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Array THE UBYSSE
NOVEMBER3.2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEX
PUKE EVERYWHERE SINCE 1918
P/03
P/08
P/09
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//
//
//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
UBC students
could present
at Harvard
Student making
waves with
Mandopop single
Go get
your
flu shot
Football to host
Manitoba in Canada
West Semifinals
ENGINEERING LOOKS TO BOOST FEMALE ENROLMENT PAGE 4
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YOURGUIDETOUBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER3,2015
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
NESTFIIK AND CHILL
TUES 3RD NOVEMBER I 8PM
TUES3
////
NESTFLIX AND CHILL 8 P.M. @ "THE EGG" IN THE NEST
The ultimate relaxation night featuring a movie, free tea and free
hot chocolate.
FREE
FEEL GOOD FITNESS
FRI6
////
ZUMBACLASS 12 P.M. @ UBC REC
Take an hour out of your busy schedule to relax with some Zumba!
Free healthy snacks are provided.
FREE
THURS12
////
WATER WARS 6 P.M. @ UBC REC
Compete in a variety of challenges with your friend. In the water. It'l
be very fun. Registration closes on November9.
PRICES VARY
Veronica Knott takes on world, Board of Governors
ON THE COVER
COVER BY
Kosta Prodanovic
and Aiken Lao
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Senior Staff Writer
As the fight over proposed
international tuition increases heats
up, Veronica Knott will inevitably be
at the centre of the storm. The fifth-
year mining engineering student is
one of three student representatives
on UBC's Board of Governors,
which is in charge of approving the
tuition hikes.
Knott decided to run for
BoG after attending one of their
meetings last winter where housing
fee increases — the subject of large
student protests last fall — were
discussed.
"I saw AMS students really
speak up and I sat there and I said,
'That's what I want to do. I want to
be able to articulate and to express
and be a strong student voice on
the board," Knott said, recalling
how she realized that student
representatives make a difference in
votes concerning student life.
Knott's responsibility as a student
member of the BoG is to act in the
best interest of the university, but she
described herself as a "megaphone"
amplifying the student voice and
ensuring that the Board hears it
every time they meet.
Although students may feel
that their voices are not heard on
topics such as tuition increases,
Knott believes the board strives for a
balance between what's right for the
university and consistently listening
to the students.
"They do care... I think I would
have given up on this role a longtime
ago if I felt like they didn't care," she
said.
Before being elected to the board,
Knott has been deeply involved in
other campus extracurriculars such
as president of the EUS, chairperson
of the National Conference for
Women in Engineering, chair of
the AMS Executive Oversight
Committee and more than 30 other
committees.
"I grew up in this world that
taught me that being confident and
expressing myself was essential,"
Knott said.
Her confidence was cultivated by
parents who pushed her to be brave
and express her mind. As part of an
annual family tradition — a family
gathering they called a "bonfire" —
Knott has had to perform skits in
front of an audience of 40 family
members ever since she was five
years old.
= HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Veronic Knott is accustomed to extreme multitasking.
Going to an all-girls high school
also fostered her self-confidence.
"Our motto was about making
a difference and empowering
women," Knott said. Until grade
12, it hadn't occurred to her that
women didn't go into STEM as
often as men — or in her words,
that "girls didn't rule the world."
As president of the Engineering
Undergraduate Society in 2014-
2015, Knott understood both the
importance of being bold when
representing the voice of students
and the value of accountability.
"I learned that you have to
be transparent and you have to
explain your decisions," Knott
said of the times when the EUS
council challenged her to justify
her decisions. By holding her
accountable, they taught her to be a
good leader.
Her proudest accomplishment
as president of the EUS was
creating the Iron Pin Ceremony,
an event in which every first-year
engineering student recites a code
of ethics and receives an iron pin.
"It was probably one of the best
moments of my life and I think that
was a team that believed in what
we were doing, which was about
making the EUS a more inclusive
place and a more welcoming place,"
Knott said, noting that she still sees
students wearing their pins with
pride.
But organizing the Iron Pin
Ceremony was not without
setbacks.
"A lot of people were insulted
by an ethics ceremony because
they thought engineers were
ethical enough already," said Knott,
explaining how mean-spirited
Facebook posts criticizing the
event brought her to tears. That's
when engineering Associate Dean
Elizabeth Croft stepped in and
convinced Knott not to allow the
criticism to get to her.
"It was just one of those key
moments where it actually really
mattered because if I hadn't had a
female engineering mentor, I may
have given up," said Knott.
Her leadership at UBC has
made Knott realize that she wants
to dedicate her future to impacting
society and hopes to apply her
mining engineering degree to work
on environmental and social policy.
As for her current duties, the
proposed tuition increases will
be discussed at a BoG Standing
Committee on November 24 before
being voted on by the BoG on
December 3.
Knott said she wants to take
the feedback she is hearing from
students during the university-
organized consultation sessions
and "make the board feel it."
In June, Knott was the only
student to vote against the
original resolution on tuition
increases. She thought the
proposal was incomplete and
left unanswered questions about
how the changes in tuition would
impact diversity.
"Students elected me because
they know who I am," she added.
"They know I'm a straight
shooter and they know that I
voice my opinion no matter what
the situation." %
'JjTHE UBYSSEY
Coordinating Editor Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Features Editor
Aiken Lao Arno RosenfekJ
arinteditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer Copy Editor
Peter Siemens Bailey Ramsay
webeditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Emma Partridge &
Moira Warburton
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
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Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
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Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
ahoto@ubyssey.ca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@u byssey.ca
STAFF
Vassilena Sharlandjieva, Matt
_angmuir,JoshAzizi,BI
Situ, Elena Volohova, Jeremy
Johnson-Silvers, Jul ian Yu,
Sruthi Tadepalli, Karen Wang,
Jessie Stirling, Vicky Huang,
Olamide Olanyan, Henry
Allan, Natalie Morris, Migue
Santa Maria, Sivan Spector,
Sarah Nabila, Sophie Sutcliffe,
Rithu Jagannath, Samuel di
3ois, Lucy Fox, Samantha
McCabe, Ben Cook
LEGAL
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EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, N0VEMBER3,2015
CONSTRUCTION //
New plans for a Kin building
Emma Partridge
News Editor
The controversial Community
Health Sciences Centre will not be
built.
