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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 2016

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Array FEBRUARY9.2016 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEXIX
PROUD OFOURSEEDSINCE1918 // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY9,2016
r
EVENTS
PERFORMANCE NIGHT
DANCE
WORKSHOPS
QUEER U
FRI 5-12
////
OUTweek® ON CAMPUS
A full eight days to celebrate "Claiming our Power, Claiming
Ourselves: Healing our Communities through (Un)Learning."
FREE
OUR CAMPUS
SAT 6
////
KOERNER'S HOUSE PARTY 8 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
With midterms just around the corner, come forget your stress
at Koerner's House Party, round XIV.
$10
Our moment to act
on climate change
▲
DIVEST" UBC
The students have spoken, the faculty have
spoken. How will UGC respond?
ffGSdG^   5C
Marc Lee
Canadian (enlre {or Polity Alternatives
Anjali Appadurai
Interactional Climate Policy Com muni cation; Specialist
Alexander Hemingway
PhD Candidate in Political Science
Emmett Keyserlingk
Divest UBC Campaigner
TUES9
////
DIVESTMENT TEACH-IN 5 P.M. @ WESBROOK BUILDING
Come to learn more about divestment and action that can be
taken. Featuring speakers and students alike!
FREE
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Kosta Prodanovic
and Tim Hoggan
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
= EBRUARY9,2016 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUEXIX
Coordinating Editor        Features Editor
Will McDonald Vassi Sharlandjieva
coordinating@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Copy Editor
Aiken Lao Bailey Ramsay
3rintedit.0r@ubyssey.ca     feed back® u byssey.ca
News Editors
Moira Warburton &
Emma Partridge
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
3hoto@ubyssey.ca
Opinions+ Blog Editor
Jack Hauen
opinions@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Watt Langmuir, Josh AzEi.BillSitu.Elen;
i/o lo ti wa, J eremy Jo tinso n-Si Iwers, J u li a r
Yu.SrutMTadepalli, Karen Wang, Jessie
Stirling, Vicky Huang, Olamide 01 anryari
Henry Allan, N atalie Morris, Migu el Sant;
Viaria, Swan Spedor, Sarah Nabila,
Sophie Sutdiffe, Rithu Jagannath,
Samuel du Bois, Lucy Fox, Samanth;
VicCabe, Ben Cook, Avril Hwang, Ber
Geisberg, Lilian Odera.Emma Hicks,
Adam Waiter, Avril Hwang, Li liar
Odera, Emma Hicks, Ben Geisberg,
Helen Zhou, Nadya Rahman, Boris
3o snjakovic.Ai den Qualizza, Jerry Yin
Arianna Leah Fischer, Tisha Dasgupta,
sa belle Commerford, Evelina Tolslykh,
Viischa Milne, Julia Burnharr
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.They
arefheexpressedopinionoffhe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
\ibli cat ons Sociely or the Uni-
versity of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Solely. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nerein cannotbe reproducec
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ay phone. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters must be receivec
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
SUB 2208
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ad. The UPS shall notbe responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that
do not lessen the value or the
mpactofthead.
Lori Brotto is a sexual misconception buster
Moira Warburton
News Editor
When Lori Brotto was a 19-year-
old psychology undergraduate
at the University of British
Columbia in the early '90s,
she knew one thing for certain
— she wanted to be a clinical
psychologist. To do that, she
needed research experience.
"I just started knocking on
faculty members' doors in the
department of psychology, asking
if they would be keen to take on a
19- year-old undergrad who had no
experience at all," she recalls.
The only faculty member who
did not shut the door in her face
was Boris Gozalka. "He said,
'Okay, I'll take a risk. I'll take you
on, but you should know that
my research involves watching
rats have sex,'" said Brotto.
At the time, however, the rats
were the least of her concerns.
Brotto came from a conservative
Italian-Catholic family who never
discussed sex or reproduction. "I
didn't even tell my parents I was
studying sex research until they
showed up at my Master's thesis
defence. I'd been doing it for six
years. They knew I was studying
rats, but they had no idea that I
was studying sexuality."
It was that total fluke which
landed Brotto in her current field
of work, but she has excelled.
She is now considered one of
the pre-eminent experts on
female arousal dysfunction,
specifically focusing on the
psychological factors that cause
this dysfunction.
In 1997, Brotto decided to
make the switch into human
research for her PhD — the
same year Viagra was approved
in men. "A lot of people [were]
starting to ask the question, 'Well,
what about women?'" she said,
noting that, in the same year, an
expansive study was published
which found about 43 per cent
of women complained about a
chronic sexual dysfunction.
Brotto was infuriated by
the glaring lack of research on
psychological factors behind
sexual arousal dysfunction
in women, especially when
compared with the overwhelming
body of research on men.
"You would read textbooks
and there would be enormous
passages on the intricate controls
of the nerves ... that are involved
in sexual function in men," said
Brotto. "Then you would see
essentially a few lines following
the textbooks saying, 'We assume
that some of these same processes
hold for women, but we really
don't know.'"
In addition to these factors,
Brotto's dream of a career in
clinical psychology was still very
much alive. "That proposition
that I could be sitting on the
other end of a desk with a
woman in front of me and her
expressing concerns to me and
me not knowing what to say to
her, having nothing to offer to
her" was terrifying, she said.
"Obviously, there are skills that
clinicians have been using, but
there was almost no science at all
actually evaluating whether those
approaches worked."
Brotto set out to change
that. Her greatest light-bulb
moment, she said, was when she
was sitting in a seminar about
how people with personality
disorders or suicidal tendencies
use a concept called mindfulness
— using breathing patterns to
get through difficult spells of
anxiety — and suddenly realized
a parallel between people who
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nomination is now open and will close February 12,
2016. Campaigning period starts 12:00am on February
22, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016. Voting starts on
February 29th, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016.
Nomination forms are available at the Nest, room 2209
between 11:00am - 3:00 pm daily.
This is not an editorial position. Members of The
Ubyssey Publications Society Board of Directors are
responsible for overseeing the finances and
administrative operations of the newspaper.
Responsibilities include attending board meetings,
tending to business as it arises and overseeing
personal projects.
For further details please email
fpereira@ubyssey.ca
were suicidal and women with
sexual arousal dysfunctions.
"[Both groups] were similarly
talking about being disconnected,
not being present. Their bodies
were going through the motions
and their minds were not tuning
in," said Brotto.
