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The Ubyssey Jan 5, 2016

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Array In light of criticism over its mishandling of sexual assault cases, UBC is reviewing its response protocols and drafting a
specialized sexual assault policy. // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
r
EVENTS
SAT 9
////
MAKE HISTORY 9 A.M. @ CHAN CENTRE
Take part in UBCs Student Leadership Conference and meet
over 1,200 student delegates, presenters and more.
$31.50
SAT 9
////
HOUSE PARTY 8 P.M. @ KOERNER'S
Don't be grumpy about the first week of school alone. Grab
some beers and be grumpy with friends!
$5 PRESALE -$10 ADVANCE - $12 AT DOOR
FRI29
////
FACULTY CUP 10 A.M. @ THE NEST
Join hands with your fellow kinsmen and unleash your fiery rage
at rival faculties!
SIGNUPONLINE
MOST POPULAR
STORIES OF 2015
2015 was a busy one. Luckily you had The Ubyssey to distract you with
articles about Mandopop stars, hot profs and tuition increases. Here
are our top 10 most popular articles from 2015:
1. UBC admission stats 2013/2014: GPAs, acceptance rates
and more
We broke down the admission statistics from UBCs data for the year 2013-
14. Basically we all had to be super smart to get here so pat your 17 year-old
selves on the back!
2. International tuition increases of 46.8 per cent over the
next three years announced
The university announced they'd be asking the Board of Governors to
approve tuition increases for future international students to the tune of
nearly 50 percent.
3. Letter: I was assaulted on campus and nobody saw
We published a letter from a student describing his racially-charged assault
aftera Pit Night earlierthisyear.
4. Pharmacy student Ariel Tsai launches her Mandopop
career
Pharmacy student Ariel Tsai is a popular Mandopop star, so we chatted
with heraboutthat.
5. Chair of Creative Writing program suspended pending
investigation into "serious allegations"
The university's had a great year for PR!
6. Gupta heads to University of Toronto
Gupta really wants to become best friends with Drake so he moved to
the Six and started teaching at U of T. Not a confirmed reason, but it's a
nice thought.
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Aiken Lao
INSPIRED BY
Roman Muradov
7. UBCs 20 hottest profs, according to ratemyprofessors.
com
We are mature and studious students who keep our eyes on our books...
and these profs.
8. Letter: We need to talk
A student decried the rise of the "regressive left."
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
9. Last Words: Hatin' on Drizzy
A prof got into a Twitter fight with a student over Drizzy coming to Block
Party — we chronicled it.
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Features Editor
Aiken Lao Vassi Sharlandjieva
arinteditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer Copy Editor
Peter Siemens Bailey Ramsay
webeditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Moira Warburton &
Emma Partridge
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
ahoto@ubyssey.ca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@u byssey.ca
STAFF
Vassilena Sharlandjieva, Matt Langmuir,
J eremy J oh nso n-S i k< ers, J ul ia n Yu,
SruthiTadepalli, Karen Wang, Jessie
Stirling, Vicky Huang, Olamide
31 a niya n, He niy Al I an, N ata li e M orri s,
Miguel Santa Maria, SivanSpector
Sarah Nabila. Sophie Sutcliffe. Rithi
Jagannath, Samuel duBois.Lucy Fox,
Samantha McCabe.BenCook, Avril
Hwang, Ben Geisberg, Lilian Odera.
EmrnaHicks.AdarnWaitzer.Avril
Hwang. Lilian Odera. Emma Hicks. Ber
Geisberg, Helen Zhou, Nadya Rahman
3 oris Bosnjakovic, Aiden Qualizza,
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It Is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
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written by the Ubyssey staff.They
aretheexpressedopinlonofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Dubli cat ons Society or the University of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing In
The Ubyssey Is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nereln cannotbe reproducec
JANUARY5,2016 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUEXV
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10. Our Campus: In the eSports ring, Kurtis Ling is king
He's the captain of UBCs eSports team and we sat down with him for an
interview. // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
REQUIREMENTS //
The debate over mandatory indigenous courses at UBC
Sophie Sutcliffe
Staff Writer
As the new Liberal government
has declared their support for
the recommendations put forth
by the Truth and Reconciliation
Commission, universities and
other post-secondary institutions
are discussing one potential direct
change: mandatory indigenous
studies courses.
As the Truth and Reconciliation
Commission recommends that
the government increase funding
for "post-secondary institutions
to educate teachers on how to
integrate indigenous knowledge
and teaching methods into
classrooms," members of post-
secondary institutions across
the country have been calling for
mandatory indigenous studies
courses for students.
The student union at the
University of Winnipeg had been
asking their school to take up this
practice for several months. The
student union was unavailable for
comment at this time, but they
were ultimately successful in their
endeavour, according to The Globe
and Mail.
At UBC however, reviews are
mixed regarding such mandatory
courses. Line Kesler, director of
UBCs First Nations House of
Learning, liked the idea of the
courses, but was unsure of whether
they would be ideal for UBC.
"The idea of wanting to provide
information and better ways of
Line Kesler, director of U BC's longhouse, is on the fence about mandating indigenous courses.
= HOTO NADYARAHMAN/THE UBYSSEY
thinking about things to as many
students as possible — of course I
support that," said Kesler. "I think
it's very useful to have the pressure
towards requirements. It's very
difficult to envision, however, a
single course that would perform
that function well at a university as
big and diverse as UBC."
Kesler instead proposed
that individual faculties and
departments across UBC find a way
to incorporate indigenous studies
into their curriculum, citing the
covering of Aboriginal Rights and
Treaties in a foundation-level law
school course as an example.
