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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 2015

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Array NOVEMBER 17,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEXII
SNIPPYJESUSSINCE1918
P/04
P/05
P/09
P/10
//
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NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
University housing
going up in the student
neighbourhood
Alumni return to
perform with UBC
Theatre
Professor takes
firm stance
against Drake
Women's soccer
wins
national title // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
MON16-FRI20
////
DO IT YOURSELF 11 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M. @ THE NEST
Stop giving your friends pet rocks for Christmas by learning how to
make cool things like a sweaterforyour mug.
FREE
^V, *
WED 18
////
REZNIGHT3T07P.M.@ UBC BOOKSTORE
This is your chance to finally buy the foam finger you couldn't
afford. Go enjoy 20 per cent off lots of things at the bookstore.
20% OFF STUFF
THURS19
////
DISCORDER FUNDRAISER 8 P.M. @ ASTORIA HASTINGS
Come out and support Vancouver's longest running independent
music magazine! Do good AND dance your socks off.
$5 AT DOOR BEFORE 10 P.M.
Neal Yonson holds UBC accountable
ON THE COVER
COVER BY
Aiken Lao
INSPIRED BY
Should I go to grad
school? printed by
Bloomsbury USA.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
NOVEMBER 17. 2015 | VOLUMEXCVIII ISSUE*
Coordinating Editor        Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubysseyca
Design Editor
Aiken Lao
arinteditor@u byssey.ca
Web Developer
Peter Siemens
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
EmmaPartridge&
Moira Warburton
iews@ubysseyca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubysseyca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubysseyca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubysseyca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
ahoto@ubysseyca
Features Editor
vassilena
Sharlandjieva
features@ubysseyca
Copy Editor
Bailey Ramsay
features@ubysseyca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@u byssey.ca
STAFF
Watt Langmuir. Josh Azizi. Bil
Situ. Elena Volohova. Jeremy
Johnson-Silvers. Julian Yu. Sruth
Tadeoalli. Karen Wang. Jessie
Stirling, Vicky Huang. Olamide
Olaniyan. Henn/Allan. Natalie
Morris. Miguel Santa Maria,
Sivan Soector. Sarah NaOila,
Soohie Sutcliffe. Rithu Jagannath
Samuel du Bois. Lucy Fox,
Samartha McCaOe. Ben Cook
Adam Waitzer. Avril Hwang.
Jlian Odera. Emma Hicks. Ber
SeisOerg. Helen Zhou. Nadya
Rahman. Boris Bosnjakovic,
AidenQualizza
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaperofthe University of British Columbia, It is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications So-
siety. We are an autonomous,
democratically run studentor-
ganization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by tile Ubyssey staff,They
arefiiee^Dressedopinionoffiie
staff, anddo notnecessarily re-
flectthe vi ewsofThe Ubyssey
luplicafjons Society or file University of British Columbia, Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications So-
siety. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
lerein cannotbe reproducec
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mpactofthead.
C/THE UBYSSEY
Neal Yonson, the voice of UBC Insiders, brings in-depth commentary on campus affairs through meticulous research.
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Features Editor
Neal Yonson, a UBC graduate and
the voice of investigative blog UBC
Insiders, responds to The Ubyssey's
questions with his own: "I don't
know, why do you do journalism?"
"We try to explain why things
are happening and why things
matter," he said, summing up the
mission of UBC Insiders. Although
he did not start the blog — which
was born in 2007 to report on AMS
elections — Yonson has grown it
into a platform for investigative
reporting and analysis of UBC
politics.
Yonson's fascination with
the inner-workings of university
governance is "a very acquired
taste," he acknowledged. Most UBC
students are disengaged, according
to Yonson, not because they don't
care or cannot be made to care,
but because their interests and
attention are focused elsewhere.
"Ignorance is bliss," Yonson
said of his long-gone pre-Insiders
days when he was not concerned
with campus affairs outside his
academics. "I am someone who
pays a lot of attention," he said of
his attitude of late.
Yonson's investigative process
involves plenty of reading —
agendas and minutes from Senate,
Board of Governors and AMS
Council meetings as well as all the
background information needed to
make sense of the decision-making
processes at UBC.
"Once you've done that for a
long time, you just start noticing
things that seem a little bit
strange," said Yonson.
"Then I just pull on those
threads and often they don't
lead anywhere or often there's
a good reason why something's
happening. But by pulling on those
threads, sometimes you find things
that are not the way they should
be."
Just last month, Yonson's
reporting on plans to build a new
academic building for the School
of Kinesiology revealed that
the school had spent more than
the Kinesiology Undergraduate
Society's entire annual budget
on organizing a referendum for a
new student fee. His investigation
had involved analyzing over 300
pages of records, receipts and email
correspondences between those
involved in the referendum.
"There's nothing we like more
than curling up with a hot mug
of tea and hundreds of pages
of FOI'd documents," Yonson
wrote as a conclusion to a blog
post instructing readers on how
to file Freedom of Information
requests — appeals for the release
of public documents not readily
available. His commitment to
sifting through records is what
makes UBC Insiders' coverage of
campus affairs stand out and hard
to dismiss.
In 2009, Yonson catalogued
and analyzed all 730 requests for
a Special Occasion Licence — a
permit to serve alcohol at events
- made to the RCMP at UBC since
January 2008.
He uncovered cases in which
the RCMP had granted SOLs
in violation of provincial liquor
regulations — often to events which
were not student-run — while also
refusing to grant SOLs to other
parties based on rules that did not
appear in provincial laws. Yonson's
data served as hard evidence to
back up many students' intuition
that a "war on fun" was taking
place at UBC. It taught him the
importance of solidifying what he
felt everyone knew "anecdotally"
with indisputable data.
"People can have their own
opinions, but they can't have their
own facts," said Yonson, pointing to
how the data he gathered exposed
problems with the RCMP's conduct
in a way that could hardly be
challenged.
Yonson believes that UBC
Insiders' example has prompted
the The Ubyssey to refine the
quality of its reporting. "I think the
best lasting effect of UBC Insiders
is that it also made The Ubyssey
better," said Yonson, noting how
this paper has started placing more
attention on university governance
and its decision-making process.
"That's what I'd like the legacy to
be."
"I would love to see more media
outlets come and do their own
original reporting," Yonson added.
"There's still not enough of that on
campus."
This year, UBC Insiders
branched out to a weekly podcast
on CiTR. Maayan Kreitzman,
a former UBC Insiders blogger
back for a PhD, has teamed up
with Yonson to provide a weekly
run-down of news, commentary
and interviews related to campus
affairs.
Despite his frequent criticism
of the university, Yonson believes
there are many good and caring
people at UBC who strive to
improve the student experience. If
it appears that he doesn't give them
due credit, it is because he views
his critiques as a counter-balance
to the university's public relations
narrative, providing coverage that
doesn't already exist.
"The way I think about myself
is like sandpaper. It might be rough
to come in contact sometimes, but
it's how things go from rough and
unrefined to polished," Yonson
explained. "You need that push-
back and that questioning to make
sure that the ideas you're putting
forward can stand on their own
and are as good as they can be." 'M // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE+ MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
TALK//
Elizabeth May
speaks at UBC
PHOTO ARJUN HAIR/THE UBYSSEY
May spoke on climate change and
inequality.
Sophie Sutcliffe
Staff Writer
Last Tuesday, students and other
members of the UBC community
packed into the Frederic Wood
Theatre for another talk as part of
the Lind Initiative. This time, the
speaker was Elizabeth May, member
of Parliament and leader of the
Green Party of Canada.
May has long been involved in
the environmental movement. In the
1970s, she helped lead a successful
grassroots movement to stop the
spraying of aerial insecticides
on forests in Nova Scotia. She
then went on to be the founding
executive director of the Sierra
Club of Canada and was a senior
policy advisor to former Prime
Minister Brian Mulroney.
Although she has been the
leader of the Green Party since
Stephen Harper's election in 2006,
May still considers herself an
activist.