She decided to try mindfulness
on women who complained of
arousal dysfunction. She and her
supervisor set up a pilot test — "I
pilot-tested a lot on myself, on
friends" — and Brotto credits
that as a turning point in her
understanding of female sexuality
and sexual arousal.
For her, feminism plays a
big role in female sexuality,
particularly the emphasis it's
brought on women's agency in
sex. "The feminist voice has been
very important for reminding
us that sexual problems are
sometimes adaptive and they're
transient and they will pass when
the circumstances change," said
Brotto. "Sex is malleable. It's not
this fixed thing that lives in one
part of the brain and, once it's
there, it dictates and dominates."
Much of her career has been
about busting such myths. "I'm not
shy to myth bust whenever I can.
If I hear myths being perpetuated
in social circles or judgments on
women's sexuality, I'm not afraid
to move in and try and correct
some of those ideas."
Her least-favourite myth — and
the most prevalent — is the idea
that sex has to be spontaneous.
"What else do you do in your
life that's of value to you that's not
planned?" asked Brotto. "Really,
nothing. When you plan [sex]
and you talk about it, it opens
up possibilities to fantasy and
anticipation, and actually thinking
about what are the factors that
give rise to a pleasurable sexual
encounter."
Most importantly though, she
emphasizes the role of consent —
regular consent.
"It's not just one thing that you
have one conversation about at
the start of a encounter and then
you don't address at any other
point, it needs to be ongoing," said
Brotto.
Although the majority of
her research has focused on
cisgender women, her current
research includes transgender
male-to-females as well. Earlier
in her career, she worked in a
clinic which catered specifically
to transgender people. The most
important learning experience
from this part of her career?
"That we're all alike. Trans
individuals just had a different
trajectory to get to feeling
female," said Brotto. Above all,
she wants people to understand
that sex is not just instinct. "Even
though there's this notion that
sex is innate and natural... at
the same time, it is something
that takes effort and work," said
Brotto. "And that's not meant to
be a doom and gloom message,
but rather the opportunities that
it opens when you really put
effort into thinking about and
working with sexuality — the
possibilities are endless." 'M // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRA WARBURTON
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY9,2016
FOSSIL FUEL//
Finance committee advises Board of Governors against divestment
Samantha McCabe
Senior Staff Writer
The finance committee of the Board
of Governors has made a decision to
advise the board against divesting
its endowment fund of investments
in fossil fuels.
During the open-session meeting
that took place early February 3, the
committee was presented with the
findings of a report on the advantages and drawbacks of divestment,
created based on consultation with
stakeholders and the availability of
the endowment fund.
The committee made the decision
based on whether or not five criteria
were met — a proven social, economic or environmental rationale,
reasonable evidence that divestment
would be an effective way to achieve
the desired outcome, an absence
of alternate policies, consistency
with the university's legal obligations as a trustee of the endowment
fund and consistency with its other
university relationships.
While the "divestment criteria" from this report asserted that
there was a proven rationale to the
decision, it also said that divestment was not an effective way
to achieve the desired outcome,
according to "reasonable evidence,"
and that there was no absence of
alternative policies.
UBC's fiduciary responsibility to
donors also remained a strong factor
against divestment. This means that
they have a responsibility to act in
the best interest of their donors'
money and remain true to its intended purpose, which lowers the
flexibility of its usage.
Although some of the university's investment donors were in
favour of divestment, the majority
were not and many went so far as
to insist that they would pull out
should the decision go through.
Instead, the university will
create a Sustainable Future Fund
(SFF), which will immediately
receive $10 million from the
Trek Endowment and will use
sustainable, environmental and
socially-conscious strategies to
make investments.
With the creation of this fund,
donors particularly interested in
environmentally friendly investment will be able to choose
whether or not they would like to
contribute with the understanding
that this fund may not financially
perform as well. The SFF would
also prove more flexible for the
board's allocation of money.
"I think the Sustainable Future
Fund is a step in the right direction and while I am in support of
this initiative, I cannot support
the rejection of the fossil fuel
divestment proposal," said Julie
Van de Valk, student member of
the Board of Governors. "I am not
voting against the motion through
a duty of loyalty, but rather I am
voting against the motion because
I do not think that the criteria are
the best decision making tools and
this decision was not adequately
informed or consulted."
Students and faculty have been
lobbying for divestment since 2013
when a proposal was first put forward for it and again showed their
support when each body voted in favour of the movement just last year.
That 2013 proposal, championed by
UBCC350, UBC's pro-divestment
group, was leaned on heavily by the
Finance Committee duringthis decision process, but the group was not
actually pulled into the discussion.
"It's not just frustrating because
the voice of students and faculty has
been ignored, but it's also frustrating because throughout the process,
it's been essentially a closed-door
process," said Alex Hemingway,
UBCC350 member and post-doctoral political science student. "If
they were going to lean so heavily on
our report, they really ought to have
invited us into the committee to discuss it with them as we've continued
our research since we submitted the
report. Frankly, there's some real errors in the reasoning that the board
articulated today at the meeting."
The finance committee advised
that the board direct the Endowment Responsible Investment Policy
Committee to continue to evaluate
investment alternatives "that could
improve [environmental and social
governance] objectives within
UBC's fiduciary mandate."
Environmental and social governance (ESG) objectives are essentially a policy that makes sure UBC's
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Among last week's protestors were many students advocating for divestment.
investments are ethically sound and
in accordance with environmental,
social and governance concerns.
"The intention is that the new
fund would meet the highest ESG
criteria and also be very low cost,"
said Philip Steenkamp, UBC's VP
external.
"There's a huge body of research
that shows that you can have the
same or better returns with a fossil-free fund. We partly put forward
that evidence in our original proposal to the board and it seems that
it wasn't considered seriously in the
process," said Hemingway.
GregPeet, chair of the finance
committee for the Board of Governors, also reiterated several times that
UBC would be open to re-evalu
ating the benefits of divestment in
the future.
"This discussion is not over and
we know that and we appreciate
that," said Steenkamp.
Hemingway reiterated UB-
CC350's commitment to making
divestment happen at UBC, noting
that they will be hosting a teach-
in on the policy next week. "This
campaign is not going away," he
told reporters after this morning's
meeting. "We're not going to be
stopping until the university divests from fossil fuels."
