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Array THE UBYSSEY
DECEMBER1.2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEXIV
EXCELLENCE SINCE 1918
P/03
P/05
P/09
P/ll
//
//
//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
Board to vote
on tuition increases
this week
Students taking
initiative to alleviate
suffering on the streets
Letter: UBC
has abandoned
women
Swimming wins men's
and women's Canada
West titles
Vi.
UBC stuns Montreal 26-23
to capture its first national
championship since 1997.
\/
r
T-Bf
r // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
make it!
Dec 3-6
%loxol
THURS3
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Check out booths from over 250 crafters and artists all across
Canada — the perfect place to find a special Christmas gift.
$7
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ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY8 P.M. @ MANCHESTER PUB
Let loose before you gorge on coffee and dive into your books.
DETAILS TBA
THEQIIEND/1R
SAT 5
////
KOERNER'S HOUSE PARTY 8 P.M. @ KOERNER S
Another party to cure your hangover from Friday.
$5 pre-sale/$10 advance
ON THE COVER
COVER BY
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'JJthe ubyssey
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Danylchuk established UBCs University transition program.
=HOTO BORIS BOSNJAKOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Daria Danylchuk brings gifted young students to UBC
LeoSoh
Contributor
Educator, administrator and
community leader Daria Danylchuk
mentors the youngest of UBC
students as the co-founder and
program coordinator at the
University Transition Program.
In 1969, Danylchuk found herself
at a crossroads. Having completed a
Bachelor's degree in honours English
at the University of Saskatchewan,
she became disconcerted with the
prospect of graduate school.
"After I had been in university
for five years, I said to myself, 'There
must be more to life than this,'" she
explained. "So I said to myself, 'I
need to get a job.' At that time, you
could get a [Bachelor's] degree in
education in just over a year — so I
did that and I got started in my first
job."
Danylchuk began teaching at
the high school level in Saskatoon
and discovered a passion for gifted
education. She often found herself
wanting to teach material beyond the
students' academic grade level.
She decided to pursue a Master's
degree with a focus on gifted
education at the University of
Connecticut and later a Doctorate
degree at the University of British
Columbia. This began Danylchuk's
involvement with the Vancouver
School Board as a District Teacher in
Gifted Education.
"At first, the district didn't have
any [gifted] programs. There was
no plan, no opportunities for really
advanced stuff," she said.
But with the addition of
Danylchuk's expertise, the
school district created many new
opportunities — such as multi-
age clutter classes (MACC) — for
students with unique talents and
abilities.
Her work with the school
district took a new direction when
Danylchuk was alerted of two boys
wanting to radically accelerate their
education.
"One of the boys came to my
attention at the age of 10," explained
Danylchuk. "He was really interested
in physics, but he was still in grade
five. We had to work to create
pathways for these two boys to find
their way to an accelerated place.
[That] boy graduated at the age of
13 and came to UBC where he was
supported by the Associate Dean of
Science. He's now completed his MD
and his PhD and gone on to do great
things."
Despite their success, Danylchuk
was concerned about the boys who
graduated without a high school
cohort and entered university in
their early teens. Danylchuk was
inspired by the transition school
at the University of Washington
where a system was in place for early
entrance to the university.
A committee of UBC professors,
educators from the Vancouver
School District and parent
representatives therefore created a
similar model at UBC.
The implementation of the model
proved challenging. UBCs own
transition school was set to open
in the September of 1993, but as of
May, Danylchuk had yet to recruit
students or secure funding. "I went
out looking for possible students. We
were interviewing into August," she
recalled.
Ultimately, the program began as
planned.
"We started with seven kids
[in] a [portable] at University Hill
Secondary School," said Danylchuk
"It was a patchwork quilt of
dropping kids into different classes
[according to their level]. By the
second year, we had 22 kids so it
began to grow."
However, Danylchuk knew that
this was not a sustainable model and
set out to expand it.
"It became clear that this
program had a very specific goal. We
wanted to have, for the students, an
identity not as a high school student,
but as a pre-university student," she
explained.
What was proposed was a move
to the Point Grey campus itself.
With this came a need for increased
funding. Danylchuk applied for and
gained Provincial Resource Program
status, which provides designated
funding for statistically rare student
populations.
"This meant we could actually
hire teachers for the program," said
Danylchuk. "By 1998, we were able
to move out to the campus and had
staff. That's when the program began
to shape itself."
Today, the University Transition
Program houses 40 students and is
nestled between Koerner Library
and West Mall.
The majority of students
enter from grade seven. After
two years of study, they complete
the requirements of high school
graduation. Students as young as 13
apply for university admission.
"In the program, work is the
norm. There's no running away, no
easy way. It's like tempering steel —
you burn off the dross," Danylchuk
said."[Program graduates] are
remarkable young people that
have emerged and are taking hold
of their lives. They are disciplined
and have overcome things like
procrastination."
Perhaps thanks to its rigor,
the program's graduates have
exhibited academic success
during their times at UBC and
many have gone on to forge
careers in fields such as medicine
and finance. Standouts among
recent graduates include Cheng
Xie, who received the Schulich
Leader Scholarship — an award
for undergraduates in science,
technology, engineering or math
programs — at age 15, and Rex
Chen, who published in the
Harvard Journal of Emerging
Investigators at age 14.
Danylchuk believes the
program should be replicated by
other leading institutions.
"[The program is] reminding
everybody that what we think
are standards are maybe not
quite as stuck in cement than we
previously would have thought,"
she said.
"Education is so important to
many of the complex problems
the world is facing. We should
remember that youth is our
greatest resource — every
university should have an
opportunity created for the very
young, bright students." 'M // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
ADMINISTRATION //
Faced with a human rights complaint, UBC responds to cases of sexual assault
Emma Partridge
News Editor
Once more in an already-controversy
laden year, all eyes are on UBC as
CBC releases their full investigation
into the way the administration
handled multiple instances of
sexual misconduct by the same PhD
student, Dmitry Mordvinov.
In the wake of CBC's reporting,
interim President Martha Piper
issued an apology to the women who
Mordvinov assaulted. Piper noted,
"[I appreciate] the light the women
have shone on this issue and I want
to make a pledge. We will begin a
discussion with our students, faculty
and staff on a separate sexual assault
policy."
Despite Piper's statement,
Glynnis Kirchmeier — one of the
women who made a report to
UBC regarding the inappropriate
behaviour directed at her by
Mordvinov — announced in a
press conference that she would
be filing a complaint with the BC
Human Rights Tribunal against the
university for their handling of the
reported incident.
According to Kirchmeier, she
brought concerns about Mordvinov
to the history department in January
of 2014 for behaviours she had
witnessed as far back as 2011. Yet,
Mordvinov was only expelled this
month.
"UBC has a legal duty to provide
a harassment-free environment.
PHOTO COURTESY UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
One scandal after another has marred UBCs cenntenial year.