Daniel Justice, chair of the
First Nations indigenous studies
program at UBC and a citizen of
the Cherokee Nation, has worked
in indigenous studies departments
at many universities. He argued
that while more students taking
indigenous studies courses can
be beneficial, mandatory courses
generally cause more harm than
good.
"Requirements don't always work
out the way people expect them to.
Oftentimes people end up doing
harm to the very people that they
intend to help," Justice said in an
interview with The Ubyssey. "If there
isn't communication about why this
is important, you are going to have a
lot of really resentful and reactionary
students in there."
According to Justice, he and
others experienced such a situation
at other institutions in which there
were courses that students of
colour didn't want to participate
in.
Instead of making indigenous
studies courses a requirement,
Justice argues that other faculties
could instead help raise awareness
of indigenous issues by integrating
First Nations studies into their
courses.
"What we would want to see is
a much more robust understanding
of how indigenous content can
be incorporated throughout the
curriculum... not just in a few
courses," said Justice. 'M
DRINKING //
UBC applies for liquor-primary license at McGavin Rugby Centre
With the license, the centre could serve alcohol from 9 a.m. to 4 a.m.
Joshua Azizi
Senior Staff Writer
UBC is currently in the process
of applying for a liquor-primary
license for the Gerald McGavin
Rugby Centre, meaning the facility
would be able to serve alcohol from
9 a.m. to 4 a.m.
The Rugby Centre is currently
used to host special events, but
has needed temporary licenses in
order to serve alcohol. By acquiring
a permanent liquor-primary
licence, the administrators hope
to make the building easier to use
as an accessible and convenient
location for hosting social
functions.
According to Kavie Toor,
director of facilities and business
development for UBC Athletics,
the centre will primarily be used
for sporting receptions, but any
= HOTOSAMARTH SHYAMANUR/THE UBYSSEY
group will be able to rent out the
space so long as they pay a rental
fee and get approval first.
"We wanted to provide a
venue that could easily host those
events and functions so hence the
rationale of having a permanent
liquor licence," said Toor.
The area will be open six days
a week from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m the
following day — a schedule that
Toor says will give the Rugby
Centre great flexibility over the
types of events they can host.
"Let's say it's the Rugby World
Cup and the game times are odd.
We may want to host an event
that ends late or starts early," said
Toor. "That's why we've got a lot
of flexibility on the timing of it."
The liquor-establishment area
of the building will be able to
hold around 200 people, while
another 100 people will be able to
fit into the reception area.
The type of liquor licence that
an establishment can get depends
on the structure of the business
selling the alcohol. Since the
primary purpose of the bar in the
Gerald McGavin Rugby Centre
is to sell liquor rather than food,
they are applying for a liquor-
primary license with an event-
driven focus.
To acquire this license,
the owner of a business must
submit an application to the BC
Liquor Control and Licensing
Branch (LCLB) where the staff
will deem whether or not the
business should be permitted
to serve alcohol. After the
business gets approval, the owner
must also submit its proposed
floor plans, then undergo an
establishment inspection and
applicant interview by a local
liquor inspector. Finally, the local
government must also approve
the application.
If the McGavin Rugby Centre
is approved by the LCLB, Toor
says that "they will then award
the license to the university
in likely about a three-month
process." 'M
GRAD STUDENTS //
GSS launches harassment
reporting site
= ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
The site has been in the works for six
weeks.
Helen Zhou
Staff Writer
The Graduate Student Society
(GSS) has launched mygradstory.
com, a website for grad students to
submit their stories of harassment
and discrimination.
Submissions received on the
site will be compiled by an ad
hoc GSS committee, created to
produce a report that will provide
recommendations for responding
to harassment on campus.
GSS President Tobias Friedel
said that the site had been part of
the vision of the ad hoc committee
"since the beginning" and has been
in the works for about six weeks.
Friedel said that it was a
coincidence that the site was
launched so quickly after the Fifth
Estate investigation and the grad
students came forth about their
experiences with sexual assault at
UBC.
The site is only open to grad
students. "As a grad student
organization, we are focusing on
the graduate student perspective,"
said Friedel. "It is an issue that
we're looking at holistically as well
because, ultimately, it is affecting
the whole community. We need to
make sure that all the pieces are
working well together."
According to Friedel, the
decision to start a website was
based on ensuring that people who
are not comfortable with sharing
their experiences with someone
face-to-face still have an outlet.
"The idea was to provide as many
channels as possible to reach as
many people as possible," he told
The Ubyssey.
The committee plans to collect
data until the end of the term,
but the report will not be written
until they have collected enough
stories to be used. The submitter
has the option to give consent for
their stories to be used in the form
of statistics or modified, redacted
"blog-style" sharing.
"It's not our intention to
pressure people to come forward.
It is very dependent on the
students' willingness to share their
experiences with us," said Friedel.
He explained that they will
also look at the methods of other
universities when dealing with
harassment and discrimination
cases in order to make suggestions
for what will work for UBC.
"My hope is that we will get a
better idea of what students are
facing at UBC and the kinds of
problems they have run into in
terms of addressing [harassment
and discrimination]," he said. "It
will hopefully help us come up
with suggestions around improving
procedures [and] closing gaps with
the reporting process." '21 M4TH
PANCAKE BREAKF
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ART.   MUSIC.   COMEDY.   FOOD.   GET   INVOLVED // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
COMEDY//
Vancouver comedy duo Hip.Bang! hits a home run
with their new comedy web series PITCH MEN
Andrea Gonzalez
Staff Writer
Ever wondered what the perks of
owning your own minor-league
baseball team are? Or perhaps
how a sleeping chair might
revolutionize your life? Even if
you haven't casually pondered
on the most socially appropriate
catch phrases for a given
occasion, the hilarious comedy
duo Hip.Bang! are here to tell you
why these objects and many more
run-of-the-mill antics are worth
your attention in their hysterical
new web-series: PITCH MEN.