The Board of Governors will
make its official decision, based
on the suggestion of the Finance
Committee, at its February 15
meeting. '21
^    Live and Let Live
According to the centre for Disease Control and Prevention, as high as twenty eight percent of gays
and lesbians have been threatened or injured with a weapon; twice as many gays and lesbians have
suicidal thoughts and attempt suicide and one in four transgender person attempt suicide. As well, incidence of depression, drug and alcohol use and a poor school attendance record, is much higher in gays and
lesbians and studies have linked these problems to harassment and abuse.
Sadly, many parents do not accept their gay children, so young gay people are more likely to be homeless.
Where parents reject gay children the incidence of suicide can be as high as nine times the rate for the
general population.
These are shocking statistics, but things use to be a lot worse. Incidence of black mail, denial of employment, housing, opportunities to work in government, have declined, but the fact remains that being gay,
lesbian or transgender, remains a singularly oppressive existence for some people.
Gays and lesbians are your classmates, friends, acquaintances and relatives. According to the Williams
Institute (UCLA), eleven percent of Americans (presumably, Canadians as well), acknowledge same sex
attraction and about four percent, acknowledge being gay or lesbian.
If you want a world where no one is assaulted or driven to self-loathing or to suicide, because of sexual
orientation, here are some things you could do:
1. Treat everyone kindly and do not judge or stereotype people on the basis of sexual orientation.
2. Remind yourself often why it is wrong to victimize others.
3. Do not make sexual orientation an issue in your decisions.
4. Do not encourage or be entertained by people spreading hate.
5. Make gays and lesbians feel welcome and safe in your circle.
6. Refrain from telling gay/lesbian jokes.
7. Avoid using hateful and defamatory language.
8. Stand up for victims.
9. Lend your voice to organizations that promote a safe, happy, and loving environment for people.
10. Gently remind those who use religion to justify prejudice, that hate and discrimination come
from people, not from God. (God is love).
The Compassionate Listening Society of Alberta
wedaretolisten.com NEWS    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2016
DIRECT ENTRY//
Cant enter comp sci from high school anymore
Students hoping to go into computer science now have to take one year of general science.
= ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Julia Bumham
Staff Writer
If you're a high school student planning on applying to UBC's computer
science program for next year, you
might need to rethink your plans.
The option to enter the computer
science major directly from high
school has been removed for the
2016 admissions. Students wishing
to enter the program must now
complete a general first year in the
Faculty of Science before applying to
the major.
Over the last five years, enrolment
in computer science has doubled,
with over 1800 students coming in
this year alone. The direct admissions program was introduced in
order to fill an enrolment gap. With
the increased student interest, this is
no longer required.
"We are now oversubscribed in
terms of the number of students
that are in our various programs,"
said Ian Mitchell, associate head
for the undergraduate affairs of the
computer science department. "The
demand for that direct admission
has surged as well. The concern that
we had specifically with direct admissions is that students don't know
exactly what they want to do when
they come into the university and by
taking these students through the
direct admissions process this was
restricting."
According to Mitchell, the varying levels of education in computer
science across the province was
also a concern. The goal of removing direct admissions, as well as
the launch of introductory computer science courses, is to level the
playing field.
"We'd like to get the right
students to have an idea of what's
involved into our majors because
it's frustrating to be in the wrong
major," said Mitchell.
"I don't really have that much
expertise with the high school program, but at the same time, I don't
see why they can't just apply like
regular kids at the end of their first
year," said Ford Atwater, a combined major in math and computer
science. "It's definitely never a bad
thing to have a little bit more time
to figure out what you're going to
major in."
The origins of direct entry date
back a decade ago when the goal was
to get more students in the program
as the university developed the
capacity to instruct based on the size
of the faculty. The direct admissions procedure was designed to get
enthusiastic high school students
into computer science by offering
them admission based on academic
standards that were slightly lower
than that of the general Faculty of
Science program.
"We wanted to have more
students and we just weren't seeing them coming in through the
normal Faculty of Science stream,"
said Mitchell.
The low enrolment in computer
science was also addressed with the
introduction of different dual major
programs both within the Faculty of
Science and as well with the Faculty
of Arts and the Sauder School of
Business. Mitchell assures that these
programs are separate and are not
affected by the direct admissions
removal. '21
AMS//
Notice of Development Permit Applications - DP16001 + DP16002
Public Open Houses
0 Indian Residential School History and
Dialogue Centre (IRSHDC) + (2) Library Gardens
)ate:
Place:
Jay, February 23,2016 11:30 AM-1:30 PM
jr, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
Buchanan
Tower
Meeting
Easyviajj^Localion
IK Barber
*©
2 Henmngs
Abdul
Lad ha
Hebb
Buchanan
(T)Library Garden
©IRSHDC l_l
<
Chemistry
Main Mai
OAB
Koerner
Library
Math
Annex
David
Lam
Henry
Angus
Join us on Tuesday, February 23 to
view and comment on the above two
development proposals in Library
Garden.
Representatives from the project
team and Campus + Community
Planning will be on hand to discuss
and answer questions about this
project.
For further information:
Please direct questions to
Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca 604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be until March 1, 2016.
To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit:
plannine.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| «*lfegt,fc»°li!^5UfegS&Sfi7hS0l 5Ui=fM^.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
Student service portal
in process of being
redesigned for 2019
Who doesn't love the SSC?
Sruthi Tadepalli
Senior Staff Writer
The Student Academic Systems
Initiative is a project to replace
UBC's current Student Information System (SIS) technology. Everything in the student
portal, such as the SSC, is to be
redesigned by 2019.
"Replacing the student information system is one of the
largest system replacements
at the university because it is
so core to everything that the
institution is involved with,"
said Jennifer Burns, UBC's chief
information officer.
The current system is over 27
years old, but is still quite advanced, according to Kate Ross,
associate vice-president enrolment services and registrar.
"UBC built its system as
a number of large research
institutions have done and
because of that, we have a lot
of functionality in the system
and we've had a lot of flexibility
as well," said Ross. "We've just
reached the point where we
can't extend the life any further.
We have a lot of new needs,
as the teaching and learning
evolves, that we can't match."
Since the Student Academic
Systems Initiative (SASI) was
officially introduced in 2014,
the team is still very much in
the design period.
"[This phase] is about really
gathering all the requirements
that we need to build an implementation plan [and] get the
costing for replacing the total
system," said Ross.
The path to replacing the SIS
is a long one since it requires
moving over 100 years worth of
data onto another system.