The Supreme Court of Canada has
stated that there's a legal duty to
warn potential victims, and UBC
has a legal duty to report their
knowledge to the police," said
Kirchmeier at the press conference.
"In my well-documented experience
of 22 months of speaking to 10
employees from four offices within
the university, UBC administrators
utterly ignored these ethical and
legal duties."
According to CBC, at least two
accusations surfaced in 2014 against
Mordvinov. It is unclear whether
one of these was referenced by
Kirchmeier in the press conference.
Although Piper remained
adamant in the last meeting of the
UBC Senate that sexual assault
will not be tolerated on this
campus, a statement issued by UBC
spokesperson Susan Danard also
noted "we can do better and we will
do better."
"While the university had to wait
until it had the necessary facts to
take action, I acknowledge that the
process took too long," wrote Piper
in a statement on the university's
website, which was then circulated
in a broadcast email to the entire
UBC community the night that the
documentary aired.
Despite these admissions,
Kimberley Beck, legal counsel at the
Office of the University Counsel, said
that she believes in UBCs current
process of reporting sexual assault.
"I think the people who go
through our process are generally
satisfied with the care and attention
... that the committee gives to
them," said Beck, speaking of the
nonacademic misconduct committee
that deals with reports of sexual
assault when they've been made
internally. The process uses a
structure of investigating in which
both victim and perpetrator are
asked questions by the committee.
The committee is made up
of a group of selected students.
According to Ashley Bentley of
the AMS's Sexual Assault Support
Centre (SASC), many survivors
may not wish to report in this way
because it involves disclosure to a
group of students.
Bentley also noted that a lack
of a single policy on sexual assault
can be problematic. Currently,
the university relies on Policy
3 which relates to harassment
and discrimination. According
to a board document, the office
received 273 files and only six were
referred for formal investigation
under Policy 3 over the last 18
months.
In addition, certain survivors
have said they felt actively silenced
by the university.
"I have been asked to share the
experience of one current student
not in the Faculty of Arts. She told
me that she reported an abusive
colleague to the equity office a year
and a half ago, and they gave her
a ... 'gag-order' — her words," said
Kirchmeier.
As a result of the slow process
it to expel Mordvinov, Kirchmeier
will file a complaint with the BC
Humans Rights Tribunal and UBC
will have to face the consequences.
"Now the lights are turned on
and the university is going to be
tried in the court of public opinion.
Then it is going to answer to the
BC Human Rights Tribunal and I
suspect it will be tried in civil
court as well. UBC did this to
itself," said Kirchmeier.
When asked where exactly
Beck felt that the process of
reporting and handling a sexual
assault was weak, she spoke
mainly of getting information to
students about the options they
have available to them after an
assault.
"I think a place we could do
better is getting information out
to our community — particularly
our students — about what's out
there for them, about the places
they can go," said Beck. "What we
want to do is make sure that we
are communicating clearly to our
students what their resources are."
Some have been calling for
a policy review following the
complaints against Mordvinov.
When asked whether UBCs process
for handling sexual assault will
change in the future after these
concerns about UBCs reporting
process surfaced, Chad Hyson,
associate director of student conduct
and safety, said "we're constantly
taking in the feedback that we've
received regarding our processes as
any organization does."
"We learn every time we have a
hearing," said Hyson. '21
BOARD //
BoG approves tuition increase proposal, will vote this week
^k^B I  ! benchmarked. said the ! cent of the revenue eained ! — voted against the approval due
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Interim President Martha Piper and Chancellor Lindsay Gordon vote on the proposal.
Moira Warburton
News Editor
The Board of Governors has
voted to approve the proposal
for international student tuition
increases with several conditions.
The Board will insist on
a clear outline of how the
administration's proposed 2.5 per
cent allocation of the revenue
from tuition going towards
diversity will be spent.
The Board's Finance and
Property Committee also
brought up issues with the
administration's benchmarking
process and will advise the Board
to suggest the administration
revisit it in cooperation with
students. This was a win for the
AMS who, in their presentation
to Board today, pointed to large
irregularities in the university's
benchmarking process such as
inconsistent methodologies used
to benchmark.
"There's a degree of
uncertainty and I'm going to have
to call upon the students and
the administration to reach an
agreement... prior to the [next]
Board meeting," said Greg Peet,
chair of the finance committee.
Several conditions were
suggested by the committee
relating to how the
administration should move
forward with benchmarking. The
first is to cut $2,000 from the
proposed tuition fees for the four
major programs — arts, science,
commerce and applied science.
Peet, who had serious
concerns about how many
of these programs were
benchmarked, said the
administration should "[do]
the right thing" in terms of
benchmarking for Master's programs
and be "accommodating to students"
on degree programs created in the
last two years.
"This is the first time the Board of
Governors has substantially listened
to students," said Jenna Omassi,
AMS VP Academic and University
Affairs. "Have all our concerns been
met? No. But this is a step the right
direction and this goes to show that
when you come up with a rational
data-based argument — along with
student unrest and support — you
can be successful."
The final condition was clearer
terms of reference for how the
university's Strategic Fund, which
under the current allocation
model will receive over 60 per
cent of the revenue gained
from tuition increases, will be
governed and managed.
Peet expressed disappointment
at the unresolved disagreements
between students and the
administration on the tuition
proposal.
"I had a dream that... it would
be a logical fact-based discussion
and that students — while
opposing tuition as a principle —
and the administration could get a
lot closer. So I'm a little disappointed
that we have as little agreement
as we have so far," said Peet. "It is
a big change in policy, so perhaps
the reality is it's very hard to get it
exactly right the first time when the
movements are so large."
Julie Van de Valk and Veronica
Knott — the two UBC Vancouver
student representatives on Board
voted against the approval due
to lingering concerns about the
proposed increases. The UBC
Okanagan students' representative,
Jeff Krupa, abstained.
"I'm an engineer," said Knott.
"This should be factual. We
shouldn't have these massive
discrepancies between the
benchmarking numbers.... We
need to make the whole thing
conditional to move forward until
we have a better proposal."
"When you have an imperfect
situation, you find some sort of
solution that makes no one happy
or everyone equally unhappy,"
said Peet of the conditions put
forward today. "Listening to the
sensibilities around the board
discussion, we've listened to the
students [and] we've listened to
the executive." '3
^S MEETS LAW
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GRAHAM L. ZILM
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
604-899-0320
graham.zilm@smeetslaw.com
I offer a range of legal services, including:
CIVIL LITIGATION        CRIMINAL LAW       PERSONAL INJURY
ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND JUDICIAL REVIEW
SUITE 1430, 1188 W GEORGIA STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C., V6E 4A2 NEWS    I   TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
SENATE //
Creation of a fall reading break a definite possibilty
Aidan Qualizza
Staff Writer
The AMS executive has been
pushing for a fall reading break,
taking into consideration mental
health and well-being. The exec
has been seeing largely positive
feedback from faculty, staff and
students about this possibility.
