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The Ubyssey Oct 12, 1979

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Array r
Show might not go on
ffor noon hour concerts
Lack of student interest could spell an end to the
UBC Alma Mater Society's noon hour rock concerts.
Concert co-sponsor Mike Pettinger warned yesterday that Gary Taylor's Rock Room night club will
stop supplying bands for the concerts unless business
picks up.
"We haven't had a full house yet, we're not too
happy with it, and it (the concert program) is costing
us an arm and a leg to set up," said Pettinger.
Pettinger, the manager of Gary Taylor's, said
musicians are also unhappy with having to get up early for the noon-hour events while working at the club
until 2 a.m.
"We've got a few kinks to work out, and if they
don't work out, we're going to pull out."
Pettinger said he will be meeting Monday with
AMS concerts organizer Meral Aydin to decide the
future of a tentative set of noon concerts planned for
October, November and December.
And AMS president Brian Short said if attendence
does not rise by Christmas the society itself will
cancel the concerts.
" "The noon hour concerts on Wednesday have not
been working out well and students don't seem interested in them," he said.
But Aydin claimed the concerts have been a success  and  will  probably continue  in .some  form,
although not necessarily as noon concerts. She suggested the AMS hold evening "mini-concerts" to
\^ reach a larger audience.	
"We considered the first five weeks as a pilot project. We should (now) carry them on a larger scale.
The mini-concerts will continue — meaning a concert
that will draw an audience of 100 to 500," she said.
Pettinger said the current schedule -of mini-
concerts, sponsored by the AMS, Gary Taylor's and
C-FOX radio station has raised $600 for the radio
station's childrens fund.
But Short claimed the AMS has paid more for the
"benefit" concerts than they originally planned,
although spending is now under control.
"The first couple (of concerts) were over-budgeted
but we're on budget now," he said.
Aydin Charged Short did not understand the mini-
concert concept and that the AMS programs committee was ignorant of how concerts are run.
"Mini-concerts are designed to be subsidized,
they're not supposed to make money," she said.
Aydin also said it is almost impossible to book major speakers or concerts at UBC because student
politicians in past years had "sold out" to the administration by allowing it to get control of buildings
paid for by students.
"It is difficult to run a concert activity in present
facilities because they have all been given away," she
said.
Aydin said buildings such as the armories and War
Memorial gym should not have been given
"wholesale" to the university. It is now difficult to
book any special AMS activity in those buildings,
said Aydin.
Noon'acts: endangered species
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday. October 12,1979
Senate looks
at rep picking
Senate could be selecting student
representatives itself if a motion
proposed Wednesday is passed.
The motion recommends senate
nominate candidates for student
positions if no candidates run in a
particular faculty. The motion, proposed by the senate ad hoc committee on the implementation of the
Universities Act, was tabled until
the next meeting Nov. 14.
Student senator Brian Short said
he felt the motion was unsuitable.
"When it (the motion) came to
senate I was surprised. I thought the
feeling in senate was that the procedure the committee proposed was
inappropriate," said the Alma
Mater Society president.
Student senators Anne Gardner
and Chris Niwinski also expressed
their concern over the motion ai the
meeting.
Short said the motion was known
to him about a month ago when the
senate committee made the proposal. He said he thought the proposal was ineffective and notified
the committee.
"We didn't think it was a good
idea, if senate wanted io do thai
they would have lo go through
SRA (student representative
assembly)," he said.
Short said senate has the final say
in the matter but added he thinks
senate will not approve it after the
SRA had made its recommendations.
The motion will be discussed at
Wednesday's SRA meeting.
Corporations hit
ffor oil crisis sham
— glen unford photo
TALKING SUBMARINE astonishes onlookers outside SUB Thursday, performing impressive imitation of
Winston Churchill's famous wartime speech. After Rich Little of sandwich set worked way through every Monty
Python sketch, though, and started in on 1956 speech by Joe Clark to high school class, woman and dog rescued
others from boredom session and split sub for lunch.
Trees glowin' in the wind
If you happen to notice some fir
trees glowing on your way home
tonight, don't be overly alarmed.
But make a point of contacting
Bill Rachuk, UBC's radiation protection officer.
Rachuk received a report alleging that someone from UBC had
injected 17 Douglas fir trees with
radioactive Carbon-14, he said.
But he added he did not know
who the culprit was.
"The information was passed
on anonymously to the provincial
government," he said. "Unfortunately, the person wouldn't give
his name."
The provincial health ministry
has been unable to substantiate
the validity of the report, Dr.
Wayne Greene, director of the
ministry's radiation protection
service, said Thursday.
"Everything just doesn't add
up completely," he said. "It
doesn't all fall together."
But if the case is authentic, it
would constitute an unauthorized
use of radioactive materials, he
said.
"The concern I had was that it
was an unathorized use of
isotopes."
Greene said the Carbon-14 was
unlikely to be in sufficient quantities to be harmful, but added
that the person who made the
report had legitimate cause for
concern.
"I think the person was worried
because his wife is pregnant,"
Greene said. "Maybe Carbon-14
isn't particularly hazardous, but it
could be something else."
Rachuk said the person using
the radioactive material was likely
conducting a research project, and
probably believes his actions to be
perfectly acceptable.
"But this is not the right way to
do it," said Rachuk.
By KEITH BALDREY
The oil crisis is a sham created by
large American oil corporations,
says a United Nations policy maker.
Bill Harding, former director of a
UN development program, said
Thursday that the. increasing control by oil companies over all resources is the crux of the U.S. energy crisis. He was speaking at
Simon Fraser University's nuclear
awareness week which ends tomorrow.
He said that oil companies control 85 per cent of the U.S. power
industry, including coal and nuclear
power, and as a result the cost of all
three are being driven up. Harding
said the oil shortage is a "myth."
"The shortage mentality has one
significant result — increased
prices."
He said oil companies had ruled
out production of alternate energy
sources as early as 1928, and encouraged other countries to become
dependent on oil.
"There is no oil shortage, only oil
security problems which don't have
a negative effect on the oil companies' profits."
Harding said he is hopeful about
new technological sources of renewable energy, particularly solar
power.
The nuclear energy industry is an
excuse for the nuclear weapons industry, said Harding.
Nuclear   awareness   week   a
success says organizer/3
"The whole thing began as an attempt by the U.S. to allay their guilt
feelings about Hiroshima and Nagasaki," he said. "The scientists who
created the bombs were appalled at
their destructive power and became
determined to prove that they were
not just weapons. So they ordained
a peacetime industry to justify the
wartime industry," he said.
Harding stressed the need for
self-reliance and said that people
must make maximum and efficient
use of national resources.
"Remember that $1 spent on insulation will save as much energy as
$1 spent on nuclear power will
create.". Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
— matt king photo
I WENT DOWN to Piraeus yesterday, where I found a sunny day, a grassy spot and another philosopher-king
struggling with the intricacies of Mandarin 100. Allegory of the cave will be further paralleled when monsoons
finally hit, sending learned one back into cave where lesser mortals struggle with images on wall. That last one
wasn't a man carrying a horse, it was the bartender dragging in another barrel of draft. Doesn't Comfeld know
anything?
Canada 'a nation without science'
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada is a
"nation without a science," financially unable to implement government research and development
policies, says a university president's report.
The Canadian Council of University Presidents says in a brief that
none of the research and development programs and proposals announced last May by the federal
government have been implement
ed; as a result the council predicts a
bleak future for science.
The brief, submitted Oct. 5 to the
prime minister, provincial premiers,
and heads of national research bodies, is in response to last year's government program to increase Canada's research and development expenditures from 0.9 per cent to 1.5
per cent Of the gross national product by 1983.
"The   scientists   and   engineers
UBC admin is cheap
When tuition fees go up next fall
it might cushion the blow to know
that at UBC the administration will
take a smaller chunk of your money
than at any of Canada's 22 other
large universities.
The UBC administration spent
3.5 per cent of university funds
which, added to physical plant's
11.1 per cent, left 85.4 per cent
spent for academic purposes and research.
The figures for 1978, recently released by the Canadian Association
of University Business Officers,
show UBC having the highest ratio
of academic to non-academic spending among Canada's 23 largest
universities.
In last place was Montreal's Concordia University with a ratio of
70.3 per cent for academics and
29.7 per cent for administration and
physical plant costs.
UBC's low administration costs
provided a bonanza for research,
which received 13.7 per cent of expenditures, eighth highest among
the universities surveyed by the
association.
"This university is one of the
highest in terms of research
growth," UBC spokesman Jim
Banham said Wednesday.
UBC's planned 58-acre research
park notwithstanding, the university is unlikely to overtake the University of Guelph in proportion of
research spending. More than a
quarter of Guelph's spending (25.7
per cent) went to university-sponsored research last year.
UBC has now maintained its
standing as the university with the
lowest administration costs in Canada for six consecutive years.
who will be necessary for a 1.5 per
cent or 2.5 per cent of the GNP national program for research and development are not being trained,
and Canada will not have in five
years the personnel needed for even
greatly reduced domestic and foreign aid research programs," the report states.
Canadian universities' capacity to
fulfill their research and development role is steadily deteriorating as
a lack of substantial funding and
high inflation have hit the field of
science, states the brief.
The brief echoes many statements
made by the University of Toronto
faculty association in a paper submitted to the standing administration of the justice committee earlier
this fall.
In the association paper, chemistry professor John Polanyi described Canada as "having become
a nation without science." According to Polanyi, other industrialized
nations spend two to three times
more of their GNP on research and
development than Canada does.
Students take a hike
Students parking in B-lot will be
able to continue their exhilarating
morning walks to their classes.
In fact, they'll have to.
Three 40 passenger buses formerly used to supply morning shuttle
service between B-lot and the
bookstore are in poor condition and
unusable as shuttle buses, said administration vice-president Charles
Connaghan.
Traffic and security director Al
Hutchinson said a new shuttle
system could be started this year if
funds can be found.
"At the present time we are investigating to see if alternatives are
open to us. We are investigating different transportation companies,"
he said.
One of those companies is B.C.
Hydro, Hutchinson said.
The service would require at least
four buses costing $100,000 each,
he said.
"At UBC we have no control
over the funding because it all
comes from the government," he
said.
At present the traffic department
runs an evening shuttle service between the main library and the
residences, using a mini-bus.
— by sherry evans
Cops' capers
are cancelled
Parked cars and their parking
stickers are no longer at the mercy
of traffic patrol officers.
Traffic and security director Al
Hutchinson said patrol members
are no longer allowed to confiscate
out-of-date or wrongly affixed
stickers.
"I feel this practice (of seizing
stickers) would lead to animosity
between traffic officers and students," he said.
"1 don't think that an expired
sticker or one stuck on in the wrong
place is such a serious matter."
Hutchinson said that these problems would Be handled by regular
enforcement procedures. "The
patrolmen will hand out traffic tick-
els and they will not break into any
cars."
Hutchinson has also cancelled the
cease-and-desist order on all assistance calls  which  was  issued  last
week by acting director Al Nicholson.
"I have changed Ihe policy concerning request for service calls, so
if a student needs help, he can receive assistance from a patrol officer," Hutchinson said.
Hutchinson said as far as he
knew not one student made a request for help while the cease-and-
desist order was in effect. Nicholson imposed the boycott on assist -
ance calls after two letters appeared
in The Ubyssey complaining about
patrol break-ins of parked car>.
Hutchinson said that from now
on problems wiih stolen slickers
would be lumed over io the university RCMP detachment.