"I would have very happily
continued as executive director of
the Sierra Club of Canada, except
that Stephen Harper became
Prime Minister in 2006," said May
in an interview with The Ubyssey.
"I ran for leadership of the Green
Party of Canada because it was
the only thing I could think of
to confront what was about to
happen to Canada."
May's talk on Tuesday
examined equity through the lens
of climate change.
"The richest societies are less at
risk from the damage of the climate
crisis than the poorest societies,"
she explained. "The poor have done
nothing to create the climate crisis
and yet they are the most vulnerable
to its impact."
During the public discussion,
May focused on actions she thought
the Canadian government should be
taking, particularly in the upcoming
COP21 talks in Paris. She named a
determination to rapidly move away
from dependence on fossil fuels as
being of the utmost importance.
"The collectivity of national
government commitment, as of
today for the negotiations taking
place at the end of this month, are
far too weak to avoid hitting two
degrees level average temperature
increase. We really must have
movement from particularly the
wealthiest countries," said May to
The Ubyssey.
She argued that the current
initiatives such as the carbon tax
and other trading schemes "open
up the possibility of fraud and
gaming the system."
May's advice for young people
had a more positive note.
"I'm convinced that Stephen
Harper was driven from office
from thousands of students who
decided to vote in 2015," said
May. "Seize that political power
and push it further." 'M
PROTEST//
AMS's boycott of food services faces criticism
Sruthi Tadepalli
Senior Staff Writer
The AMS's campaign to boycott
UBC Food Services faces
opposition from the workers'
union, CUPE 116.
In response to international
tuition hikes, the AMS recently
passed three motions. One of these
mandated the AMS to campaign
for students to boycott UBC
Food Services, a profit-based arm
of the university. This motion
inspired an information campaign
through which the AMS hopes to
encourage students to think more
about where they spend their
discretionary income.
"It's planting a seed of
information in students' heads
about what businesses on campus
do to contribute to the university's
bottom line," said AMS President
Aaron Bailey.
Jenna Omassi, AMS VP
Academic and University Affairs,
acknowledged that it is not possible
for all students to avoid using UBC
Food Services, especially first years
with meal plans.
The campaign was quickly
met with criticism. CUPE 116,
the workers' union representing
nearly 2,000 support staff on
campus, opposes this campaign.
The union says that the campaign
risks negatively affecting people
working for UBC Food Services,
especially students working part
time.
"If there is a reduction of
clientele, the first people it is
going to affect are the students
on campus who work [at UBC
Food Services] because they are
not working under a collective
agreement. They work flexible
hours ... so if they see a reduction
in the need for service, they'll cut
them," said CUPE 116 President
Colleen Garbe.
The union was also upset that
the AMS did not communicate
their plans to boycott UBC Food
Services directly to CUPE 116.
Union VP Dave Lance explains
that they only found out about the
motion and intended campaign
when they read the article
regarding the boycott in The
Ubyssey.
"We work with the AMS on
campus, we negotiate collective
agreements on behalf of the
students on campus, we have the
Graduate Students Society, we
have the Aquatics Centre ... so we
were a little taken back when this
happened without any kind of
communication with the union on
campus," said Garbe.
In response to CUPE 116's
concerns, the AMS says that,
from their perspective, it does
not seem like workers will be
impacted by the three-week
campaign.
U
l mm i
= HOTO BORIS BOSNJAKOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
The AMS is following through on a boycott of food services, but what will the effect be?
"We don't think it will have a
tangible impact on the scheduling
of the actual workers in Food
Services in the way that CUPE is
purporting within such a short
time frame," said Bailey. "We do
recognize that, as an organization,
they cannot legally support our
boycott, but... through discussions
with them, [we] have come to
the realization that it won't have
the adverse impact... that was
originally expressed in that letter."
Bailey also noted that this
campaign cannot be halted due to
AMS bylaws.
"We as the AMS have a directive
... from our board of directors, which
is council, to pursue this boycott
because general students from
the Social Justice Centre brought
this motion forward," said Bailey.
"Because of that, we have to enact
the boycott campaign. It's the way
our organization is structured and
it's what makes us functionally
democratic."
The AMS also intends to open
— and keep open — communication
between them and the union both
through this campaign and in their
future plans.
While CUPE 116 appreciates
the AMS's promise of continued
communication, they still do not
understand the need or support the
boycott of UBC Food Services.
"I know they're trying to bring
attention to the raising of the tuition
... we totally understand that and
support their efforts to try and
reduce the hikes, but we don't think
this is the proper way to go," said
Garbe.'a
WELL-BEING //
Mental health initiative starts chapter at UBC
Sophie Sutcliffe
Staff Writer
Jack.org, an initiative that aims at
de-stigmatizing mental health on
university campuses, is coming
to UBC.
"There's a discontinuity between
physical health and mental health,"
said Madi Wood, the leader of Jack,
org at UBC. "The way we talk about
mental health is not at all congruent
with the way we speak about physical health."
Another aspect of the stigma,
Wood points out, has to do with the
way we discuss suicide. "[The issue
is about] the connotation of the word
'committed.' It's a word that equates
the act with crimes like murder,
which is negatively connotated
[sic] and not directly translatable to
suicide," she explained.
Originally called the Jack Project,
the initiative was started in 2010
after Jack Windeler, a Queen's
University student, died as a result
of suicide.
The Jack Project was previously
a subset of Kids Help Phone and
helped to launch an online chat service and mobile app to make it easier
for young people to reach out.
In 2012, the project shifted focus
from working with students to
develop initiatives to decrease the
stigma and improve mental health
on university campuses. Now Jack,
org is an independent charity with
71 chapters across Canada — all led
by youth — aiming to raise awareness about mental health and reduce
the stigma associated with it.
One of the ways that Jack.org at
UBC is doing this is through social
media. Their Facebook page frequently shares articles, photos and
videos from around the internet
speaking about mental health.
They also have used their Face-
book following to promote another
group at UBC - the UBC Mental
Illness Network for Destigmatiz-
ation (UBC MIND). Specifically,
Jack.org picked up MIND's "Speak
Up" video.
"The fact that they are med
students speaks volumes to how
related [mental health issues] are to
physical health... people who are
med students not only have these
same issues, but also want to tackle
them," said Wood, who hopes that
the group can collaborate with as
many other organizations as possible in the future.
As a chapter in a national organization, Jack.org at UBC gets $800
in funding each year from the main
organization in order to plan two
initiatives on campus that are used
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
Jack.org is a national organization to destigmatize mental health.
Park residences on November
24th.
Wood hopes these actions will
create real change at UBC. "We
have the ability to change the
conversation [and to] get people to
realize that it's okay to not be okay,"
said Wood. "It's okay to have that
conversation." 'JD
to start a positive conversation
around mental health. The group
already has the two required
events in the works. They will
be screening a film at Gamma
Phi Beta's film festival to raise
awareness and are planning an
initiative for first years that's set
to take place at Vanier and Totem
^                           jpt                                       Every day at UBC, researchers
crush, burn, cripple and poison
animals including cats, monkeys, rabbits
and even wild-caught songbirds.
The cruel experiments can last
for months on end.
^^
■ ^^^—       —        HELP MAKE IT STOP
4L
AK
uc*
m±                                            'Y\\
StopUBCAnimalReseareh.org            J^ammaimsuukh 4    I    NEWS    I   TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
DEVELOPMENT//
University housing being constructed in "student neighbourhood"
The area under development is also known as Village Centre Academic or the "gateway" to campus.
Emma Partridge
News Editor
The university is constructing a
new private housing complex at
the gateway to UBCs campus.
The area being developed,
known as Site B, is beside the bus
loop and across from Shoppers
Drug Mart, Boulevard Coffee
and Mahoney's. The housing will
be part of what Michael White,
associate vice-president of Campus
and Community Planning, calls an
active mixed-use precinct.
