£ 7even
THIS SUNDAY
OCTOBER 19th
6:30 P.M.
THE WAR GAME
. . . the grim B.B.C. telefilm of nuclear consequences.
We show the film to provoke further discussion about
the War Moratorium being called for in the U.S.A. and
elsewhere.
Cost Supper (50c) for the first 40 people in
attendance. Time: 5:30 p.m. Phone 224-1614
or 224-3328 for reservations.
9:30 a.m.—Christian Growth College
10:30  a.m.—Contemporary Worship
with an "Art Happening" by Karl Schutt
in place of the sermon
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Across from the Administration Building
5885 University at Wesbrook Crescent
On Stage in Person . . .
GORDON LIGHTFOOT
Queen  Elizabeth Theatre
OCTOBER 29th & 31st, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton or from
Their Branch Office-Thunderbird Shop-U.B.C.
$3.50 - $4.50 - $5.50 - DON'T WAIT!!
AandpiperS    are Coming.
SEE PAGE 14
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
THE BRIDE
WORE BLACK
■I
II
With JEANNE MOREAU and
JEAN CLAUDE BRIALY
Directed by: TRUFFAUT MOREAU
OCT. 17-18
SUB 75c
Fri.: 7:00, 9:30 Sat.: 7:00
Sun.: 6:30
NEXT WEEK: "BYE BYE BRAVERMAN"
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INAME
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.ADDRESS                                                                                             1
'city.                                  prov.
 ,
ItEL. No.—
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534 Burrard St.,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Ph. 688-3477
REPRESENT YOUR FACULTY on
SENATE
Five positions available...
one each from:
APPLIED SCIENCE (Engineering, Architecture, Agriculture, and Forestry)
ARTS (Arts, Library Science, Home Economics, Music, and Social Work)
GRADUATE STUDIES
COMMERCE OR LAW
SCIENCES (Science, Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Nursing)
NOMINATIONS CLOSE .. .
12:30 P.M. - THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23
Forms available in A.M.S. Office
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,  1969 Mast
Since I find myself with
the space, the time and the
inclination, I would like to
enunciate Page Friday's
position in that great world
known   as   JOURNALISM.
What we are really trying
to do, I think, is produce a
non-political, quasi-philosophical, informative and
entertaining magazine of
high quality.
To achieve this we have
by necessity dissociated
ourselves in a sense from
The Ubyssey. This is not to
say we don't sympathize
with the stand of the news
side of this paper, but
instead of duplicating their
efforts we would like to
present another facet or
facets of the place in which
we find ourselves.
So, stylistically and in
content we have attempted
and will continue to branch
out in our own tangent.
We would like to
produce a less cramped and
more free style than
newside with perhaps more
entertainment in the reading
for PF readers.
Head
To do this, however, we
need diligent, competent,
people who can write and
are willing to spend some
timfe for no reward other
than the satisfaction of a
job well done.
We therefore invite all
interested people to visit us
and perhaps attend a PF
staff meeting scheduled for
noon today in which we will,
discuss future plans.
If you can write and have
ideas you would like to see
in print (other than
extremely political or
ideological) or if you have
some insight into any of the
arts, that you would like to
share with others, come and
write for PF.
Don't just do something,
stand there.
Forum
by  BARRY  ETTER
MEN IN GROUPS, by Lionel Tiger, Random House, New
York, 1968.
Lionel Tiger is a former UBC sociology professor who has
gained recent popularity as a result of his theories of the
dominant "male bond". Men In Groups was published shortly
after Tiger left UBC in 1967 and was in part made possible by a
grant from the President's Research Fund of the University of
British Columbia.
If we have not read his work, most of us are at least familiar
with the controversy that surrounds it. Briefly, Tiger's hypothesis
is an attempt at rationalizaion of the present state of male-female
relations in western society. He defines the biologically
transmitted male bond as "a particular relationship between two
or more males such that they react differently to members of
their bonding unit as compared with individuals outside it". While
males have an inherited propensity to make this bond, females do
not, says Tiger. He confirms the existence of this bond in human
society by first locating it as defined in certain groups of the
higher primates, then by using this supposed existence as a
justification to assume that any assumed or observed human
equivalent of this behaviour may be subject to the same biological
influence. He then studies the behaviour of males in certain
cultures today and attempts to base this behaviour in an
evolutionary matrix.
Most critiques of his perspective have only attempted to
point out the vast number of criticisms which can be levied on
the scientific level. Tiger, however, does much of this on his own
so that only some needs repeating. The most obvious is that man
is the only species whose behaviour can be determined almost
completely by social manipulation. He also admits that the
comparative zoological perspective can really only serve to point
out those aspects of man's behaviour for which it might be valid
to do research. Given that the evolutionary break with the higher
primates occured about twenty million years ago, biological
similarities must be a result of parallel development rather than of
direct inheritance. There also exist several societies in which no
evidence of the male bond can be found; in fact there is one in
which the reverse is the case. This alone is enough to render the
male bond invalid as a universal theory of human behaviour.
He pays no attention to the theory that man was liberated
from the higher primates by the development of the thumb. The
subsequent evolutionary development of the cortex was a result
of his labour, not his ability to form bonds. Those who were most
successful in manipulating their environment through labour were
obviously the most likely to survive. Through this process, man
was able to develop cognitive processes that rendered him
independent of instinctual behaviour.
The main issue is not whether Tiger's theory has a high
degree of scientific validity, which it has not, but whether it
should be used along with other recent research on innate
behaviour as an ideological basis for a theory of society.
When dealing with material on innate behaviour, we must
take care to distinguish between ideological and scientific
theories. Tiger's theory of the "male bond" is at present clearly
ideological; it is not universally supported by empirical data. As
anti-imperialists we must discover the reasons behind the
propagation of disguised ideological theories and attempt to give
them the same degree of exposure as the theories themselves.
-Fred Cawsey     I
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SPECIAL EVENTS AND
GREAT TREK PRESENTS—
THE
SANDPIPERS
Friday, Oct. 24
and
The Greatest Entertainment
Package of the Year
1. Concert by the SANDPIPERS and THE NEW BREED in
SUB BALLROOM. Two Performances, 8 p.m. and 10 p.m.
2. CONTINUOUS DANCE from 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. with SWEET
ROLLE from Seattle and HIGH FLYING BIRD in SUB
Cafeteria. Also NEW BREED in Ballroom after Midnight.
Ticketholders Are Entitled to . . .
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* Plus Entry to the Fabulous 2 Band Dance which runs
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AMS OFFICE IN SUB
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Friday, October 17, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY Friday, October 17, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Council meeting
rejects strike plan
BURNABY (Staff)-The general student strike proposed by
Simon Fraser University student society president Norm Wickstrom
was voted down at a student council meeting Tuesday.