"If the traffic and security office
informs us that a vehicle with a
stolen sticker is parked on campus,
we won't bother with the sticker.
We will simply seize the car," said
RCMP officer Rod Derouin.
Week succeeds
Canadian University Press
A   nuclear   awareness   week   at
Simon   Fraser   University   was   a'
downright   success   and   the   administration should now pay for it,
says the organizer.
Alan Timberlake, executive assistant to SFU president George
Pedersen, said he sees no reason
why the university can't contribute
money to the events.
"I plan to go back and say the
events were run fairly," says the
former student society president.
"There is no reason why the university shouldn't now handle the
$2,000."
The university had originally promised to fund half the $2,000 cost
for the week, but changed its mind
two weeks ago after fears the events
would severely criticize nuclear
energy.
Timberlake said the university's
fears were unjustified.
"My personal feeling is that the
week came off exactly the way 1
planned it."
But he added that the student
society might have second thoughts
about accepting the
administration's money.
"Informal communication with
some society members shows that
they feel it wouldn't be good to go
back for the money," he said. "But
if 1 can get $J,000 from the administration, I'll do that.
"If they (the student society) in
sist that I don't do that, they can do
their own fund raising."
He said the administration's decision to withdraw funds for the
week's events cost organizers time
and money.
"The university did harm the
event," he says. "I lost 10 working
days because I had to find an extra
$2,000. We were a week behind in
organization."
Malcolm Elliot, SFU student
society internal relations officer,
said the society will try to raise
funds through benefits and other
resources and will still accept
university money.
Timberlake insists that the week
was a success. "The whole thing has
been a highlight. There's been a lot
of enthusiasm and people have been
very impressed by the speakers."
UBC professor David Bates of
ihe royal commission on uranium
uiining in B.C., Gordon Edwards
of the Canadian Coalition for
Nuclear Responsibility and Ada
Sanchez of the Karen Silkwood
legal team were among the
speakers.
"Attendance at the events has
been moderate," said Timberlake.
"Relative to other events in past
years the turnout has been
average."
A dance, displays, speakers and
open forum on uranium mining are
scheduled for Saturday.
— glen sanford photo
NEW SCHEME to replace shuttle bus from B-lot was practiced by money conscious Commerce students in roller-
thon Thursday on Main Mall. Clever plan, labor intensive and involving minimal capital outlay, could revolutionize
campus transportation and make inventors millionaires overnight. But it's doubtful. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979
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THE UBYSSEY
October 12, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
The pressure in the newsroom mounted and staffer after staffer cracked. Reverting to their childhoos, Daniel Moon, Stanley Westby and Wendy Hunt
played choo-choo under the poofta desk while Kathryn Thurman sat facing thecorner, where Peter Menyasz had sent her for drawing on the wail with
Christine Wright's crayons. Steve Reilly, Kevin Finnegan and Sheila Burns reminisced about growing up in the old country, but Dave Wong knew it was all
Blarney. Gary Brookfield and Heather Conn played baseball while Glen Sanford, Joan Marklund and Randy Hahn played hopscotch on the city desk. This totally pissed off Geof Wheelwright, who owned the scotch. Lawrence Panych and Shaffin Shariff took turns playing grade three teachers who couldn't spell their
names, while Julie Wheelwright remembered 437 of her favorite excuses for nt having done her homework. Verne McDonald chuckled over puberty while Tom
Hawthorn proudly announced he recalled perfectly when he was short. It was all too much for Eros Pavan, who fled to Port Hardy, muttering to Sherry Evans it
was all so childish
It's sour
It's becoming an all too familiar song, and as usual, the notes are
noticably sour.
While Alma Mater Society president Brian Short plays a swan
song for noon concerts, concerts organizer Meral Aydin toots a
trumpet about expansion of a successful program.
The music clashes and the sound is painful, as student services
suffer because the AMS can't sing in harmony. Short claims some
of the concerts have lost money, but Aydin says Short doesn't
know what he's talking about. She says the concerts were designed to be subsidized.
The truth of the matter is that the AMS did agree earlier this year
to subsidize concerts to provide valuable entertainment for
students.
But it seems Short and Aydin have a different idea of how many
students have to attend the concerts before they constitute a student service. And Gary Taylor's Rock Room manager Mike Pettinger has his own idea of what makes up a concert quorum.
If the student politicians are going to commit themselves to offering a service such as the concerts, why don't they give it a
chance? Why are they considering scrapping the program after only five weeks, when at least 600 students have attended the shows?
The action looks like a reactionary kneejerk response to a
relatively minor problem. Before making rash announcements
about possibly killing the program, which will jeopardize the
credibility of the noon concerts among possible concert performers, Short should have examined the motives of such a move.
As it is, the fate of the program remains indecisive, with Aydin
claiming great successes while Short predicts gloom and doom.
The best students can get from their president is "we'll see."
If the AMS politicians were committed to carrying out plans they
started, they would take the leap and work out their problems with
the Rock Room or go elsewhere. But the tempting prospect of
blaming cancellation on student apathy will no doubt win out. The
issues sitting on the AMS fence are piling up. Onless they want to
let the fence and the credibility of student politicians collapse, they
will have to start showing what they learned about leadership at
their recent weekend jaunt to Camp Elphinstone.
Letters
Hiring refusal hurts gays
Recently, Jonas Goldstein, a
Vancouver man, visited the Back to
Eden health food store at 2290 West
4th Ave. and inquired about job
openings.
The store's manager, Desmond
Morris, interviewed him and told
him that when he was sufficiently
knowledgeable about natural food
diets, he would be eligible to apply
for a job. As Goldstein turned to
leave, however, the manager issued,
as an afterthought, one final job
requirement.
"If you're a fag, forget it," he
told Goldstein. "We don't hire any
fags around here."
Some prospective job applicants
would let a remark like this pass
almost unnoticed, but Goldstein, as
it happened, was gay.
Parking purges pines
Well good news fellow students,
"they" arc paving more of those
ugly, green, smelly potential rape
areas known as forests. Guess what
is going to replace them?
• a beautiful paved parking lot?
Heh!
• an exciting industrial research
park? Wow!
• a tasteful concrete retaining
wall. Golly gee!
• all of the above. Too much!
What the hell for? Seventeen per
cent of the current area of the university is used up by large parking
lots and another one has just been
paved across the street from
Thunderbird stadium. Why does
the university keep paving more
natural areas for parking lots? Who
controls the land use of the university? What input do students have?
Wnai input does anyone have?
Who cares? I would like to see less
land used for parking lots and more
used for ecological environment.
We can't go and pa\e every area
that someone thinks a rapist is going to hang around iii. We need
sonic green space. Here are some
alternatives:
• Build a multi-level parking loi
away from the main area of human
concentration, i.e. near T-Bird stadium and attempt to open up permanent green areas on campus. An
electric shuttle bus could operate
from this parking lot to the bus stop
cafe, or the more hardy people_
could walk.
• Encourage the use of the bi
cycle as a popular mode of transport. Oh, but it rains so much in
Vancouver, dearies! Oh shit! On
the few days it rains that much you
can take a bus. There should be
covered bike stands located
throughout the campus. And by the
way, they are cheaper to make than
parking lots.
• You mean there is a third alternative? Yes! You could walk or
run to school, despite a junky article in The Ubyssey saying jogging
on University Blvd. could be hazardous to your health.
I'll bet anyone that the people
ihat run, walk or cycle to university
are in better health than those who
drive a gas guzzling polluter each
day.
Greg Smith
geography 4
Love and jogging
give afterglow
The latest argument against jogging is that never do you see a jogger
running with a smile on his face,
therefore this is conclusive evidence
that jogging isn't enjoyable. If you
think about it, very few people
smile while making love. Does that
mean it's not enjoyable? The smiles
come after the effort is made in
both jogging and love making, as
well as the very famous "glow" of
self-satisfaction.
Dave Aquino
phys. ed. 4
He took the story to the B.C.
human rights commission, who told
him that because he had not been
refused for a specific job they could
do nothing. The Gay Alliance
Toward Equality was more receptive: they organized a two-hour
picket of the store. During the
picket, which took place on Sept.
29, members of CFRO-FM's gay
radio program spoke with Morris,
who smoothly defended his
discriminatory policies as being his
right as an employer.
"I have my preferences, that's
all," he maintained. When asked if
this wasn't identical to having a
"preference" against black employees, he replied that he didn't
believe in prejudice.
Subsequent questions in the taped interview established that he was
unable to make the logical connection between a prejudice against
members of a racial group and a
"preference" against gays. Finally,
when asked if he had never had any
gay employees, he responded that
he had hired employees who he had
later found out were gay, but that
they quit because, "I'm something
completely different. I'm what you
call 'straight' and they didn't like
that!" (Needless to say, the number
of gay people who quit jobs because
they have to work with heterosexuals is negligible.)
We of Gay People of UBC agree
with Morris that he generally has a
right to choose employees according to his own judgments of competency.
"Preferences" based solely on
prejudice against a minority group
however, cannot form a legitimate
hiring policy. We hope'that UBC
students will aid us in attempting to
impress upon Morris that harshould
hire on the basis of merit rather
than on the basis of personal
bigotry. Please boycott the Back to
Eden health food store.
R. C. Summerbell
vice-president
Gay People of UBC
and three others
Streak your disc
Congratulations to co-rcc. intramural sports for making ihe debut
of "Ultimate Frisbee" possible
Oct. 3. A summer derivative of
si retell-reach 'bee, ultimate 'bee,
had its debui on a perfect fall day
when Place Vanier advisors and
the MB As battled io a toughly
iought lie as officially decreed by
J  Pitcher, co-rcc chief official.
. fSbvices itad eypem ^bt strutted their stuff to vibes supplied by
UBC radio, which pumped play*
ers to competitive highs in speed,
grace and play-making skills. Yes,
ultimate frisbee, a fast-paced disc
keep-away game, entertained
players and spectators alike with
exhibitions of lightning fast
throws, end zone streaks, and
unreal "no rule" receptions.
Although the MB As, veterans
of the sport, exhibited first half
mastery with a "better to burn out
than fade away" play that would
have blown away a lesser team,
Vanier met the challenge with a
second wind that blew enough
points their way to garner them a
share of a well-deserved tie. In
terested players and curious on-
kiokcis viewed a replay of the
game in tne Pit where heroes and
goats received accolades.
All in all, it was great fun, so
much so that a rematch is scheduled lot Oct. 21, 2 p.m. at Mclnnes lield, complete with video and
sound So if you are into competitive "bee or just want to see a new
sport being played come on by
and see ultimate frisbee that Sunday.
"Downtown"
Hats off to all
needy students
Do you know why nobody out
here wears a hat? It's 'cause
they're too expensive and none of
them seem to fit. I know because
I've been trying for years. So let's
all meet at my house for a rally to
protest ali these expensive, ill-
fitting hats in this city, okay? I
can say that I did my part 'cause I
wrote a letter. Thank you.
Gregoire Fedora Watsonski
psychobiotogy 2
Voyeurs need big ears
I don't usually respond to incompetent reports on my public
lectures, but since I have to live
with those reports here at UBC,
your article on my. "Sex and
Perversion" lecture last week
deserves at least a comment.
1 did not say that "eating and
drinking are forms of oral sexuality", but just the opposite, that sex
should not be considered one of
the "appetites". My reference to
oral sex, which seemed to excite
your editor to proclaim it as
headline, were limited to Freud,
without endorsement, in fact with
considerable criticism on my part.
And your reporter's comment
that "Any act that is humanly
possible is as natural or as unnatural as any other", taken out
of context from a short discussion
of the Marquis de Sade, was,an-
forgivable.