Directed and produced by
Tom Hill and Devin Mackenzie
PITCH MEN follows two middle-
of-the-road guys as they attempt
to sell various absurd antics by
delivering high-energy, fun and
fast-paced pitches. Each episode
focuses on one specific product
— from woodchips to impossible
objects — and is followed by a
quick glimpse of the characters'
lives outside of the theatre,
increasingly put under strain by
their jobs as pitch men.
"In each episode, we're
presenting an idea and playing
a game with that idea. We kind
of juice comedy out of it," said
Mackenzie. "While a narrative arc
can be found here, there's not so
a much recurring storyline that
happens in every episode, so they
can be singular videos that can
stand on their own."
As a project for Hip.Bang!,
PITCH MEN has been in the
works for some time and was
inspired by the comedy duo's
experience with UBC Improv and
their involvement in the wider
Vancouver comedy community.
"The original concept came
from a scene we did in a show
actually in a Vancouver Improv
Festival a few years ago," said
Hill. "We were a pair of guys
pitching a cruise, but it was a
couple's cruise where there
was no kissing allowed as the
real purpose of the cruise was
harpooning whales. Overall, it
was a really fun scene and the
sort of quick-witted, aggressive
style ended up becoming part of
our inspiration for PITCH MEN."
As can be expected in the
production of their comedy web
series, shooting the episodes was
both a thrilling and memorable
experience for the comedy duo.
"At one point [during filming],
I had to go find an enormous pile
of woodchips and shovel them
into my car with the tarp down,
which was totally ridiculous,"
said Mackenzie. "The baseball
episode was also really fun to
shoot because we were doing a lot
of dives and catches — basically
playing baseball inside the theatre
— and that was really fun."
PITCHMEN is available online now.
Yet the creation and editing of
the episodes was not without its
challenges.
"The original episodes were
actually shot pretty quickly
within a period of 2 days and
quite extensively edited with
support from our two fantastic
editors, Peter Hadfield and Ryan
Anderson," said Hill. "It was also
a key part of the process to make
the videos almost unnaturally
fast to replicate the way that
pitchmen act. That was actually
quite a time consuming process
in editing just because it was very
detail oriented to get that much
air cut out."
The series' punchy two-
minute episodes feature
appearances from a variety
of renowned local comedy
heavyweights, including Aaron
Read ofThe Sunday Service, who
made a cameo appearance in
their "Catch Phrases" episode.
= HOTO COURTESY HIP BANG
With its innovative style,
PITCH MEN delivers cutting
wit and refreshing charm as
Hill and Mackenzie continue
to push boundaries with their
unique brand of comedy. In
addition to a number of surprising
twists, audiences can expect
some interesting choices on the
things that Tom and Devin sell,
including products that they are
not necessarily fond of and a
whole lot more laughs. So buckle
up!
"The series keeps changing
quite quickly and I think it's cool
that you get to see the guys evolve
as they go through the pitching.
The pitches are wild enough that
they will change you and, in the
meantime, you will see how they
change us," said Hill.
New PITCH MEN episodes
are released every Monday
and Thursday on Hip.BangFs
YouTube channel. 'tJ
THEATRE //
Heathers: the Musical a preview of the cult classic
Yasmin Gandham
Contributor
What's better than a dark comedy
musical to start off the new year?
Following the story of the 1988
classic The Heathers, starring
Winona Ryder and Christian
Slater, the adaptation seeks to tell
the story of a high school run by
three popular and gorgeous girls
— the Heathers — who are at the
top of the social hierarchy.
A spin-off from the cult
classic, Heathers: the Musical
began in an off-Broadway
production in 2014 following a
sold-out Los Angeles tryout.
The Heathers, described
as "the crudest in all of Ohio"
provide the source for two hours
of hilarity onstage.
"At the beginning of the
musical, my character Veronica
Sawyer has a shot at getting to
be in with the Heathers," said
Christine Quintana, actor and
UBC grad. "Just as she starts to
undergo this terrible personality
metamorphosis, she meets this
moody dark stranger named J.D.
who gets her to start questioning
who she really is."
Crucial to the adaptation
of the '90s classic was director
David Jones, whose priority was
to curate a diverse cast.
Quintana explained, "Theatre
all over the UK, US and especially
here in Canada is facing a crisis
of identity in that the people that
you get on the bus with in a major
city like Vancouver are not the
people you see on stage."
The casting of the musical is aiming to promote diversity.
The lack of diverse roles
is especially important in a
production like Heathers as the
musical takes place in a high
school.
"You won't find a high school
in BC that has all of the same
kinds of people attending it," said
Quintana. "We live in diverse
communities, our stages need to
be the same as well."
Heathers plays on a lot of
the same topics and themes
addressed in classic teen movies
such as Clueless and Mean Girls.
"If you're at school and
stressed, you have to see a great
rock musical with some cute
clothes and murder. What better
way to shake off the stress?" said
Quintana.
The production contains
= HOTO COURTESY HEATHERSTHE MUSICAL
strong language, mature content,
nudity, smoking, and loud noises
- it comes with a warning to
audiences. Sure to be hilarious
and heartwarming, production
begins this week. '21
Heathers: The Musical is
playing at The York Theatre
(639 Commercial Dr, Vancouver)
January 6-17. Tickets are available
online.
FESTIVAL//
Young people
IGNITE culture
=HOTOCOURTESYIGNITE
The IGNITE panel promotes inclusivity.
Howard Dai
Contributor
A group of youth in East Van
is up to something — they call
themselves The Panel.
IGNITE! Youth Panel invites
young Vancouverites age 13-24 to
join their Monday night meetings
in the heart of East Vancouver.