At the meeting, six councillors, the treasurer, clubs director,
education president, activities co-ordinator, public relations officer
and the councillor-at-large presented a brief against the general strike
proposal.
The other councillors were non-committal about the proposal
but it was clear they considered a strike premature. There are 13
student society members.
John Bishop, student public relations officer, said the six
councillors who presented the brief considered Wickstrom's statement
emotional and irresponsible.
At the same meeting, council passed motions asking the
administration to permit students to transfer out of courses affected
by the strike withdrew from courses and have their fees returned and
that no probation actions be taken against students who fail to
complete courses under the existing conditions.
An appeal board was set up for students facing difficulties
because of the strike and the administration was asked by the student
society to extend the course transfer date to Oct. 22.
Meanwhile, at an arts faculty meeting Tuesday the presence of
one student in the gallery brought about a sudden end.
A motion to admit students to the meeting was defeated 39-33,.
but the nine suspended professors were not allowed to vote because
SFU administration president Ken Strand had taken away their
franchise.
When one student entered the gallery and refused to leave, the
meeting was adjourned.
The reaction of the suspended PSA professors to the situation in
the department has remained consistent.
"With only five faculty supporting Robert Wyllie
(newly-appointed PSA head) including himself, I must say his
mandate is a limited one," said Nathan Popkin, one of the suspended
profs.
Another suspended prof, Harold Hickerson, said the strike is
very real. "As long as the people consider themselves on strike, they
are on strike," he said.
Also on Tuesday, several English department students held a
mock funeral and cremation ceremony for SFU president Kenneth
Strand outside the administration building.
Present at the ceremonies in full funeral regalia were suspended
PSA profs Kathleen Aberle and David Potter.
It has been rumored that the SFU administration has been
giving our hundreds of rolls of film to pro-administration persons to
obtain pictures of striking individuals and activities.
Palatable cuisine
service started
Now you can buy exotic lunches on campus.
International House is pioneering an international food service.
For 85 cents you Can buy West Indian parrattas and chicken on
Monday, East Indian curries on Wednesday, and Chinese food on
Friday.
The food will be served in IH from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. but due
to limited supplies you should get there early.
The auditorium cafeteria has also caught on to the foreign foods
idea and will sell 85 cent Chinese meals daily from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m.
The Chinese food is being supplied by the Hong Kong
Restaurant in the Village, better known as the Green Door.
Protesting Ryerson students
strike for relevant courses
TORONTO (CUP)-Students in their graduating year of an
interior design program at Ryerson Polytechnical Institutue Thursday
struck in protest in an inadequate program which they claim fails to
leave them competent or qualified to become "practising
professionals."
In a letter addressed to the chairman of the department,
students said the course was "out of touch with design as an original
and creative process."
The students said they had "spoken in a concerned manner for
at least a year to the staff as well as the department head," and had
received "little response but gratitude," for complaining.
Nineteen of the 20 students in the graduating class joined the
strike.
All the better to enter by
The library entrance is being renovated.
The renovations consist of widening the entrance to the library
and installing new doors. Included in the renovations are a new wall
near the entrance and a new floor.
A foreman in charge of the three workers on the job said
Thursday the renovations presently under way at the doors of the
library will take from two to three weeks to be completed.
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Young men attending the Canadian Services Colleges and Canadian universities
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For information regarding
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684-7431 Page   16
Advertisement
THE      UBYSSEY
AdVertiSemeilt Friday, October  17,  1969
EDITOR: Dave Gibson,
SUB 252, Phone 228-3969
FRIDAY, OCT. 19f 1969
A weekly official summary of Alma Mater
Society activities, including notes on Student Council meetings,
official notices, elections, undergrad
societies, student committees, etc.
Editorial
This is the first edition of a new attempt to bring the student
body of U.B.C. into closer contact with the government it elects
annually. The Alma Mater Society is your organization—every student
is a member and it depends upon you for continued action for and by
U.B.C. students.
I have felt for some time that students were lacking information
about their government. Accordingly, this page will appear on a paid
weekly basis. Reports from Students' Councillors, committee chairmen
and student senators will be solicited. If there's something you'd like to
see here, write to us. If you have journalistic cravings, see us, or phone.
Room 252, S.U.B.   Phone: 228-3969.
ubc
Student
<
GOVERNMENT
NEWS
TREKKING EVENTS
TREK WEEK-Oct. 20-25
U.B.C. Goes to the Community. This
program of community action com-
memmorates the Great Trek of 1922, in
which student action led to the completion of the Point Grey campus. A full
range of activities, including some former Homecoming events, a downtown
Trek, a special dance and concert, and
charity drives, deserve your support.
Volunteers are still needed, and should
phone 228-3694.
AMS STUDENT COUNCIL
Notice of Meeting
Monday, Oct. 20 — 7 p.m.
Council Chambers SUB
AGENDA: the major item for discussion will be the proposed 1969-1970 budget.
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE OF THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Student Council Minutes
Meeting convened at 7:15 p.m., Monday, October 6, Mr. Fraser Hodge in the chair.
Absent: Arts, Music, Social Work.
New Members: Ian MacSween, Librarianship.
1. A unanimous vote of thanks was extended to Bob Freer for his past work with the SUB Management
Committee and other student groups.
2. SUB Management Committee reported that Lome Stewart had been appointed Chairman of the PIT
Committee, and that Erwin Epp had been employed as Manager.
3. Education Undergrad Society will receive two typewriters for their common room.
4. New Election Rules and Procedures were adopted, and may be obtained at the Secretary's office.
5. $ 1500 was allocated to the Trek Week Committee.
6. Congratulations were extended to Mr. Frank Gnup and the U.B.C. Thunderbirds football team for finally
winning a game.
A motion introduced by Fred Buckwold (Science) and Dave Grahame (Co-ordinator) called for the
Board of Governors to provide an adequate replacement for the old Women's Gym, soon to be
demolished to make way for an addition to the Buchanan Building.
The reclassification of the position of Games Area Supervisor from a full-time to a part-time student
position, which had led to the recent Student Court hearing, was approved. Mr. Dermot Boyd, former
Supervisor, was re-employed in an unassigned position until January 31, 1970. A further report will be
made by Fraser Hodge to Council.
9. Thanks and congratulations were extended to Sean McHugh (Ombudsman) and Vic Hardy (E.U.S.) for
their hard work which resulted in an outstanding success at the Blaine border crossing on Oct. 1. Thanks
also went to the hundreds of students who helped the organizers, and to the thousands who participated
in the march.
10. A committee proposed by Fred Buckwold and Ann Jacobs (Secretary) to study the ecological effects of
the Amchitka test and to plan further action against continuation of these tests was adopted, under the
chairmanship of Vice-President Tony Hodge.