Not all voyeurs, it seems, are
good-listeners, •.      -,... y,,-,;  wmpum
rama
Holmes meets Tosca in gruesome ritual
By WENDY HUNT
With The Incredible Murder of
Cardinal Tosca, the Arts Club proves that talent can salvage mindless
drivel and transform it into amusing
entertainment. But the shortcomings of the script cannot hide
behind the work of cast and crew.
The Incredible Murder of Cardinal
Tosca is the latest in a long line of
mysteries based on the well-worn
character of Sherlock Holmes. In
1895 in England Moriarty, cursed
arch enemy of Holmes, is planning
to set the world aflame in a world
war, there being even a Chinese
connection.
Moriarty intends to have the
crown prince of the Austro-
Hungarian empire assassinated and
then have a double take his place.
The crown prince is almost as important as the pope in the catholic
world and the pope's secret service
is hot on Moriarty's trail.
The murder of a young priest by
Moriarty's gang of satanists brings
Sherlock Holmes into the case. The
plot thickens and thickens and
thickens to the point it almost congeals but Holmes saves the day.
The playwrights, Alden Nowlan
and Walter Learning, try to out-
Doyle Sir Arthur Conan Doyle but
fail miserably.
Nowlan and Learning capture the
form but not the essence of a
Holmesian mystery. The plot is extremely complicated but its many
elements are forced together. Each
piece of a Holmesian puzzle must
finally  fall  into   place  and   be  an
essential part of the outcome. Part
of the audience's enjoyment is trying to fit the pieces together like an
armchair Holmes, but that is missing.
Nowlan and Learnings have
dreamed up a bizarre plot and added violence to camouflage the intellectual and emotional emptiness
of the play.
The real hero is Cardinal Tosca,
head of the pope's secret service.
Even before Holmes enters the case
Tosca and his men seem to be on
Japanese dancers redefine movement
By LAWRENCE PANYCH
While many choreographers concern themselves with esoteric problems of form and space definition
their audiences are more likely to
have a simpler approach. Most
dance lovers are attracted to the art
because it is beautiful and stirring.
It is exciting, romantic; it is sensual,
even erotic.
Last weekend's performance of
the little known (though not for
long) Ankoku Buto Dance Theatre
was a rare experience. This company, in open revolt against dance
hedonists, refuses to let its audiences accept dance simply as nice
music and pretty bodies. Their unique and almost fantastic style is a
radical departure from traditional
dance movement.
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Of his dance, the company's
founder and director Koichi
Tamano says, "We aim at an internal space. The body is made into a
flat surface and the breeze blows in
through the internal organs."
Tamano's characters contort
themselves into the grotesque.
They shrink and stretch, they contract and expand. At one moment
they are flat floating, two-
dimensional shapes and then with a
quick puff of air they fiil into finely
sculpted forms in 3n endless .cycle
of self-deformation.
Movement is completely redefined. The body grows out into space
rather than being swung out by application of mechanical principles.
Space is defined not by encirclement as we are in the habit of see
ing but is engulfed or absorbed as
the body extends itself. The
dancer's body itself is no longer just
dead space.
Because of their deformity,
Tamano's characters seem perhaps
the very antithesis of humanity. Yej
they are intensely human. Horrific
as they may at times seem to be,
one is touched by their simplicity
and naivite.
It is the human animal totally
without pretense. The grotesque
quality arises from the intense expression of human feelings and
sensitivities. The characters present
themselves to us stripped of the
hard plastic shell of appearances.
Tamano explains, "Recently I've
been indulging in sense memory,
recalling the internal sensations of
the distant past, childhood. Com
forts, discomforts, shivering,
unbearable heat. These feelings
well up from within."
Tamano is a disciple of the noted
Japanese dancer Tatsumi Hijikata,
and he made his debut in Japan in
1967. Since that time he has performed throughout Japan, in the
U.S.A. and West Germany. His
small company of three dancers is
stationed in San Francisco.
The visit to Vancouver was the
result of the work of a local paper
sculptor, Shoichi Shimotsugu, who
saw the Company in San Francisco
and convinced his friends that they
must be brought to Vancouver.
Judging from the enthusiastic
response of audiences here, this exciting young group will be back in
town again before long.
top of things. He rescues Holmes
from a dark gaol cell and saves the
life of the prince.
Tosca, like God, works in
mysterious ways unseen and offstage towards a resolution of the
plot. As half the puzzle is being
withheld the audience cannot work
the plot through for themselves but
must wait to have it explained to
them in bursts.
Sherlock Holmes' main purpose
is to amuse with his amazing
powers of perception and deduction. Although these powers do not
solve the case they do save the few
remaining survivors from being
blown up in the final moments of
the play.
The Incredible Murder of Cardinal
Tosca is interesting without being
involving. There is no intellectual
effort on the part of the audience
and no emotional interplay between
the characters. There is no time for
character development, only
characterization. Curiosity, not
suspense, holds the attention.
To keep the plot moving Nowlan
and Learnings have capitalized on
that time-test plot mover, violence.
The satanists provide a chilling
opening but are an integral part of
the plot. They could be any group
of henchmen knocking off a spy. A
gruesome ritual sacrifice carries
more impact, however.
Two rather mundane murders
build up to the torture of Miss
See PF 8
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Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979 Talking Heads
Since their mid'70's debut, the
New York-based new wave band
Talking Heads have garnered
almost unanimous critical acclaim.
Originally the band members expressed their creativity through art.
By
KATHRYN
THURMAN
all having studied design at various
American art colleges. Boredom
and disenchantment with the contemporary art scene made them
decide that communication through
pop music would be much more
fun.
In 1974, David Byrne (vocals,
guitar), Chris Frantz (drums), and
Tina Weymouth (bass) formed a
band called the Artistics.
By 1977 the trio had changed its
name to Talking Heads and had
become a quartet with the addition
of Jerry Harrison (keyboards,
guitar), one of the original Modern
Lovers.
The Talking Heads have taken
the five basic components of rock
music — a singer, a song, guitar,
bass and drums and emerged with
totally fresh music.
Rolling Stone magazine called
their debut album. Talking Heads:
77, "one of the definitive records of
the decade." New York Times rock
critic John Rockwell classified their
second album. More Songs About
Buildings and Food, as his favorite
album of 1978. The album's only
cover track, Al Green's Take Me To
The River, was released as a single.
It became a Top 30 hit propelling
the band to commercial success.
With the 1979 release of Fear of
Music the band's uniqueness is
once again strikingly apparent. Co-
produced by Brian Eno and the
Talking Heads (as was the second
album), this is their most interesting
and exotic album to date and will
undoubtedly   rank   high   on   this
year's critics' best album lists.
"It was boring to teach," recounts Harrison. "I quit teaching
design at Harvard because the
students were pretty stupid and
, HARRISON   . . .
checking for audience response
dull. Actually it was not so much
that they were stupid, but that they
were only interested in getting
good grades and not particularly in-
■ Stanley westby photos
WEYMOUTH ... a lightweight Head who plays heavyweight bass
terested in learning things. They
were afraid to be creative, to take
risks, which made it harder and not
as much fun to teach them. It
became very mechanical."
Harrison found music more
creative and more fun so he left the
schoolroom for stardom. Having
played the piano since fourth grade
and having experimented with the
saxophone for a while in high
school, music was something he
just couldn't give up.
"About 5 or 6 years ago, I also
started playing the guitar, towards
the end of my stay with the Modern
Lovers. It was somewhat in frustration to Jonathan Richman's (leader
of Modern Lovers) changing his
musical style. I was annoyed at
him, because I wanted to play more
original parts."
This annoyance and frustration
precipitated Harrison's departure
from the Modern Lovers. "I wanted
to find a band that was exciting to
play with. In that I wasn't a primary
songwriter I had to find other people whose songwriting I could work
with and believe in. That's always
difficult to find."
The task was difficult but not impossible and Harrison .joined the
Talking Heads in 1977, prior to the
release of their first album on the
Sire-Warner Brothers label.
The Talking Heads try to make
their albums sound like their live
concerts. Most bands attempt the
reverse. "You learn from the audience. If a band spends most of its
time recording in the studio it loses
contact with the audience, so performing is very important. A good
way to test out ideas for songs is
through the audience response."
Harrison also relies on the audience to help him forget his personal problems — at least momentarily.
"Once I get on stage I can
generally forget my problems. But
sometimes certain things intercede
such as being upset over some intense situation happening
someplace else in your life. It's very
bad when that happens. But what's
good about an audience is that it
helps you to focus away from your
problems."
The literary intelligence and
thoughtfulness of the band's lyrics
and music has been widely
chronicled. But their music also has
a very rhythmic dance beat. In fact
their music is highly danceable.
"People are finally beginning to
realize what great dance music we
have. We've always thought our
music was great dance music.
"People used to always concentrate largely on David's lyrics and
stage demeanor. And the writers
often picked up on the words
because it's easier to write about
lyrics. Music is less tangible. But as
far as I'm concerned it's the music
that gets a live audience excited.
The more excited an audience gets
the better I like it.
"But, in Los Angeles recently we
tried to play the concert like it was
an old-fashioned dancer Unfortunately there wasn't enough floor
space to dance and everyone was
getting crushed and throwing up. It
was awful."
Some critics have inanely accused the band of purveying sterile and
emotionless music. According to
Harrison, nothing could be farther
from the truth. "In fact our music is
very erotic in a funny way. But
^eroticism is only one aspect of our
music since it is more than one-
dimensional. Also I feel that all
music you can dance to is erotic."
For many bands a tour results in
financial deficit, so when the audience demand for larger venues
occurs, a band will gladly accommodate. But though the Talking
Heads realize a high audience demand for their live performances
they still insist on playing relatively
small venues.
"For our first tour we didn't want
to be the opening act, playing to a
large audience because it wouldn't
have been fun. We just knew there
wasn't an audience one could pick
out for us. We had to develop our
own audience.
"But now that we have an audience we still prefer playing small
venues. I can remember how exciting it was for me to see the Who
and the Yardbirds in a small venue.
To remember that makes me a fan
forever and we want to give people
that same feeling."
See PF 10
The Heads
hauntingly
heavenly
By KATHRYN THURMAN
Sooner or later it had to happen.
Musically and lyrically, emotion
meets intellect, passion meets
cleverness in a magical fusion.
The Talking Heads admirably accomplished this union Oct. 6 at the
Commodore Ballroom.
Their sound was not lightweight.
It was exasperatingly brave in
balancing the precarious terrain
between spontaneity and
premeditation. The songs became
increasingly exciting and forceful as
the repertoire built up toward the
climactic encore of Life During
Wartime and Take Me To The
River.
Instrumentally the band was impressive. The velvet glove touch of
Jerry Harrison dreamily fondled the
keyboards on Air and Heaven,
selections from the band's latest
album Fear of Music. On the
perverse love song. Paper, Tina
Weymouth showed that she has
become an agile and confident
bassist.
Displaying the group's respect
for percussion, Chris Frantz held his
own with feverish activity on some
solid and intense drumming,
especially on the ever popular
Psycho Killer.
Momentarily abandoning his
characteristcally neurotic and
bizarre kinetic stage gyrations,
David Byrne seductively swayed to
the haunting lilt of Heaven, gently
stroking his guitar as if it was a
harp.
Byrne's wilfully fractured and
tense stance and vocals resurfaced
on the searing and abrasive Electric
Guitar, the lyrics ingeniously jux-
tasposing the abstract with the
concrete.