Located in the Cultch theatre, the
motivated youth gather weekly to
share their ideas and get a hands-
on opportunity to produce the
next annual IGNITE! Youth Arts
Festival in May 2016.
"I love that we don't turn
anyone away, we're super
inclusive," said Anna Matthew, a
fourth-year panel member. "It's
an amazing group of youth."
The Panel takes charge in
every aspect of the IGNITE!
festival from the administrative
duties such as budget drafting,
sponsorship and marketing, to
auditions, programming and
designs. This season's panel
meetings have begun in October.
However, any youth between the
ages of 13-24 can still join at any
point throughout the year.
For Julien Buffavand, a
fourth-year UBC student in the
Department of Film and Theatre
on his first year of exchange
from France, this is the perfect
opportunity to get involved in
the cultural scene outside of UBC
and meet people with different
backgrounds and profiles.
"It's really about being
curious," said Buffavand after
reflecting on his experience with
the panel this year so far. He
believes that the panel allows
youth to "show what you can do
out of others' creativity ... and
what you think is worth telling
people or showing onstage."
Panel members have the
opportunity to take on a wide
range of positions during the
actual festival as well, particularly
in the technical aspect. Matthew
mentioned that the technicians in
the performance venue become
mentors during the festival where
they spend a day walking the
enthusiastic youth through the
process of managing a technical
rehearsal and running the show.
"Then [the technicians] would
help us if anything like really,
really messes up," said Matthew.
"We will shape the festival
around the artists who perform.
You can do whatever you want
and then we will - if we think
that you are good enough - find a
spot for you in the festival," said
Matthew.
"It's really about bringing
something special and showing
what you can do ... what you can
bring," said Bouffvand. 'M PR
^MrTOnTic/
A look at how universities can responsibly
respond to sexual assault.
ALWILL
by Vassilena Sharlandjieva
It's unfortunate that the university has to
take on some roles that are perhaps better
served by the police."
- Scott Anderson, philosophy professor "If there are any worries about university
processes, the AMS is independent of the
institution so survivors should feel safe to
come to the SASC."
- Jenna Omassi, AMS VP Academic and University Affairs
The definition of sexual assault is any non-consentual sexual
act and includes rape (forced vaginal, anal or oral penetration), kissing and touching of a sexual nature. 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
YOGA//
UBC Yoga Club: history,
unification and balance
The yoga club is starting their new years classes this week.
Adrienne Ahn
Contributor
In 2007, the UBC Yoga Club was
established to help ease students
through the stress of exams. Now,
exams are over but with a new
semester beginning, anxiety levels
will be on the rise again. Luckily,
UBC Yoga Club are here to help.
Yoga is widely recognized for
its variety and ability to create
positive energy, but there are other
values — such as the history of
the spiritual practice — that are
commonly overlooked.
Dana Chan, a fourth-year
interdisciplinary studies student,
joined UBC Yoga Club in her
first year. In the following term,
she became a volunteer. Since
then, she has become the current
president of the club and also
shares her experiences as an
instructor.
Although she joined the Yoga
Club due to its affordability
and schedule flexibility, she
values the days she teaches yoga
and can share what she knows
with everyone. Moreover, she
emphasizes the effectiveness of
engaging in the practice for daily
life applications.
"As university students, we
have a lot on our minds. I know
for myself, I always have eight
different places I need to be and
yoga puts you in the present," said
Chan. "It makes you more focused.
After going to a couple classes, you
might take away what you learned
in class out into your real life."
As the president of the club, she
strives to maintain accessibility
by not focusing on the common
barrier faced by people interested
in yoga — money.
"One thing I love about the
club is that it is super accessible
to people that might not be able to
afford it in outside studios," said
Chan, commenting on the ongoing
commercialization of yoga. "Yoga
Club tries to eliminate the aspect
of finances being an issue while
still maintaining as high a quality
as we possibly can."
Inspired by this growing
matter, she plans on holding a
'Yoga Talk" to inform the club's
members on the original history
and purpose of yoga and how it has
been adapted to suit modern day's
commercialized yoga industry.
Additionally, her vision is to create
a larger sense of community within
the members of the club in order
to uphold the lineage of yoga.
'Yoga — with its origin from
the word 'yoke' meaning 'to unite,'
especially at UBC where there
is a huge community — there is
also a lack of community," Chan
said. "So I've started to encourage
teachers to talk more to members
after class and create that sense of
community."
One instructor has already
taken the initiative to build strong
bonds in her classes.
Fabia Zutt is an instructor for
the UBC Yoga Club who has been
deeply involved with the practice
for about 11 years. As a long-time
dancer, she found the similar
movements and postures of yoga
fascinating and decided to engage
in the practice.
"I always felt that there was
more to it than just the physical
aspect, but I didn't know enough
about it. I started practicing
consistently about four years ago
when I had to travel more and
finally moved to Vancouver," she
said. "I needed something to help
me reconnect and centre the body,
but also the mind and soul."
A past student at UBC, it was
natural for her to become an
instructor for the UBC Yoga Club
after gaining teaching experience
and finishing her training. In
her classes, she unleashes her
individual teaching style, which
she describes as a combination of
playful, creative and loving.
"It's like a dance just for
yourself. I encourage the students
to try things, but by being kind
with their bodies — therefore
I give many modifications and
variations," she said. "I like to
make a practical connection to
the practice, to give the students
= HOTO NADYARAHMAN/THE UBYSSEY
nurture for thought as well."
In her classes, she emphasizes
to her students the significance of
creating a balanced community
and the benefits of implementing
the practice in their daily lives.
By keeping this as a goal, she is
constantly inspired to show her
students why yoga is the way to
mindful exploring and living.