The process involved is very
= ILE PHOTO ASHERISBRUCKER/THE UBYSSEY
user-centred. Ross estimates
that consultations with staff and
faculty have already reached
the hundreds. Students are also
involved in the new development, particularly in SASI's
governance structure.
Last fall, a study was conducted
during which students keep
diaries of their interactions with
the current SIS. These consultations are set to continue throughout the process of development
and beyond.
"It's a big challenge for us
because we have to do it at both
campuses and with all the faculties and so it's no small feat — but
we are excited about it," said
Ross. "[We] need that input from
students staff and faculty on how
best to engage and we have to try
lots of different things to make
sure we get really good input that
helps us."
Ross and Burns hope that
students will also be given
the opportunity to get more
involved through co-op and
work-learn positions.
While the new system is a long
way from ready, Burns and Ross
are able to offer a couple examples
as to what students can expect to
see. For one, they hope the system
will be able to recommend courses
based on program requirements
and past interests. The system
should also be able to tell students
when they are able to graduate.
Overall, Burns hopes the new
SIS will allow students, faculty
and staff a seamless experience throughout their entire
UBC journey.
"What is very important for
me to be able to express is that
the technology and the system
itself is not the end goal, it's the
experience for the student and
the institution," said Burns. ^ 06 the unlit flame: my tinder misadventures
08 science of sex
10 support on campus
11 perspectives
12 my flirtation with the world of kink
13 ask natalie: sex edition
14 cooking for your lover + valentine's day
traditions in japan, korea and china
15 ubyssey sex survey
photographs kosta prodanovic & tim hoggan
at the climax in our Science of Sex feature,
^„^ j 1 „„„ rr-"-"" «" "-"» "— -j     «" i-"»'e 8. We've also laid out campus resources and
and relationships. First, our culture editor shares groups related to sex or sexuality. Page 11 offers a few
her Tinder adventures. Read on to learn more about personal perspectives on sexuality and page 12 brings
chemistry — literally. Find out what happens to our     you up close and personal with the world of kink. You
asked Natalie the questions you were too embarrassed
to Google and, on page 13, she answers. Travel across
the globe on page 14 to learn more about Valentine's
Day traditions in a few East Asian cultures, then come
back home to peer into UBC's sex life. 6    |    SEX    |    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2016 L
not a big
investment
high-
stakes
Instagram B
A
S
Myth: People with penises cannot
experience multiple orgasms
Myth: "Virginity" means an intact
hymen TUESDAY FEBRUARY 9, 2016
SEX 10    I   SEX    |    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2016
words by lisa fevral
campus resources for counselling &
sexual health
1. Campus Counselling
Resources
UBC offers a variety of
counselling services to help
students figure out how to
have the best university
experience they can.
Making an appointment
with a counsellor is a
healthy way of dealing
with any type of problems
you have. UBC offers
individual counselling,
group counselling, sexual
assault counselling and
counselling for aboriginal
students. You can reach
out to these professionals
to ask any questions about
difficulties in personal
relationships, general well-
being and mental health.
Counselling services are
available for same day
appointments for urgent
concerns — do not hesitate
to call and schedule an
appointment as soon
as possible if you need
immediate assistance. If
you are a person concerned
for someone else, you can
talk to someone at the
counselling services about
how you can help.
Location on
Campus: Brock Hall
Contact: 604-822-3811
2. Student Health Service
Student Health Service is
available to all registered
UBC students and other
students visiting or on
exchange at UBC. There
is help offered after hours
as well as with a doctor
on-call who is available for
urgent concerns only.
Location on campus: UBC
Hospital
Contact: 604-822-7011
3. Wellness Centre
This is a great place
to get a few tips about
safer sex. The centre is
staffed with students
who are passionate
volunteers and promote
a healthy lifestyle. The
Wellness Centre offers
personalized support
through their Peer
Wellness Coach program,
a number of workshops
on a variety of topics and a
wide selection of safe-sex
products for students to
purchase on a budget.
Location on campus:
Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre, Room 183
Contact: 604-822.8450
4. SASC
The Sexual Assault
Support Centre is available
for people who identify
with all genders and
sexualities to get support
after they've experienced
sexualized violence,
intimate partner violence
and/or harassment. SASC
provides a variety of
services, which include
crisis and short-term
emotional support,
support groups, advocacy,
education and outreach, a
community lending library
and a resource area.
Location on campus: AMS
Student Nest, Room 3127
Contact: 604-827-5180
5. UBC Women's Centre
This is an AMS
resource for everyone who
identifies as a woman.
They provide support,
menstruation supplies
and even a collection of
feminist literature.
Location: AMS Student
Nest Room 2113
campus groups
1. Pride UBC
Pride UBC offers social
services related to sexual
and gender diversity.
Support is provided to
anyone who identifies
as gay, bisexual, lesbian,
transgender, transsexual,
two-spirit, asexual,
questioning, queer,
intersex and people who
do not identify. Pride
UBC holds social events,
provides a platform for
dialogue and offers to
assist people who are
coming out.
Location      on      campus:
Resource Groups Centre in
AMS Student Nest, Room
2103
Contact: 604-822-4638
2. CampOut
CampOut is a summer
camp providing a
welcoming space for queer,
trans, and allied youth
between ages of 14 and 21.
Location     on     campus:
Institute     for      Gender,
Race, Sexuality and Social
Justice,    027-2080    West
Mall
Contact: 604-822-7014
access and diversity resources
1. Re: changes to name or
gender designation
If you have any questions or
need help with changing your
name or gender designation,
you can meet with an Access
and Diversity Advisor who
will put in a formal request
to Enrolment Services. UBC
provides gender inclusive
washroom around campus
— to find where they are
located, check out the map
on the UBC website under
"Know my campus — Explore
Diversity."
Location on campus: Brock
Hall Room 1203
Contact: 604.822.5844
2. Assistance for discrimination
and harassment
There are on-campus
services that can provide
assistance when faced
with discrimination or/
and harassment. Access and
Diversity student service can
give advice on handling the
situation in personal matters,
while Equity and Inclusion
Office has procedures for
handling formal complaints.
AMS Advocacy Office
provides legal representation
for undergrad students
who are in conflict with the
university.
Location on campus:
Access and Diversity: Brock
Hall,Rooml203 (604.822.5844)
Equity and Inclusion Office:
2306 - 1874 East Mall (Brock
Hall) (604.822.6353)
AMS Advocacy Office: AMS
Nest 3118 (604.822.9855) TUESDAY FEBRUARY 9,2016   I    SEX    |   11
perspectives from around campus
artwork jerry yin
Editor's note:
These perspectives are from those around campus
who felt comfortable sharing their thoughts on their
positionality in terms of sexual and romantic interests.