"The first plans were created
for the area around 2004 and
articulated a mixed-use academic
gateway to the university," said
White. "That's all the properties
[along] University Boulevard and
so it was always envisioned to
be a place that had a mix of uses
including academic-residential
services."
Known as the Village Centre
Academic, to members of the
university administration the
"student neighbourhood" includes
Walter H. Gage Residence,
the Aquatic Centre and where
Maclnnes field used to be.
The building on Site B will
be rented at or close to market
prices, but tenants will need to
be an affiliate of the university
to live there. Because one needs
to work at or attend UBC to be
considered an affiliate, the housing
is technically university housing —
and not market housing — despite
its prices. AMS VP Academic and
University Affairs Jenna Omassi
believes that having the housing
restricted to either employees or
students of the university is a step
in the right direction.
"The people this housing
is for are members of the UBC
community so they have an
understanding of the student
population, of their colleagues
[and] what this community is,"
said Omassi. "We don't want to
run into another situation where
... [people] come in expecting to
be living in a quiet neighbourhood
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when they actually are in the heart
of campus."
However, both Omassi and
her predecessor, Anne Kessler,
expressed that there are still
potential drawbacks to having this
type of housing in the student hub
of campus.
"A concern around there being
housing here is noise.... The new
Maclnnes field was going to be
right there and what about when
students want to have concerts
there?" said Kessler. "We don't
want this to become a situation
where those people are really
frustrated that this noise is
happening there when really the
students were there first."
The rooms of the building may
be more appealing to students
rather than families who would
likely take issue with the noise.
According to Paul Young, director
of Planning and Design for UBC
Properties, approximately 60 of
over 90 units are either going to be
micro units or studio units.
"They tend to be on the smaller
side. So it provides another
option for students, but also for
others who are affiliated with the
university," said Young.
Nonetheless, speaking to the
concerns about the effects of living
in a student neighbourhood, Kessler
said, "I think the university maybe
didn't think through that so much."
However, according to White,
Campus and Community Planning
(CC+P) has acknowledged
the adjacency issues. They've
recommended that tenants be
made aware of the nearby student
recreation through a note in their
leases. CC+P also suggested that the
university, AMS and the University
Neighbourhood Association and
Properties Trust look into a letter
of understanding to acknowledge
the area's activity in anticipation of
residents.
According to Kessler, it's difficult
to address some of these potential
issues since the decision to have this
type of housing in this location was
made so long ago. The consultation
process dealt more with what the
building would offer or look like
rather than the decision of whether
to construct it at all.
"That stage of consultation
[wasn't] 'what's going go here,'"
said Kessler. "[It was] more about
= HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVICE/THE UBYSSEY
what kind of shops and ... how
this building looks, which is
really a different conversation
than, 'Should there be housing
here?'"
White confirmed that the
consultation process that campus
and community planning engaged
the AMS for Site B specifically
was about "the overall principles
for the neighbourhood."
Speaking to the consultation,
Omassi said the AMS and
Graduate Student Society were
consulted and — as always —
there were extents to which the
feedback from those student
groups was and was not taken
into consideration. In addition
to these parties, "there's also the
desires of UBC Properties Trust
and the board taken into it — and
UBC Properties Trust specifically
really did want to see Site B be
housing," said Omassi.
According to White, the
original 2004 plans for the
precinct were updated and
confirmed by the Board of
Governors last June.
So how is the project being
funded? According to Young, a
lease from the university allows
for a mortgage against the site to
cover the cost of construction.
"What we do is we borrow
money for the construction of
the building and then we get a
mortgage at the end, and that
mortgage gets paid off over time
through the rental revenues,"
said Young. "It doesn't use any
university funds. The university
doesn't loan us any money, we
get that from third parties like
banks."
As for going forward, Omassi
believes the best thing to do is
establish reasonable expectations
to be shared by people who plan
to live in the area.
"Understanding where they're
moving in to and what place on
campus they're moving in to
is really important," she said.
"Setting reasonable expectations
is really important because every
year we run into issues with
the neighbourhoods and people
living on this campus who have
expectations for noise and the
campus community that can't be
fulfilled because this is a student
population here." 'M // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
MOUNT PLEASANT PROJECT //
Using art to raise awareness for mental health
Stephanie Wood
Contributor
"I am not this mental illness. I am
a strong person who has all these
goals and things I want to do and
I will continue to do them despite
this difficult period in my life."
These are words Anja Hedji is
able to say confidently after her
own struggles with depression.
Now she hopes to open up a
positive conversation about
mental health with The Mount
Pleasant Project. The project, in
its first year, invites those affected
by mental illness to share their
experiences through visual art and
has organized two workshops with
complimentary art supplies for
participants. The collection will
be displayed at a reception at the
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood
House for anyone to enjoy.
The project is a culmination
of Hedji's passion for art and
her personal experiences with
depression.
"I found art is a really great
way to express myself without
words, especially because there
aren't always specific ones for
what goes on inside," Hedji said.
The objective is to create a sense
of community and provide a safe
space to discuss mental illness.
"It's a good way to get people
together," said Gab McCarthy, one
of the artists and friend of Hedji
who has also faced depression.
Although it's difficult to talk about mental illnesses, communicating through art makes it easier.
=HOTOCOURTESYMOUNT PLEASANT PROJECT
"It's hard to just talk [about mental
illness], but while you're painting
together, it's really easy."
McCarthy emphasized how
art personalizes mental illness
by providing individual stories
rather than the anonymity that
forms when the topic so rarely
discussed. McCarthy believes
personalizing the subject
encourages people to think more
deeply about mental illness and
to consider the people behind the
illness.
The workshop showed the
"who" to have many faces — a
point Hedji seeks to emphasize.
The art varied from gentle
landscapes to abstract work with
bold colours, charcoal sketches and
several portrayals of the body.
Another artist, Mikela Vetro,
said most of her knowledge comes
from her loved ones experiencing
depression. This proximity made
her more aware of the prevailing
stigma, particularly with common
slang used at the expense of those
with mental illness.
Her biggest advice is simply
to "get informed" before forming
assumptions and — as McCarthy
and Hedji agree — to consider how
our everyday language affects the
destigmatizing process.
Hedji affirms there is still a
long way to go in destigmatizing
mental illness and this project
is the first of many she hopes
to initiate. Hedji has expressed
hope to develop a "more
positive education system" that
encourages conversation around
mental health from a young age.
She and McCarthy have also
discussed creating a youth female
magazine focusing on mental
health.
Creating communities around
art and shared stories is the
primary goal, giving everyone an
opportunity to talk "whichever
way they want... and be honest."
The reception is open to the
public at the Mount Pleasant
Neighbourhood House on
November 18 at 6.30 p.m. 1
THEATRE //
Beckett 15 brings alumni back to celebrate UBC Theatre
The production is bringing back several UBC alumni.
= HOTOCOURTESYTHEATREUBC
Hannah Kahn
Contributor
There are few things chamber
music and cooking have in
common. It turns out one of those
is the work of playwright Samuel
Beckett.
From November 18-21, the
Theatre Alumni Group and
Professor Emeritus Norman
Young will be producing Beckett
15, an amalgamation of the
shorter works of Samuel Beckett
and works of Dr. Young.
Director as well as assistant
dean of facilities and human
resources in the Faculty of Arts,
Gerald Vanderwoude explained
that chamber music and cooking
have many layers and many
ingredients - just like a Beckett's
plays. Like these, Beckett's
plays are delicate and fragile.
Explaining why Beckett was the
focus of this piece, Vanderwoude
said, "I love Beckett. I think he is
the most economical playwright.
He really takes work, takes life
experiences and boils it down to
the very essence."
That idea of the essence of
life is something fundamentally
important to Beckett's pieces.
Writing in the wake of World War
II, his absurdist theatre is some of
the most influential in the world.
Comparing him to Shakespeare,
Vanderwoude explains the story
of Beckett IS.
The project was the brainchild
of Peter Loeffler, whose Memorial
Award proceeds will go towards.
In 1998, Loeffler came up with
the idea on a whim over tea and
biscuits with Vanderwoude to
create a production centred on
the plays of Samuel Beckett.