"As post-secondary
institutions continue addressing
mental health concerns in
education, university officials
seek to evaluate ways in which
administrative changes may
impact student stress in the most
positive way," wrote Lina Castro,
the AMS Mental Health and
Weil-Being Commissioner, in a
draft copy of the Reading Break
Proposal that will be taken to the
UBC senate.
The exec hopes to convince
senate and faculty that the
reading break would be beneficial.
The proposal will be coupled with
other changes in scheduling and
course delivery that are intended to
improve well-being. These changes
include having a notation for
dropping a course due to extenuating
circumstances and more defined
requirements for syllabi. The AMS
exec plans on bringing all of these
issues to senate as a package.
"I think the conversation is much
more broad, which is good because
... ultimately it means we won't be
getting one and not the other," said
Jenna Omassi, VP academic and
university affairs.'We will be getting
what we ask for... but it means that
it will take a bit longer, because it is
going to be a longer conversation."
The exec acknowledges that
students are in need of this
break, but this a complicated
process that not only involves the
students on the UBC Vancouver
campus, but also the staff,
students and faculty of UBCO.
"To be perfectly honest,
students that are looking for
something to be happening right
now — it's not happening. The
academic side of this institution
moves at snail pace," said Omassi.
"I predict we will see a fall
reading break in 2017."
Even though this process is
going to be a long one, Castro still
says that she feels as though they
are moving fast.
"No one has been pushing
back ... everyone I have talked to
So far, the AMS has been getting mostly positive feedback about a reading break in the fall.
has been really receptive to all
of these ideas," she said. "It seems
like a lot of people have been talking
about it, but not sure what to do
in their position."
A group of students in the
Faculty of Applied Science are
in the beginning of creating
quantitative data to support the
AMS initiative, through a survey
and a petition that they hope
will show how important the
reading break is for students and
potentially faculty.
"We don't have a moment to
appreciate how good of a job [we]
are doing... and appreciate how
crazy the stuff is [that] you are
learning about. I am actually hating
my degree right now because I don't
have time to sleep," said Amanda
Santoro, one of the second-year
students, in the Faculty of Applied
Science who is creating the petition.
= ILE PHOTO CHERIHANHASSUN /THE UBYSSEY
"I feel like if we all had a minute to
take a breath, we could appreciate
life a little bit more."
The petition will mix
quantitative and qualitative
questioning that will allow the
university to develop a strategic
outlook on the potential reading
break and clearly understand
student perspectives when making
decisions surrounding university
scheduling. 'M
DEVELOPMENT//
"Living lab" housing complex to be constructed
The research for the living lab complex will
Emma Partidge
News Editor
The question of where and how
to go about building faculty staff
housing is asked constantly at UBC.
The university plans to address this
in part by constructing a "living lab"
housing complex in the University
Boulevard area.
A living lab building is one in
which the behaviour and operations
of the building are studied by
researchers. According to John
Metras, managing director of UBC
Infrastructure and Development, the
idea for creating housing that will act
as a living lab arose from the desire
to have a residential version of the
Centre for Interactive Research and
Sustainability building.
The first of this kind of project on
campus was the Bioenergy Research
and Demonstration Facility. This
building "providefs] heat for campus
buildings and it's also generating
electricity... we've got at least 12
active research projects going on in
the Bioenergy Facility right now,"
said Metras.
The housing slated to go up
on the land currently occupied
by the DH Copp building - just
west of Shoppers Drug Mart on
University Boulevard - will house
faculty and staff and is to be rented
at a 25 per cent discount off of
market price according to Michael
White, associate VP of campus and
= HOTO NADYARAHMAN/THE UBYSSEY
bewide-ranging
community planning.
The research will be wide-
ranging and will study such areas
as environment, sustainability,
building performance and behaviour.
However, the specifics of the
research that will be carried out are
still in the works.
"We're in the process right now of
working with the VP Research office
and a number of faculty members
to develop a research plan for the
facility. It's under development at
this point," said Metras. White said
both the VP Research and certain
faculty members have relatively
concrete ideas right now that will be
further narrowed and integrated.
The residents of the building can
be part of the research initiative if
they choose to be. However, ethical
standards in research demand that
participants in a study have the
option to opt-out — no matter the
time range.
"Some studies may only take a
minute or two. What is necessary
is the opportunity to withdraw
participation," said Laurel Evans,
director of research ethics at UBC.
"A lifetime study would require
periodic revisiting of the individual's
consent."
The fact that residents will
necessarily have the option to stop
participating in the study has raised
some issues with members of the
UBC community who are already not
on board with the development.
"What if years and years down
the line, all residents decide they no
longer want to be a part of it and it
no longer actually is a living lab, but
housing is already built there?" asked
Jenna Omassi, AMS VP Academic.
"It's setting quite a dangerous
precedent for the future."
Metras responded that,
while such a situation would be
unfortunate, it wouldn't stop the
building's research capacity.
"There are studies that
potentially involve building
technologies. For instance, that could
be carrying on or just monitoring the
ongoing performance of the building
from an energy perspective," he
said. "It doesn't necessarily have
to involve the residents, but we're
hopeful studies can be undertaken
that involve the residents."
This isn't the only concern that
students have raised. According to
Omassi, even though the building
will be used for an academic
purpose, "the AMS and GSS
throughout the consultation...
have adamantly said time and time
again that it is not justifiable to have
housing there."
According to Omassi, the danger
is that UBC is using academic
land for housing "that is justified
as academic by a loophole." By
classifying the housing as a research
facility, the university is able to build
non-student housing on academic
land.
Omassi's predecessor, Anne
Kessler, was in the AMS VP
University Affairs position during
consultation for the DH Copp
building and shares concerns over
the establishment of housing on
academic land.
"There is absolutely a need to
be thinking about affordability for
faculty and staff and to have housing
on campus... I'm not against that,"
said Kessler. "[But] it's kind of going
under the table and [they're] not
being explicit about what they're
doing and not fitting within the
definitions that they've set out."
Neal Yonson, who runs the
investigative blog UBC Insiders,
also felt that the definition of a
"living lab" may be being used
to loosely. Even if a better, more
comprehensive definition was to be
developed, then "the way [Yonson
sees] that playing out is they redefine
[the rules] to conform to the project
that they're building... the whole
thing is an exercise in changing the
rules."
These issues aside, the housing
will come to fruition. White
mentioned that a part of the reason
for such a development is that
three other sites - where Gage
South, The Nest and the Alumni
Centre now are - were intended
for faculty staff housing, but were
lost to those projects.
"We're still playing catch up
to the housing that we actually
lost in the first place in that
neighbourhood," said White.