11. The new constitution of the Agriculture Undergraduate society was approved.
12. The recently amended constitution of the Rehabilitation Medicine Undergraduate Society was referred
back to that group for further amendment to correct certain contradictions in the additions.
13. The proposed Moratorium on the Vietnam War, to be held Oct. 15 across the United States, was
explained to the Council. Mike Doyle (External Affairs) was appointed A.M.S. representative to the
committee planning action at U.B.C. on that date.
A joint committee with the Graduate Students Association was established to survey the degree of
student involvement in departmental decision-making throughout the University. Mr. Jim Bell of the
G.S.A. was appointed Chairman, and $50.00 appropriated for their use.
Dave Gibson (Internal Affairs) was authorized to publish a weekly page in the Ubyssey, outlining
Council acitivities. That's what you're reading now.
Meeting adjourned at 11:30 p.m.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
Assistant Treasurers
Any student interested in applying for position as
Assistant Treasurer should apply in writing or in person
to Chuck Campbell by Friday, Oct. 24.
Two positions are available:
1. a special assistant to work on some areas of
benefit to all students, requiring much research
and day-to-day work. The first such project
is reduced admissions to theatres, concerts, and
movies.
2. requires some knowledge of campus activities
and the planning and arrangements necessary
for dances, concerts, etc., and will involve working with organizers from clubs, undergrad
societies, etc.
Both are rewarding positions, in terms of practical experience gained, and provide an opportunity to contribute significantly to campus life. Further information
from Chuck at 228-3975.
7.
8.
14.
15.
Small vote
picks senators
VOTING
RESULTS
WED.,0CT. 15
Following are the official results of balloting: Any enquiries or protests must be
directed to the A.M.S. Returning Officer, SUB, by 2:00 p.m.,
Friday, Oct. 17
REFERENDUM
(Industrial Education Students)
YES          2238
NO             526
SENATE
(5 Positions at Large)
LADNER               1386    *
BROCK
1304    *
O'BRIEN
1166    *
WALDMAN
1078    *
DAVIES
1000    *
DeBECK
957
BRUCE
832
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma Mater Society
CHERRIN6T0N     710
JACOBS
562
Committee Appointments
There are still positions on the following committees for
interested students:
Library committee 4 positions
Food services committee 4 positions
Residences committee 4 positions
Please submit all applications, in writing, to the A.M.S.
Secretary, second floor  S.U.B.,  no  later than Monday,
October 20.
SUB Management Commtitee Vacancy
There is one position on the SUB Management Committee now vacant. Anyone interested in applying submit
a letter with your qualifications to the A.M.S. Secretary
no later than Wednesday, October 22.
Senate Elections
Nominations are now open for the five remaining constituency senators.
1 from Applied  Science — Faculties  of Engineering
Architecture, Agriculture, and Forestry.
1 from Arts — Faculties   of   Arts,   Library   Science,
Home Economics, Music, and Social Work.
1 from Graduate Studies — Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
1 from Commerce and Law — Faculties of Commerce
and Business Administration and Law.
1 from Science — Faculties of Science, Dentistry,
Medicine, Pharmacy, and Nursing.
Pick up nomination and eligibility forms from the A.M.S.
General Office, second floor S.U.B., and return to the
office of the A.M.S. Secretary. All forms must be received
by the  Secretary no  later than   12:30  p.m.,   Thursday,
October 23. Friday, October 17, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
MHIND THE SCENES
Another committee
created by AMS
The Alma Mater Society is planning to establish an education
. committee.
"This is one of the most important things we will do," said AMS'
vice-president Tony Hodge.
The education committee will, in effect, be taking over what
was previously half of the internal affairs officer's job. The internal
affairs officer will not be in charge of public relations only.
Hodge said the committee will aid undergraduate societies in
publication of anti-calendars.
The education committee is to consist of nine members: an
education commissioner, the AMS president or vice-president, a
student senator, three members of the students council, and three
members-at-large.
The education commissioner is to be chosen by a committee
headed by Hodge. The three students-at-large will then be chosen by
the newly appointed education commissioner and the committee.
In the future, the education commissioner will be an elected
member of council.
Hodge said the committee is destined to become a permanent
part of the AMS structure.
Referendum fails:
not enough votes
The percentage was there but the minimum vote requirement
was not.
The industrial teachers' referendum calling for the elimination
of the $ 15 SUB capital fee levy was defeated Wednesday because not
enough students voted.
The referendum was held because students at the industrial
teachers training centre in Burnaby are paying for the SUB but never
come to the university.
The students feel they should be exempt from SUB fees,
as are students in third and fourth year medicine.
The referendum needed a two-thirds majority with a minimum
of 20 per cent of the students voting.
Only 2,799 students, 13 percent of the total enrolment voted,
returning 2,238 favorable cotes, 526 unfavorable votes, and 35 spoiled
ballots.
"This shows that there is a serious lack of communication on this
campus," said education undergraduate society treasurer Ron
Gulmans.
When asked what the industrial education students will do now
Gulmans said," I don't know, I just don't know. He mentioned a
rumor that Alma Mater Society treasurer Chuck Campbell will
propose a $750 grant to the students in Burnaby to make up for the
SUB fee they are paying to the AMS.
"If that doesn't work I guess we'll just have to try again to push
this referendum through," Gulmans said.
"There are a lot of very disappointed and disgusted students out
at the industrial education teachers training centre."
Campbell tojd The Ubyssey: "It is quite clear to me that the
percentage of the ballots cast favor the refund of the money
retroactive this year. I will submit a motion to the council on Monday
to grant the students out in Burnaby the money which would be due
them if the referendum had gone through."
Campbell said the money grant would only be a temporary
grant taken out of the AMS funds and would be replaced from the
SUB capital fee levy funds after another referendum vote.
He said another referendum vote will be called "as soon as we
feel we can get a sufficient number of voters."
Housing crisis remains
despite vacant rooms
There are approximately 20 double rooms vacant in university
residences, but housing director Les Rohringer says there is still a
housing crisis at UBC.
"Although the rooms are vacant it is hard to contact the
students on the waiting list since most of the addresses they gave us
are no longer valid," Rohringer said Thursday.
He said there were 600 students on the housing waiting list in
September, but many of them have since found other housing or have
"given up."
"I am worried about next year," Rohringer said. "Due to lack
of funds, no new housing has been built and instead of 2,000 students
on the housing list we will have 3,000."
Leading US dancers to perform at UBC
Dance is coming to UBC. Contemporary dance, that is. The
performers will be the Murray Louis Dance company, featuring
Murray Louis and Phyllis Lamhut in a company of 6 dancers.