Inspired by Arthur Miller's
famous quote that he was "full"
after having seen one of Beckett's
13 minute plays, Rockaby,
performed, Vanderwoude decided
the production would be focused
on Beckett's shorts. So Beckett 15
was born.
In asking what the audience
should expect from such
a complicated playwright,
Vanderwoude articulated clearly
that the audience is central to
the performance in that their
energy and relationships with
the characters are central to
the stories. The audience goes
through what the characters do in
the same time frame, connecting
them in a way rarely experienced
in other productions.
"He's very deep. He's very
challenging. He doesn't pander
in any way to his audience," said
Vanderwoude.
In these ways, Beckett draws
his audience in, causing them to
think hard about everything from
the essence of life to its purpose
and its end.
However, for those who are
not familiar with Beckett, going
into a production of his work
could be intimidating. After all,
there is nothing in the world
quite like absurdist theatre
and anyone's first experience
with it is thought provoking
and memorable. Vanderwoude,
however, is not worried about his
audience.
The plays are fragile things
— quiet and still. Vanderwoude
said a cell phone going off
in the production would be
like an express train riding
through it. The audience must
be prepared to be challenged,
but will always be entertained.
The thoughtfulness of the piece
lasts far longer in the mind than
the physical performance does.
Leaving an audience shocked and
confused, Beckett IS is the type of
performance that stays with you.
The highlight of the
production, Vanderwoude added,
will be the end as each part of the
production builds on itself.
"It's all about communication
and our desperate desire as
people to reach out to people and
to touch them ... yet at the same
time, that practical reality that
you can't," he said. "You can only
know yourself. As Beckett would
say, 'We die alone.' There's hope
in that as well as great despair
and great comedy."
Beckett IS will be a production
that opens minds. Whether the
audience goes into the production
intending to be changed or not, it is
likely that they will look at the sky,
the trees, the leaves on the ground
and the rain, seeing something
different as they walk out of the
theatre — something symbolic.
They will see the world in a
different and Beckettian light, tl
Unofficial Potluck Guide
LLUSTRATION JERRYYIN/TH E UBYSSEY
Don't try and pull a Martha Stewart.
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
Where'd the time go? With
the holidays and end of term
approaching, it's time for a good
old fashioned get together with
all your friends whom you can't
bear the thought of parting with
for winter break. And what's
better than a potluck when you
all want to gather over some
food? Whether you're hosting or
attending, here are my tips and
recipes for a successful event:
Get organized. We've all been
to that classic all-dessert potluck
where everyone brought two-bite
brownies and no one thought to
make an entree. If you're the host,
get everyone to coordinate dishes
in advance to avoid any potential
overlap.
Make something easy. Save
yourself the trouble: don't try
and pull a Martha Stewart. Make
something delicious, but portable
and not overly complicated.
Chances are that by the time
you bring it to the party (or your
guests arrive), you won't want to
fuss with any last-minute details
or have it fall to ruins on the way
there. Choose dishes that can
be made in advance. Whether
you're the guest or the host,
aim for finger foods that don't
need to be served at any specific
temperature.
Keep dietary restrictions in
mind. I know, I know - it seems
like everyone's a gluten-free vegan
with a nut allergy these days. But
it sucks for people with dietary
restrictions not to be able to eat
anything. Even though most of
them probably won't say anything,
it's always nice to have your needs
considered. If you're at a loss for
what people with X allergy or Y
dietary regime eat, ask them for
ideas or do some googling - there
are plenty of specific food blogs
out there that cater to many a
food niche.
Have fun. I mean, duh. You're
getting together for an evening
with all your friends where
everyone heaps their plates with
random delicious foods! What
could be better?
Snack: seasoned popcorn. Pop
your own at home and sprinkle
with a mixture of the spices while
it's still hot.
Appetizer: Guacamole. Easy
peasy, lemon squeezy. Rather,
make that lime squeezy.
Dinner: Vietnamese salad
rolls. Sounds fancy, but these are
cheap, delicious and very easy to
customize.
Dessert: Scones. Easily made
in advance, easy to transport and
hella impressive-looking.
There you have it! Your friends
will be the (pot)lucky ones when
you roll up with any of these in
hand. 'tJ FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2015
EXPERIENCE AND EXPERTISE
Is academic excellence enough
for a start to a good career?
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
In the 2014-15 academic year,
1.7 million students attended
university in Canada. There are
not 1.7 million jobs available in the
country for the students graduating
after four or five years of university
- youth unemployment is at 13.9
per cent.
With so many graduates and so
few jobs, the excessive emphasis
on the value of a university degree
only makes the problem worse.
The woes of a student don't
begin after graduation - it's hard
enough attaining the degree in the
first place. To thrive in a university
setting, it's necessary to possess
certain traits: appropriate levels
of preparation, curiosity and
motivation.
Youth
unemployment is
at 13.9 per cent.
Yet there is a difference
between studying hard and
working hard. Regardless of the
degree type — be it in arts or
sciences — an undergraduate
university education is unlikely to
bring students a return on their
investment unless they work hard
to maximize the investment while
they're in school.
This is where work experience
comes into play. A 2013 study
in New Zealand found that
university graduates who had
work experience already were
significantly more likely to find
jobs sooner and with a higher
starting salary than graduates
without work experience. The
students in the first group were
able to get a return on their
investment to a much higher
degree than those in the second.
There's no denying the
investment is a huge one. A recent
report by TD Economics revealed
that 10 to 15 years ago, students
could fund their tuition, other
school fees and living expenses
from savings accumulated through
summer and part-time jobs. Those
days are past.
A student who started studying
in 2011 would spend $55,000
over the course of their degree if
living at home, and $84,000 if the
student lived away from home.
In contrast, children born in 2011
are projected to pay $102,286 for
their post secondary education if
they live at home, and $139,380
if they live away from home. To
fully cover the cost of university,
a Canadian citizen would have to
dedicate $1.22 of their hourly wage
during their entire working career.
For a student paying international
tuition, this would increase to
$3.16 after UBCs proposed tuition
increases.
Students who need a Canadian
student loan now graduate with
an average debt of $28,000. When
job prospects rely heavily on work
experience that a student is able to
aggregate before they graduate, this
places extreme limits on the kind of
internships indebted students can
take. They often find themselves
unable to afford taking an unpaid
internship, which could help them
find gainful employment in work
related to their studies.
An estimated 300,000 young
people work without pay in
internship positions. However,
these opportunities privilege those
who have the financial support
to work for free while their peers
fall behind invaluable experience.
Many graduates are forced into
unemployment or work outside of
their field of study, such as retail,
which leads to skill degradation
and lost networking opportunities.
They become stuck in a position
where their expensive and time
consuming degree is all but
worthless in practical terms.
Javed Iqbal, director of the UBC
Science co-op program, is one of
the voices aiming to make students'
university experiences worth their
time and money.
"By the time you graduate
and you have 16 months of
work experience, it's absolutely
invaluable," he said, pointing to
how stepping outside of the lecture
hall gives students both insight
and skills employers value. From
work-learn programs to paid
research assistant positions, many
universities offer opprotunities for
extra development.
While some students' paths
are very focused with goals like
medical school, law school or
pharmacy, many students are
unclear about how they can apply
their degree. Leaving the campus
environment to work for a year or
16 months is — to Iqbal — about
finding out what their chosen field
is like, what skills they'll need and
how to succeed in their profession.
"I think it is so important for
students to have that knowledge so
they can make informed, educated
decisions as to where their career
is heading," he said. On top of
career exploration, co-op is an
early opportunity to connect with
potential employers or even secure
a post-graduation job.
"Many of my students who have
graduated are actually working
with the employers where they
were a co-op student," said Iqbal.
"I always tell the students, 'When
you go in there, you should be
focused and so successful that your
employer will call you asking when
you're going to graduate because
they have a job for you.'"