The band's live performance offered both emotional and intellectual stimulation. Therein breathed
the ultimate character and charm of
The Talking Heads' concert.
Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 Road hasn't slowed
Brubeck band's style
By DANIEL MOON
Dave Brubeck can still pack them
in.
The veteran jazz pianist kept a
near-capacity crowd begging for
more Friday night. Brubeck proved
to the well-groomed Queen
Elizabeth Theatre patrons that
twenty years on the road hasn't
slowed his style or delivery. Solo
and ensemble playing balanced
each other in spite of a last minute
change in personnel.
Bill Smith flew in from Seattle to
replace Jerry Bergonzi, the group's
tenor saxophone player who booked off sick. Once warmed up, the
versatile clarinetist demonstrated
that improvisation is the heart of
jazz. "It helps when you've known
each other for years," said
Brubeck, referring to the octet
Smith joined back in the 1940s.
Brubeck's piano was the centrepiece of the evening, featured in
his own compositions or in tribute
to other jazz greats like Duke Ellington or Count Basie. His boogie-
woogie ending St. Louis Blues was
the first of many shifting moods of
the evening.
Koto Song from Jazz Impressions of Japan featured a sparkling
piano intro that swelled into myriad
incoming   and    receding   patterns
that carried the audience along like
the tide.
There is a long-standing controversy about Brubeck's playing.
Fans praise him for popularizing
off-beat time signatures, for incorporating ethnic music from his
travels abroad and for bringing an
intellectual flavor from his classical
background. Detractors label his art
cocktail music, mere mellow
background. They claim he prefers
cool abstract ideas to direct un-
purged emotion.
Regardless of the listener's interpretation, one thing is clear. After
all these years Brubeck is not likely
to change his stripes. And he has
raised a family to carry on the tradition.
His son Chris was on hand Friday
to fill in on electric bass. More than
technically proficient, he exhibits a
conservative stance that never really ignites. It would be interesting to
hear him in a group setting outside
his father's shadow.
Butch Miles on drums garnered
the most applause and earned all of
it. Engaged in snappy dialogue with
the pianist or lost in misty
brushwork, he matched every
mood Brubeck threw his way. Miles
ran the circuit from loose and easy
to   straight   ahead    business,    to
pugilistic workout and back again.
The key word was articulate. His
solos were spellbinding as he made
the drums talk to each other.
Rock drummers would be ashamed to hear Miles do more on his
rims than they do on a full set of
Ludwigs.
With one ear-opener after
another the first half ran a full thirty
minutes over schedule. "Guys were
running in from the lobby saying
'What'll we do, the ice is melting',"
cracked Brubeck. No one complained or even seemed to notice.
The second set featured stand-in
Bill Smith giving a few new twists to
the perennial request Take Five.
With the unexpected solo even the
band got a kick out of this one. The
crowd brought the group back for
two encores.
After the show, Russell Gloyd,
Brubeck's manager and music
director, said the quartet will be
playing every night till December.
The tour extends till April 15 and
will treat jazz buffs as far away as
Australia and Japan to Brubeck's
special brand of music.
Special is the word for a musician
who can play night after night, year
after year. And still deliver the
goods.
v't1.,;
'?>
Initiation
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979 Jazz Primer
By DANIEL MOON
Jazz.
The word scares people but it
shouldn't. Rooted in various forms
of music and having evolved
through several generations, there
is something in jazz for everyone.
The most popular branch of
Afro-American music is the blues.
Jazz has borrowed heavily from the
blues but has not restricted itself to
that form's 12-bar format. Jazzmen
trade licks as blues players do but
John Coltrane takes jazz back to
its roots on Coltrane Plays the
Blues. This giant of ;he tenor saxophone tills the fields of blues to
unearth richer, more expressive
veins of the loneliness and yearning
for love that knows no color boundary.
A more romantic album that has
become the cornerstone of any
serious collection is Miles Davis'
Kind of Blue. Coltrane again contributes to this impressive collection
Jazz sets itself apart by its
insistence on improvisation
rather than preset arrangement.
That is why many jazz favorites
are recognizable but rarely
played the same way twice
they tend to develop their solos in
more open ended structures.
Both groups share a common
background of segregation because
of skin color that shaped the
temperaments of the musicians.
Color prejudice also kept them
obscure and poor. White college
audiences in the 50's and 60's were
shocked when black jazz musicians
harangued them about color prejudice.
Reflection on the issue can't
escape the fact that white rock and
rollers got the club dates and recording contracts while their dark skinned brothers starved. Classical
music is still dominated by upper
middle class Caucasians.
of horn-dominated compositions
J:hat have yet to be equalled for texture or unity of playing.
Rock and jazz were no more than
neighbours until quite recently.
Jazz sets itself apart by its insistence on improvisation rather
than preset arrangement. That is
why many jazz favorites are
recognizable but rarely played the
same way twice. Musicians interpret the basic tune with solos that
reflect the player's mood at the moment and vary from a few bars to a
half hour virtuoso performance.
Not only are longer solos allowed, but they are often played on instruments considered to be back-up
pieces   in    rock.   Jazz   drummers
ELLINGTON AND COLTRANE ... two greats together
share the spotlight with the other
members of the band and often are
leaders of their own quartets. Their
role is to be more than background
timekeeper, to move ahead and inspire the other soloists and to
display ingenuity that too often
evades rock drummers. Men like
Elvin Jones, Jack DeJohnette and
Danny Richmond are a treat to
watch on their own.
Bass players have been stepping
out front as well. Charlie Mingus is
becoming a household word thanks
to his influence on pop music
figures like Joni Mitchell.
Although it's not unusual to find
an electric bass in today's jazz
group it is the stand up acoustic
that is favored for its rich
resonance.
Jazz is finding its way into rock
but it took a man like Miles Davis to
bring about the reverse. His
monumental Bitches Brew offended a lot of jazz purists because it
dared to cross over into rock territory. He relied heavily on John
McLaughlin's electric guitar to give
his compositions the distinctive
sound and feel of rock.
Their collaboration on Miles' Jack
Johnson album is a purer, more
refined working out of the same
concerns. Miles weaves his trumpet
in and out of McLaughlin's sharp,
spare chordal structures in this
tribute to a black boxer.
McLaughlin is best known to rock
fans for his work with Mahavishnu
Orchestra, an ambitious rock-jazz
effort that eventually ran out of
steam.
Jazz hasn't ignored the introduction of electronics into rock music.
Synthesizers have been hooked up
to trumpets, flutes and saxophones
not to mention the sizeable influence of the electric piano.
Weather Report is the group that
has made the most successful inroads into fusion music. Their third
album. Mysterious Traveller is a
magical intersection of acoustic,
electric and electronic instrumentation. When the music tries to
become too commercial, the flavor
of jazz is watered down to become
almost non-existent. Victims can
get lost exploring electronics like
Herbie Hancock did.
Or like George Benson they can
get so mellow they get piped into
airports and cocktail lounges. Or
they can follow Freddie Hubbard by
committing the ultimate sin and going disco.
Jazz has been slowest to absorb
classical influences probably due to
its ghetto origins and dependence
on non-traditional instruments like
the saxophone. The constant
search for new modes of expression
inevitably led to an investigation of
classical forms. The movement that
was popularized by pianists like
Dave Brubeck and Chick Corea has
developed so quickly that today
avant-garde jazz and avant-garde
classical music often overlap extensively.
The deprogramming of rigid
forms begun by Bartok and Varese
is seen carried on in jazz circles by
innovators like Cecil Taylor and Anthony Braxton. TheseUwo men are
on the fringe of jazz and not recommended for those without an appreciation of atonal music.
Keith Jarrett is much closer to
the popular conception of classical
piano.    Koln   Concert,    the   solo
DAVIS . . . romances with Kind of Blue
masterpiece recorded as a double
album, is the most cohesive expression of Jarrett's philosophy. It retains inprovisational freedom
developed in a lyrical, classically
tinged framework.
Vancouver is fortunate in having
a number of experienced and up
and coming musicians that put their,
art   ahead   of  their  pocketbooks.
nobody has been bringing in big
names in American and European
jazz to town since the lamented
demise several years ago of Oil Can
Harry's upstairs room. Jazz Alley at
the Istanbul, 255 W. 2nd, is hoping
to fill that vacuum and at the same
time give local talent a place to play
in an intimate nightclub atmosphere.
Vancouver is fortunate
in having a number
of experienced and
up and coming musicians
that put their art
ahead of their pocketbooks
m
How they pay the rent remains a
mystery but their sweet sounds
echo in the city's clubs.
The Classical Joint on Carrall
street, a Gastown institution, gives
free-form players a place to blow
their horns, usually in a quartet setting. This relaxed coffeehouse is a
mecca for low budgets and adventurous tastes.
Those who desire more traditional fare such as dixieland or big
band sounds should investigate the
Hot Jazz Club at 36 E. Broadway.
Old hands and young bloods,
studio musicians, CBC types and
semi-professionals pool their
talents to bring alive an older,
more established jazz stream.
With the notable exception of
The   Vancouver   Jazz    Society
Black Swan Records at 4th and
Bayswater stocks a discriminating
selection that specializes in hard to
get imports and out of print
classics. A friendly, well-informed
staff can direct the buyer to the
brand of jazz that most attracts
him.
Ernie's Hot Wax on Denman near
English Bay offers a wide range of
recordings with a more popular appeal. Those who take time to flip
through the stacks will find some
real gems.
. Quintessence on 4th Avenue
near Burrard Street is best known
for punk but their selection features
a lot of the must-have discs that are
the base of any good jazz collection.
Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 5 4
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Pa^e Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,1979 *™r,itstr.
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Though it hasn't happened quite!
yet, a similar breakthrough is ready |
to appear on Canada's West Coast.
Should the Pointed Sticks or K-Tels I
achieve international recognition, [
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perform  their  own  material  and
have proven themselves contenders!;
for the crown of best original act.
j Tight, with proven musical ability,;
'they will be putting out a single
;soon.
Then there are those who are not
ready for stardom but are not to be
ignored. The Dishrags, three
women with style who unfortunately can't articulate lyrics, can still
find new ways to perform rock in al
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* band to be reckoned with. ™"
The list continues almost forever. 1«
Private School, No Fun, Femalel
Hands, The Payolas, Rude Norton
and The Big Black Puppet are all on
vinyl or soon will be. And I haven't
mentioned The Devices, Shades,
Rabid or U-J3RK5. The new music
I scene is so volatile that any attempt
to catalogue it is out of date as
soon as it set down.
If   you   blinked,   you   probably
I missed three  bands that held a
ess Br*--•■"I
■heainning.
Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 i
Literary types clutter up courtyard
By CHRISTINE WRIGHT
The Literary Storefront has
become an active force in the Vancouver cultural scene since its May,
1978 opening.
Founder Mona Fertig was inspired by the bookstore-salon run
by Sylvia Beach in Paris from
1919-1941. Beach's Shakespeare
and Company was the favorite
haunt of such writers as Hemingway, James Joyce, T.S. Elliot
and Gertrude Stein. Fertig's Vancouver Storefront boasts a contemporary collection: Earl Birney, Bill
Bissett, Susan Musgrave and Jack
Hodgins rank among the Canadian
writers who have held readings at
the Storefront.
The Storefront's purpose is "to
stimulate interest and development
in the literary arts, and to promote
interaction and support between
writers," as stated in the monthly
newsletter. Courses, workshops
and readings are open to the
general public. The focus is distinctly Canadian.
In the first summer after opening,
the Storefront attracted a total audience of over 3,000.