The building, which would have
been shared between the schools
of Nursing and Kinesiology and
the Faculty of Education, needed
the support of the AMS to levy the
student fees to fund its construction.
In the last AMS council meeting,
Kinesiology Undergraduate
Society (KUS) President Justin
Tsang put forward a motion to
indefinitely postpone approval of
the Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) that would have allowed
implementation of the fee.
The motivation for scrapping the
MOU — and therefore the building —
was that the school of Kin wants to
change the scope of the project. The
future building will be a kinesiology
hub with students, faculty and TAs
all under one roof as opposed to an
interdisciplinary health centre.
When asked about the motivation
behind changing the building
concept, Tsang that it was "just
difficult because [the KUS]... was
really the only stakeholder that had
anything on paper."
The motion to cancel the MOU
passed unanimously. According to
Tsang, "This doesn't mean that the
CHSC isn't moving forward."
Tsang says the referendum
question will also need to be rerun.
The first referendum was dogged by
questions and controversy.
Last March, a referendum to
approve construction for the $88
million building passed. Make Your
Mark was a Kinesiology-funded,
student-led campaign promoting the
"yes" vote to the project. Kinesiology
students agreed to a $250 increase
in their student fees to fund the
building, which would have been
implemented after the building was
finished.
The first issue that raised
eyebrows was the fact that separate
faculties were also supposed to have
a stake in the building, even though
only Kinesiology students would
be providing the whole $5 million
necessary to fund the project.
The Faculty of Education
and School of Nursing were also
supposed to be in the building,
despite that it was mostly kin
students feeling the need for a
central location of their own.
Another question that arose
recently surrounding the CHSC
and the Make Your Mark Campaign
pertained to finances. Documents
obtained by UBC Insiders through
a Freedom of Information Request
show that the total budget to
campaign for the last referendum
was just over $41,624 — exceeding
the total budget of the KUS who
funded Make Your Mark.
Tsang confirmed that UBC
helped out the KUS financially
because the School of Kinesiology
is a small group without much
of an ability to fund large-scale
initiatives.
"The year previous, the KUS
raised our yearly student fees,"
said Jason Quach, KUS president
during the time of the referendum.
"But then again, we're not even a
faculty — we're a school. We don't
have a large student population
FILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
Most academic space for Kinesiology students is located in the Osborne Centre.
[and] our budget is always at the
brink of capacity."
The financial issue relates to
another major concern about the
referendum — the involvement of
the university. The spearhead of
the project, Robyn Freiheit, was
hired by the university to work on
Make Your Mark, and was paid by
UBC during her involvement with
the campaign.
Questions arose over whether
it was a conflict of interest
to have an employee of the
university lead an initiative
defined as student-led. However,
Tsang disagreed with this.
From my first year, I've known
that all the individuals that have
been involved with [it] have been
passionate students from the very
beginning and their vision was
ultimately to have a space for
students, regardless of what that
looks like," he said.
With the cancellation of the
CHSC, speculation and discussion
about whether the referendum
was too costly or a conflict of
interests is essentially moot. The
school is back in the planning
stages.
According to Tsang, the
KUS are in conversation with
Kinesiology's new director,
Robert Boushel, who took over
from Robert Sparks.
Boushel could not be reached
for comment, but according
to Tsang, he and Boushel are
essentially on the same page.
"We're at the preliminary
stages of what this concepts
is," said Tsang. "Study space
and things like that I don't
think students should pay for.
But things like a gym that's
exclusively run by the KUS ...
maybe students could pay for. But
not at $250 a student." fH
TRANSIT //
TransLink seeks feedback on cutting the 258
Emma Partridge
News Editor
TransLink is seeking feedback on
a package of proposed changes —
some of which could affect UBC
students by reducing bus stops or, in
one case, cutting a bus line.
TransLink has put forth more
than 85 proposed changes to their
service. Included in that package
are alterations to the 44 and the 258
bus lines which end at UBC. In the
case of the 44, TransLink is asking
customers about possibly reducing
stops and eliminating the 258 all
together.
At Wednesday's AMS council
meeting, council voted in favour
of a motion to object to TransLink
cancelling the 258 bus route to UBC.
"One of the things we have
been working is a lot of the short
term improvements to bus service
provisions that are available to our
students. One of the bus routes
that [provides] a direct connecter
between us and the Westernmost
part of the North Shore was the
258," said VP External, Jude Crasta.
"That's why we strongly advise
TransLink against the cancellation of
such a service route."
The mayor of West Vancouver,
Michael Smith, is also not in favour
of the proposed changes and
called the proposed cut completely
unacceptable, according to North
Shore News.
As part of a package of proposals that also includes reducing stops on the 44,
TransLink is asking customers for input.
According to TransLink
Spokesperson Chris Bryan, a
number of factors are taken into
consideration when suggesting
a package of changes and the
company is prepared to make
changes based on the feedback
that they receive. However, they
have identified the 258 as a more
expensive route to service.
Last year, the 258 was one of
the most expensive routes on the
road, costing over $6 per boarded
passenger with roughly 200
passengers per day.
"We actually analyze every
single route in the region, all 212 ...
an important factor in our decision
making is how much does it cost
to deliver this service." said Bryan.
"But we also look at a number of
priorities. You know we have to
make sure we provide service in
transit dependent areas and service
transit dependent customers."
Students living all the way out
in West Vancouver who may not be
able to afford a car or other form
of transport and could be called
transit dependent. While there are
other options in terms of travel
to UBC - the 250 and 257 take a
similar path — passengers would
have to transfer to the 44 in order
to continue making their way out
to UBC.