The program to be presented next Wednesday night at 8 pm in;
the SUBallroom will feature dances to commissioned contemporary
music, including eletronic tape scores, with a repertory of new works,
and the classic comic ballet, "Junk Dances."
Admission is $3.00 generally and $1.50 student wise.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
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True_ False_
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True— False_
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True False	
5. It's easy to learn how to use
Tampax tampons.
True False	
6. Once you've tried Tampax
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tried them sooner.
True False	
ANSWERS:
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That was more than 30 years
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2. True. Any normal girl of menstrual age—married or single—
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General Admission $3.00
Students HaIf-Price $1.50
BALLROOM, STUDENT UNION BLOC, UBC
For Information Phone: 228-3708
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALMA MATER SOCIETY Page 18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17, 1969
•A/iV**!1  *
Birds sighting for Bowl
in Monday night action
It's Shrum Bowl time again.
This Monday night at Empire Stadium is the
game of the year for the UBC Thunderbirds.
If the Birds could somehow defeat their hated
rivals from Burnaby Mountain, the season could be
termed a resounding success.
This will be the third meeting between the
Clansmen and our Thunderbirds, SFU having won
32-13 two years ago and 27-7 last year.
This year's game promises to be a lot closer
than the first two contests
It is not to far-fetched a possibility that the'
Birds might actually upset the Clan.
In addition to their rivalry, both teams are
coming off scheduling farces that had each badly
outclassed. UBC lost 35-3 to a very strong Portland
State team while the Clan was bombed 74-7 by
California Poly.
In the UBC-Portland State game, the Vikings
were bigger, faster and more polished than the
Birds. Once they shook off their doldrums, most of
the game was played in the Birds half of the field.
"They let us off easy," commented assistant
coach Norm Thomas after the game.
Bird fans had
little to cheer
about other than
the power
running of Dave
Corcoran and
Ron Fowler who
helped the Birds
go 170 yards
along the ground.
Dick Stein
connected for a
44 yard field goal
early in the game
and Gnup called
it. "A beautiful
kick, just beautiful!"
The Birds then do have a chance to knock the
Clan off the pedestal the Vancouver media have put
them on.
For the win, coach Gnup must find a way to
score some points with an offence that has only
been able to run in previous games.
Even more vital for Gnup is finding a way to
stop the Simon Fraser's quarterbak Wayne Holm.
The Clan's attack is built around Holm's sprint-out
passing and if you can stop him, you stop the Clan.
Position for position, the Birds have to
considered underdogs. But then so were the New
York Mets.
Quarterback Al Larson, although
inexperienced, has shown definite flashes of passing
prowess.
Larson's receivers are glue fingered, but
lead-footed. If Dave Rice, Rick Peck and company
BIG FRED MAIER helps
can be induced to run faster, sharper pass patterns,
the Birds may put forth a decent aerial game.
The running backs are excellent—a little short
of speed, but plenty powerful. Last year SFU could
key on Corcoran, but this year Ron Fowler is too
good to be ignored and Paul Danyliu is healthy
again.
The offensive line is perceptibly better than last
year, especially when Don Lumb and Fred Maier are
up front. The line will open up holes for the running
backs, but must improve their pass blocking, so
Larson has time to throw.
This year the Birds' kicking game has finally
become respectable. Dick Stein has found the
groove with his place kicking, and his kickoffs are
sailing high and far.
Punting by Al Rose has been woefully
inconsistent but so far he has escaped having any
kicks blocked. Surprisingly, he is maintaining an
average of over 30 yards per kick, almost 15 yds.
better than last year.
Gnup realizes the only way to stop Holm is to
contain him, preventing him from scrambling.
Thunderbird defensive ends Bill Plant and Mike
Ayre as well as
linebackers Doug
Eaton and Ross
Nelson have the
odious job of
containing   him.
The Clan lost
three of last years
defensive team to
the Canadian
Football League
and are weak on
both running and
passing defensive
moves.
quarterback Roger Gregory. Both  coaches'
Gnup and SFU's Lome Davies realizes the damage
UBC can do up the middle with its workhorses.
Davies talking about the upcoming game
mentioned Simon Fraser has heard of the Birds.
"Our reports from teams that have played them say
they hit hard and are tough," said Davies.
The Clan has lost two stars for sure, end Mike
Begg with a sprained ankle and Jerry Orbon to
bronchial pneumonia.
Davies is also moaning about a number of his
players struck by a virus and laid up, but as Gnup
says, "He'll dress 'em all, and besides who has heard
of a two-week cold?"
For campus dwellers unable to get to the game
the campus radio, CYVR will broadcast the game.
The Booster club is also active, arranging for
buses for this game and the one next week in
Bellingham.
Optimistic TBirds
looking for victory
By SCOTT McCLOY
This year's edition of the Varsity Rugby team seems much like
that of the B.C. Lions.
While they have the potential talent, they are inexperienced,
consequently they look good in one game and very poor in the next.
Last weekend the Thunderbirds took on the University of
Calgary in their first game of the Meraloma tournament.
The Birds managed to build up a six to nothing lead in the first
half, but like the Lions they slowed in the second and Calgary took
the game 11-6.
Said Coach Donn Spence, "The Calgary team played much
better than they appeared to."
In the second game the squad fared much better waxing the
University of Alberta 25-0;
Spence however, did not think the tournament was a true
indication of the team's performance. He outlined the team's showing
this way:
"The field we played on last weekend was considerably
narrower than a regulation one, and because of the time factor, the
halves were shortened as well."
These two factors nullified the team's style of game because the
Birds possess a fast, running attack which requires the full width of
the field.
Due to the shortened halves the team was not able to wear
down their oponents by superior conditioning.
This Saturday the Birds (0-2-1) will look for their first league'
win when they play Rowing Club here. Coach Spence seems unusually
optimistic about this coming game.
"The team has been practising well all week and I think they are
ready," he said.
It is still early in the season for this young team so some
mistakes can be expected, but if they can jell and play as a team, they
could end up on top of the league.
Of course, that's what the sports writers said about the Lions as
well.
Hockey girls here
The seven team Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Women's
field hockey tournament goes this
weekend at Chris Spencer Playing
Fields, Oct. 16 to 18.
The defending co-champion
UBC team will play host to six
clubs including U of Calgary, U of
Alberta, U of Saskatchewan
(Regina and Saskatoon), U of
Manitoba and co-defending
champion University of Victoria.
Last year UBC won all their
games in the Pacific Northwest
City league finals. This year's
team has played once, losing to
the Canadian National team 3-1.
The Thunderettes are led by
Barb Moon and Trudy Leishman,
both of the Canadian National
team and Diane Romaniuck, a
member of the B.C. field hockey
team.