These perspectives were open-ended to the authors
and those who wrote volunteered what information they
felt was pertinent to be shared. We hope this section
offers a space for anyone at UBC to relate experiences
and thoughts that they see as impactful, and to expand
in future issues. These short perspectives are not meant
to be representative of the spectrum of sexualities
on campus and in the world, nor are the experiences
intended to be relatable to all students on this campus.
Aiden Qualizza
Staff Writer
A few weeks ago, my straight
friend's girlfriend awkwardly
admitted to me that my friend felt
uncomfortable being around me
because he thought, that I thought,
that he was hitting on me the first
time we met. I'm sorry, what?
Are you that uncomfortable with
your own sexuality that you think
because you're nice to another
guy he'll automatically think
you're hitting on him? When did
sexuality become the determining
factor whether people are nice
to one another? If that thought
is not oppressive, discriminatory
and completely offensive, I don't
know what is!
I may like men, but that does
not mean I like all men. My
sexuality works exactly the same
way my friend's straight, white,
male, sexuality works. This is a
misconception among people who
don't identify as gay — we are
not all thirsty nymphomaniacs
waiting to pounce on every
guy who gallops past us. Please
remember this if you remember
anything from this thought.
The gay community,
unfortunately, is known as
particularly sexually active. I will
be the first to admit that I have
been perpetuating this stereotype,
but it bothers me because it's not
true. Yes, many gay men like to
have sex. Why wouldn't we?
I    would     assume
that there are significantly more
heterosexual people in the world
who have so called "loose morals"
when they enter the bedroom
than the homosexuals in question.
So, stop assuming that I'll hook up
with your other "gay best friend"
just because I am gay. I actually
have particularly high standards
and I do not like being set up
with every gay person you know
because apparently you think it's
harder for us gays. I can take care
of myself, thank you very much.
To respond to my friend's worry,
I never thought he was hitting on
me. I just thought he was being
genuine, which is a personality
trait I respect. Though, you need
to realize that I am not attracted
to you. Frankly, I don't really
know how to interact around you
because apparently, based on your
thoughts, gay people make you
feel uncomfortable. So be careful
what you think and how you
iterate that thought through your
words, because saying things like
that will only push a great group
of people further away from your
straight, white, male, self. 'M
Emma Partridge
News Editor
The first thing I learned as a woman
confused about her sexuality is that
a lot of other women are too.
I   can   remember   as   a   teen
reading articles about how women
find    other    women    attractive,
regardless of whether they're
heterosexual. Women are just
beautiful, they exude natural
appeal, I remember reading in
one magazine. The thesis of this
article was — whether I realized
it at the time — "Don't worry,
you're still straight. Don't think
too much of it."
Fast forward to university and
I'm enjoying certain drunken
experiences way too much, but
now the rhetoric has become,
"You're just experimenting."
"Don't worry, you're still
straight. Don't think too much of
it."
Perhaps there's a better label
other than pan to apply to myself,
but from what I've learned as
your average, confused woman,
pansexuality is most closely
reflective of my preferences.
After two relationships and
several more sexual encounters
with women - though no
relationships with females - I
came into my twenties with a
better understanding of how I
identify, and also that it's OK.
There is no normal. Normal is a
social construct. Your sexuality is
exactly what you're supposed to
be.
And yes, your sexuality
exists. Pansexuality is not
experimentation or something all
women identify as. It's a distinct
sexuality. Essentially, gender for
me isn't a determinant of why I'm
attracted to someone. It's much
more to do with who they are. I
can be romantically interested in^"
to a girl, and vice versa.
This isn't an advice manifesto,
nor is it reflective of everyone's
experience. But the normalization
of women finding other women
attractive has brought us to a
point where penasexuality can
be erased or invalidated at every
turn. All I have to say is, we exist. 'M
VietVu
Contributor
"To me, being bi means I can
appreciate everyone's butts" —
that's how I opened my 2014
TEDxTerryTalks. I remember the
room laughing and clapping in
agreement. Everyone thought it was
a good joke. Bisexuality, at its core, is
that simple.
Of course, from this very simple
understanding, people go on to
define their own bisexuality. Just
like how some love a good laugh,
some bi guys love large rim glasses
on guys while loving dimples on
girls. Neither does defining oneself
as bi "restrict" one to the gender
binary. But you might ask, "What
about pansexuality?" Many do
identify as pan and that's completely
fine. Pansexuality's existence doesn't
diminish bisexuality's existence.
Unfortunately, there is a common
sentiment to try to classify everyone
as either gay or straight. And a bi
individual navigates through that
every day. This summer, while I
was searching for a new place to
live, I was point blank asked by my
potential landlord whether I was
gay or not. I answered truthfully
that I wasn't, but realized that they
wouldn't have given me the place
had I said yes. When I was offered
the place, I politely said no and
moved on. Overall, I'm fortunate
though.
None of my friends question
me over my romantic interests.
Many other bi individuals are not
as fortunate. Even in Canada, bi
individuals — regardless of their
gender — consider suicide at a rate
much higher than either gay, lesbian
or straight individuals. Is it because
bisexuality is not as understood? Is
it because it becomes easier to put
pressure on them to be "straight"?
I don't have an answer to these
question. But there is one thing
that's clear to me. Bisexuality
doesn't have to be as complex
as people make it to be. At
its core, bisexuality is
simple. 'BJ 12   |   SEX
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2016
fit to be tied:
my flirtation with the
world of kink
Kathleen Downey
Contributor
a I don't think this is the right
place."
I'm standing outside the
Sapperton Pensioner's Hall
with my friend Andy. I'd ridden
the bus for an hour to get to this
weirdly-silent-on-a-Saturday-night
kind of suburban neighbourhood.
There is no way this is The Place.
I was expecting a non-descript
building with shady windows or a
house party with elegant classical
music playing to mask the sounds of
leather hitting skin — not a retiree-
aged woman smoking a cigarette on
the front porch of a pensioner's hall.
Who throws a BDSM party in a
pensioner's hall?
'You guys looking for Rascal's?"
she asks, probably noticing Andy's
leather pants.
'Yeah," he replies, and I notice
that the flowy, sequined blouse over
her black slacks is sheer, revealing a
lacy black bra beneath.
Maybe this is the right place
after all.