"[Yoga] is a practice on many
different layers and works towards
balancing all these layers. In the
end, it's all to live a healthier,
happier life. Some people might be
drawn to the practice for mainly
physical reasons at the beginning,
but at some point Pranayama
(breath work) and meditations
become more important and you
start to notice the benefits off the
mat."
Both instructors share similar
advice on yoga. Chan reminds
everyone to listen to their own
body and take advantage of the
resources available to practice
yoga.
"That's one thing I love about
yoga — it builds body awareness.
It's just about learning how to
check-in with yourself and your
body and learning how to decipher
all the little messages your body's
trying to say to you," she said.
Zutt also advises those who
may be intimidated by yoga to
keep an open mind when trying it
for the first time.
"There is no right or wrong in
yoga. Nothing should ever hurt
or you should take a step back. In
addition, try more than one class
as the style or teacher you tried
might just not be for you. As for
the rest, be open [to] where it
might get you. Maybe you enjoy
practicing once a month, maybe
you yourself [may] become a
teacher at some point."
UBC Yoga Club has 17 classes
every week and the schedules can
be found on their website.
Membership for UBC
students is $10 and $20 for
non-UBC students. A drop-in
class is $2 each and there is no
commitment. '21
COMING UPTHIS MONTH
Opera Warriors
January 5, Queen Elizabeth Theatre
A larger-than-life theatrical dance production overflowing with emotion,
extravagance and some of the most prestigious talent from China's
opera scene.
Student Leadership Conference
January 9, UBC
One of Canada's largest student-run conferences. This year the theme
is "Make History"-a celebration of the past, present and future of UBC,
recognizing our history as individuals and as an institution.
PuSh Festival
from January 19, The Cultch
A powerhouse performance by a UBC-trained opera singer, the
performance offers a response to the radical theatricalization of the
recital form of performance.
Eurydice
from January 21, Frederic Wood Theatre
A reimagination of the Ancient Greek Orpheus and Eurydice myth, this is
a modern and minimalist production of the haunting fairytale. The play is
sharp, alert and engaging-not to be missed.
Aboriginal Children: A UBC Centennial Session
January 21, Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre
This is the fourth of six in the "How to Love a Child" series, devoted to key
issues crucial to the well-being and rights of the university community.
This lecture will focus on the significant challenges Aboriginal children
face in exercising their human rights.
It works in theory,
but will it work
in the real world?
At U of T's School of Public Policy, we'll help you find out.
U of T's School of Public Policy and Governance
puts research and practice in the same classroom. From
climate change to human rights, today's challenges require
both a firm rooting in powerful ideas and a motivation for
real-world action. Through its Masters program in Public
Policy (MPP), U of T is tapping into Canada's most productive
research faculty to shape the next generation of policy leaders.
1 School of Public Policy & Governance
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
www.publicpolicy.utoronto.ca // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
YEAR IN REVIEW//
The 10 most-read opinion pieces of 2015
10. Response to "We need to talk"
m
Brent Lin argues that Reymann ignored silenced voices in his letter.
mWHS!-!
I
• UBC has abandoned women
Alexis Wolfe calls out the university for its lack of support for women on campus.
5,173 views
O. Showing pictures of war on Pit Night
was completely inappropriate
Emma Partridge argues that the Pit's Remembrance Day display was in poor taste.
5,423 views
I • You're angry about the international
tuition increase for the wrong reasons
John Harvey argues what he believes are the root causes of outrage at UBC.
5
Why I'm leaving The Ubyssey to fight the
international tuition increases
Arno Rosenfeld explains why fighting the university needs to take priority.
6,923 views
£h« Why I'm not voting
Jastej Luddu explains why he didn't take part in the federal election.
10,177 views
£. We need to talk
Albert Reymann decries the rise of the "regressive left.'
6,028 views
• UBC takes advantage of loopholes they
made themselves
Th
The Ubyssey's staff takes a look at the absurdity of a UBC housing proposal.
>917y
—^_
7 views
1. I was assaulted on campus and
nobody saw
An anonymous person was the victim of a racially-motivated attack.
22,233 vie
ADVICE //
Ask Natalie: New term blues and how to leave UBC
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice
"Dear Natalie,
My Christmas break was good...
until I got my marks back I've
failed one of my English classes
and it actually matters because
I'm in third year and this was a
required course. I'll need to take
it again, but I don't want to be
the old person in the class. What
should I do?"
You take a breath. A big deep breath.
Grades do not define who you are
or your worth. One (or two) failing
grades aren't going to make or break
anyone. Sure, if you are planning
to apply to grad school it may be
a little dent in your plans, but it
doesn't mean that your plans are
completely derailed. You can still
reach your goals without a 100 per
cent pass rate.
If you aren't planning on going
to grad school, then calm down. As
much as I hate the saying, C's get
degrees. Don't stress too much. UBC
won't kick you out for one sub-par
grade. The Arts policy says you may
be put on Academic Probation if
your winter session average falls
below 55 per cent. If it's below 45
per cent, you will be required to
withdraw for one academic year.
But in both cases, you should talk
to your Academic Adviser. I am
not your Academic Advisor. Other
faculties' policies may vary.
As for being the old student in
class, I think you overestimate how
much other students care about
you. No one in any of my classes
have ever asked how old I was
outside my language classes' forced
conversations. It's a required course,
so just do it before you forget what
you know about the course material.
It doesn't matter if you're the "old"
person in the class because you're
not old and unless you're going
around shouting that you failed this
class before, I doubt anyone will
know.
Learn from what happened and
move on. One failed class isn't the
worst thing that's ever happened.
"Dear Natalie,
With the New Year, it's become
very clear to me that this will be
my last semester at UBC. I'm not
sure what I'm doing after this,
but the tentative plan is to move
back in with my parents until
I land myself a job in their city.