The games begin at 3:00 p.m.
Thursday and run from 9:00 a.m.
to 4:00p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Jv's open ice action
By DICK BUTTON
Collegiate hockey action returns to campus this weekend with
the UBC Braves playing an exhibition game against New Westminster
Royals Friday at 8:00 pjn.
The Thunderbirds will hold their intra-squad game Saturday at
8:00 p.m. at the Winter Sports Center.
The Braves will play in a newly formed league this year, the
Pacific Intercollegiate League. This league includes Simon Fraser
University, Selkirk Junior College, Gonzaga University in Spokane,
and BCIT.
Regular season play starts in two weeks.
DEANS
RESTAURANTS
Full
Dining
Facilities
Take-Home
Service
PIZZAS - CHICKEN
HAMBURGERS
4544 W. 10th
5688 Yew at 41st
224-1351
266-7188
Hoars: Weekdays 7 aJm. to II pjm.
Smdays  10 o.m. to 11   pj*.
w
'Big'nJail
Shopftd.
Levis
BACK-TO-CAMPUS
TRENDSETTERS
Whether you be "BIG" or "TALL", be rest assured that We have your
size this fall. On the field or behind a desk, you will be the TRENDSETTER! Mr. Big 'n Tall Shop Ltd. carry a full line of styles, colours and
fabrics from LEVIS, selectively chosen to provide you with the best, no
matter what the occasion.
MBjajam ■ think big ... think of
■Hb4UI      550 GRANVILLE ST. VAN. 2, 681-7814
BOSTON
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI  HOUSE
21 VARIETIES OF PIZZA ... a kind for every taste
plus Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli and Rigatoni
Chicken Cacciatore - Veal Scaloppini
FREE DELIVERY
4 p.m. - 4 a.m. — 7 Days a Week
4450 W. 10th
Tel. 224-1720 Friday, October 17, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Car club sponsors
non-protest rally
The Totem Rally, organized by
the University of British Columbia
Sports Car Club (UBCSCC),
enjoys one of the longest histories
as a B.C. event, having been run
annually since 1956.
It is known as having the
largest entry of any rally in B.C.,
usually well over one hundred
cars.
This year the event will count
towards the Fraser Valley Rally
Championship and the North West
Rally Council Championship.
BASKETBALI Preliminary round begins Oct. 27. Schedule outside intramural office.
CURL I NO—Oct. 23, S p.m.—Union vs.
Phi Delta; Aggies vs. Pharmacy; St.
Andrew vs. Place Vanier; PE I vs.
Forestry I; Eng. HI vs. Commerce.
FIELD HOCKEY—Oct. 20, 12:30—PE
vs. Beta; Phi Gamma vs. Kappa Sigma.
—Oct. 21, 12:30—PE vs. Arts; Beta vs.
Eng.
—Oct. 22, 12:30—Phi Gamma vs. PE;
Beta vs   Kappa Sigma.
SOCCER—Oct. 17, 12:30—St. Marks vs.
PE; Psi U. vs. Eng III; Eng. VI vs. Eng
V.
—Oct. 20, 12:30—Aggies vs. Phi Gamma; PE vs. Beta; PE vs. Commerce.
4:30—Union vs. DU; Phi Delta vs. Law;
Law vs. DU; Kappa Sigma vs. Forestry; PE II vs. Psi U.
—Oct. 21, 12:30—Aggies vs. Dekes;
Law vs. Union; Eng I vs. Kappa Sigma.
FOOTBALL—Oct. 17, 12:30—Phi Delta
Although asked many times to
do so, we have been reluctant to
include the event in the B.C.
Region Championship because we
have always wished Totem to
remain a relaxing Sunday rally,
characterized by smooth roads,
moderately fast average speeds,
and instructions which require the
navigator to perform functions
other than consuming bravery
pills.
The Rally will be run in the
Fraser Valley  and northwestern
Intramural
Notices
vs. DU; Beta vs. Commerce; Phi Gamma
vs. Kappa Sigma; Beta H vs. Aggies II;
Beta III vs. Union.
—Oct. 20, 12:30—Commerce vs. SAM;
ZBT vs. Beta II; Eng IV vs. ATO; Eng X
vs   Eng VH; Eng V vs. Eng VH.
—Oct. 21, 12:30—DU vs. Arts; Beta
vs. SAM; Commerce vs. Union. 4:30—
Beta in vs. Eng III; Commerce n vs.
Pharmacy; Eng V vs. Eng VTTI; Eng VI
vs.  Eng VH.
SWIMMING—Oct. 20, 12:30—Beta vs.
Eng; AD vs. Union: Arts vs. Phi Gamma;  PE  vs    Dekes.
Washington, staring from the 70th
and Granville Safeway parking lot
and finishing in Bellingham.
Technical inspection
(roadworthiness of the car) will
commence at 7:30 with first car
away at 8:30 a.m.
The event will be
approximately 150 miles long and
of seven to eight hours duration.
Supplementary niles and
regulations can be obtained from:
Craig Sanderson, Rally Manager,
Phone: 325-0024.
RESULTS
CURLING — Oct. 9—Aggies/St. Marks
(12-1).
FOOTBALL — Oct.8 — Alpha Delta/
Kappa Sigma. Oct. 9—Dentistry/ED (14-
2); Aggies U/Eng IV (12-6); Arts/Aggies
I (4-1); Pharmacy/Eng (8-0). Oct. 10—
Phi Gamma/Commerce (22-8); Beta/ATO
(8-0).   Oct.   15—Forestry/Union   (2«).
SOCCER—Oct. 8—St. Marks/Eng ID
(3-1); Grad St. /Psi U. Oct. 9—Eng VI/
Eng V; Eng IV/Union (4-0). Oct. 14—
Law/Science. Oct. 15—Forestry/Union
(2-0).
SWIMMING—Oct.    8—Dekes/Arts   (62-
WOMEN'S   INTRAMURALS
1. PE   managers   meeting,   Tuesday,
12:30,   Women's Gym.
2. Manager for  bowling  needed.
JOGGERS CLUB
1.    First meeting Thursday,   12:40.
T-BIRD DAY
TODAY
The Thunderbird Shop
See larger ad for details
Pay Your Way
'To: American Student Informa-
.tion Service, 22 Ave. de la .
ILiberte, Luxembourg, Grand I
, Duchy of Luxembourg
I Please send free material asl
checked below via air mail
|D Handbook «Study, Work & i
I    Travel in Europe» ■
□ Job application
|D Listing of all paying jobs    |
available in Europe
|D European discount card form!
'□ Registration for language   '
.    lab courses in Europe .