The kink community is
something I've been aware of, but
not really paid attention to since
moving to Vancouver — like the
body heat of the stranger sitting
next to you on the bus. Except
if your friends kept inviting you
to things that the bus stranger
would definitely be attending. And
eventually you felt like you should
probably talk to them at some point.
From what I already knew about
kink, I expected to be surrounded
by the kind of people who got
pleasure out of pain — their own
or others', physical or otherwise. I
also expected my environment to
be consent-heavy and accepting:
a place where events that would
distract from a normal party — say,
somebody stripping to their skivvies
and getting smacked around for a bit
— were not only commonplace, but
encouraged.
We enter, immediately greeted by
the muffled beats of edgy pop music
thumping out from somewhere
inside. I'm 13 again, about to attend
my first school dance. My goal
tonight isn't to become homecoming
queen, so much as it is to not spill
punch on myself — for one thing,
this garter belt is a loan from a
friend.
The ballroom inside is sectioned
off into a socializing area and a play
area. Almost all the attendees I could
see were middle-aged, overweight
or  both   —   average   people   now
Public Open House - February 11
Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood Design Vision Supplement
and Proposed Neighbourhood Plan Amendment
UBC, working with the UNA, has undertaken a process to develop an
elaborated design vision for the Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood
This public open house will present the draft design vision supplement for the Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood
as well as a proposed amendment to the Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood Plan. The proposed changes will allow
for a broader variety of housing types on the remaining building sites in Wesbrook Place
Date: Thursday, February 11, 2016     Time: 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Place: Wesbrook Community Centre, Lobby, 5998 Berton Avenue
Please note that no changes to the UBC Land Use Plan and no
net change to planned overall residential floor space within the
Neighbourhood Plan area are being considered.
Online consultation runs from February 4 - February 19 at
planning.ubc.ca
For more information, contact:
Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior Manager, Public Engagement,
at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984,
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #*lt S&« n|S ^ Sit ffifl SS7h ftCH Si^Mch.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Campus + Community Planning
changed out of their business-
casual or boardroom-acceptable
wrinkle-free slacks from earlier in
the day and busting out their collars
and harnesses.
At the back of the room, six
or seven people are all bent over
and getting spanked in a variety of
places by a variety of people. The
sounds of leather hitting skin are
audible from the entrance. One of
the spankers flogs in time to the
music and I wondered vaguely if
her partner notices or if they are
too caught up in adrenaline and
endorphins to register.
This is all I have time to take
in before somebody starts trying
to sell me handmade paddles. "I'm
a woodworker by trade," he says
proudly, and it shows. I spend a
minute expressing appreciation of
his craftsmanship and safely escape
without buying anything, grateful
that I'm not too overwhelmed
by my surroundings to lose my
functionality.
Before I can turn my attention
back to the floor, a potbellied man
in his fifties trots up to me with
his hands bent into paws in front
of his chest and wiggles happily at
me, making the fox tail clipped to
the back of his trousers sway from
side to side. I nod politely, he moves
on and I suddenly feel like Alice in
Wonderland — surrounded by the
bizarre, but not threatened.
I turn my attention back out to
the play area. Stations have been
set up around it for people to pick
and choose as they please. Closer
to me, there are rigging setups
— structures for people to be
suspended from, by rope, like flies
caught in a spiderweb.
Andy rejoins me with his friend
Bev. Her life story, which she relates
to me, is occasionally interrupted
by yelps as Andy bites her, playfully
and painfully, not to mention the
occasional ecstatic scream of pain
from the floor across the tables.
From her seat on his lap, she tells
me about the Bible college she went
to where she met her husband. In
a green corset and fishnets, she
gestures below her knees to where
their hemlines had to reach when
seated and necklines couldn't be
more than three fingers below the
collarbone. Men and women sat on
opposite sides of the room unless
they were engaged and then they
could only sit next to each other.
She laughs at this. "I used to
be the minister preaching on the
corner," she says. And now here she
is. Andy and she are play partners,
but not romantically involved or
dating, and both of them have other
partners and relationships with
varying degrees of intensity. Non-
monogamy is fairly commonplace
here, along with relationship
dynamics you can't expect to be
addressed in next month's issue of
Cosmo - "Top 10 Ways to Make
Your Daddy Happy," anyone? What
about "How to Keep Your Slave
from Topping from the Bottom"?
Andy is more dominant and
gets a kick out of consensually
controlling people, pushing them
around a little, inflicting some pain.
Bev, on the other hand, is more
submissive — she wants to be on
the receiving end of the control.
But they both agree on one very
important thing.
"Kink is about acceptance," Andy
says, and Bev nods enthusiastically.
I can see what they mean. I am
surrounded by every body type
imaginable, from model-slim to
overweight, young and spry in
ripped tights to corset in a walker.
Sexualities are not visible, but both
Andy and Bev are pansexual and
assure me that heteronormativity—
while still present — is significantly
less present here than elsewhere and
all genders are spoken for. It is far
from unusual at these events to ask
straight-up about sexuality instead
of the usual guessing games, and
rejection is respected.
When we get bored of watching
the festivities on the floor before
us, the three of us retired to the
aftercare room. People who have just
been tied up, beaten up or roughed
up can come, cuddle and eat sweets
until they feel human again. The
rush of adrenaline and endorphins
requires a certain amount of comedown and recalibration time. To
keep people safe and cared for,
rooms like this are commonplace.
Cuddling is standard and we all take
to it enthusiastically.
Even though none of us have been
beaten or pleasurably degraded that
day, we all benefit from the close,
human contact and the knowledge
that we are in uniquely judgement-
free environment. At a quarter 'till
midnight, my carriage turns into a
pumpkin and I trade in my garter
belt for leggings again. Sitting on the
Skytrain with mussed hair, I'm glad
I managed to at least shake hands
with the stranger on the bus. 'JJ
Names of the people featured
in this article have been altered to
protect their anonymity. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2016   |   SEX    |    13
ask natalie: first times, sexting, improving and one night stands
Natalie Morris
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
I'm going to start having sex
soon, but I'm worried it's going
to be awkward. There's so much
hype around your first time and
I feel like there's all this pressure
to make it special or whatever.
What do you think?"
Most importantly, your sex life
involves only two people — you and
your partner (unless you have an
understanding otherwise). No one
else is really involved. Your life is not
a movie set with 10 people filming
and getting the lights right. No one
else can judge your experience and
decide if it's "special," or "magical" or
whatever. It's just you and whomever
you decide to sleep with.