When asked what the AMS
opposing this suggestion will look
like, Crasta said, "[They] will
be drafting a statement to send
over to TransLink and I have ... a
meeting with the acting CEO of
TransLink, Cathy McLay, that is
supposed to take place sometime
soon. I'm just waiting to hear
back and we will be stating that
opposition to those channels."
The 44 is another bus route
that changes may be coming to —
the proposed changes affect the
Davie, Nelson, Georgia, Burrard,
Granville and Waterfront Station
stops, according to Bryan.
"We've found that, due to just
the crowding that you find in the
Downtown peninsula, it means
that affects the reliability of that
service so it slows things down,"
said Bryan. "It's quite a dense area
so we see an opportunity to reduce
the number of stops in Downtown,
improve the reliability of the
service [and get] those buses out
of Downtown faster."
As one might have noticed, this
round of changes is particularly
larger. In fact, much bigger than
the usual proposed changes sent
out four times a year. The number
of alterations can be attributed
to the Evergreen Line being near
completion. "That's going to
drive a lot of changes out in the
Northeast like the tri-cities area,
but it will also impact transit
throughout the region," said
Bryan. fH
CONFERENCE //
Students have chance to
present at Harvard
= HOTO COURTESY LEEROY/LIFE OF PIX
The Ivy institution is hosting a conferernce
for undergrads to present research.
Josh Azizi
Senior Staff Writer
The UBC Undergraduate Research
Opportunities Club (URO) is offering
grants for undergrads to present
their research at a conference at
Harvard University.
The National Collegiate
Research Conference (NCRC) is an
annual conference held at Harvard
by undergrads, for undergrads.
Students who win the URO's grant
will have all travel, registration and
accommodation costs covered.
URO VP of National and
International Collaborations Kevin
Ng predicts that about six to 10
students will be able to win grants
this year.
"It's an interdisciplinary
conference. We would hope that
we'd get UBC students from across
lots of different fields to go and
to represent the very high level of
research that UBC has to offer,"
said Ng.
The interdisciplinary nature of
the conference means there will
be displays from the sciences as
well as the social sciences and the
humanities. According to URO Co-
President Jacqueline Siu, students
who are interested in research
will learn a lot by presenting at the
conference.
"It's a very good chance to
get a feel of how research at an
international level is available and
[how] it works," she said.
In particular, Siu notes how
presenters will learn how to present
their ideas to people from other
disciplinary areas.
"I think a big part would just
be learning how to communicate
your research to people not in
your field," she said. "Say you are
a microbiologist: we expect you to
be able to communicate why your
research is important and why it's
exciting to someone... in political
science."
Additionally the NCRC can give
undergraduate researchers a chance
to interact, socialize and network
with researchers in the same field of
study from all around the world.
'You'll meet people who are in
different fields," said Ng. "But you'll
also meet people probably working
on very similar problems and you'll
get to share how your approaches
are different, how they're similar and
how your results may differ."
In order to win the grant,
students must first apply for the
conference through the NCRC's
website. After that, they have to
apply for the travel grant to which
they essentially explain what their
research is about and why they want
to go to the conference.
The deadline for applying for
the grant is Monday, November 1.
Applicants must be members of the
URO in order to apply. 'M 4    I    NEWS    I   TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2015
DIVERSITY//
Faculty of Engineering sets goal of 50 per cent female enrollment by 2020
The Faculty of Engineering has created a number of programs to promote engineering to more women.
Aidan Qualizza
Staff Writer
The UBC Faculty of Engineering
is attempting to increase female
enrolment to 50 per cent by 2020.
The faculty says that the key
to this is in education, awareness
and beginning at the earliest age
possible.
To accomplish this, the
faculty — along with student
organizations — is creating
opportunities for young women
to learn and discover engineering
and how it is a supportive and
creative environment to be in.
"We do have a situation where
two-thirds of the members
of our student body are men
[and so they're] dominating
the discussion," said Marc
Parlange, dean of the Faculty of
Engineering. He stated that there
is a need to go against the cultural
tendencies of male dominance
within the engineering faculty
and push for more diverse
representation.
For Elizabeth Croft,
associate dean of education for
engineering, this is particularly
important. "The biggest
influencers of girls are their
parents and teachers," said Croft.
She described how she was
discouraged by peers and parents
from entering engineering
because of the cultural myths
that surrounded the profession
and the lack of women who were
represented in the engineering
workforce at the time.
This lack of positive influence
when it comes to choosing
engineering as a career becomes
an issue. Many parents and
teachers are not exposed to
the environment and culture
that the engineering profession
and university faculties have
developed. Therefore, they are
unable to speak to its positive
nature for young female students.
"A lot of people think
that engineering is a male-
dominated faculty and it's scary
for girls to get into it," said
Tirajeh Mazaheri, the Student
Coordinator for UBC Women in
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Engineering. "A lot of the time
it is a man's club and it is hard
for girls to get involved with the
faculty ... it is great to see guys
coming out to all our [Women in
Engineering] events because it
just shows that they promote us
and that they support having all
of us women around."
To reach their goal, the
Faculty of Engineering has
created a number of programs
to target traditional role models
as well as young women in order
to raise awareness about the
realities of studying and being an
engineer. Some of the programs
that have been created include
teacher professional days, BC-
wide student and parent outreach
and workshops targeting young
women in grades 8-10.
The teacher professional
days introduce elementary and
high school teachers from the
Lower Mainland to the faculty.
The teachers learn about
engineering from both male and
female students as well as faculty
members so that they are able to
return to their classrooms and
positively promote engineering
to their students. This will
potentially create interest in the
engineering faculty within their
schools and institutions.
Along with the professional
days, the Faculty of Engineering
has created a BC-wide outreach
program. This program brings
parents and students between
grades 6-10 to the faculty to learn
more about engineering through
workshops, presentations and
activities. These aim to show
parents and their children
that the faculty is an open
and inclusive environment
where high social and ethical
responsibilities are practiced.
The faculty also puts on
workshops for young women
in grades 8-10 where they are
encouraged and motivated to
make a positive change in their
environment through engineering
and design projects. These
events are completely organized
and managed by female faculty
members and students. This way,
high school girls can meet women
within engineering and develop
relationships with women in the
faculty.
= HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
"Showing role models to
girls in high school can make
a big difference in their future
ambitions," said Jeanie Malone,
VP communications for the
Engineering Undergraduate
Society (EUS), in an email to The
Ubyssey. "There are female UBC
engineers who lead clubs like
Engineers Without Borders, there
are female UBC engineers who lead
design teams and there are female
UBC engineers who represent their
department clubs on EUS Council."
These mentorships continue
to be developed as women
enter the engineering faculty
as first-year students through
the Women in Engineering club
on campus, which runs events
for male and female students.
They hold events ranging from
networking opportunities for
female students with leading
female industry professionals to
social events. "I have met so many
incredible women that I don't
think I would've if it wasn't for
this program," said Mazaheri. "I
personally didn't know that there
were so many girls in engineering
who are cool, awesome, smart
and driven... I want to strive for
success myself. So to see other girls
who are in similar mindsets as well
— that encourages me."
Through these programs,
the faculty and the student
associations have tried to created
a more inclusive environment
for all students. "The nature
of engineering is changing
worldwide," said Parlange, noting
that the profession is in need of
cultural innovation.
Malone believes that a more
diverse workforce will allow
engineers to make great change
and impact on societies globally.
"When UBC starts graduating
more classes with a higher
percentage of women, we cause
change on multiple levels. There
are now more women available
to enter industry positions, but
there are also a variety of new
grads who are used to working
alongside their female peers,"
said Malone. "This is how UBC
starts to change the face of
engineering culture [and] how we
start to break down barriers and
stereotypes. This is how we start
to change the world." 'M // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27,2015
FOOD COLUMN
-LUSTRATION JERRY YIN/THE UBYSSEY
Recipe to the rescue: overnight oats
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
Fast, healthy and cheap: the
trifecta of student food that too
often goes unfulfilled.
Of course, these terms are all
relative — especially with food.
What is quick for one person might
be more involved for another and
budgets and diets vary from person
to person.
Most recipes I find only satisfy
two of the three criteria, but lo and
behold, this recipe is a refreshing
exception, managing to meet all of
the conditions that comprise the
ideal of student food.
I present to you my saviour
from breakfast-less mornings and
lunch-less afternoons in the midst
of the semester's inevitable chaos:
overnight oats.
They are low maintenance,
require no cooking and almost
infinitely flexible to dietary needs.
You can buy certified gluten-free
oats. If you don't eat dairy, you can
use non-dairy milks. If you have
an allergy or aversion to any of the
ingredients, you can substitute
almost anything similar you can
think of and it will still be delicious.
You can also use things you might
already have on hand or that aren't
a huge investment — especially if
you buy them in small quantities
from bulk bins.
Below is my classic version, but
there are many substitutions and
combinations to play around with.
This makes one serving and will
last for up to two days in the fridge.
Eat it for breakfast or pack for a
delicious lunch or hearty snack!
INGREDIENTS
1/4 to 1/3 cup rolled oats is
where to start depending on your
appetite. The oats expand as they
soak, so if it looks meagre at first,
have faith.
1/4 to 1/3 cup milk should
match the amount of milk to oats.
1 tbsp maple syrup if you
want to sweeten it. I recommend a
liquid sweetener like honey, maple
or agave syrup — but brown sugar
also works! Just make sure you
shake it really well. Err on the less
sweet side because you can always
add more after soaking.
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
and other spices are fun to play
with. Try substituting cardamom,
cloves, ginger or apple pie spice.
But be sure to use 1/2 tsp if you do
— these spices are stronger than
cinnamon.
1 tbsp roasted pumpkin seeds
are good substitutions as well as
chopped roasted nuts, sunflower
seeds and hemp hearts.
1 tsp flax seeds or sesame seeds
also work and add a nice savoury
flavour.
1/4 cup blueberries are also
lovely as are sliced strawberries,
bananas, raspberries, pitted
cherries, peaches, nectarines,
plums, pears or apples... The list
goes on.
Dried fruit is another option.
Cranberries, cherries, blueberries,
raisins, currants, chopped up
candied ginger, dried mango,
pineapple, apple and apricots are
all delicious choices.
1 tbsp unsweetened shredded
coconut is optional, but this makes
it taste like dessert for breakfast. If
you're using sweetened shredded
coconut, add less or no sugar unless
you like it really sweet.
1/3 cup plain yogurt mixes into
your oats in the morning to make
them creamy and slightly more
filling.
INSTRUCTIONS
Put oats, milk, sweetener, spices,
seeds and/or nuts, fruit and coconut
into a lidded container that seals
tightly — mason jars or lidded
tupperware are great. Make sure
there's a little air left at the top so
that it will mix properly. Put the lid
on tightly and shake.
Put in the fridge overnight or
for at least six hours to soak. Eat it
cold with yogurt or warmed in the
microwave like oatmeal.
VARIATIONS/SUBSTITUTIONS
If you want something more
indulgent — though obviously less
healthy — or think that chocolate
deserves a place in your breakfast,
add chocolate chips or substitute
them for fruit. Use chocolate
syrup as your sweetener. Add
cocoa instead of spices. Add mini
marshmallows and sprinkles. Or
make a banana/caramel/pecan
version. Go wild.
I use rolled oats because they
soak the best. Quick oats also
work, but they're a little mushier.
Steel-cut oats would either need
to be cooked or soaked for longer,
so they probably wouldn't work as
nicely with this particular version
of the recipe. You could also use
an instant oatmeal packet, but you
would probably need to cut out the
sweetener and spices.
Try putting peanut or other nut
butter into your oats for a creamier
version. '21
THEATRE //
Cock: Intense, passionate, exciting theatre
Cockwas hilarious and intense.
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
Depending on your level of maturity,
you may be either attracted to — or
wary of — the title of Mike Bartlett's
newest play, Cock, which is playing
at Performance Works on Granville
Island. While your mind might go
straight to images of that kind of
cock, the mise-en-scene for Rumble
Theatre's production is reminiscent
of a brutal Elizabethan cock-fighting
ring.