"We get all kinds — old and
young writers, a lot of people from
the Kitsilano area, librarians and a
few who just wander in off the
street," says Fertig.
She is pleased with the community support and interest. "We
expected it to take 3 years to reach
the public's attention," she says.
There are some immediate problems for the Literary Storefront.
The Gastown location has provided
maximum accessibility at a
minimum rent for the past year and
a   half.   But  the   new  owners   of
Tosca
fails to
puzzle
From PF 2
Violet Tichbourne. The lady's only
crime is to fall into the hands of
Moriarty while searching for the
priest's killer. She is made to tell all,
which is disappointingly little, by a
Chinese method of torture called
Death of a Thousand Cuts. Happily
the audience only has to suffer
through six. Blood and screams are
acutely authentic in live theatre.
Such senseless violence is an
assault upon and an insult to the
audience. It crudely manipulates
the feelings of an audience for
shock value and adds no dimension
of understanding to either plot or
character.
The characterizations are well
done by all members of the cast.
Allan Gray's Moriarty, looking like
death warmed over, balances the
clipped, terrier-like Sherlock
Holmes played by David Schur-
mann.
Director Bill Millerd keeps the
play moving quickly so that it does
not bog down in its own circles and
even throws in a few chuckles for
good measure. The luxurious sets
and costumes by Alison Green are
excellent.
A professional production is not
enough" to excuse a thin plot
bolstered by cheap tricks. One
leaves the theatre feeling empty.
The Incredible Murder of Cardinal
Tosca does not give anything to the
audience other than two hours of
slick entertainment to be quickly
forgotten. The full house Saturday
evening may indicate this is what
Vancouver audiences want: pablum
theatre.
Gaslight Square don't want literary
types cluttering up the courtyard.
"The new owners want to turn '
the square into exclusive lawyers'
offices by Christmas," says Fertig.
The Storefront is currently looking
for a cheap loft or store space. But
Fertig is not overly concerned about
the Christmas deadline.
"It could just be a lot of hot air,"
she said.
During the first year in operation,
the Storefront received $11,000
through Canada Council Exploration grants. Of this amount, $500
went towards Fertig's salary. The
grant was not renewed last May
because of recent Canada Council
cut-backs.
Sylvia Beach's Shakespeare and
Company faced a similar problem
during the Depression. Beach and
friends petitioned the French
government for subsidies, yet the
money wasn't available. They solved the problem by forming "The
Friends of Shakespeare and Co.,"
Whose 200 members pledged 200
francs per year.
"The Canadian government is un-
doubtably wealthier than the
French government was in 1936,
but Fertig learned a valuable lesson
from her mentor. Since last May,
the Storefront has been subsisting
on its own. Membership fees, admission charges and benefit events
cover the rent. If the fall courses
and workshops go well, Fertig will
be supplied with a minimal salary.
There are presently over 250
"Friends of the Literary
Storefront," each donating $12 or
more per year. The membership offers reduced rates on courses and
readings,*   access   to   the   lending
library of over 2,000 titles and
delivery of the newsletter.
The Storefront, in conjunction
with the Canadian Writers' Union,
might receive a new grant from the
Arts Council. The Writers' Union
has office hours in the Storefront
and offers information on matters
of publishing, copyright, book contracts, and censorship. The Union
also arranges seminars with professional Canadian writers. If the Arts
Council grant comes through,
visiting writers will receive small
honorariums.
"In the 66 readings last year, only
six were given cash," Fertig says.
By offering a small donation
($15-50), the Storefront will encourage writers to return.
With or without the grant, the
Storefront will survive. Fertig is
assisted by volunteers, and people
-on welfare can earn money by
working on the monthly mail-out.
Fertig sees the non-profit book
sales becoming a more important
angle of the operation.
"We can provide an outlet for
Canadian fiction, poetry, plays, and
journals," she said. The books are
relatively inexpensive ($5-8 in
paperback). Small-scale publishing
is also a future possibility. The
Storefront will continue to offer
courses and readings.
After playing the chief role of
coordinator in the initial period, Fertig sees herself "fading mete into
the background."
The Literary Storefront is unique.
Vancouver boasts the only nonprofit literary salon in the tradition
of Sylvia Beach. And if all continues to go well?
"Maybe we'll open an outlet in
Paris!"
CAREERS IN
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Back to school. Exams. Christmas. More classes, more exams
and graduation. And next...
Right now you are probably thinking about the past several years
and what you have to look forward to after graduation.
While you're at it, consider the personal growth and satisfaction
you could experience at Procter & Gamble - a leader in the consumer
products industry. We regard training and development as our most
basic responsibility because we promote strictly from within Procter
& Gamble. We know of no way to train people to become managers
other than to have them learn by doing.
Economics, history, psychology, business - our managers include
diverse backgrounds. More important than your specific field of
study are such basics as intelligence, leadership ability, innovative-
ness, and a solid track record of achievement.
Prior to on-campus interviews, representatives from our Company
will be on-campus:
Date:  October 16,1979
Time:  12:30 p.m.
Room:  Party Room 200 S.U.B.
Topic:  Business Management Careers
(open to all students)
Representatives from Sales, Brand, Buying
and Distribution will be available.
October 17,1979
12:30 p.m.
326 Henry Angus Bldg.
Sales and Brand
Management
presentation
The visit will be a session in which ALL interested students can
learn more about career opportunities in Business Management
at Procter & Gamble.
As a first step, we invite you to visit your placement office and
obtain a copy of our literature. Additional information is also available in the library file in the placement office.
SYLVIA BEACH . . . forerunner of Literary Storefront
LOOK.' HE TOLD US TEQUILA
SAUZA! AND WE BETTER GET IT
RIGHT THIS TIME! AS HE LEFT HIS
OFFICE HE PRACTICALLY YELLED:
"TEQUILA SAUZA IS NUMERO UNO
IM THE \NHOLE COUNTRY! GET IT?
NUMBER ONE-JUST IN CASE
YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND!*
yT\:
w«
&
%
j^e)
m
\Q
.*^rnryijjUNjyyg^
PROCTER & GAMBLE
NUMERO UNO IN MEXICO AND IN CANADA
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,1979 ■p—mmmmmtfgritMwm
mmt^tmiM^mmmmmmim
-'*■■-»■■•
Jungle journey evokes madness, horror
By VERNE McDONALD
"The most important thing I
wanted to do in the making of
Apocalypse Now was to create a
film experience that would give its
audience a sense of the horror, the
madness, the sensuousness, and
the moral dilemma of the Vietnam
war."
— Francis Coppola
Having blown the initial $12 million budget, used up all his bountiful earnings from Godfathers I and
II, and mortgaged everything but
his short hairs, Francis Coppola has
at last completed and screened his
"war epic."
Apocalypse Now
Starring   Marlon   Brando
At the Stanley theatre
From his list of aims above, he
accomplished three out of four.
The sense of fear he so artfully instills in the audience shrivels
thoughts of sensuousness. The voluptuous jungles of the tropics appear as nothing but sinister. A
U.S.O. Playboy Bunny troupe is
treated cynically and distastefully.
But in achieving his other aims
Coppola is superb.
Trying to describe this movie in
words is difficult. If words were sufficient Coppola never would have
had to make the film. As it is not
even ordinary film technology was
enough.
Certainly the most striking aspect
of Apocalypse Now is the stunning
use of advanced sound techniques.
From the opening scene when
The Doors' song The End is overlaid
with the phantom echoes of helicopters floating out above the audience, right up to Capt. Willard's
(Martin Sheen) penetration into
Cambodia and his confrontation
with Col. Kurtz (Marlon Brando),
the aural effects are magnificent.
Some who have seen the movie
claim that without the special effects, visual and aural, the movie
has little real impact. But such a
stand ignores two important points.
First, Coppola uses special techniques in order to establish immed
iacy and presence. Anyone who lived through the 1960s has already
seen Vietnam, live and in color, on
their television set. To make any impact on them an extra effort must
be made.
Second, the effects are used
largely in the first two-thirds of the
film when Coppola is merely establishing the empirical basis for the
philosophical argument of the last
third. Willard's confrontation with
Kurtz is the raison d'etre for the film
and it stands on its own.
It is strange that many people
praised the first two-thirds and
scorned the latter part of the film.
Impressive as it was, the first part
offers nojfiing new or different in its
treatment of the subject of war. It is
the second part that both complements and transcends by forcing
the audience to think about the reasons for the horror they have
witnessed.
And it is the first part that contains the obvious flaws in Apocalypse Now. Coppola's anti-war
slant at times becomes heavy-handed to the point of clumsiness.
Some scenes undermine his attempts to portray a frightening reality by being too unbelievable or
too strident in their condemnation
of the American participation in
Vietnam. At times the audience is
too aware of the director's feelings
about what he is filming.
This attitude also interferes with
character development. Capt. Willard is introduced as a cynic, already
almost driven insane by at least one
tour in Vietnam and now back for
his second. Yet he reacts with
shocked bewilderment every time
he witnesses another battle or
atrocity.'It doesn't fit.
These inexplicable fits of innocence are good from a visually dramatic point of view but confuse the'
viewer and cause him to distrust the
portrayal of Capt. Willard as portrayed by Martin Sheen and directed by Coppola.
And Col. Kilgore (Robert Duvall)
as the blood-and-guts commander
of  a   helicopter  cavalry  battalion
comes off as something out of a
comic book. He is effective as a
symbol, not as a real man.
Yet this is the first inkling we
have of Coppola's true intention.
Having promised us realism, and in
the midst of giving it to us, he reveals a harbinger of the less physical conflict to come.
Col. Kilgore exists only as a symbol; his battle tactic of playing
Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries
while roaring over a Vietnamese village directing the fire of his helicopters underscores his role as
such.
Coppola's emphasis, like Joseph
Conrad's Heart of Darkness that he
emulates rather than retells, shifts
to the mystical and the inexplicable.
Once the river leading to Kurtz is
entered we have come with Willard
into a different world.
Symbolism at this point takes an
equal place with dramatic action.
The shift is sometimes awkward.
Coppola    reverts   occasionally   to
making his points with a thick club
and once or twice stoops to cheap
melodrama. But these are sidelights
and irrelevant to the essential
theme.
Why did the experience of Vietnam have such an effect on those
who were there (a large percentage
of veterans are at least partially psychologically disabled) and on America as a whole?
How could such acts of atrocity
and violence occur in our civilized
world?
One thing Coppola tells us about
Vietnam, as Conrad told us about
Africa, is that it is not our world. If
it is not beyond our understanding
it is at least beyond our laws and
values.
Any review will undoubtedly
make little difference in your decision whether or not to see Apocalypse Now. The importance of this
film and its place as a landmark film
of this decade are concepts that are
already public knowledge.
The violence necessary in conveying the war in Vietnam is admittedly repulsive, even mind-
numbing. This too is well-known.
A person leaving the screening
said, "all I know is I want to be sick.
What's the point of that?"
But the intention of Apocalypse
Now is to portray the Vietnam war
in all its aspects: physically, morally
and spiritually. The effect of the
film on the audience is close to the
effect Vietnam had on the
Americans.
Fun, nostalgia make
Who super-alright
By EROS PA VAN
The Kids are Alright is not so
much a tribute to the Who as it is a
celebration of nearly two decades
of music from a band that many
consider to be the greatest 'live'
rock n' roll band in history.
The Kids Are Alright
At the Broadway 2
In contrast to the controversy
that, sometimes surrounded the
Rolling Stones and the eventual
breakup of the Beatfes, the Who
has survived as a band because
they ve never stopped havinc, a
good time. The film is certainly
testimony to this.