If you want to have sex in a hotel
after prom with candles and rose, go
ahead. If you want to do it in your
dorm room when your roommate's in
class, that's cool. If you never want to
have sex, or if you want to wait until
marriage, that's fine too. Your sex life
is none of anyone's business, except
for you and your partner(s). Your first
time having sex is going to be special
because you were there. Don't worry
about making it special, just be sure
you are 100 per cent ready and okay
with it.
Remember the
first time you
rode a bike? No,
because you
sucked at it, fell
over and hit your
head."
As for first time awkwardness,
sure. It will probably be weird.
Do you remember the first time
you rode a bike? No, because
you sucked at it, fell over and hit
your head. Hopefully that doesn't
happen to you during your first
time having sex, but you get the
point. Sex is like anything else.
You're probably going to be bad a
little at first.
It gets better.
Lube.
"Natalie,
How do you sext?"
In many cases, poorly.
I'm kidding. But in all
seriousness, by communicating
with your partner. Talk it out with
them and get to know what they
are and aren't comfortable with.
They may be cool with some dirty
talk, but not fine with nudes. They
may love sending nude photos,
but hate sending text messages of a
sexual nature. Also, it's okay not to
send nudes if you don't want to.
Respect people's limits and play
within them. I'm not going to tell
you how to sext in detail because,
honestly, I don't really want to be
that involved in your sex life, but
I'm sure the internet has great
examples you can work off of.
Just as a PSA: Sending
unsolicited dick pics to anyone isn't
cool. And that goes beyond gender
here. Do not send unsolicited nudes
to people. They may not want them
and they may open their snapchat
in front of their friends — or worse,
family.
Make sure you trust whomever
you send explicit stuff to. Seriously.
"Hey Natalie,
How do I become better at sex? I
want to be a better partner in bed
because my partner is wonderful
and I feel like I'm letting them
down by not being as good or as
experienced as they are. What
should I do to make rocking my
world rock?"
Communication! Surprisingly to
some, the most important part of good
sex is found outside the bedroom.
Communicate! What do you want?
What does your partner like? What
do you wish your partner would do?
What are your fantasies and desires?
If you're worried about not
fulfilling your partner's sex life, then
tell them you want to get better
and ask if there is anything you can
do better or differently. You don't
have to do anything, mind you. Your
comfort level should always be taken
into consideration, but it may be as
simple as being more involved during
sex (i.e. not just lying there) or being
more vocal... or less vocal. One must
respect the roommates.
If you just feel like it's not right yet,
there are tons of websites online that
can help you with ideas, positions,
communication, whatever. A quick
Google can really help. There's
everything from YouTube videos and
women's health magazines, to Reddit
threads and Cosmopolitan, although
I've heard very mixed things about
Cosmos' sex advice.
You are able to have a fantastic sex
life, you just have to go out there and
grab it by the balls... so to speak.
"Dear Natalie,
Does having a one night stand
make me, I don't know, a slut?"
Nope, and I don't allow slut shaming
around here. If you want to sleep with
a hundred million people, go ahead
because I think I missed the memo
where your sex life became public
gossip. As long as you're comfortable
with the choices you're making, I
don't see why anyone should tell you
to stop what you're doing. 'M
Need advice? Contact Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions
answered in an upcoming issue.
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UBC > SAUDER 14 | SEX
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2016
Gov**/
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
Valentine's Day is just around the
corner and the pressure is on to
impress your love interest with some
seriously sexy food. Don't have a
dinner reservation? Don't bother. I've
got you covered with five sure-fire
ideas for what to serve on the most
romantic of evenings.
Garlic Soup
Love is in the air and you know what
else could be too? The sensuous
vapours of this 44-clove garlic soup.
What better way to express your
undying affection than to ensure that
no one in the immediate vicinity will
want to come near either of you in the
near future? Speaking of undying, it's
also a great way to double check that
your partner is not a vampire.
Delissio Pizza
It's not delivery, it's... a way to deliver
on your romantic promises by adding
some pizzazz to your relationship!
Two Single Peas
Food can be a great way to express
your feelings for your dinner
companion    and    you    and    your
valentine are like two peas in a pod.
Voila! Why not let them know by
serving them two individual peas for
dinner? They'll be sure to appreciate
your apt use of metaphor and the
artistry behind your minimalist
meal.
The Heart of an Ox
Your love for each other is strong —
strong like an ox. This one's a hearty
artwork jerry yin
meal that is sure to make theirs skip
a beat.
Nothing at All
"Oh, shit. It's Valentine's Day
already? Uh... I... well... I had kind of
a crazy week and didn't really have
a chance to prepare anything. Uh,
yeah." This one's especially great
because the meal will be over as fast
as your relationship. %
valentine's day traditions in japan, china and korea
*
Aiken Lao
Design Editor
In typical Western culture,
Valentine's Day is often celebrated
by exchanging chocolates, flowers
and other objects of affection.
Other parts of the world celebrate
romantic love — or the lack thereof
— as well, but in starkly different
ways. From celebrating love every
month to consuming fried donut
sticks shaped like the number one
to celebrate being single, here's
a look at how some East Asian
countries celebrate Valentine's Day.
Japan
In most parts of the world, men are
typically expected to present gifts
such as flowers or chocolates to
women. In Japan, it's the opposite.
On Valentine's Day, women —
single or not — are expected to
give chocolates to their significant
other, friends and family. Of course
we can't all afford to give $50
Godiva gift boxes to all our friends,
or to ourselves for that matter.
Thankfully, the chocolates that are
given to friends and family, also
known as giri-choco, are relatively
inexpensive. In contrast, chocolates
given to a partner or romantic
interest are either handmade
or costly — these chocolates are
known as honmei-choco. But
to show appreciation for the
chocolate, recipients are expected
to return a gift that is white — such
as marshmallows, white chocolate
or cookies are some examples — on
March 14, also known as White Day.
Korea
Like Japan, women usually give
chocolate to men. However, Korea
has raised the celebration of love
by a few thousand notches by
celebrating it on the 14th day of
every month. These holidays, if
you can keep track of them all,
are celebrated with your special
someone or with friends and family,
with the exception of April. This
day is known as Black Day. On Black
Day, single people come together
to celebrate their singleness. They
indulge themselves in all things
black — black clothes, black coffee
and black bean noodles to name a
few.