"Those three sites were converted
and were previously identified for
different types of housing. We're
still playing a game of catch up
because ... the idea here is to have
a mix of uses and housing is a key
part of a vibrant area." 'M
**r
UBC researchers inflicted
third degree burns
on the roofs of pigs- mouths
^ ^^^M                             to study wound healing in humans -
even though the researchers themselves
acknowledged that animals do not model
human healing accurately.
•■
f                                                                                                        M:
StopUBCAnimalResearch.org                     JJ U
UKAMMUMMAKH // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
SHELTERS //
Collecting blankets, warm clothing for Vancouver's homeless
Bradley and George say they feel safer on the streets than in shelters.
Sivan Spector
Staff Writer
UBC fourth-year Fearghus Arnold
is organizing a blanket drive that
will collect warm clothes and
blankets for homeless individuals
in Vancouver. The drive will
accept socks, sweaters, coats,
gloves, hats, blankets, sleeping
bags, shoes, scarves, formal
clothes and any warm items in
good condition. Collection bins
will be placed in the Nest, Henry
Angus Building, Robert F. Osborne
Centre, Jack Bell Building and
H.R. Macmillan Building from
November 29 until December 5.
The clothes will be donated
to The Door is Open — an
organization on the Downtown
Eastside of Vancouver that
gives away free clothing and
runs a weekly soup kitchen for
both homeless and low-income
individuals. Arnold, who is
working towards a major in
finance, has been volunteering at
the soup kitchen at The Door is
Open since he started attending
UBC. He was inspired by the
charity work he and his mother
did in Campbell River where he
grew up.
Arnold is aiming to connect an
organization "that is giving out
warm clothing and UBC that...
has the ability to donate." As the
winter approaches, the situation
on the streets grows more difficult
for the 1,746 homeless individuals
in Metro Vancouver because of the
cold.
Although Metro Vancouver
has more than a dozen open-
access shelters and several more
specifically for youth and women
that provide food, shelter and
other amenities, many say they
choose to stay on the streets
because the shelters have bed
bugs, violence, stealing and drug-
riddled environments. They find
the streets to be safer.
=HOTO NADYA RAHMAN/THE UBYSSEY
Tom, however, who has been
homeless in Vancouver for about a
year, said that the shelters provide
good support. Despite his difficult
condition, he feels he has enough to
get by. He even said he has enough
warm clothes.
Bradley and George, who
usually sit on Granville street and
have stayed drug-free their whole
lives, say that going to the shelters
makes them feel unsafe due to an
environment of substance abuse.
"It's better to live on the streets
than in a shelter because you get
raked, punched and robbed," said
George, referring to an experience he
once had.
George, who suffers from PTSD
from events in his childhood,
becomes triggered when he goes into
an environment of substance abuse.
Although both say it's cold on the
streets, they would not go to East
Hastings to pick up clothes because
it is a bad area. George expressed
that he is often in a state of fear and
doesn't "have friends, only people
[he] respects." They both wish that
there could be more outreach efforts
beyond just donating to stationary
organizations.
Pete, who was lying on a bed
of newspapers on Granville across
from Pacific Centre, said he has
trouble getting up. Shelters, as well
as stationary organizations, are not
a viable option for him. He suffers
from learning disabilities and Grand
Mai Seizures — the medicine for
which he cannot afford and has
difficulty acquiring even when he
has collected enough change. He
fears that, if even if he were able
to go, his few belongings will be
stolen because he physically can't
travel anywhere
"There is an unfortunate stigma
that [homeless individuals] have
made a mistake ... and that these
mistakes have propelled them into a
spot that make them unpredictable
or dangerous," said Arnold. "That's
almost always not the case."
In fact, according to The
Vancouver Homeless Count, 74 per
cent of homeless individuals suffer
from some kind of medical condition,
including mental health issues,
disabilities and other illnesses.
Fifty-eight per cent report
substance abuse, which in many
cases is a result of underlying
psychological and socioeconomic
factors. Many, like George, have
had rough childhoods without
opportunities to escape their
situation.
"Their situation is above and
beyond them... they started at the
bottom... they have been in this
spot for a longtime," said Arnold. In
Pete's case, the metaphor is literal.
Pete said he would like a
blanket to keep warm, revealing
the need for work like the kind The
Door is Open is doing. Collecting
warm articles is obviously not the
entire solution, but it is a stepping
stone to help these individuals —
who are often in poor physical or
mental health — have a some sort of
protection from the elements.
"It's so easy when someone asks
for money on the street to just say 'I
don't have any money'... your eyes
just glaze over that person," said
Arnold. "But if you are that person
... it is psychologically damaging."
He said that, while volunteering
at The Door is Open's Sunday
soup kitchen, the members of the
organization encouraged him to
sit down, converse, eat and — most
importantly — listen to the stories
of homeless individuals. The most
important part of their work, he
said, is to be compassionate and
humanize those who are more
often than not ignored on a daily
basis.
Most UBC students do not
face the trials of homelessness
or even encounter homeless
individuals on a daily basis. Arnold
hopes that the Blanket Drive will
encourage UBC students to help
those in need. Arnold said his own
perspective changed when he began
doing charity work for homeless
individuals.
"I was guilty of having this idea
that if you were homeless or quite
poor, it was of your own making,"
he said. "When I was dealing with
people who were homeless, I had
this idea of being scared of them."
While speaking with the
homeless individuals mentioned
above, two unconnected pairs of
individuals approached the homeless
individuals as well, handing out
sandwiches. Clearly, many are
taking the initiative to alleviate the
suffering of those on the streets.
Starting November 29, UBC will
be taking initiative too. 'M
Editor's note: Names of all
homeless individuals have been
changed to maintain privacy.
Canadian Food Politics (Literally)
LLUSTRATIONJERRYYIN/THE UBYSSEY
Political PUNdits aside, Canada's politicians make for interesting dinner conversation.
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
The Ubyssey's/ood columnist takes
on the role of political PUNdit for
some very serious post-election
commentary.
With environmental crises
looming and big agri-business
impacting our everyday lives
on an unprecedented scale, the
politics of food is an important
emerging field. Much has been
written on concerns ranging from
the national to the agricultural
and the personal. But a literal
analysis of national food politics
is unprecedented — so dare I ask a
more pressing question?
What if our country's political
leaders were reimagined as
foodstuffs?
JUSTIN TRU-DOUGHNUT
Now that the dust from the
election has settled, we've got
ourselves a new Canadian icon:
Who better to symbolize our
national affection for Tim Hortons
than Justin Tru-Doughnut?
Depending on how his leadership
pans out —and who you ask
about it — we either have a very
well-rounded prime minister
or one with a gaping hole in the
middle. Either way, he's been
sprinkled with his fair share of
criticism, but he's certainly not
old-fashioned. Has he glazed over
gender inequality in his cabinet?
Doughnut even go there.
STEAMED-HEN HARPER
Well Harper, you made your
pot and now you've got to steam
in it. Our former prime minister
was too concerned with his place
in the pecking order to take his
opponents seriously, so the PC
party had their feathers in a
ruffle trying to portray Justin as
a poultry adversary. They clearly
put all their eggs in one basket
with that strategy. Too bad now -
they're all out of cluck.