John has been in a relationship
with his extrovert boyfriend when,
following an argument and breakup,
he sleeps with a woman with whom
he subsequently falls in love. Cock
follows the conflicting emotions and
guilt John feels between the two
partners - both of whom are willing
to fight to keep him. As tension and
pressure mounts, a dinner with both
parties is arranged in an attempt to
force John to make a decision.
The play is essentially a question
to John: Who is he? Or, perhaps,
= HOTO COURTESYTIM MATHESOK
what is he? Less about the topic of
bisexuality and more focused on the
tension of John's question of identity,
Cock is hilariously witty and smart.
Bartlett's intelligent script is made
stronger only by the team of four
talented actors.
John (Nadeem Phillip) is the only
character to be given a name. He is
the most dithering and pathetic —
but endearingly so — of the four. M
(Shawn MacDonald), John's broker
partner, is passionate, wild and
desperately in love, while W (Donna
Soares) is strong-willed but tender.
These characters and M's father
(Duncan Fraser) all know what and
who they are.
For a play with a perhaps off-
putting title, Cock is surprisingly PG
Yes, sex happens. It's very passionate,
but at no point do clothes come off.
There is very little man-to-man or
man-to-woman contact, yet the
tension and passion in the scenes are
electrifying.
As if to backhand the
conventions of a traditional script,
Artistic Director Stephen Drover, a
UBC MFA alumnus, uses nothing in
the way of scenery, props or mime.
The focus is only on the actors with
scenes punctuated by eerie and
somewhat piercing sounds set to cut
out potentially uncomfortable and
graphic dialogue. When the next
scene starts, the audience is all too
aware of what's been cut.
Philip is mesmerizing as
the "hero" of the play, yet his
character's internal weaknesses
are infuriating at times. The
end of the play is perhaps a
cop-out on Bartlett's part and
the climactic crux is maybe too
drawn out for the 90 minutes of
theatre.
But this show is something
special. There are theatrical
conventions in the realism of the
sometimes-mundane script, but
Drover's direction sustains the
intensity and candid passion in
every snippet scene. I definitely
recommend this play — it blew
me away. 'M
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IS
m^T*G
vroRTHrr?
uUStrMion
MKE^O/THE^ As UBC prepares to release its annual animal research data,
critics continue to assail the ethics of testing on animals.
UBC insists it's necessary for medical science to advance.
- Ian Welch, UBC veterinarian 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2015
MUSIC//
Pharmacy student Ariel Tsai
launches her Mandopop career
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Tsai never had any formal training, but her wealth of experience in composing and music speaks otherwise.
Vicky Huang
Contributor
They say that when you desire
something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.
Second-year pharmacy student
Ariel Tsai desired no more than
to write her own songs and share
them on YouTube. The universe
took a step further and made her
an internet sensation as a singer-songwriter, catching the eyes of
well-known record labels.
Tsai is the co-founder of Big
Brothers at UBC and a Kappa Alpha Theta sister. Tsai loves music
and is a self-taught recording artist. She is like any other involved
member of the UBC community,
but with her hobby taken to a
whole new level.
Tsai's first video got featured on
a Taiwanese talent show and garnered nearly 10,000 views within
a day in April 2015. Her second
video attracted over 715,000 views
and she has more than 50,000
followers to date. The production
team behind The Voice of China
invited Tsai to go on their reality
talent show, Sing My Song, which
features singer-songwriter contestants performing their original
compositions instead of covering
songs by other artists.
Tsai was invited by the Chinese
Students and Scholars Associations (CSSAs) in the nine Vancouver post-secondary institutions to
compose the theme song for their
annual singing contest and appear
as a special guest at the contest
finale. Tsai composed, arranged,
recorded, mixed and mastered the
song. The typical length of time for
a professional studio to properly
cover all these aspects of music
production is two months. Tsai
did all these in three days while
bracing herself for two midterms.
Despite her status as a rising
Mandopop star, Tsai has a girl-
next-door demeanor. Originally
from Taiwan — the hub of Mandopop — Tsai immigrated to Canada
when she was three and then
moved back to Taiwan at age nine
before returning to Richmond,
Canada in grade 10.
"Those years of being in Taiwan
helped develop my sense of appreciation for [Mandopop]," said Tsai.
"I was amazed by... the melody
progression [in] Chinese songs ....
Usually, English songs [are either]
very mellow or just like beat beat
beat and then rap — there's not
a lot of melody going on. When
I first listened to S.H.E. or Jay
Chou, I was like, 'Oh wow, there's
actually musicality in it,' and I fell
in love."
Tsai describes her music as
"ballad-style [and] very emotional," but craves challenge and has
recently been experimenting with
R&B.
So far, Tsai has recorded six
songs and signed with Seed Music
Group — the same record label that
renowned Mandopop singer David
Tao is under — and will be releasing
her own EP in early October this
year. Despite the promising music
career path lying ahead, Tsai is insistent on continuing her pharmacy
studies at UBC and turned down
interested talent agencies' requests
that she relocate to Asia.
"To get to pharmacy, I worked
hard. I like pharmacy. I like being
able to interact with patients. I like
the health science area," said Tsai.
The inception of her music
career might be an act of self-fulfillment, but the proudest achievements that Tsai gleaned from her
success are the empowerment
of others.
"I remember people messaging
me, asking, 'Can you give me the
music sheet because I want to sing
it at my sister's wedding.' Then
there's another person saying, T
want to propose to my fiancee. Can
I have the music sheet?' I felt really
honoured... I was like, 'Whoa,
people are actually taking this
seriously!" said Tsai. "That really
touches my heart... people value
[my music.]"
"Having different experiences in
music is pretty important to make
your music more well-rounded
[and] diverse," she said. "Everything that I have today is all because of the past experiences that I
was exposed to... it all makes sense
now... it all adds up."
Tsai shines with confidence.
She is a force of nature, unleashing
her seemingly endless energy with
such finesse. She is the shining star
of the Mandopop scene tomorrow.