China
Aside from celebrating the Western
Valentine's Day, China has another
celebration of love known as the
Double Seventh Festival. This
festival takes place on the seventh
day of the seventh month under
the Chinese lunar calendar, which
means it changes every year on
the Gregorian calendar. Traditions
during this festival include testing
women on their needle threading
skills under the moonlight or their
fruit  carving  skills.  Traditionally,
this was how females would prove
their some of their "skills" to
potential husbands.
Like in Korea, there is also a
holiday for single people to rejoice
about being single. On November 11
(11.11) those who are single eat four
sticks of fried donut (also known as
youtiao) and a round steamed bun
to represent the date 11.11. People
also buy ridiculous amounts of stuff
online — companies have marketed
this as a day to treat yourself. It's
basically like Black Friday — or
more accurately, Cyber Monday —
but even scarier. %
Note: this piece does not represent
the full array of romantic practices in
the countries mentioned.
You don't have to
sit in school to stand
among greatness.
> Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved on to invent a
little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else, or have a scheduling conflict
come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized online courses, then move on to bigger
successes. Talk about a light bulb moment.
Athabasca
University TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2016   |    SEX    |   15
What's your biggest concern during sex? How often do you masturbate?
• STIs
0 Performance
Body image
0 Pregnancy
• Pain
0 Once a month
0 Once a week
A couple times a week
0 Once a day
0 A couple times a day
A Never
Where have
you had sex on
campus?
Botanical gardens
In a tree near the MOA
Ubyssey office
Top of the clock tower
Aquatic centre roof
How long had you known your last sexual partner?
Do you use dating apps?
Met them day of
At least a week
At least a month
At least six months
At least a year
Does not apply to me
0 Yes, every day
0 Yes, a couple times a week
Yes, a couple times a month
0 Yes, rarely
0 No, because I'm in a
relationship
0 No, but I want to
0 No, and I have no interest in
robots controlling my love life
Everywhere
MOA parking lot
Your mom's house
Wreck Beach
Office 244 BuTo
Frat house bathroom
Suspension bridge
Does penis size matter?
0 Yes, the bigger the better
0 Yes, smaller is better
Yes, big is better within reason
0 Size doesn't matter if it looks
nice
0 Not at all!
Does butt size matter?
0 Yes, the bigger the better
0 Yes, as small as possible
please
Yes, bigger is better within
reason
0 Shape matters more
0 Nopel
Fuck you that's personal
Thunderbird stadium
49.252070, -123.236624
CiTR newsroom
UBC Security office
Thunderbird parkade
Arvind Gupta's office
Main Mall hammocks
Would you try an open relationship?       How often do you wish you were having sex?
0 Yes
0 No
Don't know
0 Only with someone I would
trust with my life
I More than once a day
I Once a day
A couple times a week
I Once a week
I Once a month
I Never
Magic Forest near Totem
Parkade stairwell
Stairs to Tower Beach
Benches outside Irving
Will McDonald
And more, at ubyssey.ca!
*This survey had 2,094 responses with an even split between male- and female-identifying people (49.7 per cent male, 48.3 per cent female). Two per cent of respondents identified as non-binary.
This survey is not meant to be a scientifically accurate representation of UBC's diverse campus. The full list of responses can be found at ubyssey.ca. 16    |    GAMES AND COMICS    |    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2016
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CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1-Reindeer herder;
5-"Bird on _ _" (Gibson
film);
10-Sphere:
14-Dies ;
15-Sired;
16-Arch type;
17- -a-brac;
18-Scottish seaport:
19-Tear;
20- Federal soldier in the
Universite d'Ottawa
COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
= EB2ANSWERS
Civil War;
48-Opera set in Egypt;
DOWN
25-Solitary;
51-Slammin'Sammy;
22-Middle way;
50-Ford flops;
1-Tripoli's country;
27-Metallica drummer
52-Muse of poetry;
24-Moving about;
54-Bahamanian island;
2-Tapestry;
Ulrich;
53- Popular disinfectant:
25- Soviet leader Brezhnev;
58-Hawking;
3- Enamel;
29-Trigonometric function;
55-KofioftheU.N.;
26- Silage storage tower;
61- Key with no sharps or
4-Somewhat hungry;
30-Miscalculates;
56- Funnel-shaped;
28-Misplaces;
flats;
5-Up to it;
31-Chair;
57-Papal garment;
32-Fancy-schmancy;
62-Let'sjust leave       that;
6- Itty-bitty;
32-Unskilled laborer;
58-Discover;
35-Santa       .California;
63-Artist's support;
7-Uncle!;
33-Potpourri;
59-Play to       (draw):
37-Look up to;
65-Editor Wintour;
8- Rate;
34-River sediment;
60-In       land;
38- Biblical high priest;
66- Cairo's river;
9-Patriot Allen;
36-       carte;
61-Pub offerings;
39-Museum piece;
67-Do penance;
10-Tedium;
37- Broadway opening;
64-Vanedir.;
41-Heston'sorg.;
68-Follow;
11-Long in the tooth;
40-Nest eggs, briefly;
42-Edmonton team;
69-Spent, as batteries;
12- Director Riefenstahl;
43-Put up;
45- Guggenheim display;
70-Bob and Elizabeth;
13-Mother of Helen of Troy;
44-Make over;
46-Forfearthat;
71-Suffix with exist;
21-"      tu" (Verdi aria);
46-Lip shaped;
47- Dame;
23-Temperate;
49-Block up;
University of Ottawa
La medecine, un choix d'avenir
■■t        Etudier a I'Universite d'Ottawa
\ i"
places reservees au programme francophone de medecine
des places reservees pour les etudiants de
I'Atlantique, de I'Ouest et desTerritoires
un appui financier pour retourner faire certains
stages pratiques chez-vous
• un programme francophone de medecine
• un environnement bilingue
• un programme innovateur ou la technologie fait
partie integrante de la formation
A I'Universite d'Ottawa, le Consortium national de formation en sante (CNFS) contibue a offrir un acces
accru a des programmes d'etudes dans le domaine de la sante, aux francophones issus des collectivites
en situation minoritaire. www.cnfs.ca
www.medecine.uOttawa.ca
a Consortium national
*' de formation en sante
volet Universite d'Ottawa
mn
Cette initiative est financee par Sante Canada dans le cadre de la
Feuille de route pour les langues officielles du Canada 2013-2018:
education, immigration, communautes.
u Ottawa
Faculte de medecine
Faculty of Medicine

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