It is a mixture of nostalgia, early
television appearances (most
notably the film's opener - a rendition of My Generation on the old
Smothers Brothers Hour), the Who
in concert, and even a couple of
home movies with the boys "mucking around.''
Takes from an interview done on
British television circa 1973 are interspersed throughout the movie
and provide some of the film's finer
moments, thanks to a very serious
interviewer who unwittingly
becomes the perfect straight man
for the antics of Townshend,
Moon, and company. Moon's buddy Ringo Starr makes a cameo appearance that also adds to the fun.
Although The Kids are Alright
was released after Moon's death
there is no reference to his demise
in the movie, we are shown such a
direct insight into the character of
the man that it emerges as a perfect
epitaph to the heart and soul of
the Who.
As is always the case when a
movie is shot in retrospect, film
quality and sound quality often suffer, but not enough to seriously affect the overall film.
Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 Reynolds and Clayburgh
team up for comic love story
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
With an able cast including Jill
Clayburgh, Burt Reynolds and Can-
dice Bergen and producer-writer
James L. Brooks and director Alan
J. Pakula, it is difficult to imagine a
film going wrong.
But that's exactly what Starting
Over does. And despite three fine
acting performancesand a director
who tries hard to overcome the
underdeveloped script.
Starting Over
Starring    Burt    Reynolds,    Jill
Clayburgh and Candice Bergen
At the Capitol 6
Reynolds plays Phil Potter,
whose wife (Candice Bergen)
wants a divorce to pursue a career
as a songwriter-singer. Daunted by
the ordeal, Potter seeks solace with
his brother and his wife, who introduce nim to Marilyn (Jill
Clayburyh), another recently-
divorced woman. And love blooms •
between Phil and Marilyn.
Heads
Talking
clearly
From PF 3
On tour the band travels light,
with only the most minimal amount
of equipment and only two crew
members. They don't even travel
with the usually obligatory tour
manager. "We have very spare
touring policies. We even do our
own laundry. All of these things
combine to allow us to play places
that other bands would find unprofitable."
But on their present extensive
and exhaustive world-wide tour the
band and crew members are allowing themselves the luxury of occasional privacy. "On the first tour
David and I shared a room. We got
along very well, but you can only
put up with certan things for a certain amount of time and then there
comes a time when you just don't
want to any more.
"We just reached a point where
we now want our own rooms. Not
that we weren't getting along or
anything. But after we had separate
rooms it was lonely. It drove me
crazy at first. Now I could never go
back to sharing a room. And it's
just nice to be able to have a TV all
to myself and watch which TV
show I want to watch."
In the last two months the band
has  travelled  60,000   miles.
"I wish there was more time to
go sight-seeing, though. Our basic
travel pattern so far has been five
days on then one day off. Even
though this tour has been a bit too
much it has not been too exhaustive. You must look for the
right balance. Now that we (the
band) are more established we will
have a more relaxed schedule in
following years.
"But we realized thnt we had to
work very hard at first to get to a
certain point to be able to make
more records. We still have a long
way to go before we get a lot of
commercial success. But we have a
growing audience for our records.
"We believe that what goes up
fast comes down fast. It's important to build a group slowly. People
will appreciate it and last with you."
The thorn is that Jessica, now
famous, still has feelings for her ex-
husband.
Reynolds and Clayburgh
generate an unmistakable
chemistry. After a barrage of
"macho" roles, Reynolds has a
challenging comic role. Clayburgh,
in an another tour-de-force performance, is first-rate. She plays the
role of Marilyn with delicacy and
charm, reminiscent of Diane
Keaton's brilliance. Clayburgh
recreates the gentle vulnerability
she displayed in An Unmarried
Woman with the comic timing of
Semi-Tough.
After, the disaster of Oliver's
Story Bergen delivers. Her captivating beauty and talent are wisely
captured by director Pakula.
Despite three very good performances and a top-notch supporting
cast including Charles Durning,
Pakula fumbles. The initial promise
of Starting Over is delivered.
The beginning of the film and the
meeting between Reynolds and
Clayburgh are classic scenes. But
Pakula does not keep up the pace,
and what could have been a
hilarious male version of An Unmarried Woman turns out to be a disappointing exercise - a never-ending
series of quips and one-liners.
But the fault does not lie solely
with director Pakula. Writer James
L. Brooks must also share some of
the blame for the eventual failure of
Starting Over.
Brooks, a writer of television
shows including the original Mary
Tyler Moore Show and Taxi, never
gives enough depth to any of his
leading characters. The film often
falls back on the star presence of
Clayburgh, Reynolds and Bergen
-such a necessity spells trouble for
any film, especially Starting Over.
When Potter is lured back by
Jessica, and he nearly succumbs,
one has trouble believing that he
would risk losing an intelligent and
understanding woman like Marilyn.
The explanation that he is still infatuated with his wife holds no
ground, as it is obvious from the
beginning that Potter dislikes his
wife.
And what is less believable is that
Potter does not even talk to Marilyn
about going back to his wife (at
least not on camera.) So when the
characters begin to act in a way the
audience cannot understand, or
identify with. Starting Over
becomes tedious.
Those wanting to see Clayburgh
and Reynolds together again after
Semi-tough should see Starting
Over. For those expecting a well-
defined and thoroughly good adult
film, in the tradition of Annie Hall,
it's a different matter
altogether ....
MUSICAL TRIPLE BILL-Oct. 11-14
ELVIS: THAT'S THE WAY IT IS 7:30
TOMMY 9:30
LETTHE GOOD TIMES ROLL 11:30
16th and Arbutus, Vancouver 738-6311    Box Office Opens 700;
Iff
\K&rm&Dry
at special prices
P1020
Goose Down
Quilted
Parka
$49.95    k
(Limited Supply)
[^ PACK & BOOTS SHOP
V^aa- 3425West Broadway,"\fancouver 738-3128
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OUR TOWN
by Thornton Wilder
OCTOBER 26 - NOVEMBER 3
(Previews - Oct. 24 6- 25)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $3.00
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - Four Plays For $8.00]
BOX OFFICE    »    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    -    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
II       FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 6871515
THE ONION FIELD
A True Storv
VOGUE
Warning:  Some violence and
^5,.„ coarse language B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 12:45 2:55 5:10 9,« ghanville
7:35 9:55 Sunday 2:55 5:10 7:35 9:55^£L^li
MATMMAL LAMFMM'.
▲MMAL IWUtB
Warning:  Occasional  nudity and suggestive
scenes.   Coarse  language  throughout.   B.C.
D"     Show,imes^15 3.2015*0 7:45 9:60 „,  GRANVIlu
Sunday 3:20 5:30 7:45 9:50 *gi?«*»
OQEON
A FORCE OF ONE
Warning: Some violent scenes.
B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 2:10 3:50 5:50 7:55 10:00
Sunday 2:10 3:50 5:50 7:55 10:00	
CORONET 1
• il   GRANVILLE
685-6»2»
u
KING <ft#@ FRAT
Warning: Some nudity and suggestive scenes.
Coarse language throughout. B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 1:30 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:35 ...  „_.„.,
Sunday 3:30 5:30 7:30 9:35 •5I6RANVILII
A Hf** A Yb****
Warning:    Occasional   coarse |
language and swearing. B.C. Dir. ^TmTT^HshT
Showtimes: 7:30 9:30        874-2747
Sometimes...
The Runner Stumbles
SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:30
THE SEDUCTION
OF JOE TYMAM
Warning: some coarse language.
B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 7:30 9:30
■"DAWN OF THE DEaFI
0k   Warning: completely concern^
E!5TT3E!^s... ed with violence. B.C. Dir
Showtimes: 7:30 9:40
THE ROCK'N ROLL MOVIE!
Showtimes: 7:159:15  yoy^;y9yyWAY||
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,1979 Theatre group dreams of Kafka
By SHEILA BURNS
Tamahnous Theatre is one of the
hottest theatre groups around
town.
The group of young, talented
and hardworking actors has, over
the past few seasons, become
popular with Vancouver audiences,
largely because of their artistically
imaginative productions.
"Basically, we decided to start a
company because we wanted to
create work for ourselves," says
current Tamahnous director Larry
Lillo. They felt there were limited
prospects with the Arts Club,
Playhouse, and the New Play
Theatre, the three companies
which existed at that time. "I didn't
see any possibilities for myself
there," he says.
With the help of an Opportunities
For Youth grant Tamahnous was
born. Over the years they have
received financial assistance from
the Canada Council, the B.C.
Cultural Fund as well as a number
of private organizations.
Lillo says with a smile that they're
doing well financially. The success
of the group, despite drastic
government cutbacks, is proof of
their popularity with Vancouver audiences.
Tamahnous' philosophy is different from that of other theatre
groups. "The unique thing about
Tamahnous is that it's collectivist,"
says Lillo. "Everyone has input,
everyone shares responsibility for
the operation of the company."
Collective involvement is present
at all levels. Choosing the plays
presented in a season, deciding
about costumes and working out
how a given scene will be performed are all group decisions. "This
results in a more cohesive perfor-
NORRES
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MOVING AND j;a55
STORAGE      ""
Big or
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Reasonable
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2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
 CLEAN UBS
COMMERCE
OKTOBERFEST 79
Friday, October 12,
7:30- 1:00 a.m.
TICKETS AVAILABLE
IN ROOM 302C
HENRY ANGUS BLD.
$6.00
COMMERCE WEEK
GUEST SPEAKER
Mr. Robbie Sherrell
President of
I.C. B.C.
Friday, October 12
12:30- 1:30
Room 302
Henry Angus Building
mance because people are contributing at all levels," Lillo says.
Nettie Wild, in charge of public
relations for Tamahnous,says
discussions about sets,
characterization, and costumes are
a tremendous help to an actor. "If
you know what's gone into your
costume you'll work a lot better
with it," she says.
Most Tamahnous members are
local. Several left Vancouver to
train but all came back here to
work. Sue Astley, an actress with
the company for six years, talked of
her unusual beginnings in the acting profession. "I never trained,"
she says. "I just learned on the
job." She started as the company's
business manager but gradually got
into acting instead, thanks to the
help and patience of the company.
"With other theatres you never get
a chance like that — I was lucky,"
she said.
Most of the actors involved with
Tamahnous like to write. One of the
company's most unusual features is
that they write most of their own
work. "Our actors have to like that
kind of work," says Lillo. "It's difficult, confusing, and long but
ultimately an incredibly rewarding
experience for the actor."
The company's first production
this year, Kafka's Metamorphosis,
is an exception. But the. other two
plays they will perform this season.
The Clown Show and an adaptation of Robin Hood, are collective
works written by the company.
They have not yet started work
on The Clown Show. "It will be
performed in progress in February
and then the finished play will be
presented in April," Lillo says. "By
performing it in progress we'll be
able to get some feedback on it and
so be able to work out any pro
blems or put new ideas into it."
Tamahnous has become known
for its unusual; supremely imaginative approach to theatre.
While visiting Tamahnous a number
of the company were sitting around
discussing their dreams and attempting to explain them, "We talk
about dreams a lot," Nettie Wild
said. "And you'll probably see that
reflected in our present show."
The company's upcoming production of Metamorphosis is a play
in which dreams play a central role.
The strange, nightmarish atmosphere of Kafka's play appears
to be well-captured in Tamahnous'
production.
Metamorphosis is the story of
Gregor Samsa, who awakens one
morning to find he has been
transformed into a gigantic insect.