It's possible that I'll find a better
opportunity before I graduate,
but I'm wondering how I will
move all my stuff back to my
parents' place. What's the best
way to do it?"
If your parents live close by:
Pack up the car! Recruit your
friends with cars! Move that bus!
You can do it! It's just going to
be slower (and sadder) than you
think as you pack up the last bit
of freedom you'll get until you get
to pack everything up again.
If you'll have to drive more
than eight hours:
Pack the car up, but as tightly
as possible. The absolute easiest
way to move your stuff back is to
not move it, but dump it. Just get
rid of anything that isn't necessary.
Those beautiful clay pieces of art
from Intro to Ceramics? Toss 'em.
Those clothes that are super cute
(!!) but have been hanging in your
closet since fall 2013? Donate!
Things like dishes, hangers and
textbooks are heavy and they take
up space so they would be a terror
to ship, but you can pack them
up and stick them in the bottom
of your car/van/U-Haul/truck/
whatever. Keep everything that
you really, really, really need and
donate everything else.
If you'll have to fly:
This is where the real decision
making happens. How expensive
is shipping/Greyhounding your
stuff, or at least how much is your
budget for shipping/Greyhounding
your stuff? It's not going to be
cheap, but you can weigh the costs
and benefits of keeping each piece.
Those posters from the poster sale?
Not really needed unless they take
up less than .02 per cent of one
of your bags. The textbook you
know you'll use again? Fine, keep
it.
It's not possible to keep
everything unless you have
unlimited amounts of time and
money. You'll have to say goodbye
to some memories, but you can
rent someone's garage or a storage
unit until you can comeback for
everything. Don't take too long
though, no one wants a favour to
last longer than expected.
"Dear Natalie,
How do I keep my New Year
resolutions this year? I always
fail!"
My piece last year outlines what I
think are the best ways to keep a
resolution, but for sure the best way
is to be passionate about it. Only
when you care about something can
you really succeed at something,
whether it's your grade, working out
or personal goals. Keep at it and you
will have success! 'M
Contact Natalie at asknatalie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions
answered in an upcoming issue. // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY,JANUARY5,2016  |H
By the time I began studying for my
final exam, I'd already had enough
of staring out of the windows of
Koerner Library, trying to make
out the mountains through the
rain and the clouds. So I packed
up my textbooks and unfinished
review and met up with the rest of
the mid-finals expedition team at
a cafe. After some quick googling,
we decided to head to Hollyburn
Mountain in Cypress Park and
snowshoe to the peak.
We grabbed our rented
snowshoes from MEC (I managed
to put mine on backwards
somehow — I'd never snowshoed
before) and parted ways. I was
giddy with the anticipation of not
spending another day glued to
library chairs.
We headed out early the next
morning, trying to beat the sun to
the mountain and make the most
out of the few hours of December
daylight. As we rode up the
mountain, the rain gradually froze
into snow. We finally found the right
parking lot and piled out into the
snow and into our snow shoes. Even
at the trailhead, the snow was thick
and continued to fall. We dodged
nordic skiers and stopped every
other minute to check the map. On
the way back down, we realized the
snow had been falling so heavily that
we had walked right by the correct
trailhead and onto an alternate one.
Eventually, we found our way and
continued up the mountain.
In the woods, the snow was still
falling, but not quickly enough as to
blind us. It was silent except for the
crunch of the snowshoes in the fresh
powder and the heavy breathing
of our group. The silence was very
different from the anxiety-soaked
quiet of the library — this silence was
comforting and calming.
The trail was easy enough to
follow and we  made  good time
passing through the dense woods
quickly. We stopped at a clearing that
separated the kept trail from the less
traveled path that led to the peak. We
layered up — it was getting colder
and the wind cut deeper without the
trees. Snacks were consumed and
then birds, eyeing our snacks, began
to bravely fly closer and closer to our
group. They landed on our bags and
hands, hoping to join in our morning
snack. The group, which had four
photographers in it, started shooting
away only to soon pack their cameras
back up again in fear that the snow
would damage them.
From here, the tree cover thinned
and the slope steepened. Snow was
less tightly packed and, with each
step, my snowshoes threatened to
slip and send me back down the
mountain. However, the snow and
shoes held. After a sweaty hour and
a few close calls of sliding down over
hard fought elevation, we reached the
peak. The view, which supposedly
looked over the entire city and the
North Shore mountains, was five
metres of snow and fog.
The peak, which was largely
unprotected from the elements, was
cold. After a short meal and a stretch
out of the snowshoes, we turned back
to head down Hollyburn.
Snowshoeing climbing slopes or
walking on even ground is relatively
easy — it's just like walking. Down,
on the other hand, is trickier. We all
adopted a run down the mountain
until we slid. Then, we slid until
we fell onto our butts getting
down. Once mastered, it was quick
and relatively painless. With a
lot of laughing and several face-
plants into deeper-than-expected
snowbanks, we Teached the clearing
with the birds again. As it was now
early afternoon and the snow had
stopped falling so heavily, the trail
was busy and well packed.
Once at the car, we brushed
the snow and ice out of our hair
and pants before piling back in. As
we drove down the mountain, the
snow gradually melted back into
rain. We headed into rainy West
Van to warm up with some fresh
pies. With pie in my stomach, the
last of the snow melting out of my
hair and sensation returningto my
fingers and toes, I unlocked my
door and crawled into bed with
thoughts of studying for my last
exam far from my mind. 'BJ TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
FOOTBALL //
Thunderbirds football finally finds its place
Bill Situ
Staff Writer
UBC football's 2015 run may be
over, but it will continue to live on
as a miraculous season that saw
the end of an 18 year Vanier Cup
drought.
"I don't think a university
or province can be more proud.