THOMAS MULCARROT
Many NDP supporters were
salad to see that the orange wave
didn't make much of a splash on
the rest of Canada. Perhaps their
platform wasn't deeply rooted
enough or the party is still too
far underground and hasn't quite
sprouted yet. Although Thomas
Mulcarrot perhaps seems like a
more responsible choice than the
sexy, sugar-coated Justin Tru-
Doughnut, who wants a vegetable
when they can have dessert?
ELIZABETH WHEY
Elizabeth Whey is the key
ingredient in Canada's Green
Smoothie Party, taking on the
responsibility of bulking up our
country's eco efforts. If Canada
wants to make environmental
gains, it needs to seize the pro-
green protein to make sure its
policies work out and supplement
other priorities — especially
because we're so fresh-pressed for
time on these issues. Maybe it's
best to juice as much as possible
out of her example and blend some
different ways of thinking.
VEAL DUCEPPE
Let's just say that Veal Duceppe
is an acquired taste. Arguably,
the Bloc Quebecois' goals
doesn't meat the needs of many
Canadians, but French Canadians
do need an outlet to express the
fact that they've got beef with
the government. They can't be
completely cowed into silence
by the Anglophone majority.
Altogether, this group of powerful
leaders can occasionally seem
unsavoury to many Canadians, but
it's important not to stave your
hunger for change so that they
understand what our nation is
craving. '21 6    I    FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
FOOTBALL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015   |    FEATURE    |   7
VICTORIOUS
Bill Situ
Staff Writer
The cup drought is officially over.
After a challenging season, the
UBC football team finished with
a hard-fought 26-23 win over the
University of Montreal Carabins
to win their first Vanier Cup since
1997.
The T-Birds were first to get
onto the scoreboard with two
field goals by star kicker Quinn
van Gylswyk on UBCs first two
possessions.
With Montreal in possession
during the final minute of the
first quarter, UBC linebacker
Dylan Chapdelaine caught an
interception at the Montreal 39-
yard line before tailback Marcus
Davis caught a six-yard reception
from Michael O'Connor early in
the second for a touchdown.
Midway in the second, van
Gylswyk added another field goal
to increase the T-Birds' lead to
16-0.
On Montreal's next possession,
they were forced to punt after
gaining only five yards on three
downs, but the Carabins quickly
regained the possession on a
fumble by O'Connor. Montreal then
scored a touchdown on the ensuing
drive to narrow the T-Birds' lead
to 16-7.
UBC made another error on
its next possession when the team
failed to fake a field goal after a
third and goal situation. Montreal
responded with a successful drive
before adding a field goal in the
final few seconds, making the score
16-10 by halftime.
Despite two misplays in the
second quarter, the T-Birds saw
an impressive performance from
O'Connor, who racked up 290
passing yards in the first half, of
which receiver Will Watson caught
120.
Early in the third, T-Birds star
running back Brandon Deschamps
rushed the ball 44 yards to score a
touchdown for UBC. The Carabins
then responded with a field goal on
their next possession.
Quinn van Gylswyk
became the nero for
the Thunderbirds
as he scored in the
final second of the
game to give UBC the
26-23 win.
In the final minute of the third
quarter, the Carabins made a
successful drive near the T-Birds'
end zone before UBC forced a third
and goal. Linebackers Terrell Davis
and Mitch Barnett both nearly
caught interceptions. Montreal
then scored av field goal to make
the score 23-16 by the end of the
third.
The first seven minutes of
the final quarter saw no scoring
as strong defence by UBC and
Montreal kept each other in check.
T-Bird defensive back Stavros
Katsantonis forced and recovered a
fumble early in the fourth quarter.
With the seven-point deficit,
Montreal got a touchdown midway
in the fourth quarter to equalize
the score. Intensity then peaked as
both teams anxiously fought to gain
possession and come out on top.
The T-Birds did have a field goal
attempt, but Montreal's defence
prevented the team from scoring.
The game changer came with
less than 1:32 remaining on the
clock, when UBCs A. J. Blackwell
caught an interception. On the
ensuing possession, the T-Birds
managed to drive to the Carabins'
13-yard line.
After UBC failed a fake
field goal attempt earlier, van
Gylswyk became the hero for the
Thunderbirds as he scored in the
final second of the game to give
UBC the 26-23 win. 'tJ
BY THE NUMBERS
Total Yards:
UBC-487       MTL-i
Passing Yards:
UBC-389       MTL-39:
Touchdowns:
UBC-2 MTL-2
Rushing Yards:
UBC-117       MTL-1!
Turnovers:
UBC-1 (V
MVP: Michael O'Cor
UBCs Quarterback
THF DRIVF THAT WON THF GAMF
GOAL LINE   10
40 50       CENTRE
GOAL LINE
O'Connor and Watson connect again for for eight yards
Montreal call a timeout with 52 seconds left on the cloc
Brandon Deschamps rushes for a two-yard loss but IVIon
treal is called offside. The ball moves to Montreal's 26
With 1 second left, Quinn van Gylswyk kicks a 20
yard field goal to capture the Vanier Cup for UBC.
ichael 0'Connorthrowsl2yardsto W
son for a first down at Montreal's 39 yard
A.J. Blackwell intercepts the ball
on Montreal's 51 with 1:19 left.
II Wat-
line.
Deschamps rushes again, losing two yards, putting
UBC on Montreal's 13-yard line. UBC calls a timeout
GOAL LINE   10 20 30 40
CENTRE        50 40
GOAL LINE 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
ART//
Studio-hopping at the Eastside Culture Crawl
1
U BC kinesiology graduate Van Oyen is a pioneer in pyography.
=HOTO COURTESY JULIE VAN OYEN
Keagan Perlette
Staff Writer
Over 400 artists opened their studio
doors to the public for the 19th
annual Eastside Culture Crawl. The
event lasts four days and is hosted
in 78 different buildings centralized
between Main Street, Victoria Drive,
1st Avenue and Waterfront Road.
"There's a higher per capita of
artists who both live and work in
that area than in any other part
of any Canadian city," said Esther
Rausenberg, one of the executive
directors of the Eastside Culture
Crawl Society.
The Crawl allows people
to studio-hop throughout the
weekend, giving the public access
to a variety of artists and their
works and practices.
"The Crawl showcases
emerging to professional artists
working in painting, sculpture,
jewelry, ceramics, photography,
mixed media, design, glass and
furniture," said Rausenberg. "The
primary goal is to connect artists
and the public. [We hope] to
engage in a dialogue about the art-
making process."