According to The Guardian's
list of the top 10 criteria that
business employers look for when
hiring for entry-level positions,
degree subject studied falls in
third place - below relevant work
experience and a good work ethic.
A university-level education
does not necessarily foster
these qualities, but workshops,
internships or co-op programs are
the most beneficial opportunities
a university can offer for gaining
these skills.
Iqbal believes many students
don't have the direct capacity
to work full-time straight from
university. "It's really, really
important to start your career in
an environment where you have
so much support available," he
said.
Students ask co-op advisers
why they should sacrifice
graduating "on time," but work
experience gained early on is far
more valuable than getting the
certification on time, according
Students requiring
a student loan will
graduate with an
average debt of
$28,000.
DATA COURTESY CAANDIAN FEDERAL OF STUDENTS AND UBC
LLUSTRATION AIKEN LAO/TH E UBYSSEY
to Iqbal. In fact, four out of five
surveyed employers say that co-op
positions and internships take
priority over GPA or class standing
when it comes to hiring graduates.
Jobs in medicine, pharmacy
and education depend on
university degrees. However,
in many fields — computer
science being a prime example —
experience and skill are far more
qualifiable. A university degree,
along with all its expenses, is
unnecessary to people with the
acquired skills.
"There's quite a demand for
rudimentary computer science
skills," said Kevin Leyton-Brown,
a professor of computer science at
UBC. "If somebody drops out of a
computer science degree and gets
** It's really, really important
to start your career in an
environment where you have so
much support available.))
- Javed Iqbal, director of UBC Science co-op program
a job at a computer tech company,
I don't think they'll have any
problem staying employed
throughout their career."
However, Leyton-Brown
believes it is still worth
completing a degree program,
noting that a computer science
degree is less about landing
somebody their first job and more
about helping them learn the
basic skills.
Steven Richards, who began
his first year as a computer
science student at UBC in 2013,
sees things differently. He worked
at Hootsuite, a Vancouver-based
social media company, as a junior
operations engineer the following
summer. After his four-month
contract expired, Richards was
invited to stay as a full-time
employee. He accepted the offer
and left UBC after his first year.
"I was learning more in a week
of work than a whole year," said
Richards. "[At UBC], I only had a
few computer science classes and
only some of them touched on
things that are actually relevant
to what you'll do in the real
world."
He believes it is essential to
do whatever helps you learn best
— which may not necessarily be
going to university.
Attending university
because of a love for learning
or an interest in the subject
is challenged by the common
question — "What are you
going to do with that degree?"
The assumption behind it is TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2015   |    FEATURE
A BREAKDOWN OF
Domestic
International
International after
tuition increase
that a degree program has to
directly lead to a career, which
is uncommon. This begs the
question: Does university need
to focus on directly preparing
students for a job in order to
make a degree valuable? Perhaps
as higher education becomes
more and more expensive over
time, students should only
attend for the applicable job
qualifications as they can no
longer afford to treat university
solely as a place to learn and
explore interests.
A report in The Economist
showed that engineering and
computer-science students earn
the most following graduation —
a 20-year annualised return of 12
per cent on tuition. Courses in
business and economics also tend
to result in good pay, delivering
an 8.7 per cent average return.
The report suggests that while
arts and humanities graduates
may pay well in intellectual
dividends, the economic returns
are mixed.
According to The National
Post, universities have responded
to increased enrolment with
large first year classes, a growing
reliance on contract instructors
and limited student support
services. This has resulted in
considerable dissatisfaction
among students, faculty and
parents about the quality of
educational experience. Unless
students take part in other
activities — such as relevant work
and volunteering — is university
going to be worth the time and
money?
A degree program might be
interesting, enlightening and
compelling. However, students
need to take the initiative and
make more of their program than
simply attending lectures, taking
exams and writing papers.
Students need to
take the initiative
and
make more of
their program
than simply
attending
lectures, taking
exams and
writing papers.
Or else they will finish their
program with no real-world
experience in a pool of graduates
with the same skills — to study and
get good grades. Being realistic
about the role a degree plays in
future prospects can help students
make smarter choices about their
program, school and the way they
spend their time at university. 'M
A post-secondary
student studying in
2011 would spend
$55,000+ if living at
home or $84,000+
living away from home
throughout their degree.
A post-secondary
student born in 2011
will spend an estimated
$102,286+ if living at
home or $139,380+
living away from home. 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
MUSIC//
Genre-defying performance at the Chan Centre
Carminho and Tavares both are famed for their music.
Adam Waitzer
Staff Writer
As part of an exciting Portuguese
music double bill, renowned
artists Sara Tavares and Carminho
will be appearing at the Chan
Centre on Saturday, November 21.
On a joint North American tour,
the two singers hope to provide an
evening of compelling world music.
While both artists are native
to Portugal, each bring a unique
stylistic approach to their
musicianship.
Sara Tavares, a Lisbon-born
musician with Cape Verdean
roots, will be opening the concert.
In her genre-defying music,
Tavares integrates a mixed
bag of languages, rhythms and
instrumentation. Throughout her
diverse sound however, Tavares
retains her hallmarks — hushed
vocals and understated guitar
strokes.
Having taken an interest in
music at a young age, Tavares was
quickly exposed to a variety of
musical styles from radio pop to
church gospel and Cape Verdean
styles.
"I just got into church because
of the music actually. I had heard
of gospel music through my musical
heroes, so I went in search for a
church and I started singing," said
Tavares. "Then I won a contest - a
very antique version of American
Idol. Ever since, I've been singing,
recording and travelling."
Drawing from a wide range of
influences and having no formal
musical training, Tavares likens her
songwriting process to cooking.
"I learned a couple of chords on
the guitar, I practiced a bit -1 just
let it flow. When I start writing
some words, it comes in either
Portuguese or Criollo and I follow.
It depends on who and what I'm
thinking of," said Tavares. "If you
talk to a Cape Verdean in Lisbon,
you would be speaking most of
your words in Criollo, but you'd
have many little sentences in
Portuguese."
For Tavares, performing her
captivating music is equally as
important as sharing her sunny,
cheerful disposition with the
audience and creating an inviting
atmosphere.
"I'm a very smooth kind
of personality. I have to feel
comfortable to sing and perform,
so I try to create a positive mood,"
said Tavares. "I want people to feel
= HOTO COURTESY CHAN CENTRE
comfortable, light and smooth."
Following Tavares'
performance, acclaimed Fado
singer Carminho will take the
stage. Growing up in Lisbon,
Carminho was immersed in
Fado - a rich Portuguese musical
tradition - from a young age.
Fado emerged in early 19th
century Portugal and continues
to be the country's main musical
emblem to this day. Dealing
in melancholia, the genre
expresses the spirit of "saudade"
- an allegedly untranslatable
Portuguese term for a distinct
strain of nostalgic longing.
Lately, the genre has
witnessed a dynamic resurgence.
Led by artists such as Carminho
herself, today's Fado revival
carefully balances modernity and
tradition. Carminho's music has
received ample critical praise
and has topped charts in Portugal
and Spain. Having also toured
internationally, Carminho has
deservedly become a cultural icon
in Portugal.
Together, these two promising
artists look to showcase their
native musical traditions in
what is sure to be an excellent
performance.'
ORCHESTRA//
UBC alumna to conduct
Vancouver Academy Symphony
Public Open House - December 2
Library Garden Draft Design Concept
UBC is undertaking a process to redesign the public green space between
Memorial Road and Agricultural Road, in front of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.
This central location will bring together students, faculty, staff, residents, and visitors
and will house the new Indian Residential Schools History and Dialogue Centre
Join us to learn about the project, view the draft design concept for Library Garden and provide your input.
The project landscape architects and Campus and Community Planning staff will be on hand to discuss
the draft design concept and answer questions
Date: Wednesday, December 2, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm
Place: 1st floor lobby, Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd
Online Consultation: Project information, the draft design
concept for Library Garden and an online questionnaire wil
be available from November 23 - December 6 at
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver
Questions? Please contact Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior
Manager, Consultation at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or
604-822-9984.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
*&A*#ffl#.