She is a dedicated pharmacy student. She is the exemplar of what
the UBC motto, Tuum Est, should
represent - both in UBC and in her
life, •a
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OPERA//
Esteemed singer welcomed
back to UBC in Manon
Castagner will be performing two of the fou
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
"Sex and murder is basically how
we communicate in opera," said
Philippe Castagner, who will be
singing the role of Le Chevalier
des Grieux in UBC Opera's
production of Manon.
Manon begins with the
Chevalier who meets and falls
passionately in love with Manon
Lescaut — an innocent, but
lively, girl who has been brought
to the "safety" of a convent for
schooling. The two agree to
elope and the couple's families
intervene to part the two lovers.
A tale of kidnapping, loss and
gambling, the couple's parting
and reunion lead to Manon's
eventual downfall.
Castagner, the lead tenor
in UBC Opera's production,
began his UBC degree over
10 years ago. During his
degree, he was selected for the
Metropolitan Opera's Young
Artists Development Program
in New York after winning their
international competition.
Although the Chevalier is his
first lead male role, Castagner
has performed numerous
supporting roles across the
opera world — a particularly
memorable one involved entering
on stage while on horseback and
dressed as a harlequin clown.
"I'm now at the stage in my
life where the voice has settled,"
he said. "It's gone through some
changes that happen sometimes
in your mid 30s and so I emerged
as this lyric tenor."
On his character in Manon,
Castagner acknowledged the
lyrical and French-stylistic
elements.
"He's the lover boy, but maybe
he's got a sword."
The role is challenging in
terms of lyric operatic repertoire
— lengthy, dramatic leaps
and smooth lines are key to
portraying the Chevalier's role.
=HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/TH E UBYSSEY
ir performamces of the opera.
'You have to be able to deliver
a very natural style that sounds
very French," he said. "There
are some very specific aspects
of French classical music that
are part of that, including a very
smooth line where you try to not
to show where all the beats are.
It's supposed to sound like the
language."
Although Manon was written
in the 1800s, Castagner believes it
to be extremely relevant to society
and culture today.
"Today, we have slut shaming
and unequal consequences
for men and women," he said.
"The heroine, Manon, is kind of
looked down upon by the other
characters as making bad choices
when actually she's acting quite
rationally."
The consequences for the
female Manon at the end of the
opera are devastating, whereas the
men are able to continue living on
in their hometown. The aim is to
get people discussing these moral
issues after the performance.
Directed by UBC Voice & Opera
Division Head Nancy Hermiston
and conducted by Okanagan
Symphony Orchestra Director
Rosemary Thompson, the female-
led Manon has two separate casts
— each performing twice out of
the four performances.
"In the professional world,
time and money are breathing
down everyone's necks," said
Castagner, clicking his fingers in
a frantic metronome. "Everything
tends to be moving pretty quickly
and there's no room for error
or for being slow. Here, you're
watching as much as you're doing."
Ten years on, Castagner is
excited to finish his degree at
UBC with Manon. Costume, sets
and musicians are all ready to
transport audiences back to smalltown French life. '21
UBC Opera's performance
begins on November S and runs
for four performances at the Old
Auditorium. // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER3,2015
HEALTH //
Martha Piper receives a flu shot.
= HOTO COURTESY MARTIN DEE
You have a responsibility
to get a flu shot
KOBY MICHAELS
Op-ed
You're a university student, you
love free stuff. So why haven't you
gotten your free flu shot already?
Say what you want about
rising tuition, the price of student
housing or bookstore prices, but
at least UBC will pay for your free
flu shot. And you should really
take advantage of it.
Don't say you don't have
enough time for it either. The shot
itself takes 30 seconds and, adding
in the minute or two it takes to
sign in plus the five minutes you
have to wait after getting the
vaccine, the whole process won't
take more than 10 minutes. You
can do it between classes, at the
checkout at Shoppers or while
you wait for the bus.
The vaccine is safe and
effective — you should really
get it. Worst case scenario: your
arm is red and swollen for a day.
Absolute worst case scenario: you
are allergic to the vaccine and you
get a second free shot to stop the
allergic reaction.
If you don't get the vaccine,
you are more likely to become
infected by the flu and spend up
to two weeks with a fever, chills,
cough, sore throat, runny noise,
ache muscles, headaches and
fatigue. About five to 20 per cent
of the adult population will get
the flu, but flu vaccines can be
up to 60 per cent effective and
cut your chances of getting sick
drastically.
Ten minutes and a little poke,
and you are likely to save yourself
a week of bed-ridden, fever-
induced misery.
Don't think that just because
you are a healthy young adult that
you won't get the flu. First of all,
the vaccine isn't just about you.
The vaccine isn't as effective for
Getting a flu
vaccine isn't
about just keeping yourself
healthy, it's about
keeping everyone
healthy"
infants, the elderly and people with
compromised immune systems,
and the flu is incredibly dangerous
to them. Getting a flu vaccine isn't
about just keeping yourself healthy,
it's about keeping everyone healthy.
Secondly, even as a young, healthy
person, you are susceptible to the
flu. Peak flu season and exams
fall at the same time — stress has
been shown to make you more
susceptible to infection.
The vaccines are paid for by the
university, organized by UBC Risk
Management and administered by
fourth-year nursing, medical and
pharmaceutical science students.
A registered nurse oversees each
vaccination site.
Last year, UBC administered
4,537 vaccines to students, faculty
and staff. This year, let's make it
65,659.^
Koby Michaels is a second-year
integrated science student and Sports
andRec editor at The Ubyssey.
EDITORIAL //
-LUSTRATION SOPHIASLOAN/THE UBYSSEY
Last Words: Piper's weird Bushism, UBCs
relentless PR, and a home for Kinners
UBYSSEY STAFF
One lump or two?
You would think that after all the
years Martha Piper has served as
president, she would be better at
handling tuition town halls. While
she kept up her ever-positive attitude
about UBC and "excellence," we
can't get over the weird mixed
metaphor she blurted: "If you get all
the camels in the tent, it's pretty hard
to poke holes."