[The Thunderbirds] ended up
accomplishing a goal that they set
out to do and against all odds,"
said David Sidoo, director of an
organization that fundraises for
the team called the 13th Man
Foundation.
In 1997, UBC won its third
Vanier Cup after 10 straight
seasons without any hardware.
T-Birds running back Mark Nohra
was the recipient of the Hec
Creighton Trophy, an award given
to the CIS's top football player.
Other notable Thunderbirds
alumni who played in the 1997
Vanier Cup include quarterback
and former coach, Shawn Olson
and running back Akbal Singh who
is considered one of UBCs best-
ever running backs. Olson is UBCs
second all-time leader in passing
yards and Singh remains the team's
all-time leader in rushing.
The year after the Vanier Cup
victory, Casey Smith — UBCs head
coach at the time — was unable to
return due to liver cancer. Dave
Johnson entered as an interim
coach before Jay Prepchuk took
over in 1999.
Despite the coaching changes,
the T-Birds' performance remained
solid in 1998 and 1999. The team
finished 6-2 and 7-1 respectively
before losing in the Hardy
Cup during both years to the
Saskatchewan Huskies.
It began in 2000 that the
performance of Thunderbirds
football began to take a downturn.
Between 2000 and 2014, UBC
missed a total of nine playoffs and
saw four coaching changes.
Prepchuk lost his coaching
position after the 2001 season
when the team failed to make the
playoffs. Lou Deslauriers then
replaced Prepchuk the following
year, but his tenure did not last long
either. Having missed two playoffs
and lost twice in the Canada West
semifinals from 2002 to 2005, UBC
ultimately relieved Deslauriers of
coaching duties in 2005.
In 2006, the Thunderbirds
promoted offensive coordinator
Ted Goveia to head coach. Still, the
team continued to struggle, missing
the playoffs for three straight
seasons from 2007 to 2009. Goveia
did not return for the 2010 season.
With Goveia's departure, Olson
— the once famed quarterback —
returned to the university as head
coach. One item on Olson's agenda
was to bring more off-field support
to the struggling football team.
"All the top-level football
programs basically have very, very
significant influx of resources
from outside sources," said Olson.
"Without the off-field foundation
of resources and stuff at your
disposal, then you never get the
opportunity to show what you can
do on the field."
According to Olson, it was
at the turn of the century that
support from athletic departments
started to become essential to the
The Thunderbirds during the Vanier Cup held in Quebec City.
success of varsity football teams
in Canada. He believes that UBC
fell short in this area during his
absence, which led to the several
lacklustre seasons.
"In 2000, if you had a choice
between Laval and UBC ... there
would have to be some crazy
reason for you to choose UBC,"
said Olson.
After more than a decade
of disappointment, UBC had
its best season in 2011. Coming
off of a 6-2 regular season, the
T-Birds placed second in Canada
West and entered the Hardy
Cup for the first time since 1999.
However, due to the use of an
ineligible player, CIS football
forfeited all of UBCs wins and
the 2011 season was recorded as
0-8 in the record books.
"That moment more than any
other ... was one that stunted
our growth. It really prevented
us from taking the next step in
the program development," said
Olson.
Still, the 2011 season saw
quarterback Billy Greene become
the first T-Bird to receive the
Hec Creighton Trophy since
Nohra, and Olson named Canada
West Coach of the Year.
During Olson's years as head
coach, UBC missed the playoffs
in 2010, 2012 and 2014 as well as
lost in the Canada West semifinal
in 2013. Olson ultimately parted
ways with the team by the end of
the 2014 season.
Desperate to see progress,
UBC football fought to hire Blake
Nill as the next head coach. With
seven Vanier Cup games under
his belt and a history of creating
CIS championship teams, Nill
sought to transform the culture
of the football program.
"Coach Nill brought in the
idea that you had to compete,
that you had to earn everything
that you'll be given," said
Brandon Deschamps, who played
running back from 2011 to 2015.
Deschamps also said that
the arrival of a new head coach
required many veteran T-Birds
like himself to demonstrate that
they were capable on the field.
"You had to prove yourself to
[Nill] and I think that was a big
thing for a lot of the veteran guys,"
said Deschamps.
After assuming command of
the football program, Nill's first
order of business was to recruit the
best players he could find. With
the entry of recruits like Michael
O'Connor, Trivel Pinto and Stavros
Katsantonis to the team, UBC
placed first in CIS recruiting for
the 2015 season according to
Canada Football Chat.
"[Nill] is probably the best
recruiter in the country... I think
it was the first time that UBCs
been ranked number one in CIS
recruiting for an off-season," said
Sidoo.
Alongside Nill's efforts, the
football team was also beginning
to receive off-field support from
the newly established 13th Man
Foundation, which Sidoo founded
towards the end of the 2014
season. One of the foundation's
projects in 2015 was the Learning
Centre, which aimed to help
football players achieve academic
success.
With the hiring of Nill, the
drafting of new recruits and
= ILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
support from the 13th Man
Foundation, the T-Birds' first
reality check came during an
exhibition game against the Laval
Rouge et Or, who had won seven
Vanier Cups since 2003. To Nill's
satisfaction, UBC came out with
an impressive 41-16 win.
After the showdown against
Laval, the T-Birds set their sights
on Nill's former team — the
Calgary Dinos — for the first
regular-season game. This time,
against another top CIS team,
the weaknesses of UBC began
to expose itself as the team fell
49-16.
With the loss against the
Dinos, the T-Birds were under
intense pressure on their return
to Thunderbird Stadium to host
Homecoming. In front of 6,950
spectators, UBC defeated the
Regina Rams 27-20 to compensate
for the previous loss.
Following the home opener,
the T-Birds beat the Manitoba
Bisons on the road before
dropping to the Saskatchewan
Huskies on the return home.