The Samsa family's reaction to their
son's transformation, the shock
and disgust of the outside world,
and Gregor's own reaction to his
extraordinary dilemma are all explored with sensitivity, imagination,
and humour.
The plots sounds a trifle fantastic, the play is frighteningly real.
"It's a reality that happens to people when they're alone," Nettie
Wild says. "Although it's really
bizarre it's really a very sad play,
very human."
Tamahnous is working with a
new adaptation of Metamorphosis
by the London Theatre Group's
Steven Berkoff. While they have introduced a number of interesting
and imaginative techniques that
heighten its nightmarish quality,
Tamahnous has closely followed
the original play. "We've really only
changed the play when we find it
self-indulgent," Lillo says. "We've
changed the style a bit but we
haven't cut any dialogue out. We're
METAMORPHOSIS . . . one good turn deserves another
more loyal to Kafka than a lot of
other companies."
One of these style changes is the
incorporation of mime and masks
into the play. Mime artist Wendy
Goriing, who is co-directing the
play, is also the company's mime
coach and in charge of mask production. "The mask is used as a
highlight, as an extension of the
character to complete the image,"
says Goriing.
"The company has used masks in
the past in different productions
and found them highly effective.
But they are a difficult form for an
actor to master," says Wild. "It's
really difficult. I have to mold my
whole body around something I
wasn't born with."
But the mask provides tremendous motivation for the actor.
"Masks make a production very
dynamic; they raise the tension
level incredibly," says Wild. "They
train the actor to use the rest of his
body. All of his actions are poured
See PF 12
Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 11 Brothers' sound muddied
By DANIEL MOON
The Wade Brothers fought the
SUB auditorium sound system and
almost won.
From the first song Wednesday
the band struggled to keep their
zippy spatial sound floating above
the muddy PA. When backup
singers Joani Taylor and Jane Mor-
tifee came on for the second song
the problem became even more evident.
Still, the marching band introduction kicked Didn't Expect to
Feel into a funky groove. Brett
Wade took time from his guitar to
lead the vocals with a stretching
falsetto. Dave Pickell and Graeme
Coleman    of    keyboards    cleverly
Kafka
bugs
play
picked up his guitar riffs and fed
them through their electronic
machines. The song led into In
Need of Someone with brother Joel
Wade taking over the vocals and
giving them a Stevie Wonder
delivery.
The group's roots in psychedelia
were obvious on the playful Rainbow Mountain. Lyrics dripping in
fantasy were humorously counter-
pointed by a disco bass line.
Today Has Brought Me You was
the most sensitive number of the
noon-hour presentation. Brett
Wade put in his most convincing
vocal on this slow, bluesy love
song. His elegant guitar solo com-
Krom PF 11
into his face."
Another characteristic of
Tamahnous is the length of time the
company spends rehearsing a play.
"Most companies downtown
rehearse for three weeks," says
Wild. Tamahnous, by contrast,
spends six weeks working on a
show. "Because we deal collectively it takes longer," she says.
Several actors have joined
Tamahnous for" their current production. Sheelagh Megill, working
with Tamahnous for the first t;me,
stresses the benefit of extra rehearsal time. "The rehearsal time for me
has been really rewarding," she
says. "You have time to try other
things — time to make mistakes.
This is a much richer process for the
actor."
Wendy Goriing is also enjoying
her first production with
Tamahnous. "The actors are all
very hardworking," she said. "It's
been a very exciting experiment for
me."
tamahnous is an exciting experiment for Vancouverites as well. The
company is a reflection of the city's
expanding and enrichening cultural
life. It is a tribute to Vancouver that
an experimental theatre ensemble
such as Tamahnous could take root
and thrive.
Tamahnous started in. 1971 as an
outgrowth of UBC's Freddy Wood
Theatre Company." Only two of the
original ten-member group remain.
Lillo and Jeremy Long, in charge of
lighting design, are both graduates
of the UBC directors' program.
Tamahnous is the resident company of the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, and their works form part
of the centre's subscription series.
Tamahnous' headquarters are
located next to the VECC on the
corner of Venables and Victoria in
east Vancouver.
Their huge old house is complete
with a rehearsal studio, costume
design rooms, set rooms, and offices. It also serves as a meeting
place for the actors to relax, drink
endless cups of coffee, discuss
their work and amuse and mystify
visitors. The house is leased from
the VECC who in turn lease it from
the city for ten year periods.
The name Tamahnous is derived
from a Cowichan Indian word that
has to do with the magical elements
of earth and sky.
Lillo is non-committal about
Tamahnous' future. For Lillo, as for
Tamahnous, the present is all-
absorbing. "We'll just keep going
one show at a time,' he says. And
undoubtedly they will.
plemented the lyrical rendition of
perfect love.
After such a quiet moment it was
a shock to adjust the punchy finale
One Way Ticket. Brett Wade beefed up the group's first recorded
single with a fast fingers solo but it
still managed to sound overproduced.
Wednesday's show marked the
end of the successful AMS,
C-FOX, Gary Taylor's Rock Room
series in aid of the children's
hospital. Three cheers for a job well
done. But just one word of advice
in case another series is planned.
Fix the sound system.
WADE BROTHERS . . . wade through SUB auditorium
Increase your reading speed as much as K>0%!
Chris Walsh,
Ertgineering
"It s really boring to read the way
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All it hikes is one free lesson and you can zip through homework a lot faster. In fact,
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TODAY-SUNDAY and MONDAY^
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STUDENT UNION BUILDING
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□EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Page Friday 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,1979 - -   / -'.*   »
rvT"-i
Reggae comes to Vancouver
with Third World plus Toots and
the Maytals Sunday Oct. 21st at
the Gardens. Tickets are $10 in advance.
The UBC Fine Arts Gallery
presents Recent Work in
Ceramics by Lisi Siegel and Denys
James Oct. 9 to Nov. 17.
The K-tels, one of Vancouver's
most promising new wave acts will
play Rohan's for one night, Monday Oct. 15.
The Actors Workshop, 280 E.
Cordova Street, will be holding acting, dance, and voice classes from
Oct. 15 to Dec. 14. For more information, call 681-0241.
The Literary Storefront
presents Scottish poet Liz
Lochead reading her own work at
8:30 p.m. Oct. 13. Admission's $1
and $2 for non-members.
Up and coming at the Commodore: Black Oak Arkansas on
Oct. 17 and Judas Priest Oct. 19.
Both bands will be backed by the
Rebals.
The Vancouver New Music
Society presents Hortulani
Musicae with lute, winds, viola de
gamba, keyboards, and voice in a
programme of Ars Nova of the 14th
and 20th centuries.
Painter Leslie Poole presents
'Man in the Bath' at the Bau-xi
Gallery, 3045 Granville St. The
show opens Oct. 15 from 8:10 p.m.
SOFT ROCK CAFE   1921£^Av°
Oct 12/13
FLYING MOUNTAIN
Oct 14
CONTAGIOUS
Oct 15
QUINTESSENCE
Oct 16
IAN McCONKEY
Oct 17
SHIRLEY COX and JOHN LYON
Oct 18
DENISE LARSON and FRIENDS
Decorate With Prints
MAN IN THE BATH WITH MIRROR ... at Bau-xi gallery
and continues to October 27 from
10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily..
The Kitsilano Theatre Company will present two original plays
by Kico Gonzalez-Risso at Kits
House Hall. Bzzz is an extravagant
satire dealing with the sources and
exploitation   of   human   violence.
Caution: Contents Under
Pressure deals with the pressure of
various human relationships. The
show runs from Oct. 17 to Nov. 4.
(No show Monday or Tuesday).
Tickets are available at the Vancouver Ticket Centre and outlets or
at the door. Showtime is 8:30 p.m.
bin
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Friday, October 12,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 13 Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979
Tween classes
"t
TODAY
INTRAMURALS
Last registration day. Arts 20 race, men's slow
pitch softball,  co-rec bike tour, women's inner
tube water polo, War Memorial gym room 210.
CSA
Chinese painting workshop, noon, SUB 211.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Demonstration, noon, SUB ballroom.
SPEAKEASY
General meeting for all volunteers,  noon, SUB
125
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Pan-African disco. 8:30 p.m., IH.
HOME EC U.S.
Beer Garden, 6 p.m , SUB party room
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CUS
Robbie Sherrell speaks, noon, Angus 302.
Oktoberfest,     tickets    $6,    7:30    p.m.,     Italian
Cultural Centre.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 209.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
SATURDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Hike on Hollyburn, meet behind SUB. 9 a rn.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate, 10:30 a.m.. SUB.
INTRAMURALS
Flay football, 1U a.m , south fields
SUNDAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Renaissance    music   foi    two   lutes.    3   p.m ,
museum
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Slalom, registration 8.30 a m , raring 10d.ni.. B
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130
WUSC
Slide presentation, noon, Buch. 205
CSA
Cantonese class, noon, SUB 115.
WEDNESDAY
PRE VET CLUB
Dr. Butler speaks, noon, McMillan 166.
GRAPHICS SOCIETY
Organizational   meeting   and   elections,   noon,
SUB 111.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Special presentation, noon, Chem. 250.
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, SUB 115.
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
GAY PEOPLE
Wendy von Stalt speaks, noon, SUB 212.
INTRAMURALS
Flay football. 10 ..
south fields
MONDAY
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, 7 30 p.m.. SUB 125
INTRAMURALS
Last day lor registration in womens soccer and
co rec curling bonspiel. War Memorial gym room
210
TUESDAY
CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimonial meeting, noon, SUB 224
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch   1256
WOMEN'S STUDENTS' OFFICE
Free film series, noon, SUB auditorium.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
General meeting and slide show,  noon,  Buch
205
Hot
flashes
Race away
B-lot blues
Strap your hands across your engines and get ready to put that
hammer down. All you need is a car
and blood hotter than high octane
to enter in the second of a six-race
series being held by the UBC
Sports Car Club.
Registration and technical inspection takes place Sunday from
8:30 a.m. at B-lot. Slalom racing
follows from 10 a.m. Registration
costs three dollars, cheap like
borscht. Don't drink — you might
hit a bump and spill it all.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Employment Opportunity!
Referees needed in: Hockey
Basketball
$7.50 per hour     Soccer
Football
Sign up in Rm. 210, War Memorial
Immediately
A Professional Opening to the
World of Business
Discover Deloitte Haskins & Sells. One of. the largest accounting firms..in Canada
and tnroughout the world...with a diversity of clients and services the equal of any.
A people place. Unsurpassed in technical leadership. A place where professional
development and personal achievement are the ways of our life.
Arrange to talk with us when we visit your campus by submitting UCPA form to the
Canada Manpower Employment Centre or by forwarding your resume directly to J.
F. (Jim) Gordon, Personnel Director, P.O. Box 11114, Royal Centre, 1055 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 3P8.
Please feel free to call us at 682-8781.
FREESEE
Sponsored by the Women Students' Office
With the support of The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
CIVILIZATION
OCT. 16 - NOV. 27
EVERY TUESDAY
12:35 p.m.
SUB  AUDITORIUM FREE
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
Deloitte
Haskins Sells
Chartered Accountants
Oshawd
North Yo
Montreal.
OltdWd
Hamilton
Branttorrt
Kitchener
Winnipeg
Saskatoon
Reyina
Edmonton
Calgary
Prince George
ujnqley
V-incai-ver
ARTS
BEAR GARDEN
Friday, Oct. 12
CHEAP BEARS
GREAT MUSIC
a:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Buchanan Lounge
SUBFILM
PRESENTATION
THURS. SUN
7:00
FRI, SAT
7:00 9:30
$1.00
in
SUB
THEATRE
Students! Get a discount on any 5 or 10-speed
you buy before Oct 31st.