= HOTO COURTESY VANCOUVER ACADEMY OF MUSIC
Allan is using her dance experience to influence her conducting.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Campus + Community Planning
Emilie Kneifel
Contributor
Symphony orchestra concerts are
unique in that they are one of the
few musical performances lacking
an accompanying dance - no
flailing lead singers nor leaping
ballerinas.
Throughout the show one
person remains standing,
treading in a sea of string, brass,
woodwind and percussion.
This individual moves in time
with the composition, but her
dance is different. It hasn't been
choreographed in order to flow
in tandem with the music. It is
the music. On November 22 at the
Orpheum Theatre, that new moon
will be Kathleen Allan.
Allan, a UBC alumna who
recently graduated from Yale
University with a master's in
choral conducting, is back in
Vancouver to join the Vancouver
Academy of Music Symphony
Orchestra (VAMSO) as associate
conductor of orchestras and the
Vancouver Academy of Music
(VAM) as director of choral studies
— a brand-new program at the
academy.
"These young players are so
passionate about what they're
doing," she said. "I can feel that.
It's so satisfying as a conductor
to stand on the podium and feel
that the 80 people in the room are
invested in the same thing. It's
quite magical actually ... they are
young and they're pursuing their
instruments with a real passion
and quite a lot of talent. It's a very
exciting energy to work with."
The performance features
three of Tchaikovsky's best known
works. The first piece, Nutcracker
Suite, is from the infamous
Nutcracker Ballet — a favourite of
the upcoming holiday season. The
second piece, Piano Concerto No.
1, features soloist Amanda Chan
who is the recently appointed
head of the VAM piano faculty.
She is described by Allan as "really
riveting and ... quite impressive."
"It has very beautiful and soft
moments, but also really bombastic
and exciting parts. So that might
be one of the most exciting parts
of the program for me," said Allan.
"Working with a soloist of that
calibre and to introduce these
young players to a repertoire like
this is really exciting."
Tchaikovsky's compositions
are pervasive in ballet, but
the distillation of the music in
symphony performance reveals the
potency of Tchaikovsky's works as
their own entities.
"The music is just universally
awesome. It's some really
powerful stuff just on its own
merit.... The thing about it is
that it's timeless," Allan said.
"These Tchaikovsky works that
we're doing have lasted and they
have always been hits. There's a
reason for that and it's because
the music has such integrity and
complexity that you can listen
to it a hundred times and still
get something new out of it. I
think that it's very relevant to our
culture today."
Allan's job is to bring all
of that to life. Part of that
means incorporating her own
connections with Tchaikovsky.
Growing up, Allan was heavily
involved in ballet dancing until a
hip injury ultimately steered her
towards other forms of musical
expression. But Allan's continued
love of dance has allowed her
to relate with the pieces in the
upcoming program.
"I definitely feel that it's a
reconnection with [the dancing]
world. Even though we're
performing just the orchestral
suite without dancers, it's music
that I grew up knowing as part
of my involvement in dance,"
she said. "I was talking to the
orchestra the other day about
the way that the phrases flow
together and I said, 'If you delay
here, if you hesitate, you have to
remember that. If a dancer's in
the air, they can't wait for you,
right? They've got to land!'"
As a conductor, Allan has
to incorporate that into the
interpretation of the music as
she imagines that somebody
is relying on the orchestra to
support their gracefulness.
"But conductors make no
sound and that's the challenge,"
she said. "We have to shape the
music. As a conductor, I have
to impart my musical decisions
and my interpretation of a work
without actually making any
sound myself."
Although Allan no longer
dances ballet, she will
nonetheless be seen moving at 2
p.m. at the Orpheum November
22. Keep an eye out — she will
be the one steering the VAMSO
with her baton and her very own
soundless conductor dance. 'M // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
CLASSES//
We need a fall break
BAILEY RAMSAY
Op-ed
Right now, many of us have
friends who are resting after a
long and strenuous season of
midterms — so why aren't we?
Senate has considered
implementing a fall reading
break. "The highest traffic for
counselling services is right
around November and October,"
said Lina Castro, the AMS
Mental Health and Well-Being
commissioner in an interview
with The Ubyssey. "A short
break in that time would be very
beneficial for students."
That was in September.
A university's academic timetable can
significantly affect
the mental health of
students, especially
with the days growing shorter, darker
and colder."
While our fellow students
across the country are about
to return to their classrooms
well-rested and refreshed, UBCs
crowd continue to lose more and
more sleep. We are all crying out
for a pause from essays, exams
= ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
and assignments. Two weeks of
winter break is not enough to
compensate for the stress caused
during the hectic fall term or
prepare us for the following
spring term.
While the idea of a fall reading
break is still working its way
across Canada and is relatively
new to a lot of universities, why is
UBC Vancouver one of the last to
the plate? Even UBCO has a fall
reading break, albeit a two-day
one.
A university's academic
timetable can significantly affect
the mental health of students,
especially with the days growing
shorter, darker and colder. After
a survey in 2012 at Queen's
University, 10 per cent of students
admitted to having thought of
suicide at some point in their
academic careers. Queen's, which
had experienced numerous
suicides in as little as two years,
made a proactive effort to adjust
class and exam schedules as well
as created a fall break to alleviate
the pressure of academic stress
for students and improve their
mental well-being.
Universities all over the
country have taken the fall
reading break into effect and
expanded their counseling
services to directly address the
abundant presence of mental
illness and severe stress on
campus. Why aren't we? 'M
Bailey Ramsay is a fourth-year
English literature major and Copy
Editor at The Ubyssey.
EDITORIAL //
Last Words: Hatiri on Drizzy
LLUSTRATION ELENAVOLOHOVA/THE UBYSSEY
Anthropology professor Charles Menzies got his cane out on Twitter.
UBYSSEY STAFF
Last Words
At 6:06 a.m. on November 13,
professor of anthropology Charles
Menzies got out of bed and took to
Twitter to trash the Hotline Bling
project put on by Dive Into UBC,
The Calendar and the AMS.
AMS Senator Gurvir Sangha
(@girby) was quick to defend the
completely harmless series of dance
videos, and called out Menzies for
cane-waving and fundamentally
misunderstanding what happened.
Not one to give up easily, Menzies
doubled down on calling out the
AMS out for not doing enough for
social justice causes, presumably
while on top of a mountain, peering
down and hating the happy town
below, or writing a one-star review
oiFootloose.
Only middle-class, entitled
students dance to Drake. And
dancing to Drake is the only
thing those entitled, middle-class
students care about. Damn those
entitled, middle-class students and
their... dancing.
Sangha then linked Menzies
a Ubyssey op-ed on UBCs
international tuition increases to
illustrate what the AMS is actually
investing their energy in; we'll just
let the last couple of tweets on the
right speak for themselves. '21
» Fallow
charlesmenzies
©charlesmenzies
"It's one of the coolest things I've ever done at #UBC," AMS
Student President. The sorry state of student politics.
In.is/www.cbc.ca/new...
6:06 AM-13 Nov 2015
* Follow
charlesmenzies
©charlesmenzies
So where is action on issues of social justice as opposed to
entitlement middle-class antics? @girby Not found in
mainstream Student Orgs.
7:34 AM -13 Nov 2015 ■ Greater Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
charlesmenzies 13 Nov
©charlesmenzies
©girby that's your example? Off to a workshop that will make real
change. Bye for now,
£
} Gurvir Sangha
©girby
tf Follow
©charlesmenzies don't think it is physically possible to cringe
harder than I just did. Have a good day, Professor.
7:52 AM-13 Nov 2015
+i     t> 1     #13
You don't have to
sit in school to stand
among greatness.
> Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved on to invent a
little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else, or have a scheduling conflict
come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized online courses, then move on to bigger
successes. Talk about a light bulb moment.
Athabasca
University // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015
NATIONALS //
Women's soccer capture national title in 3-0 win over TWU
The women's team captured the Canada West title and their first CIS national title since 2006.
