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The Ubyssey Mar 23, 1972

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 TOT UdYSSEV
Unions get
SUB
mil
king
PLEASANT ATMOSPHEFiE  of Place Vanier residence corridor captivated Ubyssey photographer Garry
Greunke, who later commented on the eye-pleasing warmth of the plastic scene.
By SANDI SHREVE and MIKE SASGES
The Alma Mater Society council voted Wednesday to allow any
union organizing campus workers to book SUB rooms at the regular
rates charged to all non-AMS groups.
The motion, introduced by arts representative Brian Loomes,
overturns a previous AMS ruling against such meetings.
Loomes made the motion as a result of AMS treasurer David
Dick's cancellation, earlier Wednesday, of the women's studies
program booking of SUB 211 on behalf of a group of non-organized
UBC employees.
The workers are mostly women who did not want to join the
American-based Office and Technical Employees Union and wanted
to discuss whether to join the Canadian Union of Public Employees or
to form an independent union, spokesman Brian Sproule told council.
The original motion was to allow the employees to hold their
meeting on the basis that they are not an organized union.
Dick argued against this on the grounds it did not matter
whether they were organized, saying: "It isn't who organizes the
meeting but what the meeting is about that matters."
The workers wrote to AMS president Doug Aldridge to request
their booking be renewed because they had already released
publications announcing the meeting.
Aldridge told council the booking had been cancelled because
CUPE had complained about it.
He said CUPE called the AMS when it was informed of the
meeting and claimed if these workers could meet in SUB CUPE should
also be allowed to.
"If we let one union meet in SUB we have to let them all hold
meetings here," said Murray.
When asked by Ubyssey news editor Paul Knox why that
shouldn't be allowed, Murray did not answer.
But Dick moved to amend Loomes' original motion to allow all
union and union organizational meetings to be held in SUB.
Council accepted the amendment and then voted in favor of the
motion.
Council's decision to allow union meetings in SUB negates
Dick's cancellation.
The worker's meeting will be held as planned at 5:15 p.m. in
SUB 211.
A second motion by Loomes to waive the rental fee for
non-AMS groups using SUB space was tabled until next week's
meeting.
Earlier in the day some Human Government caucus members
staged an impromptu meeting with the finance committee to protest
Dick's cancellation of the women's studies booking.
At the meeting in the executive conference room sociology
graduate student Jim Green charged the AMS with acting as an
anti-union force on campus by disallowing unorganized workers to
meet in SUB.
Dick told the 15 protesters the AMS council voted last fall to
allow union organizers to set up information tables in the SUB
concourse.
"The executive's policy is that any request to hold a union-
organizing meeting in SUB must come to council before being
allowed," said Dick.
When asked what is the current executive's feeling on union-
organizing on campus, he said: "We haven't decided pro or con."
AMS co-ordinator Rick Murray said the executive has the right
to tell people what they can do in a room when the room is booked.
Caucus members said the executive used the rights as a means of
censorship.
"I don't think censorship is the word. We are responsible for
what happens in the building," said Murray.
Answered Green: "You really guard it well - you don't want
any dirty workers here."
John Young refuses to resign
By CONRAD WINKELMAN
Campbell River secondary
school principal John Young,
whose school board refused him
permission earlier this week to
take time off to speak at UBC,
says he will refuse to hand in his
resignation as requested by the
board.
The school board's Tuesday
decision to demand Young's
resignation came after school
board trustee Ray Sharpe accused
Young of "abusing the privileges
of his office".
The school board's vote was
4-3 in favor of Young's
resignation, with board chariman
Harold Newman casting the
decisive vote.
In a' telephone interview
Sharpe told The Ubyssey Young's
refusal to resign was received
Wednesday in writing by the
school board's secretary-treasurer.
"We have hired Mr. Young as
chief administrator of the
Campbell River high school and as
such he must abide by the
decisions of the board," said
Sharpe.
When asked what next action
would be taken, Sharpe said:
"Any further action is now up to
the board. We will meet soon and
decide on Mr. Young's refusal.
"I have much respect for Mr.
Young and his ideas but what he
has done is setup a private school
with public funds. My major
concern is that he has defied the
decisions of the board while that
should be his first responsibility."
Young could not be reached
for comment.
Isolated protests by high
school students against the school
board's decision took place
Wednesday in Campbell River.
Most of the students expressed
support    for    Young    and    his
See page 3: RESIGNATION Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1972
Whafs up, doc?