The actual metaphor about how
the camel in the tent is basically a
"give an inch and they'll take a mile"
story told through the metaphor. A
camel owner allows the camels to
stick their nose in the tent with the
rest of the camel slowly following in.
Maybe that's what Piper actually
meant — let UBC hike tuition rates
in pursuit of "excellence" once and
pretty soon, you'll have a tent full of
money — pretty hard to poke holes
in that.
Not-so-great Treks
You might've seen UBCs recently
posted overview and description of
Great Treks, with an emphasis on the
first one. It's true that UBC has some
amazing history. This institution has
a big part to play is asking questions
and challenging assumptions.
But there's also been a lot of
the opposite. A lot of higher level
administrators have made decisions
without proper consultation and
there are a lot of issues concerning
transparency, housing and so forth
— what makes it worse is not talking
about it.
There have been a lot of Great
Treks — to save the UBC Farm, to
lobby for more government funding,
etc. — but none them addressed
problems at the university that
showed up in UBCs PR pieces.
Suggesting our history is
squeaky clean is a lie and robs UBC
of a rich education about students
being spurred to protest and
causing administrators' minds to be
changed.
Kin katastrophe
We were utterly overjoyed to
see the whole sorry kinesiology
building mess put to bed at
Wednesday night's council
meeting. Even more refreshing
was to hear Justin Tsang, KUS
President, call the cancellation
of the building a "blessing in
disguise."
Kin students, you deserve so
much better than the Community
Health Sciences Centre. At every
turn, you were led to believe
that you were getting the best
and the simple fact is that you
weren't. The Make Your Mark's
campaign was accurate — you
do need a home. But you need a
solid, well-built house in a nice
neighbourhood with a mortgage
that you can afford, not a sketchy
model home built by the Bluth
family.
Hopefully the change in
leadership within the faculty
means you'll finally get the long-
term residence you deserve. 'M
Angry? Happy? Emotional wreck?
Send a letter to opinion@ubyssey.ca
TUDERTS FOR LIBERTV
REGIONAL   ;
CONFERENCE W
VANCOUVER
UBC ROBSOn SQUARE      800 ROBSOfl ST.
nouEmBER? i0Am-?pm free RDmission
REGISTER at tinyurl.com/VancouverRC 10    I   SPORTS+REC    I   TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2015
THUNDERBIRDS //
T-BIRDS5-ON-5
WICKED WINNERS
by Isabelle Commerford
1. What are you dressing up as for
Halloween?
2. Do you have any game-day superstitions?
3. If your team had to face a team of pirates or
ninjas, which would you rather face?
4. Describe the scariest moment you have
had as an athlete.
5. In the spirit of trick or treating, what's your
most impressive party trick?
BRANDON
DESCHAMPS
Football
Coach Nill if I find a way to
convey his fear-inducing
aura.
need to shave my head
a few days before the
game — a 2015 trend.
I'd liketothinkthe
football team could take
a bunch of malnourished
drunkards. We'd stand
no chance with ninjas.
Pretty much every offseason morning when
Coach Joe brings us in
fora "warm-up."
Icanjivedancelikea
turkey.
JASMIN DHANDA
I am dressing up as
Princess Jasmine-you
can probably guess why
she is my favorite.
have to have a small
amount of candy before
every game!
I would ratherface
pirates because I feel
like they aren't as good
fighters.
My scariest moment
has to have been when
joined the team and was
pretty much interrogated
by every senior player on
ourfirstawaytrip.
I wish I knew some
tricks, but unfortunately
I don't!
JOE
ANTILLA
Hockey
I was thinking about going as
one of the Will Ferrell characters-probably Chaz Michael
Michaels or Ron Burgundy
- but it has been hard to find
a sex panther cologne that
works 60 per cent of the
time, every time.
Putting on gearfrom left to
rightandshowering before
suiting upforgames. I also
run backto the dressing room
following our off-ice jump
aroundtobethefirstone
getting readyforgametime.
Having watched Pirates
of the Caribbean and
Beverly Hills Ninja I would
have to say pirates.
Facing that Kraken thing
wouldn't be very fun -unless it was Kraken rum.
In my second yearat
UBC, we flew to Alaska
to play Fairbanks and
Anchorage. Ten minutes
before landing in
Fairbanks we had some
pretty scary turbulence.
My party trick is probably being able to eat
mass amounts of food. I
have been known to eat
boxes of cookies before
I go to sleep.
I'll probably be working
in the lab (lame), sol
guess a mad scientist?
Nothing too crazy-
have a lucky necklace
that I wearongame
days and I always put my
water bottle on the same
sideofthegoal.
I would definitely rather
face pirates! Ninjas
are super agile and
way too tricky... they'd
do things like disguise
themselves as team
members.
Onetimeduringaslow
game, I was bored and
fooling around with the
net and then got caught
in it and was almost
scored on. It was pretty
terrifying.
I don't really have any
party tricks... but,
through some unfortunate experiences hosting
parties in an older house,
lean worksome magic
with broken plumbing!
ROWAN
HARRIS
Field Hockey
MaxfromTheGrinch
and my best looking
friend is being the
Grinch.
have no game-day superstitions, butforthe past couple
years I have been keeping
up the tradition of forgetting
at least one item of my
equipment.
Ninjas, definitely. They
would accept me as
theirown.
blacked out once after
diving forthe ball in a game.
The swing went right
through my head. I made
the save then headed
straight to the concussion
clinic.
I can tie a cherry stem
using only mytongue.
But the real feat is
theinsaneamountof
pull-ups I can do while
exhausted.
A
Breast
Cancer...
not just a disease
of older women
Shanna (Shan) Larsen was only 24
when she lost her life to breast cancer
Funded by
Canadian
Breast Cancer
Foundation
BC-YUKON
£
visit or contact us at
teamshan.ca
facebook.com/team.shan.ca
@TeamShan
* TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2015   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
RECAP//
Football wins playoff
home field advantage
= HOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS /THE UBYSSEY
UBC finished their season with a 6-2 conference record and a home playoff game.