Olamide Olaniyan
Senior Staff Writer
In their first CIS national final
since 2006 and their first time
hosting the Gladys Bean Memorial
Trophy in 25 years, the UBC
women's soccer team defeated
the Trinity Western University
Spartans 3-0 to record the program
at six CIS title wins — the most of
all the teams in Canada. This win
also records the UBC athletics
program's 100th CIS title.
This is a stark contrast to the
'Birds 2014-2015 season. Last year,
the T-Birds lost to the Spartans in
the quarter-finals of Canada West
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15035
Public Open House
Gage South Student Residence and Diesel Bus Transit Exchange
Join us on Wednesday, December 2 to view and comment on the proposed Gage South Student
Residence and UBC Diesel Bus Transit Exchange to be located southwest of Wesbrook Mall and
Student Union Boulevard.
nesday, December2,2015 3:00 - 6:00 PM
Lobby, Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Boulevard
Subject Site
North Parkade
New
Aquatic
Centre
Aquatic
Centre
University
Boulevard
Plans will be displayed for a new integrated facility
incorporating a student residence for upper year
students, bus storage and a transit exchange area.
The facility will comprise four buildings ranging in
height from 5 -14 storeys that will be constructed
on a 2-storey podium for bus storage.
Representatives from the project team and Campus
+ Community Planning will be on hand to discuss
and answer questions about this project
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be accepted from Nov. 16 to Dec. 9.
To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit:
plannine.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| «*lfegt,fc»°li!^5UfegS&Sfi7hS0l 5Ui=fMtr.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
and had lost four games in regular
season play. This year, the 'Birds
have lost only one game, clinched
the Canada West playoffs and
defeated their regional rivals to
solidify their place as CIS national
champions.
"[I am] proud of my team. I
think they had this goal in mind
all season and they never faltered
in their preparation and their
determination," said Marisa
Kovacs, who is finishing off her
inaugural season as Thunderbird's
head coach.
"They have played for each
other this season and they deserve
it. I am extremely proud and happy
for them."
Kovacs' high-pressure style of
play and constant attack showed
up right from the first whistle to
the first goal. After a mad scramble
in the Spartan's box in the 17th
minute, the ball found T-Bird
midfielder Madison Guy and
she proceeded to lob the ball over
Spartan goalkeeper Ally Williamson
for her first goal of the season.
There was an opportunity for
a Spartan comeback in the 30th
minute, to level the score and
equalize. Spartan forward Seina
Kashima snuck into the box to
receive a through pass from the left
side of the field, but Thunderbird
goalie Olivia De Goede dove deep
and saved it. In the next minute and
after an incredible counter-attack,
the Thunderbirds scored another
goal to make it 2-0 in the first half.
T-Bird forward Jasmin Dhanda
made a quick drive down the right
side of the pitch and fourth-year
Shayla Chorney polished it off.
Spartan forwards Isabella Di
Trocchio and Krista Gommeringer
went on a rampage in the opening
moments of the second half, posing a
big danger to the 'Birds. A real scare
occurred in the 55th minute when
= HOTOSJEREMYJOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
Gommeringer unleashed a hard shot
from the edge of the box, but De
Goede dove and caught it.
In the 63rd minute, the T-Birds
got a free kick. Thunderbird
defender Aman Shergill took three
steps back before launching the ball
towards Williamson. Williamson
intervened at the last seconds,
tipping the ball over her and out of
bounds, putting it momentarily out
of danger. However, the following
corner kick by UBC midfielder and
assist leader Taylor Shannik led to
a hustle right in the middle of the
Spartans box and found its way into
the back of the net.
Dhanda and her striking
counterpart Amirit Berar were a
fantastic duo in the game with quick
back and forth passing and weaving
in between defenders. The gaps
that they opened up in the Spartans
defence seemed to wear down the
opposition. The two were also very
proactive forwards, coming back
several times to make a tackle or to
defend the goal.
The 'Birds, as a unit, managed
to stay comfortable and composed
the entire game and tournament —
even with the pressure of hosting
the national championships.
Perhaps the comfort was as a result
of their home advantage or their
firm belief in Kovacs' coaching
philosophy. Whatever the case,
the 'Birds managed to completely
shut out all their opposition —
the University of Calgary and the
University of Sherbrooke — in
the CIS, maintaining clean sheets
throughout.
"I think the talent speaks for
itself on the pitch and... we couldn't
have done it without all 27 players,"
said Kovacs.
"We just needed something to
believe in and they started to believe
in themselves and believed that they
could win the national title." 'M TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2015   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
COMPETITIVE CLUBS //
UBC Lacrosse wants to rebuild Canada's oldest sport
Olamide Olaniyan
Senior Staff Writer
The UBC Thunderbirds' Lacrosse
Sport Club has come a long way
since its inception in the fall of
2012. What started with a couple
of friends, three-foot long lacrosse
sticks and a ball tossed around
Totem Park Residence now has 25
players on its roster and is one of
nine clubs selected to kick off the
UBC Athletics' new athletic stream
— the competitive club.
Despite field lacrosse being one
of Canada's oldest sports, many
people are unaware that a UBC
lacrosse team even exists. But
things may be about to change.
The team, due an early season
start, will be the first in the new
competitive status division and the
first non-varsity team able to don
the Thunderbird name.
Kyle Robinson, New
Westminister native and head
coach of the team, has been playing
lacrosse most of his life. Being from
around here, UBC should have
been an obvious pick for his post-
secondary education. However, the
lack of a strong and competitive
lacrosse team at UBC means
that he went to school at McGill.
The East Coast boasts a more
established and prominent league
called the Canadian University
Field Lacrosse Association
(CUFLA) which is comprised of 13
teams from Ontario and Quebec.
He ended up playing four years in
that league.
"One of the major driving forces
for not going to UBC was that there
was no lacrosse," said Robinson,
who is also the club's competitive
director. "I've grown up playing
lacrosse here, the club level [and]
the high school level — everything
but at the university level."
After he graduated from McGill
in 2013, Robinson came to UBC
where the lacrosse club was still a
fledgling team trying to grow. The
previous year, Dan Millar with his
friends Sam Neuharth and David
Hammond, recruited friends to
their new lacrosse club — albeit
with free beer. Months later, they
had their club constituted by the
AMS.
Robinson arrived in the fall
and UBC had just played a lone
exhibition match against the
University of Victoria. There
was talk of going to Edmonton
to play in a tournament with the
University of Alberta, University
of Calgary and the University of
Lethbridge. It would be a great
opportunity to procure some
competition and at least put
them on the map for Canadian
field lacrosse. They came second,
losing to University of Alberta in
the round-robin segment of the
tournament and the final.
"We practised for two months
[and] went over there at the end
of October... that's where I saw
we have enough guys here at the
university and we can compete
against a similar level of teams
around here."
Come February 2014, the team
applied for competitive club status
just as talk of the infamous sports
review was gaining traction. While
waiting to see if they would be
selected as part of the competitive
club stream, the team started playing
in exhibition matches against teams
in the Canada West Field Lacrosse
League (CWFLL).
"So we played a few exhibition
games in there and the commissioner
asked in the summer — in the off
season — if we would be interested
in joining that league full time," said
Robinson.
Their 2014/2015 season
was their first in the CWFLL.
Despite being the newest team
and a fresh entry into the league,
UBCS lacrosse team is celebrating its first year as a competitive sports club.
the Thunderbirds managed to
come fourth in the league out of
seven teams with a 6-10 regular
season record. They proceeded
to the provincial championship
tournament in April and were
a runner-up in the Tier II
Championship.
The club's initial goal was to
gain varsity status and eventually
play in national intercollegiate
lacrosse. However, that is
an especially large problem
considering that there is no
overarching college lacrosse
championship across Canada
like the Canadian Interuniversity
Sport (CIS). For this lacrosse
team, every step they take is a new
one. They are pioneers not only
for lacrosse teams on the national
front, but also on the competitive
club front here at UBC.