ACNE
When anyone over 20 wishes to
indicate the utter worthlessness of
teenagers' hopes, problems or
pasttimes the oldie describes them
as "pimply". What can you do to
avoid the dread trauma of
adolescent acne?
The party line nowadays is that
acne is caused by a hormone
imbalance, possibly due to
overproduction in the adrenal
glands. Not much can be done
about,that.
Almost everybody gets some
pimples in their teens and early
twenties. Some drugs, including
birth control pills, can cause acne.
There are four kinds of
treatment. First, washing removes
some of the oil and bacteria that
cause acne. However, the real
problem is plugging of the oil
glands with keratin (skin) and
hardened oil. The resulting
blackhead becomes infected with
an ordinary skin bug, producing
by-products that cause
inflammation and finally pus. So
using very drying agents alone
(such as rubbing alcohol) may
simply make things worse. What
you want is soap plus sulfur,
which cuts down fat secretion (it's
in a lot of dandruff shampoos)
and a peeling agent.
Second - peeling agents. These
are ultraviolet light (sunshine,
sunlamps), chemicals (resorcin,
salicylic acid) |^d Vitamin A,
which is thought to mature the
keratin in skin.
Hexachlorophene is a chemical
that dissolves in soap. If you wash
regularly, the film of soap on your
body can contain enough
hexachlorophene to cut down on
some bacteria, but it does not
seem to help acne much. (If you
have heard some scare stories
about hexachlorophene, here is
the truth: it is found in practically
every deodorant soap, deodorant
cosmetic   and   feminine  hygiene
spray. It causes brain damage to
baby monkeys in large amounts,
and it makes your tongue numb if
you — er — come in contact with
a sprayed surface.)
Third, tetracyline, an
antibiotic, may produce great
improvement.
Fourth, steroid drugs can cause
large cysts to shrink without
scarring. Hardly anybody is this
badly off.
Acne pustules should never be
lanced by a doctor or squeezed by
a sufferer. They always scar.
Diet has been thought to affect
acne in hundreds of ways but
there is no proof. One study
showed no increase in oil
production after huge doses of
chocolate. Of course if something
you eat really does worsen your
acne you should cut it out, if only
for peace of mind.
Several soaps, such as Fostex,
contain sulphur and one or more
peeling agents. Creams spread on
the skin will not affect infected
pimples, just cover them.
Finally, everybody's acne goes
away eventually and acne scars are
not noticed — just as smallpox
scars used to be ignored. After all,
Trudeau must have been covered
with acne once, and he made out
all right.
ASPIRIN
Somebody told me their friend
takes aspirin to sleep. This is
crazy. Aspirin has no sedative
powers. It relieves pain, brings
down fever and that is all. Aspirin
is a good drug that causes very
little damage considering the tons
and tons sold every year, but it
can and does cause ulcers and
reduce the clotting power of the
blood. If invented today it would
probably not be approved for use.
People who can't sleep should
examine their lives for causes of
tension, overwork, anxiety or
depression. They should take the
appropriate step — change jobs,
_*^- : <_ <cy
>".'!>;
TRucKiM' my Blues /vu/Ay;
•6;
change lover, see shrink, take
political action or whatever. As a
last resort, see a doctor and get
legit sleeping pills. But don't eat
aspirin.
By the way; all the pain-killers
flogged on TV contain
acetylsalicylic acid, called aspirin
in the States. Here Aspirin is a
brand name and we say "A.S.A.".
Alka-Seltzer contains aspirin. The
Seven Grain Pain Reliever is just
seven grains of aspirin. Bufferin is
aspirin plus some alkalis, whose
effect can be imitated by that
costly drug, a glass of water. And
so on. "The pain reliever doctors
recommend most" is A.S.A., not
Bufferin or any other brand name.
Some cheap aspirin breaks
down in the bottle, revealing a
smell like vinegar. Avoid such
bottles. Otherwise, buy the
cheapest aspirin you can find —
it's all the same, and by law it
must all be effective and pure.
Always take it with a big drink to
avoid stomach irritation.
TUXEDO
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BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
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Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
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Contact your local
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work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area,	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
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In the last five years has your
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Date current policy expires	
This coupon  is designed solely to enable non-policy
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LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
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FPR UBC 53 Thursday, March 23, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Senate scores: red tape-3,progress-l
By YAUGHN PALMER
One important issue facing the
UBC senate made some progress
at Wednesday's meeting but three
others remained bogged in the red
tape of senate committees.