Participating for the first time
in the Culture Crawl this year is
kinesiology graduate Julie Van Oyen,
who works under the name Burn &
Yonder. Van Oyen's studio is located
in the massive art space MakerLabs,
which is a facility where tools to
create — table saws, laser cutters,
sewing machines and 3D printers
— are available to every artist who
rents space in the building. Van Oyen
works primarily in pyrography, also
called wood burning, which is the
process of making an image in wood
with wood burning pens.
She began her pyrography
practice when she participated in
Hot Art Wet City's 2014 Boobies and
Wieners show.
"I remembered wood burning
[from when I was little] and I was
like, 'Oh my god I'm going to get a
wood burning kit!' I basically came
up with the subject matter — very
detailed anatomical illustrations —
pretty much right away."
Her choice of subject matter is
directed by the medium. "I think
things that are inspired by those old
anatomical or botanical illustrations
where they use pen and ink...
it's a lot more satisfying to draw
something like that drawn with hard
lines," she said. "It just seemed to
make more sense to have natural
subject matter on the wood or to
go completely the other way and to
have something weird on the wood
like a pair of skeleton feet."
"When I was little, if you asked
me what I wanted to do when I
grew up, I would have said, An
artist,'" she recalled. "But I grew
up in a small town and there
wasn't really any viable options for
artists."
Van Oyen decided to pursue
her second love, biology, in the
kinesiology program. However,
when she graduated, she found
herself disenchanted with her
career options.
"[I thought] why not try
evening classes at Emily Carr?
And I just loved them ... taking
classes meant that I was creating
finished work."
This is what Culture Crawl is
for — giving the public the ability
to have open discussions with
artists and talk about the often
non-linear journeys that brought
them to where they are today. 'M
EQUALITY//
Students fighting "tokenistic" displays of diversity
Blain speaking at the solidarity display on Friday.
Miguel Santa Maria
Senior Staff Writer
In recent years, incidents such
as the Ferguson or Charleston
shootings in the United States
proved that racism is still a
common problem in North
America. Most recently at the
University of Missouri, there has
been controversy over several
racist incidents that were largely
neglected. In light of these recent
developments, a handful of UBC
students organized an event to
speak out against this inequality.
"UBC Students of Colour In
Solidarity With..." featured songs,
poems, speeches and dances from
various artists and speakers to
celebrate racial diversity. Despite
this description, the event is not as
celebratory as it sounds.
The gathering itself was mainly
inspired by prejudices on racial
diversity, whether due to societal
hegemonies or outright racial hate.
Although speeches and songs did
celebrate identity, there were equal
amounts of content that strongly
spoke against discrimination. The
penultimate feature of the event
= HOTO NADYA RAHMAN/THE UBYSSEY
itself was a silent march down
Main Mall where attendants held
up signs in support of those who
are victim of racially prejudice.
Cicely Blain, a fourth-year
European studies student, is
the main organizer of the event.
Although president of the UBC
Intercultural Alliance, she
organized it solely on her own
accord with the help of her peers.
With other universities already
doing similar events in light of the
University of Missouri scandal,
Blain felt that it was something that
needed to happen here.
However, organizing the event
was not just a matter of responding
to recent racial controversies. For
Blain, it is also a response to what
she feels is apathy on behalf of
the UBC administration regarding
diversity in general.
"UBC definitely has an issue of
visibility and that's why I wanted
to have an event like this," Blain
said. She also claims that although
the university does promote
diversity, it is in a highly tokenistic
attitude. "They love [diversity] like
that's how we sell — that's how
we get the money from donors
and that's how we look good in
comparison to other universities.
It's not a real celebration of all the
culture and communities that exist
here."
Blain attributes these problems
largely to the white-centric
hegemony not only on campus, but
also across the globe.
"A lot of my books are not
written from people of colour, most
of my professors are white ... just
those small things that add up to
feeling that the university doesn't
acknowledge students of colour,"
she said. "White people still have
the most power even though
there's only one white person in
the room... [they] have privilege in
this society and are able to do stuff
without question."
Blain has endured numerous
forms of racism in her home city
of London prior to coming to UBC.
Although she acknowledges that
Vancouver is generally safer than
most places in terms of cultural
and racial diversity, she thinks
it exemplifies the need for more
racial visibility.
"Being in Vancouver, you
feel removed from these things
— especially for me. There's not
a very big black population,"
she said. "We're in a pretty safe
environment here ... I think it's a
responsibility to have that privilege
to organize in a safe space [and]
raise awareness on what other
students are going through."
This is not to say that Blain's
problems have stopped entirely.
According to her, a friend working
in Vancouver quit her job due
to racist remarks from her coworkers. Additionally, she regularly
endures racial insults online,
whether through email or social
media posts. Like many others, she
also sees that poor treatment and
visibility for indigenous peoples is
still a nationally prevalent problem.
Despite her strong views and
the enduring ignorance of others,
Blain insists that the event is not
meant to be an aggressive reaction.
"I do acknowledge that some
people may misunderstand this is
as a protest or being an aggressive
retaliation towards white people
- it's not. All that we're trying to
do is reclaim some space and have
a moment where people of colour
are celebrated and acknowledged,"
said Blain.
"It's supposed to be a
celebration of these communities
that don't always get the
support they need. Hopefully, by
watching [their performances]
and just being in that space of
really talented people of colour,
that will help UBC students
acknowledge that everyone has
something to offer regardless of
their race." '21 // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
SEXUAL ASSAULT//
UBC has abandoned women
ALEXIS WOLFE
Letter
Since it operates as a business, it is
entirely understandable why the
university would choose to silence
survivors of sexual assault in the
interest of preserving their brand,
securing profit and attracting
the support of stakeholders. Of
course, it is not as though the UBC
administration directly benefits
from rape culture on campus or
that individual persons pursue
this process with the intention of
re-victimizing survivors of sexual
assault. But instead, a neoliberal
sentiment that one must protect
oneself (read: their job), thereby
protects the institution.
Consistent failures to adequately
address rape culture on campus
on behalf of the university reveal
a system that is working almost
seamlessly to ensure that the flow
of capital is not disrupted and the
university's reputation remain
unmarked. Only after public shaming
does the university take "action."
But is it not public embarrassment
that deters UBC from publicly
naming rape culture, publishing
statistics or simply acknowledging
that rape happens on campus. As
The New York Times reported that
one in four women will experience
sexual assault during their time
at university. Isn't it the risk that
stakeholders, prospective students
and other sources of profit may
reconsider their relationship
to UBC if they knew that rape
happens here? It is apparent that
the six figure incomes of faculty and
administration are considered more
important than the safety of women
on campus and the right of survivors
to receive justice.
In April 2015, several women
from the UBC Women's Centre
organized a sit-in demonstration
in then-President Arvind Gupta's
office, demanding that the university
acknowledge that rape happens
here. Providing a list of demands
to the university, we were met
with consideration — the response
appeared to be sympathetic.
Despite a history of complicity in
the silencing of sexual assault on
campus, we were optimistic.