Despite an inconsistent start to
the season, UBC football finished
with a winning streak for the
remainder of the regular season,
coming out with a final season
record of 6-2 and placing second in
Canada West.
After four straight wins, the
'Birds showed no signs of stopping
as they got past the Manitoba
Bisons 52-10 in the Canada West
semifinal and advanced to the first
Hardy Cup game since 1999.
As the T-Birds routed the
Bisons, the team came to the
cold realization that their next
opponent was to be Calgary — the
top-ranked CIS football team. At
a time when even Nill anticipated
defeat, UBC came out with an
astounding 34-26 victory to stun
the entire nation.
After upsetting the Dinos, the
Thunderbirds went on to beat the
St. Francis Xavier X-Men 33-9 in
the Uteck Bowl to earn their ticket
to the Vanier Cup. There, they
faced the defending champions, the
Montreal Carabins. After another
intense game, the Thunderbirds
came out on top 26-23, successfully
ending the cup drought.
Having won against successful
CIS teams and captured the Vanier
Cup, Nill believes that "the UBC
football team in 2015 has to be
considered one of the top programs
in the country."
"The teams that everyone was
saying would be the top three
were Calgary, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba," said Nill. "This past
season, we ended up playing those
three teams six times and our
record in those games was 4-2."
In preparation for the 2016
season, Nill has the important
task of recruiting running backs
to replace Deschamps, who is
now at the end of his five-year
eligibility, and other key players.
"Recruiting running backs is
a big deal for us in the off season
and we'll work hard to make sure
that we do a good job with that,"
said Nill.
Even with Deschamps'
absence next year, Nill believes
that the handful of freshmen
players like O'Connor and Pinto,
who will be returning next year,
will continue to be an important
driving force for the team.
"[The returning players]
understand what has to be done
and the way things need to be
done. That's going to make it a
little easier for us there to garner
success next year," said Nill.
However, whether the UBC
football team can repeat its 2015
performance next year remains to
be seen. '21
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graham.zilm@smeetslaw.com
I offer a range of legal services, including:
CIVIL LITIGATION        CRIMINAL LAW       PERSONAL INJURY
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SUITE 1430, 1188 W GEORGIA STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C., V6E 4A2 12    I    GAME AND COMICS    I   TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,2016
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CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS
1- Lethargy;
6- Primitive calculators:
11-
14-
15-
16-
17-
19-
20
21-
23-
24-
25
29
30
31-
StarWars letters:
Triple;
Puerto ;
Cooking container;
Notjoined;
Mag. staffers;
Not a direct hit;
Half-hourfunnyshow:
Wall St. debut;
Crushed sugarcane;
Discovers;
Brother of Moses;
Founded: abbr.;
Mayberry lad;
32-Sheep talk;
35- In spite of;
39- rule;
40- Burrows and Vigoda;
41- Big name in insurance;
42- Greek island;
COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
44-Rubber;
45-Show;
48-And so on: Abbr.;
49-Request;
50- Symbol that represents an
idea;
55- Society-page word;
56-Trotting competition;
58- Before, once;
59- Follow, as advice:
60-Bits;
61- Complete collection;
62- Distorts;
63-Trades;
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15038
Public Open House
Biological Sciences Building - 6270 University Boulevard
Join us at an Open House on Wednesday, January 13 to view and comment on a proposed
addition and renovation to the Biological Sciences building at 6270 University Boulevard to
accommodate new UBC Undergraduate Life Sciences Teaching Labs.
Date:
Place:
Wednesday, January 13,2016 11:30 AM -1:00 PM
rth Sciences Building Atrium, 2207 Main Mall
Chemistry
A Block]
East Mall
Bookstore
Michael
Smith
1
*©
FNH
I
3
o
Chemistry CQ
" Block     >>
Subject
Site
AERL
Bio Sciences
Beaty
Biodiversity
iD:
Main Mall
Henry
Angus
Scarfe
Meeting Location
Earth
''Sciences
Building
EOS
Main
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Plans will be displayed for the project which will
include the demolition of a portion of the building
to allow for a new 9,620m2 4-storey East Wing for
new teaching labs, an upgraded interior courtyard,
and renovation of the existing North Wing.
Representatives from the project team and Campus
+ Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be
accepted from Dec. 7,2015 to Jan 20,2016. To learn
more or to comment on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| 5x|feg&Sn|«4saife#fi&Sfi7h§ol °[£u|r4.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Jewett;
DOWN
1- Flabbergast:
2-Writer Sarah __
3-Size of type;
4- a bout (approximately):
5- Chinese money;
6-You right!;
7-Some pens;
8- Do one's part?;
9- Roman capital of Palestine;
10-Blue dye;
11-Glasses, briefly;
12- Bygone birds;
13-"Who's there?"
reply;
18- Bites;
22- Convert into leather;
24-Teases;
25-Musical Home;
26-Those, to Juan;
27- boy!;
28- Inexperienced;
29-Church recesses;
31-Yippee!;
32- Fragments;
33-Green Gables girl;
34- Food thickener;
36- North American
larch;
37- State of drowsiness;
38- Narc'sorg.;
42-Sunblock letters;
43- Island greetings;
44- Hottimes abroad;
45- Borge's
countrymen;
46-Grenoble's river;
47-Shooting sport;
48- Paradises;
50- pronounce
you...;
51- Increase in size;
52- Pro follower;
53-Put on (limit);
54- Pigsty;
57- Numbered hwy.;
i—°*-Car
Jm back! 1 ap\ S07 nog
and almond nog, cos 4tay
Wereou-r of regular—
is Jha+ our free?/
COMIC JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
<I suppose +he Wnino^
decorations do make
frrM*e»'
COMIC PATRICK MURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY
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