"We really laid the groundwork
for a lot of what are becoming
new policies in this new division
they have created. So that's been
pretty cool being on the forefront
of that and getting a little bit more
support within the university
rather than just operating on
your own," Robinson said. "[UBC]
Recreation [has] been ... helping
us begin to achieve some of the
goals."
Joining a seven-team league
and gaining competitive club
status is a good start. According to
Robinson, having the status comes
with its own perks.
These perks come in the
form of support from UBC, but
not in the way you might think.
The competitive club teams do
= HOTO MATTHEW LUND/THE UBYSSEY
not get funding, but they do get
small stipends for coaches, allow
easy access to fields for practice,
reduced fees for field use and
they get to use the "Thunderbird"
name at their competitions and
tournaments.
According to Robinson,
the next step for the club is to
develop their on-field product and
continue their growth within their
new competitive club status.
"Trying to attract students
who are interested,... create a
sustainable competitive roster
to grow within our league and
increase our competitiveness is
our first on field priority," said
Robinson. "Off the field, we
want to continue to grow the
competitive club division as well
as our own team." 'M
PLAYOFFS //
UBC upsets Calgary 34-26 to capture Hardy Cup
UBC hasn't won a Hardy Cup since the Thunderbirds Vanier Cup winning season in 1997.
Bill Situ
Staff Writer
Coming off of a win against the
Manitoba Bisons in the Canada
West semifinal, UBC football
earned a stunning 34-26 victory
against the undefeated, number-
one ranked Calgary Dinos to hoist
the 79th Hardy Cup.
The T-Birds opened the
scoring right at the kickoff
with a rouge by kicker Quinn
van Gylswyck. On their next
possession, UBC scored a field
goal to take a 4-0 lead early in the
game.
The Dinos had a sloppy start
as they picked up four penalties
on their first possession. Still,
Calgary erased UBCs lead
midway in the first quarter when
star quarterback Andrew Buckley
made an 81-yard pass to receiver
= HOTO COURTESY LOUIE VILLANUEVA/THE GAUNTLET
Rashaun Simonese that set the
team up for a touchdown.
The Thunderbirds then
regained their four-point lead as
tailback Marcus Davis scored a
touchdown on a 12-yard reception
from quarterback Michael
O'Connor. Receiver William
Watson caught two receptions for
42 yards on the drive. He finished
the game with an impressive 130
receiving yards.
In the second quarter, Calgary
narrowed UBCs lead to 11-10 with
a field goal. On the next kickoff,
receiver Trivel Pinto returned the
ball 61 yards before Davis got his
second touchdown of the game on
a 33-yard reception from O'Connor.
On UBCs next possession,
O'Connor completed a 70-yard
pass to Canada West all-star
receiver Alex Morrison to bring
the T-Birds to the Dinos' 15-yard
line. Trevor Casey then came
in as quarterback and scored a
touchdown for the T-Birds on a
two-yard run to give UBC a 25-10
lead.
Near the end of the second
quarter, the Dinos scored a
touchdown to narrow the score to
25-17. The T-Birds then finished
the first half with a field goal
after gaining 35 yards on three
Calgary penalties.
The third quarter saw no
scoring by either team until
Calgary got a single point with 2:33
left on the clock. Van Gylswyck got
a field goal for the T-Birds in the
final seconds of the quarter as UBC
led 31-18 by the end of the third.
The fourth quarter was a
stalemate again until Calgary got
j a touchdown with 2:16 remaining.
I On the ensuing kickoff, the Dinos
I picked up another rouge to narrow
I the gap to 31-26.
I       With the four-point difference,
I intensity peaked during the final
I two minutes of gameplay as both
I teams anxiously fought to come
| out on top. The Dinos had a chance
I to take the lead after gaining
i possession on a T-Birds punt, but it
i quickly vanished as they fumbled
[ the ball. UBC then scored a field
I goal to secure the 34-26 win.
I       UBCs victory against Calgary
I is the team's 16th Hardy Cup
; and the first one since 1997 The
| Thunderbirds now advance to the
I U-Teck Bowl to take on the St.
i Francis Xavier X-Men.
;        "My heart goes out to them
i because they're the top team in the
i country and on this one day, things
I just didn't work out for them. It's
| tough in football that way," UBC
| head coach Blake Nill said of the
I Dinos. "You look at these kids and
I what it means to them, it's worth
| it."
i       "We knew we'd have to play the
i best game possible and we played
I a really hard-fought game," said
i O'Connor.'JJ 12    I    COMICS + GAMES    I    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2015
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CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS
1- Currency unit in Western
Samoa;
5- Aromatic compound:
10-Con game;
14- School founded in 1440;
15- Roman goddess of the
moon;
16-Stinging insect:
17-Cool!;
18- Early Peruvian;
19- Bluesy James;
20- Potpourri bag;
22- Congregation;
24- Old anesthetic;
25- Besides;
26-Catsound;
28-_ _firma;
32-RR stops;
35-CD- ;
37- Official countof population;
38-Small island;
39- Oldsmobile model;
41- Driving peg;
COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
42-Gasoline;
45-Outdo;
46- mater;
47- Capital of Yemen;
48-Memory unit;
50-Short essays;
54-This is only ;
58- Having the form of a sac;
61- List of corrections;
62- Eastern nanny;
63- Brush a horse;
65- I've Got in Kalamazoo;
66- Irritate;
67-Very, to Verdi;
68- Honeycomb unit;
69- Insect-repelling chemical:
70-Role for Clark;
71- Deuce topper;
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15034
Public Open House
Chan Gunn Sports Medicine Pavilion
Join us on Thursday, November 26 to view and comment on a new proposed sports medicine
facility. The Chan Gunn Sports Medicine Pavilion will be located on the southwest corner of
Thunderbird Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall, next to the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports
Centre.
ay, November26,2015 11:30 AM-1:00 PM
. _. :h Lobby, Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre, 6066 Thunderbird Boulevard
Spirit Park
Apartments
HouTe
Fraser Commons
Hall
Osoyoos
Housing
Fraternity
Village
Wesbrook Mall
.^L. Dou
Meeting
Location
Frank Buck Field
Gerald McGavin
Rugby Centre
Arthur Lord Field
:©
Plans will be displayed for the new 1,630m2 Chan
Gunn Sports Medicine Pavilion that will accommodate clinical practice and research facilities to
serve varsity athletes and the general public.
Representatives from the project team and Campus
+ Community Planning will be on hand to discuss
and answer questions about this project.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be
accepted from Nov. 12 to Dec. 3. To learn more or to
comment on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
For further information: H
Please direct questions to Karen Russell
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
jfkae-a-g-sn^m. w$m4z&mfc.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE   UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
DOWN
1- High-strung;
2- Bothered;
3- Slender freshwater fish;
4- National songs;
5- Prepare a book or film for
release;
6-Transgression;
7- Be silent, musically;
8- Put into law;
9-Cattle spot;
10-Add sugar;
11- Burmese, Manx, and
Scottish Fold;
12- Italian wine city;
13-Movie-rating org.:
21- Before;
23-After the bell:
25-Mil. truant;
27- Like the Sabin
vaccine;
29-Queue after Q;
30-Sorry sort;
31-Cruising;
32- Dupes;
33- yellow ribbon.
34- Env. notation;
36-
37-
40-
43-
44-
46-
49-
Ran into;
Reproduction;
Holds up;
■ Move by degrees;
Hawaiian island;
■Takeaway;
■ Paving material;
51- "Enigma Variations"
composer;
52-Waterlogged soil;
53- Irregularly notched;
55- Enthusiastic;
56-Stagnant;
57- Reckoning;
58- Reddish-brown
gem;
59- French friend;
60- Racer Yarborough;
61-Send forth;
64-Muesli bit;
f— "-Car
So III never -Qolp-
<*e\ \o be in GryffirvW\
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life-on-campus.wikia.com
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COMIC PATRICK MURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY
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NOVEMBER 10 ANSWERS

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