I can safely say, after this process
of working with UBC administration,
addressing sexual assault on campus
is not of high priority to them. It
may appear so with working groups,
dozens of meetings and emoji
consent campaigns, but there is
very little action. In our experience
working with UBC, there was
significant concern and legitimate
sentiment to do what was necessary
to support survivors from each of
the participants. But ultimately,
a clear plan of action was never
developed. Working meetings as
well as drawing individuals from
various perspectives and levels
of expertise failed to address the
completely inadequate response
that continues to characterize UBCs
relationship to rape culture. Talk
about the reduction of bushes and
greenery or the implementation of
further lighting on Main Mall filled
the conversation, leaving very little
time to address the development of
a sexual assault policy that expels
perpetrators and supports survivors.
Nevertheless, these meetings were
successful in propagating an image
of concern and tending to the egos
of those dedicating their morning to
the discussion.
It is quite obvious
that there is no
acceptable way
to address rape
culture on campus that both
benefits women
and protects the
institution."
It is quite obvious that there is
no acceptable way to address rape
culture on campus that both benefits
women and protects the institution.
As discussions remained shallow and
often explanatory, UBC was more
inclined to toss money our way. As
one of our demands, we requested a
budget to begin a peer-led support
groups for women on campus, which
was — unsurprisingly — the only
demand addressed directly. UBC, in
the style of most Western capitalist
institutions, threw money (crumbs)
at the problem and, as I suspect,
hoped it would disappear — or
maybe that we would graduate and
move on.
The lack of institutional memory
for students coming in and out of
the system ensures that persistent
and unmoving pressure from
students be diffused. Those with
institutional memory - faculty and
staff — are often collaborators in
service to the institution. Those
faculty and staff who see the
injustice and speak out against
sexual assault on campus receive
immense pressure to also stay silent.
Within these confines of possibilities
available for both students and
faculty, an adequate sexual assault
policy will never be developed.
In doing so, the university names
an epidemic and risks both their
reputation and profit.
It is imperative that students
demand a sexual assault policy.
There can be no justice for women
when there is a system designed
to confuse and deter them from
reporting and subsequently not
believing them when a report is
made. The university's system
of abandonment requires that
students remain distrustful,
disillusioned, distracted and
apolitical — thus rendered
ineffective and nonthreateningto
the university. Survivors are doubly
victimized, first by the perpetrator
of sexual violence and secondly
by the bureaucratic system that
consciously fails them. '51
Alexis Wolfe is a third-year
sociology major.
HOUSING //
Last words: UBC is addicted to breaking its own rules
UBYSSEY STAFF
Last Words
UBC plans to build private housing
on academic land, and they've
justified the decision with the
rhetoric of "campus as a living lab."
The idea of campus as a living
lab is nothing new, but UBC
is saying that if they do some
studies in a residential building, it
magically doesn't count as housing
anymore.
We've seen this situation time
and time again: UBC decides they
want to do something. People
don't like it or they realize it's
against the rules. They reinterpret
the rules or make new ones and do
it anyway.
The university is the owner
and developer of land on campus
and will continue to do whatever
they want with it, barring major
governance reforms. 'SI
-LUSTRATION JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
ADVICE//
Ask Natalie:
Long-distance
heartache
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice
"Dear Natalie,
I have been missing this person
ever since last seeing him over half
a year ago. Unfortunately, we may
never even get a chance to meet up
again before the end of the year.
He used to be a very intimidating
person but it seems like there has
been a 180-degree change in his
personality the last time we talked
with each other. I'm not sure if
he's hinting at anything What
should I do to get myself thinking
logically again?
That's the problem with being
human and having feelings — you
can't just turn them off when you feel
like it. Being human isn't logical.
I wonder, though, if this
relationship is worth it. You haven't
seen this guy in over six months and
you're still wondering about feelings
and hoping for the possibility of
a romance. Do you talk to him
regularly? Do you get something out
of the relationship you have now,
other than heartache?
Long distance friendships
and romances can work, but they
definitely take work. Are you sure
both of you are committed to that?
But even if your friend is down
for a friendship, it doesn't mean
he's looking for a relationship. It's
hard to know what he's feeling,
especially with what you've told me.
But if he knows your feelings and is
purposely dangling the possibility of
a relationship over your head, that's
just rude.
As for his personality change, I
can't know if it means anything. It
could be him warming up to you as
a friend, him growing as a person
or he could have feelings for you.
You'll never know until you talk to
him. Hopefully that will help you
straighten out your own feelings.
If you need an answer to feel
better, don't feel bad asking for one.
In a lot of cases, knowing is better
than not knowing.
If you don't want to question
this guy, that's your choice, but you
can't expect to just be able to force
yourself to feel a certain way —
especially right away. You can try, but
much like trying to be friends after a
break up, you generally need a break
from that person in order to starting
"feeling logical" again.
Need advice? Contact Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@ubyssey.
ca and have your questions answered
in an upcoming issue.
THE UBYSSEY
We want to hear your opinions!
email us at opinions@ubyssey.ca // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
CONFERENCE FINAL //
UBC swimming captures Canada West titles again
Matt Langmuir and Tamara
Rutherford
Staff Writers
UBC took the last day of the
Canada West Swimming
Championship at the UBC
Aquatic Centre by storm. The
final heats took place Sunday
night and saw the T-Birds rack up
points that led to a meet victory
for both men's and women's
teams.
The competition took place
over three days and featured
teams from eight different
universities. As the hosts
and defending champions,
expectations were high for the
Thunderbirds to thrive in the
competition.
After finishing Friday in
third place, trailing the top spot
by 55 points, UBC dominated
on Saturday, winning 7 of 11
individual finals as they even
swept the podium on a few
occasions. In addition, the 'Birds
won both the men's and women's
relay races.
"We have a pretty small team
this year," said UBC head coach
Steve Price. "The fact that our
team is doing so well on the
quality side of the meet — picking
up wins and dominating the
relays — is a really a good sign."
Pleased with his team's
performance, Price claimed he
was particularly impressed with a
couple of swimmers on the team.
"I thought Erin Stamp did
a great job winning that 100m
breaststroke race and breaking
the Canada West record," said
Price. "Keegan Zanatta's been a
great swimmer as well. He's the
team captain and he stepped up,
won the 200m freestyle, anchored
the relay and won that so he's
doing a great job as well."
Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson
was the most successful
Thunderbird of the night,
winning the 400m individual
medley, 200m backstroke and
200m freestyle. Ranked as
UBC swimming continues its dominance in Canada West with wins in both the men's and women's meets.
one of the top swimmers in
the competition, Seltenreich-
Hodgson wasn't surprised she
was able to win all three of her
finals appearances.
"I knew going in that I was
ranked up with the capability of
getting first in all of [my races],
but obviously not a guarantee
or anything," said Seltenreich-
Hodgson. "I had to post some
pretty good times for me to
be able to accomplish that. I
honestly just had to race my heart
out and I just happened to be able
to out-touch people in a couple
races."