Senate      approved
recommendations of a report on a
degree program for part-time
students and sent the
recommendations to the faculties
for consideration on how they
might be applied.
However, the issue of student
membership on the board of
governors was referred to a
committee which cannot possibly
reach a decision before the end of
the year.
A  science faculty request for
changes in admissions criteria was
—daryel ericfcson photo
MUSICIAN UNDER GLASS catches reflections of watching students as clock-tower music is created in front
of main library.
Resignation binding
from page 1
attempts to change the education
..   policies in the district.
The education department last
year suspended the school's right
to recommend students without
having them write government
exams. The reason given by the
» government was that Young did
not provide complete attendance
records.
Education    minister    Donald
Brothers  told  The Ubyssey the
_ school board's demand for Young
____-
resignation was binding.
"The    matters    are    entirely
within the jurisdiction of the local
school board as stipulated in the
Public Schools Act," he said.'
When asked about new
methods of teaching such as
promoted by Young, Brothers
said: "I believe in local school
board decisions in such matters."
Young was scheduled to speak
to UBC education students
Tuesday but the Campbell River
school board refused to give him
permission for time off.
UBC education dean Scarfe
said Young's educational policies
are generally
When asked if his department
supported Young's policies Neville
Scarfe said: "Yes and no. We
prefer   a  number  of alternative
ways in education that allow more
flexibility and diversity in
teaching methods.
"Perhaps I do not agree with
all the methods employed by
Young but in general he has our
support.
"I think political problems in
Campbell River are clouding the
educational issue. Young believes
students should have more
freedom but in that he is certainly
not alone. All over the world the
idea of increased freedom for the
students is catching on. It is my
opinion that the Campbell River
controversy is a personality rather
than an educational conflict."
returned for additional
consideration to a committee
which has told senate it is
opposed to the changes.
The problems in the medical
faculty's clinical clerkship
program are still under
consideration by senate and
medical faculty committees.
A comprehensive report by
economics professor Peter Pearse's
programs for part-time students
committee survived a motion by
applied science dean W.D. Finn
that it be tabled until May, and
was approved.
The report urges "the senate
adopt an explicit policy of
encouraging the development of
opportunities for part-time study
toward degrees where this is
academically and financially
feasible."
Finn's objection was that
approval of the report would bind
faculties too strongly to its
recommendation.
However, president Walter
Gage described the report at
"timely" and urged immediate
action on its proposals.
A motion by student senator
Svend Robinson that a committee
be formed to consider the
question of student membership
on the BoG failed by a 26-17
vote.
The issue was instead referred
to A.J. McClean's committee
which is studying the Universities
Act.
McClean had opposed
Robinson's original motion on the
grounds that were an additional
committee formed it would only
duplicate studies his committee
would "inevitably" have to make.
Education professor Roland
Gray said he feared the proposal
would be "pigeon-holed."
"If students feel this is an
urgent issue requiring a separate
committee, then why not form
one," said Gray.
"Obviously they do feel there
is a privileged group elected to the
BoG from which students are
excluded."
Robinson pointed out that the
matter should be considered
before the September election to
select three senate members for
three-year terms on the BoG.
McClean said he doubted if his
committee could make a report
before the end of the year.
Senate also received a report
from the admissions committee,
chaired by biology professor
Dennis Chitty, which
recommended acceptance of
raised admission standards for the
pharmacy faculty and a rejection
of a similar request by the science
faculty.
See page 8: SCIENCE
Osmundson calls
for 'hasty action'
By SANDI SHREVE
Alternate food service manager Lyle Osmundson confronted the
Alma Mater Society council at its Wednesday night meeting with an
urgent request for "hasty action" in its negotiations to buy the
administration food services.
But his only achievement was the promise of private meetings
this week with both AMS co-ordinator Rick Murray and AMS
president Doug Aldridge.
Council also agreed to bring the issue to council for some
definite decisions next week, should the private meetings fail.
Osmundson's request followed Murray's progress report on the
negotiations, in which he stated there was neither a fixed date for the
transaction nor a set bargaining price.
"I'm tired and I want out of this (continuing his service) as soon
as possible," said Osmundson.
He told council he and his four assistants have worked all year
"for almost nothing and we are now $400 in the red at the bank.
"I want some assurance that my efforts at pressuring the
administration's service have not been wasted."
He said the administration food service "loses about 200
hot-meal sales a day to me" and if he withdraws before definite
arrangements for the transaction are made, the AMS will lose its
principal bargaining agent.