Bill Situ
Staff Writer
After picking up a win on the road
against the Saskatchewan Huskies
last week, UBC football finished
the regular season at home with
a crucial 24-10 victory against the
Manitoba Bisons.
"Not only did they take every
rep during the week [and] during
game, they made every rep at
practice and they deserve so much
credit," said Blake Nill, UBC head
coach.
The game witnessed noticeably
strong defence on both sides of
the ball from the very start. Both
UBC and Manitoba recorded an
interception and a fumble recovery
during the first quarter.
UBC was first to get onto the
scoreboard during first quarter on
a 14-yard run by receiver Marcus
Davis. Manitoba then responded
with a 30-yard field goal early in
the second to narrow the score to
7-3.
With continually strong
defense by the Thunderbirds and
the Bisons — which included an
interception by UBC defensive
back Stavros Katsantonis — neither
team produced a point in the
next 12 minutes. Near the end of
the second, quarterback Michael
O'Connor scored the T-Birds'
second touchdown on a four yard
rush to make the score 14-3.
The first 10 minutes of the third
quarter was again a stalemate until
O'Connor made a 45-yard rush that
set up kicker Quinn Van Gylswyck
for a 12-yard field goal. UBC led
17-3 by the end of the third.
In the final quarter, both teams
continued to show impressive
plays on defence. Katsantonis got
his second interception of the
game and Manitoba's Matt Hallock
recorded a sack on O'Connor.
"The defence, I felt, played a
really key role today in holding
[the Bisons] in by 10 points, which
is really impressive," said Brandon
Deschamps, T-Birds running back.
With three minutes remaining,
the Bisons finally gained some
ground by scoring a touchdown.
Less than a minute later,
Deschamps responded with a
50-yard run for the Thunderbirds.
UBC won the game by a final score
of 24-10 and Deschamps finished
with 119 rushing yards— his second
most of the season.
UBC and Manitoba both held a
5-2 record coming into the game.
With the win against the Bisons,
the T-Birds finished the season 6-2
and placed second in the Canada
West Division. UBC also gets the
home field advantage next week in
their first playoff game against the
third place Manitoba.
"To go six and two with this
group of young men and this group
of coaches is amazing... I'm hoping
that the country sees what this
university is," said Nill.
The Thunderbirds will face the
Bisons at Thunderbird Stadium on
November 7 in the Canada West
Semifinals.
TAC//
Alex Mascott isn't done leaving his mark
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Alex Mascott is a fifth-year business student, Rugby hooker and the president of the Thunderbird Athletic Council.
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
UBC rugby hooker, Sauder student,
Thunderbird Athletic Council
(TAC) president and Red Bull
student brand manager — meet
Alex Mascott. The Vancouver
native is entering his fifth year at
UBC, but he's definitely not done
leaving his mark.
He's looking to repeat as league
champions with the 'Birds, build
the TAC into a household name
and make sports a rallying point on
campus.
Historically, the TAC has been
a social club for athletes to get
to know each other and organize
events. They are also a platform
for athletes to have a voice on
campus. Mascott is growing the
council, hoping that it can — as
many campus groups do — build
community at UBC around varsity
sports.
"I'm hoping to move in towards
being a more prevalent club on the
UBC campus," explains Mascott.
"I'm looking at really moving it
from bringing athletes together to
bringing UBC together."
The talent of the athletic
teams, the size of the student
population and the size of campus
is the perfect recipe to build a
school spirit around sports spirit,
according to Mascott. He sees
various groups on campus like The
Calendar, frats, sororities and the
student societies as having great
spirit and pride — but they don't
share that pride.
"There isn't really some niche
to bring everyone together," said
Mascott. "There's not really a
united sense of pride and that's one
of the things I'm trying to combat."
Mascott and the TAC are
working with the AMS and UBC
administrators — namely Louise
Cowin, the vice president of
students. Aaron Bailey, the AMS
president, and Cowin share
Mascott's vision of a unified,
sports-centric campus, according
to Mascott.
"I think it's a very promising
time for athletics. They are
bringing in some younger people,
bringing in some people who
know a lot about what's going,"
said Mascott. He cited that Laura
Thompson, a former Thunderbird
and TAC president, is now working
for athletics.
"Homecoming was huge," said
Mascott. "I think there's starting
to be some buy in [to UBC teams].
These things all take a while."
He's hopeful that future
events, like the CIS basketball
championships, will be better
attended than they have in the past.
Outside of heading the TAC,
Mascott plays for the men's rugby
team which he called, "The best
club team in North America ... you
can quote me."
The team is looking to win
the league championship again,
a feat Mascott believes will
happen. The team has already
proven themselves as a formidable
international team after finishing
second at the inaugural World
University Rugby Cup hosted by
the University of Oxford.
"It's been a very big 360 in my
time, from losing to UVic ... in my
first year to pummelling them in
the premiership final. I really think
we are going to repeat this year,"
said Mascott.
"We have a good, older team
now — our team's been together
for two or three years with roughly
the same consistent players. People
are really starting to set up and we
are gelling as a team," said Mascott.
"All the players on the team are
coming together and they are all
bring something powerful to the
table."
"That's my little shout out for
the boys cause I know they'll love
it."
Mascott is graduating UBC this
year and doesn't know what he'll
do next. He wants to continue
playing rugby, possibly for Team
Canada or overseas in Europe. He's
also hoping to put his business
degree to use.
"[It's such] a cool and exciting
time to be part of UBC. There
are so many groups that are
coming together now [and] are
trying to drive visible, tangible
chance. I think it's a great time
to be a student and get invested
in some of the stuff going around
campus." 'M
You don't have to
sit in school to stand
among greatness.
> Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved on to invent a
little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else, or have a scheduling conflict
come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized online courses, then move on to bigger
successes. Talk about a light bulb moment.
Athabasca
University 12    I    COMICS + GAMES    I    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2015
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COMIC PATRICKMURRYAND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY

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