Going into Sunday, the
Thunderbirds trailed the
University of Calgary for the lead
by just 5.5 points.
Sunday saw the T-Birds step
up the swimming a notch and
capture the men's and women's
meet.
Second-year Jacomie Strydom
won the "A" final of the women's
200m butterfly. UBCs Mia Bottrill
also made it to the podium by
placing third and the men took
second through fifth in their event.
In the 100m freestyle, the
women placed first and second
with Rebecca Terejiko and Maia
Brundage, respectively. The same
was true for the men when fourth-
year Keegan Zanatta placed first and
Carson Olafson placed second.
Erin Stamp, Erika Seltenreich-
Hodgson and Stefanie Serka swept
the women's 200m individual
medley this year at CanWest. Third-
year Jonathan Brown placed first
for UBCs men's time.
Mckenzie Summers and
Katherine Stamp took second
and third on the podium for the
backstroke, while Darian Fry
beat out the centre lane racers
and placed first for UBC in the
"B" final for the men. Stamp
came back for second place in the
women's 200m breaststroke and
Tera Van Beilen placed first.
Brundage won the women's
400m freestyle with a seven
second lead over Calgary. Zanatta
won the men's event and Brown
placed third.
The women's 400m medley
relay was dominated by UBC.
Summers, Stamp, Strydom
and Terejko each led in their
individual strokes and landed the
team in first place by more than
four seconds. The men's relay
= HOTO BORIS BOSNJAKOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
team placed third with Karl Wolk,
Ryder McGinnis, Justin Chan and
Marshal Parker.
Varsity athletes from across
UBC sports came out to support the
swim team and were particularly
proud of Zanatta in the freestyle
and women's relay. The Sunday
final heats yielded improvements
from the preliminary times and
the T-Birds were consistently
placing on the podium. The
highest scoring athletes at the meet
were Seltenreich-Hodgson and
Zanatta. The Canada West trophies
ultimately went home with UBC
this season, making this the third
consecutive Canada West title for
the men's team.
UBC will head to Quebec City
for the CIS championships at the
end of February. 'M
VARSITY//
Cross country shines at NAIA National Championships
The cross country team warms up during a preseason warm-up session.
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
The football team might be
making all the headlines this
week, but they aren't the
only UBC team competing
at the national level. The
Thunderbirds' cross country team
competed at the NAIA National
OSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Championships November 21 in
Charlotte, North Carolina.
The women's team, three time
defending champions, finished
second this year. The men earned
their best ever finish in sixth, one
point ahead of Lewis-Clark State
College — a perennial rival.
The team fought early injuries
and a slow start to the season.
Under new head coach Laurier
Primeau and his assistant
coaches Chris Johnson and Norm
Tinkham, the team has had a
change in training techniques.
Marek Jedrzejek had previously
coached the team for 25 years
before retiring after last season
and handing responsibilities off to
Primeau.
"We had a whole renovation, if
you will, of the coaching structure
[with] a new head coach and a
bunch of new assistant coaches.
The big change for us was the
replacement of Marek Jedrzejek,"
explained John Gay, a second-year
Arts student.
On the women's side, Natalia
Hawthorn finished first for the
'Birds and ninth in the race. She
was followed by two athletes in
their last year, Devan Wiebe and
Kirsten Lee. Wiebe finished 18th
and Lee finished 24th. Nicola
Symonds, Madelyn Brunt, Nicole
Lacis and Sandra Kilmartin also
competed at the event.
Jesse Hooton finished 10th at
the race and was the first T-Bird
across the line. He was followed
by second year Jeff Groh, who
debuted at nationals this year and
finished 40th. Bilal Shamsi, John
Gay, Devin Rajala, Max Trummer
and Lukas Jarron also competed at
the race.
"Another big performance
came from a senior on our team,
Bilal Shamsi... it was his last
cross country race as a T-Bird
and he came in really clutch for
us. Kicking down a runner from
Lewis-Clark ... he was able to take
him down just at the finish line
which ended up being huge. We
ended up beating Lewis-Clark by
one point," said Gay.
The 'Birds return to running
as the track and field season starts
January 17 in Seattle, Washington
at the University of Washington
Indoor Preview. '21 GET READY FOR	
AMS ^EVENTS
FWKTFKT
JAN 4 " 0 #AMSFROSTF
#AMSFROSTFEST
ART. MUSIC. COMEDY. FOOD. GET INVOLVED.
FEE PANCAKE BREAKFASTS I FRE COFFEE FDR COMUUTERS
CLUBS SHOWCASE I All AGES CONCERTS I NESIFUX AND CHILI
I    IMPROV AGAINST   HUMANITY   I   CONCERTS AT THE PIT
ANDSOMUCH MORE
^ 12    |    COMICS + GAMES    |    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1,2015
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COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
COURTESY KRAZYDAD.COM
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS
1- Meets one's maker:
5- Bashful;
8- Hawaiian goose:
12- Caper;
Hook's helper;
■St. crossers;
Italian lady;
■Caucus state;
Nair rival;
■ Farewell appearance;
21- Girl in a Beach Boys song;
23- No-win situation;
24-UK honor;
25-Bar bill;
26-Too;
14-
15-
16-
17-
18-
19-
30-Dean Martin's "That's       ";
60- Nasal grunt;
32- Cubic meter;
61- Indian princess;
33- Fate;
62- Dresden denial:
37- French actor Jacques;
63-        nous;
38-Sneak;
64- Otherwise:
39- Exultation;
65-Obtain;
40- Political union;
66- Cong, meeting;
42-Aquarium fish;
43- Become less intense, die off;
DOWN
44-Sharon's land;
1- Pops;
45- Packanimal;
2-        pronounceyou...:
48-From        Z;
3-2002 erupter;
49- Compass pointopposite
4-        Fein;
WSW;
5-Air pollution:
50- Leave:
6-Fell;
52-Veteran;
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57- Opaque gemstone;
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13- Fortified feudal residence;
14- Trigonometric function;
20-Vinegar's partner;
22- Munich mister;
24-Signs;
26- "The Thin Man" dog:
27- Ollie's pal;
28- Dampens;
29- "Fear of Flying" author Jong;
30-Come up;
31-Gardener's tool;
33- Disney dog;
34- Neighbor of Sask.;
35-Able was ...;
36-Actress Patricia;
38- Boards thatsupporta
life-on-campus.wikia.com
COMIC JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
He looks nervou5. Jeremiah,
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When Ihe soa^s done
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42-African fly;
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45- Love deeply;
46- Calyx component;
47- Bridges;
49- North Carolina university:
51-That's !;
52-Put a lid !;
53-Taverns;
54-Speckof dust;
55- Miscalculates;
56- Numbered rds.;
59- Maiden name preceder;
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NOVEMBER 24 ANSWERS
COMIC PATRICK MURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY

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