ID Scholarship information       I
□ New info on discount tours
I    & transatlantic flights I
□ Fun travel tips for students
jO Earn money as campus rep.i
IaII the above is free of charge,'
but you must enclose $2 for
|overseas   handling   & airmail]
postage. Limited offer.
[Name i
Address
City
State
97&% OJjay StoMA
OPEN 9:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. - 7 DAYS
(University Location Only)
Directly behind Bank of Commerce in the VILLAGE
Your complete convenience store:
GROCERIES - MAGAZINES - SUNDRIES
PARTY SNACKS
SPECIALS THIS WEEKEND
Ramen Instant Noodles, Reg. 19c. Spec. 2 for 29c
Dad's Cookies (reg. 59c)       49c
Blue Ribbon Coffee (1 lbs.)  75c
European 15 oz. Bread 5 for $1.00
Parity Hose Nylons (reg. $1.65)  $1.49
MacLeans Giant Toothpaste  59c
PRODUCE -
Sunkist Oranges (doz.) 59c
Chiquita Bananas (2 lbs.)  29c
Florida Grapefruit (white and pink).. 2 for 25c
YUMMI YAMI YOGHURT 4 for 89c
7 pair of Donna Lynn Nylons FREE with
every purchase of $5.00 or more.
CHARLES MAINGON puts the finishing touches to John Ozaki
as he prepares for the World Judo Championships in Mexico City
from October 22—27. Charles is a third degree Black Belt and is
currently reigning :Iightmiddle weight (150 lbs.) B.C. and Canadian
champ. He also won the University championship in 1966-67 but
has. been unable to compete for the last two years because of
UBC's rather hit-or miss way of financing and supporting minor
sports. He trains with the UBC Judo club under the direction of
Doug Rogers who is a fifth degree Black Belt and brought fame to
the Canadian judo picture by a third place finish in the World
Judo Championships in 1965 and other medals of international
competitions. The distaff side of the club is upholding the club's
good reputation also. Daphne Akrigg, the club secretary won the
Burnaby Invitational Judo Tournament last year, and was
crowned one of the top female judo players in the province. Plans
for the club include participation in all local tournaments.
—brace stout photo
VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
(tsso)
A Complete Automotive Service
Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANC A - 224-7424
THE BRAVEST ARMY THAT EVER
HAD TO BE HOME FOR DINNER,
"Hey puys. Our spy is
back with a full report.1
"He says taking the land from those kids will be a cinch.
Now here's what we'll do."
THIS IS THE BATTLE THAT NEITHER SIDE COULD AFFORD TO LOSE
BECAUSE THE WHOLE TOWN WAS WA TCHING.
The Boys Of Paul Street
■ # •« ENGLISH DIALOGUE
¥Ql VIi U Showings: 7:30, 9:30
432754 W^Oth Sundays: 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 17,  1969
>
FRIDAY
SUB  FILMS
"Bride   Wore    Black".   7:00   &    9:00
p.m.  SX7B theatre.
MUSSOC
Dancing auditions for "Hello Dolly".
6:30 p.m., old auditorium. Male dancers urgently needed.
LECAL AID
Legal advise, noon  SUB 237 and 237A.
SQUARE  DANCE  CLUB
Square dancing, 7:30, SUB party room.
Everyone welcome.
FOLK   SONO   SOCIETY
SUB 210.   Come  anytime.  New members   welcome.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT
Discussion  of National  Liberation in
Quebec.  8 p.m.,  2233 Columbia.
CLAM
Discussion of Chinese Cultural Revolution, noon, Bu.   106.
SCIENCE   FICTION
General  meeting,   noon,   SUB   119.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 109B.
EUS ACADEMIC  SEMINARS
Hear   Stan   Persky,   noon,   Civil   Engineering Bldg. 201.
UBC   NOP
General meeting,   noon,   SUB   111.
LIFE  SCIENCES CLUB
Pollution:  Biology  or Politics?  Noon,
SUB 207-209.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP   SOCIETY
Talk on automation in libraries, noon,
Bu.225.
UBC STUDENT  LIBERALS
General meeting  with  guest  speaker
Rob Walsh, noon, SUB 212
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
SUB FILMS
"Bride Wore Black",  6:30 p.m.,  SUB
Theatre.
CHINESE VARSITY
Bowling  party   at  Brentwood  Lanes,
6:30-8:30  p.m.
CUSO
"The Third World"—film and discussion, 8 p.m., phone 228-3264 for place.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
General meeting, nono, SUB 130.
SAILING
Douglas Cup eliminations. RVYC.
SUNDAY
GEOGRAPHY TOUR
Gastown tour, 1:30 p.m. Tour starts
at Europe Hotel. Everyone welcome.
No charge.
UNION COLLEGE RESIDENCE
ASSOCIATION
Fire-side discussion with Barrie Clark.
7:00. Union College Reception lounge.
UBC  SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Totem rally. 8:30 a.m.  Safeway parking lot,   70th  & Granville.
IWW  OBU
Meeting   to   continue    projects,    7:30
p.m., 2411 Stephens St.
CANOE  CLUB
Canoeing  safety  clinic,   9  a.m.,   Seymour River, Deep Cove.
MONDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
New artists presentations, noon, SUB
213.
TREK WEEK
The New Men are Coming, noon, SUB
plaza.
CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES
Discussion on underground scriptures,
7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
POSE
Executive meeting, noon,  SUB 211.
HELLENIC CULTURE SOCIETY
Greek folk dancing, 7:30 p.m., International House.
SPEAKER'S COMMITTEE
Hargo Yesuz, president of the Ethio-
pean students* association.  12:30, Bu.
100.
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Chinese lunch,  11:30-2:00.
TUESDAY
ASSOCIATION   FOR  GOSPEL
STUDENTS
See and hear the singing of the "New
Men" of Seattle,  noon,  SUB PIT.
CIASP
First general meeting, noon, SUB 111.
UBC   FLYING  CLUB
General meeting, noon,  SUB 105B.
SCM
Dr.   Bill  Willmott   —   does   Vietnam
really exist? Noon,  SUB 207-209.
ARTS  U.S.
Meeting of AM9 Arts representatives
candidates, noon,  Bu.   107.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL  EVENTS  PERFORMING
Murray Louis Dance Studio.  8 p.m.,
SUB   Ballroom.
DADGS
Debate   between   D.   A.   Hodge   and;
Malcolm McGregor,  noon,  Bu.   108.
CIRCLE   K  CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105A. New members welcome.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Experimental   college:   Prof.    R.   M.
Clark, noon, SUB 125.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
LEGAL   AID
Legal   advice,   noon,   SUB   237   and
237A.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Sign up for tour of UBC psychiatric
hospital, noon, Angus 24.