Murray contended there is no possibility of a definite purchase
of the food service until January, 1973 and the takeover plans cannot
be made in a matter of days.
Osmundson also complained of frequent power shut-offs in his
SUB kitchen but later withdrew the complaint when Aldridge claimed
he hadn't heard of such goings-on.
In other business council announced an 80.5 percent approval
vote of repealing the abortion laws in Wednesday's abortion action
committee's referendum.
It also announced the graduate class voted Wednesday to grant
funds to the Crane library and covered swimming pool applicants.
There was a tie vote for the mental health and urban car
applications and a second vote will be required to decide between the
two.
Ubyssey editor Leslie Plommer announced the unanimous staff
selection of Jan O'Brien and John Andersen as next year's editors.
Council ratified the selection despite vice-president Gordon
Blankstein's concern over the AMS constitutional specification that
"an" editor be chosen.
Aldridge said council would "ignore" the point and ratify the
new editors.
Council approved a motion by arts rep Brian Loomes requesting
the administration to solicit faculty members, students and
community members to develop accredited courses designed to study
racism and sexism next year.
The motion was council's most concrete action to date in
dealing with recent racist issues of the Red Rag. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1972
Consistency
Well one thing we can say about the student
council executive, they're consistent.
They're consistently stupid.
They're consistent about increasing
bureaucracy.
They're consistent about decreasing
democracy.
They're the all-round "we didn't want to get
involved" kids.
Take Wednesday's council meeting: the pres
was unable to keep the meeting going, th
co-ordinator didn't know anything about the
building he co-ordinates, the treasurer couldn't
keep a straight face and nobody had a key for
anything.
But we congratulate council on allowing all
union meetings to book in SUB at regular campus
rates.
This is at least a step beyond the policy of
the administration, which will not allow buildings
on campus to be used for unionization meetings.
Now if only council could get "involved" and
support unionization of workers on campus by
allowing the unions to book SUB free of charge.
It has also come to our attention that the
Alma Mater Society business office, under the
direction of our stalwart treasurer has initiated a
policy of freezing cash returns for 30 days on
items bought without a purchase order.
This means that organizations or clubs that
wish to become more democratic and delegate
more power to individuals within their
organization are unable to do so.
In other words only one person is allowed to
organize anything involving the spending of
money.
And it has also come to our attention that it
takes no less than six persons to process a
purchase order in the AMS office. This procedure
takes no less than 12 hours.
Yep, that's where most of our AMS fees are
going and what is the executive doing? Making it'
more difficult to decentralize and save money.
So when the executive talks about drinking
in the faculty club with the administration and
the  importance  of  exchanging council  minutes
with Vancouver City College, we know they're'
stupid and its going to be a long year. — J.O.
Shakey
A can of worms has been opened in yet
another department. It was bound to happen and
this time it's the political science department.
It seems the poli sci faculty rejected a
proposal that graduate students participate in
decision making by sitting on some department
committees.
The reason: harmony and equality among
faculty members would cease and decision
making would return to dark, deep recesses of the
chairman's office.
That's pretty shakey. — J.O.
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Letters
— from McGill Daily
Neat trick
Neat little trick the engineers
pulled (again) with the grad class
vote. At least Wednesday's version
of the ballot was legible, but
students were still prevented from
voting for how they wanted the
whole $20,000 allocated.
Students were given three
choices, which in most cases will
mean students were voting for the
allocation of about $15,000.
(Average request $5,000; student
could vote for three requests.)
That means there will likely be
more than three groups that get
money from the grad class, unless
the majority of people vote for
requests that total more than
$20,000, which from the ballot
appears unlikely.
That means the groups
receiving the fourth and fifth
highest number of votes will also
get money.
That means the engineers, if
they all vote for Slipstick (their
V
THE USYSSSY
MARCH 23, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Alas, 'twas I, the incorrigible renegade, who found it. Oh,
unmentionable. How can I tell you what I have done? I ngratuitious,
charged Vaughn Palmer. Audacity cannot begin to describe your
unwarranted action, shot Gary Gruenke. Ah, the dastardly daring of some,
said Mike Sasges. There are no words . . . fretted Jan O'Brien as Leslie
Plommer raked her nails through her hair. And so it went, on and on, until
my very soul was torn to shreds. Such agony I had never been subjected to.
But worse was the countenance of one Conrad Winkleman — verbal dissent,
I pleaded, 'twould be easier to bear than your consternated eyes. Hark.