Accessory Sale - discounts for all students
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNTS!
3771 W. 10th at Alma
224-3536
'The Bicycle Specialists"
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
15 — Found
FREESEE: Civilization Series starting Oct. 16
every Tues. 12:35 p.m. SUB Aud. Free Film
Series.
20 — Housing
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
PROF. ROBERT SOLOMON
University at Texas,
Visiting Professor, UBC
EMOTIONS AND
HUMAN NATURE
A philosopher and psychologist, Prof
Solomon is a witty speaker and an outstanding
lecturer He's studied at schools of fine arts,
music and medicine and is the author of several
books.
LECTURE HALL 2. WOODWARD BUILDING
SATURDAY, OCT. 13. at 8:15 P.M.
FEMALE (preferred! student needed to share
large   2   Brm   duplex   close   to   campus.
$187.507mo. & utilities,
ph 734-3832 Carmen
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
WANTED: COURIER. Male or female Must
have own car or van. Full or part-time,
Mon. - Fri. 228-1818
35
Lost
SILVER fountain pen with gold cross-
hatching. Great sentimental value. Reward
435-3540.
HEAR YE
How much power should a
union have? Come, hear all the
issues regarding "Right To
Work Legislation" this Saturday
in SUB at the Arthur Fouk's
Debating Tournament. The action starts at 10:30 a.m.
Presented by the
UBC Debating Society.
40
Messages
SINCERE. REFINED, grad student of
Scottish origin, 24 5' 10", wishes to meet
mature, attractive, single female student
20-25, preferbly in Arts, Commerce or
Education who is a good conversationalist
and a non-smoker, for outings and companionship, 988-3408.
CINDY, the best little sister. Sure glad to
have you in the family! Thanks for phoning
Tuesday - it sure helped. Now let's go
conquer the world together! Grandma
50 — Rentals
SATURDAY
AFTERNOON
put down your book,
relax and listen to a
harmon/kardon with
Danny Chan
at International Stereo
on Seymour
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Member
of B.C. Registered Music Teachers Ass'n.
731-0601
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
10 — For Sale— Com'l   cont'd.
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and
racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accu-
ate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING: Essays, Thesis, Manuscripts,
Reports, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
90 — Wanted
SALE
30% - 50% OFF
LES
CREATIONS MONIE
3619 W. Broadway
lat Alma) 734-5015
VOLUNTEERS  needed  to  do  one to one
tutoring with 12-16 year old, three hours
per week in a.m. for three to four months in
treatment center in Kitsilano. Supervision
from experienced teacher. No previous
training required. Expenses paid. Phone
Volunteer Services at 733-8111.
DRILLBOOK of French pronounciation by
Valdman, Salazar, Charbonneaux, New-
York, 1970. Principes de phonetique Francaise by Delattre, Middlebury 1948. Call
224-1629 evening.
FIELD HOCKEY coach for young enthusiastic serious women's second division team.
Call Pat Macleod 731-3894.
11
For Sale — Private
99 — Miscellaneous Friday, October 12, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
A lucky student will win
A TRIP FOR TWO
in 80 days or less
AND $2,000
MOD
LONG DISTANCE
SWEEPSTAKES
Here's how to enter.
Complete and mail the entry
form below. Carefully read the
rules and regulations and
answer the four easy questions
Travel package provided by Pan American World Airways.
Robert J Clegg Limited and Canadian University Travel Service
on long distance calling. Entries
must be received no later than
November 15th, 1979.
Travelling is one of life's
great adventures, and who
knows, you and a friend may
soon be setting off on a round
the world trip. Enter now!
Long Distance
TransCanada Telephone System
I
Rules and Regulations
1. To enter the 1979 Student Long Distance Sweepstakes, complete the
Official Entry Form and Questionnaire. Only official entry forms will be
considered. Mail to:
Long Distance Sweepstakes
Box 8151
Toronto, Ontario M5W 1S8
Contest starts September 1st, K)79 and closes with entries post-marked
as of midnight, November 15th, 1979. The member companies of TCTS
do not assume any responsibility for lost, delayed or mis-directed mail.
2. There will be one prize awarded. The prize will consist of a trip for two
persons including economy return airfare from the commercial airport
nearest the winner's home to a connecting flight to participate in the
Pan Am "Round the World in 80 Days-Or Less" programme which will
include the winner's selection of destinations in accordance.with this
travel package. Prize does not include meals, hotel accommodations,
gratuities, misc. items of a personal nature, departure gr airport taxes.
The winner will be responsible for passports, visas and inoculations. The
prize includes 52,000.00 Canadian, spending money. Trip prize must be
accepted as awarded and is conditional upon space availability, and
must be completed by February 28,1981. Value of the prize is dependent
upon*the particular points of arrival and departure of the trip. The
approximate value, based on a Toronto departure is $4,913.00.
Arrangements for the trip to be taken will be made by Canadian University
Travel Service (CUTS).
3. Following the close of the contest, a draw will be made November 29,
1979 from among eligible entries received. Chances of winning are
dependent upon the number of entries received. The selected entrant,
(whose questionnaire is completed correctly) will be required to first
correctly answer a time-limited^ arithmetical, skill-testing question
during a pre-arranged, tape recorded telephone interview conducted at
a mutually convenient time. The prize will be awarded. Decisions of the
judges are final. By entering, the winner agrees to the use of his/her
name, address and photograph for resulting publicity in connection with
this contest. The winner will also be required to sign a legal document
stating that all contest rules have been adhered to. The name of the
winner may be obtained by sending a stamped self-addressed envelope
to TCTS, 410 Laurier Ave. W., Room 950, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 6H5.
4. This contest is open only to students who are registered full -time or
part-time at any accredited Canadian University, College or Post-
Secondary Institution. Employees of TCTS, its member companies and
affiliates, its advertising and promotional Agencies, the independent
ludging organization and their immediate families are not eligible. This
contest is subject to all federal, provincial and municipal laws
LONG DISTANCE SWEEPSTAKES
Official Entry Form
Answer the following questions, then complete the information below
them. Mail the complete form to be received by midnight, November 15,
1979. (ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON.)
Questions:
1. Give two ways you can save money on your long distance calls.
2. During what hours can you save the most money on long distance
calls between Monday and Friday?
Calling to (location of your choice)	
from am to am
pm pm
3. Under what conditions do discounts apply on calls made
from payphones?
a)
4. Give two reasons vou would make a long distance cat-
si
hi
NOTE: Answers to most of these questions can be found in
phone book.
GOOD LUCK!
your
local
NAME (please print)
ADDRESS
CITY/TOWN
POSTAL CODE
PROVINCE
PHONE NUMBER
UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE attending Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12, 1979
2122 THE RECORDS -
THE RECORDS
3783 CAROLYNE MAS -
CAROLYNE MAS
3064 SUZI... ANO OTHER
FOUR LETTER WORDS
- SUZIE QUATRO
7183 LIVE AND SLEAZY -
VILLAGE PEOPLE
(2-LP-SET)
AND MORE!
• QUADROPHENIA - THE WHO (2-LP-SET)
ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK SHD 8.99,8.99 • PITFALLS OF THE BALLROOM
-COOPER BROTHERS4.79,4.99• DIRE STRAITS  - DIRE STRAITS4.79,4.99•
SECONDHAND DAYLIGHT - MAGAZINE SS} 4.79, 4.99   • SPIRITS HAVING FLOWN -
BEE GEES 4.79,4.99 •  BOMBS AWAY DREAM BABIES-JOHN STEWART 4.79,4.99 • BLACK
ROCK-A ROCK LEGEND - THIN LIZZY 4.79,4.99   •   COMMUNIQUE - DIRE STRAITS 4.79,4.99 •
THE JUKES - SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY 4.79, 4.99 • DANGER MONEY - U.K. 4.79,4.99 • UNDERDOG
- ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION 4.79,4.99 • EXPOSURE - ROBERT FRIPP 4.79,4.99 • STRANGE MAN,
CHANGED MAN - BRAM TCHAIKOVSKY 4.79,4.99  •  REALITY... WHAT A CONCEPT - ROBIN
WILLIAMS 4.79,4.99 • BAD GIRLS - DONNA SUMMER (2-LP-SET) 7.99,859 • CHUCK BERRY'S
GOLDEN HITS - CHUCK BERRY 2.99,3.99    •    LAND OF MAKE BELIEVE   -   CHUCK
MANGIONE 2.99     •      GREATEST   HITS    - ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM 2.5
•    BEETHOVEN: 9    SYMPHONIES    -    KARAJAN,    BERUN   PHILH.
(8-LP-SET) 34.99,34.99 (cms.)   •    PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
-OZAWA, BOSTON SYMPH. 5ml 5.99 •   JOE'S GARAGE-
FRANK ZAPPA 4.49,4.99
RECORDS   556 SEYMOUR ST.
TAPES   552 SEYMOUR ST.
CR 220 AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
15 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distortion. Drive main speakers in your living room plus
extension speakers in your bedroom or den.
Continuously variable loudness allows you to
compensate at any listening level for the natural
drop off of the ears response.
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5 YEAR
LIMITED
QUANTITIES AT ?ZZ7
KYAMAHA CR420 AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
22 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distortion. FM muting hushes interstation as you tune
across the dial. High filter. Separate recording
and listening (taping buffs take note!) Twin
headphone outputs.
YAMAHA'S
FUIL 5-YEAR
LIMITED
QUANTTTESAT 9w I *
HYAMAHA
CR 620 AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
35 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distortion. Its 92 db phono signal-to-noise ratio means
clearer sound, especially during quieter
passages. High and low filters. Twin tuning
meters for totally accurate FM tuning. Two Tape
Monitor Loops.
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
flHfTED C17Q95
QUANTITIES AT   ^O/ T
.yamaha CR 820 AM/FM
*■ STEREO RECEIVER
50 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distortion. Optimum Tuning System assures perfect
FM reception by locking onto the selected station automatically. Two turntables are possible.
Presence equalizer adds extra muscle impact to a
soloist or vocalist.
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
UNITED
XmW C4T095
QUANTITIES AT 94/7
CR 1020 AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
70 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distortion. Three sets of speakers for maximum flexibility. FM blends for maximum enjoyment. Full
Range Power Meters. Both High and Low Filters
have two turnover points for maximum flexibility.
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
LIMITED
QUANTITIES AT
$629
95
18YAMAHA    CR-2020
■■"-■■■=-   AM/FM RECEIVER
100 Watts RMS per channel with 0.05% distention. Four-gang volume control lets you listen at
low volumes without losing the quietest sounds.
Pre amp out/mains in. Balanced design input to
output.
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
UNITED CA0095
QUANTITIES AT ^"OT
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
gjYAMAHA
YP-B2
TURNTABLE
Belt-Drive Auto-Return Turntable with precise
anti-skating device and smooth, gentle cueing to
protect stylus and records alike from damage. At
a surprisingly affordable price, the YP-B2 offers
all you need to enjoy the whole world of recorded discs with cartridge of your choice.
U"'TED < 1 A99s
QUANTmESAT      f I**/
IYAMAHA
0RTH0DYNAMIC
HEADPHONES
Three ultra lightweight' headphones with Or-
thodynamnic design for lower distortion and
wider frequency response. Private listening completely free from distortion and listening fatigue.
HP  1   Most efficient;    biggest '
magnet
HP3 Lightest,
least expensive,
best buy

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