THURSDAY
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Talk by Prof. J. V. McDonnell, 12:30,
Angus  212.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO WIGGY SYMPHONY
and Lemon, Friday, Oct. 17, SUB
ballroom,   8.45   to  1.   $2.50  couple.
ANTI - MASSACREE BENEFIT,
SUB   ballroom.   Sat.   8.   $1.25   Gin-
gerbox.   Sandal  Spring.
636 GIRLS, READY, WILLING and
waiting for Wiggy Symphony, 3-1
Sat.,   Oct.   18,   at   Totem   Park.
POPPY FAMILY IN CONCERT,
Fri., Oct. 17, Totem Park Ball-
room,   9   to   11.     $1.50.	
POPPY FAMILY, FRIDAY, Oct. 17
from 9-11 p.m. in Totem Park
Ballroom. Last performance before going on tour. Admission
$1.50 per person, AMS card required.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
WANTED: — INFORMATION ON
Cooperatives, residents and those
interested, call Alan 688-9177,
Myra  731-7562,   9   to   10 p.m.
Lost & Found
14
LOST—Basement Washroom, main
library, dark briefcase with books.
Busted without same, must drop
out.   Barry   Brown,   588-3825.
POUND:— Four link silver puzzle
ring.     Phone   261-1914,   Dune.
FOUND:— Woman's watch, Wed.
noon in front of main library.
Phone    224-3064.	
LOST:— Tabby and white cat and
tabby cat, both, with 6 toes on
front paws, UBC area. Reward.
224-5243.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month Inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone 228-9077.
CAR POOL NEEDED FOR 8.30's,
29th   East,   N.  Van.     Ph.   987-3917.
Special Notices
16
SCIENCE STUDENTS! — Nominations are open for Executive positions: AMS reps., Publicity,
Athletic Co-ord., Academic Coord. Nomination forms are available  in  AMS  office.
SCIENCE STUDENTS wishing to
sit on the Student-Faculty Lias-
son Committee apply to Box 178,
S.U.B.    Campus Mail.	
BOB DYLAN'S PREVIOUSLY UN-
published Tarantula now avail-
able   U.B.C.    Bookstore.    Duthies.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
ARE YOU OVER-FED? Overpaid?
Complacent? Hear Barrie Clark,
M.L.A., LTnion College, Oct. 19,
7  p.m.	
SUBFILMS PRESENTS The Bride
Wore Black, Oct. 17, 18, 19; Fri.
7, 9.30: Sat. 7; Sun. 6.30. SUB
Aud.     75c. ___
ENGA OOR RAJA, TAMIL Movie
from India is to be screened on
Nov. 8 at YWCA. Accommodation limited. Contact before Oct.
24.     Tel.   685-4974   or   733-5582.
BINGO ENTERTAINMENT, Wed..
Oct. 22, 8 p.m., Lord Byng H.S.,
16th Ave. and Crown St.. Cash
Prizes.        __
POPPY FAMILY returns Fri., bet.
17, Totem Park Ballroom, Concert  9   to   11.    $1.50.
17
Travel Opportunities
STUDENT INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee, School
of   Architecture,   U.B.C.
FIND HIM (OR HER)
FAST
in
BIRD CALLS
but row copy today
Travel Opps.—Cont'd
17
KHATMANDU OVERLAND FROM
London, Depart Vancouver May
'70, return August. 12 seats only
for mixed group of under 25's.
Letters only to Ed Wilks, 45,
2560.     Whitelcy  Crt.   N. Van.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
WANTE:— Jaubert ten speed bicy-
cle.      Phone   Karen,    731-1669.
WANTED:— Camp Trails "Medium
Cruiser", aluminum backpack and
bag.      Phone   Ian,   261-2503.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 FORD ZEPHYR '6'. CALL
Chris, 224-4635, 3866 W. 18th.
Reasonable condition. Any offers
considered. 	
1964 DODGE, 330^ 4-door Sedan,
6 cylinders, standard radio, new
tires & snowtires. Tel. 732-6449
evenings.    Excellent   condition.
TR4, 1965, B.R.G., — Wire wheels,
new paint, air horns, wood rim
Michelin x. 1065 West 8th.	
1966 ENVOY EPIC, $750 OR OFFER.
John Fox, room 320 Chemistry,
228-9254
765 HONDA CAR, low mileage,
excellent condition, pirelli tires.
Call   Peter,   733-9293   after   6   p.m.
'61 VAUXHALL VELOX 4-door
Sedan, 6 cyl. stand, synchre
trans., $300. Phone Joe, 224-7853
after   7   p.m.	
MGA 1959 BODY needs work, engine trans, good, $250. Phone AL
224-9835.	
'58 VOLKSWAGEN with rebuilt
engine, excellent mechanical condition. Call 228-3432, 9 a.m. to
5  p.m.	
MUST SELL 1967 CAMARO, gold
with black interior, power steering, radio, defroster. Offer Ph.
731-3706.	
1968 MGB-GT, 22,000 ml. excellent
condition, snow tires, ski pack,
etc., mineral blue, asking $2,400.
Phone   736-9509.	
1965 COOPER, Loaded with acces-
sories, $1000. Call Laurie, 325-
5927,   6575  Vivian   St.	
1966 RAMBLER American Convert
big six, automatic, 32,000 mis.,
$1,250.     Phone  AM  1-2197.
LADY OWNED '69 MGB with specially imported hardtop from
Britain: Mich 2X radials, O.D.'
driving lamps, luggage rack and
other extras. Open' to offers.
Phone   224-3132.	
'60 AUSTIN - HEALEY, excl. con-
dition, hardtop, wire W., new
paint,   O.D.,   $950,     738-6787.
'60 V. W. Deluxe, very good condition, new valve Job, city tested,
$425   or   offers.   224-4581.
'58 FORD RANCH WAGON, Six,
with 3 sp. auto, transm, r & h,
80 000, 2-owner miles, 6 good
tires, $300. Call 228-2648 or 228-
9534. 	
Automobiles—Wanted
22
, WANTED—PLUS 4, OR SUPER
sports Morgan. No specific year.
Call David-Room No. 86. Phone
224-9834.
Automobiles—Parts
23
'57 LAND ROVER MILL. Over,
$130 in new parts, B.O. over $35
takes,   after 6',   731-7659. !
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
1968 BSA ROYAL STAR 500 cc,
new cond., only 800 mi., $800.
433-1890 after 6:00,  Larry.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.
Photography
34
NIKON 35mm. CASE, F. 1.4, $350.
Nikon movie carrying case, $250.
Wide angle Nikon 35mm F.2,
$150. Telephoto 135mm. F. 2.8
Nikon, $190. UV Filters complete,   $900.     Phone   224-6113.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
MOTHER: I WON'T BE HOME
Sat. nite. Going to Wiggy Sym-
phony G-l Oct. 18, Totem Park.
R.J.R. WHERE THE HECK ARE
you?   Lindy-Lou.	
SUZIE FOOBAR WILL BE THERE!
Poppy Family Concert Fri., Oct.
17, Totem Park Ballroom 9:00-
11:00,   $1.50.   Bring  a pillow!
DO YOU NEED A PLACE TO
Live? We offer the largest rooms
on the row, most cupboard and
drawer space, and much more.
Come    and    see    us.    Sigma    Chi
Fraternity,   5725   Agronomy   Road.
38
Sewing & Alterations
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please   phone   277-5640.	
TYPING WITH DELIVERY. REAS-
onable rates. Phone days 733-
2042,  eves,  and  weekends 732-6372.
TYPING DONE — 3589 WEST 19th
Ave.   Reasonable   rates.      733-5922
EXPERT TYPING, COMPETITIVE
rates. Essays, papers, etc. Phone
879-1807.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.	
TYPIST — ELECTRIC. 224 - 6129.
Dunbar   Area.	
EXPERT, NEAT, ACCURATE
typing on thesis and term papers
done quickly in my home. Low
rates.   Phone  266-4720.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253.	
STUDENT TYPING DONE, 30c
per page. 5c per carbon copy.
Contact Heather DuBois, 327-
8450.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c/
page. Essays 30c/page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.	
TYPING — PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00.   266-6662  after 6:00.	
A FORMER SCHOOL TEACHER
and a competent typist is interested in doing typing at home.
Call 298-5657.	
TYPING SERVICE. MRS. GAIL
Symons—224-6435. 3885 W. 12th
Ave.	
TYPING ON ELECTRIC TYPE-
writer. 30c. per sheet. Close to
university.   Tel.    224-4261.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
Help Wanted—Male 52
Male or Female
53
EARN EXTRA MONEY QUICKLY,
easily. Will not conflict with
studies. Larry after 6:00 p.m. Ph.
224-7352
CUSTOMERS WANTED
No  experience  reuired.   Apply   He
and   She   Clothing,    2140   Western
Parkway,   Univ.   Sq.   224-0915.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
PRIVATE LESSON WANTED FOR
English 100 student. Ring evening
261-6939,   Tony.
Language Instruction 61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French, Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take   advantage   of   this   amazing
offer:   only   six  students   maximum
per group.
For  the  best  tutoring  in  language
conversation,    call   us    today    (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 736-5401.
CONVERS A- SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
1603 W. 4th  (at Fir)
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH TUTOR FOR STUDENTS
with  high  school   or first  year  of
French,    $2.00    hour.    Phone    Mar
Mayet,   224-9073   after   6   p.m.
FLAMENCO     GUITAR
Michael   Kocial,   tel.
TUITION.
224-7762.
TUTORING IN MATH-PHYS. FOR
undergrad by instructor. (Ph.D.)
$5.00  hr.  Ph.  733-6037  eve.	
EXP. TUTOR FOR STUDENTS IN
math & chemistry by graduate.
738-5603.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
FOR SALE—REIKER SKI BOOTS;
Buckle, 1967 model. Excellent condition,   $60.   Call   683-2872   after   7
p.m.
LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND
Chemicals    for    sale.    Phone    Bill
224-6585	
LANGE SKI BOOTS SIZE 8V£ USED
only six times, like new, only
$100.00.    738-3430.
GIBSON THIN HOLLOW - BODY
electric guitar, 15 yrs. old, beautiful   mellow   sound   $150.00   cash.
736-7574.	
B R A U N HOBBY AUTOMATIC
professional flashgun. 8 West 19th
Ave.  874-3268.	
TWIN BEDS AND MATTRESSES,
$25.00 each. Matching nite tables,
Frig, Stove and Drapes. Call RE
8-7442.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS $40/MONTH; ROOM
with breakfast; girl student wanted; available immediately. Tel:
224-3162.
SINGLE ROOM — OR ROOM AND
breakfast, men only, Dunbar area,
priv.   entrance.   Ph.  224-3389.
WANT TO LIVE ON CAMPUS?
Male accommodation. Room $50.
R&B $95. Kitchen privileges,
Parking, large study room &
loung. Weekly linen. 5760 Toronto
Road   or   phone   Ron,   224-0327.
JUST OFF CAMPUS. LARGE
pleasant room for one male student. Private bathroom and en-
trance.    224-6757.	
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM. PRIV-
ate entrance. Study facilities, Near
gates,   ready  Nov.   1st.  224-7623.
CLEAN SLEEPING ROOM CLOSE
to   gates.   Phone   RE   8-6992   after
5 p.m.	
ON CAMPUS ROOM WITH
breakfast, private bath, kitchen
priv. Available Nov. 1st. 5665
Chancellor Blvd.   228-8635.	
WARM NEW L-H-K ROOM. PRI-
vate   entrance   &   bathroom.   25th
6 MacDonald.   Close   to  bus.   738-
5603.
Room & Board
82
MAKE THIS YEAR AT UBC A
memorable experience! Live at the
Sigma Chi House! We offer largest rooms, with w/w carpeting,
most cupboard & drawer space,
comfortable lounge areas, colour
T.V. Newest house on campus.
Come on over and see us Sigma
Chi Fraternity, 5725 Agronomy Rd.
LIVE ON CAMPUS, PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Color T.V., sauna. 5785
Agronomy   Road.    224-9684.	
ROOM OR ROOM AND BOARD,
private entrance and shower, 1
room only $40.00, room and board
$100.00.   Phone   228-8158.	
ROOM AND BOARD, ALSO SUITE
for two girls to share. 1998 Cedar
Cresc,   20th,   Maple.
Furn. Houses & Aprs.
83
GRADUATE COUPLE NEEDS Accommodation in or near the campus.   Phone   224-9001.
HOUSE TO SHARE, MALE OR
female. 596 W. 17th Ave. Private
rooms.   876-4607.
THIRD PERSON, PREF. FEMALE,
wanted to share roomy house,
$60.   736-7574.	
FOR RENT: LARGE SELF-CON-
tained one bedroom basement
suite.   Kerrisdale   area.   Call   263-
8575. 	
ROOMMATE WANTED — MALE.
Furnished basement suite. 4478 W.
13th.   Call   Chris,   228-9277,   $50.
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.        84
WANTED TO RENT: WORKING
couple desire 1 or 2 bedroom house
to $135 funr. or unfurn. Kits,
Jerieho  or UBC  area.  Phone 224-
3839  after   5:30.	
UNFURNISHED     SELF-CONTAIN-
ed    basement   suite,    private   entrance.    Graduate    couple    preferred.   Call  224-4087.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION

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