Who treads past my typewriter? Dick Betts — at last, someone to state my
case for me. But no; he scowled: whyfor your impertinence. For shame,
shamed John Twigg. Ditto chanted Daryel Erickson and Sandy Kass. Tsk
tsk interjected John Andersen. Sandi Shreve, you've done it again, they
chimed in unison. Another chapter to the saga of the World's Worst
Mastheads. Forget us sports types, begged Gord Gibson, with Mike Gidora
and Kent Spencer cringing behind their folios, hoping not to be discovered.
Heh, heh, no way, retaliated I, in spiteful glee.
vanity rag) and the Urban Vehicle
Project, will be getting our
money.
Pretty    neat,    eh?    Highway
robbery I call it.
John Twigg,
Arts 4.
Clods
Last Sunday afternoon was
spent as usual, wondering about
the mentality of that group of
individuals seen daily wandering
mindlessly all over campus —
students and I use the term
loosely. This letter is addressed to
them:
When the benevolent powers
that be decided to redecorate
Brock Hall as a study hall, they
obviously overlooked (or did
they?) the squeaky doors, creaky
floors and generally, the inherent
noisiness of the building.
One can, however, at least
adapt to this environment. But
the level of noise generated by
certain people who have the
temerity to call themselves
students, cannot be ignored or
tolerated for that matter.
For Christ's sake! The place is
a study hall, not a sewing circle.
Short "howdy-do's" with friends
are certainly understandable and
often necessary, but full scale
conferences are ludicrous and
downright selfish. Besides, there is
a lounge just a few short paces to
the north.
Believe it or not, some people
actually come to Brock with the
intention of doing some work.
That soon becomes merely
another hallucination, among a
group of self-centred, insensitive
clods.
Study hall gossip circles rate on
par with blocking hallways and
stairwells for the purpose of
sharing mindless inanities. Of
course, you say these are only
minor inconveniences (so does a
premier, I know, about road
conditions).
Just add them up: look around
yourself, look at yourself,
see how well you will fit into that
"degenerate society out there"
which you so tritely declaim while
others attempt to deal with the
problem.
Contemptuously
Raymond C. Roch,
Ed 5.
Decay
E. A. Milsom who took Irina
Reid's excellent Russian course 23
years ago is more than justified in
lamenting the present situation in
the department of Slavonic
studies. Indeed, the department is
disintegrating. Its destruction,
however, is not caused by some <
hostile rampaging forces; the
department is succumbing to
decay.
For years it has been a special
preserve for a few ingrown
individuals who brought in others
and "raised" them as loyal
supporters. Working in admirable
harmony and with true dedication
this group voted a stream of
promotions and raises for its
members. Now everyone is secure
and more than well paid.
But how long can this sort of
thing go on before the top-heavy
structure begins to crumble?
How long can a group of "elder
statesmen", academic ooliticians
and people no longer capable of
any but token participation in the
affairs of the Department
continue to reign supreme in their
cozy and lucrative fief?
How long can they keep out all
influences inimical to their ease
and convenience? How long can
things go on as they always have? -
Granted, 25 years ago and even
15 years ago, academic standards
were  different.  MA degrees for Thursday, March 23, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
university teachers were the norm.
Research and publication was
encouraged, but not expected.
Granted too, 25 years ago UBC
was a provincial school — rather
small, and outstanding only
among other similar schools. But
do these conditions prevail today?
The university is rapidly
growing in stature, it is becoming
increasingly noticeable nationally
and internationally. Thus we are
justified in asking: What kind of a
face does it present to the world?
In particular, how does the
department of Slavonic studies
contribute to the image?
In what comparable
department at a major university
in North America would we find
associate professors with
ceremonial MA degrees? Or
tenured instructors with BA's
from missionary schools in China?
Or associate professors teaching
Russian with no training in
linguistics or Russian literature?
Or teachers of Russian with
MA's in Asian studies? Or tenured
assistant professors whose
contribution to knowledge — after
23 years of teaching Russian
language and literature - consists
of two articles on horse breeding?
But never mind what
impression the department makes
on the world! What impression
does it make on students and
taxpayers?
The present administration
clearly cannot cope; it has only
one ambition — to hang on by
hook or crook. There are no
indications whatsoever that it is
capable of bringing life and
excellence to the teaching of
Russian language and literature.
The defeat of its feeble efforts
in that direction is assured by the
fact that the implementation of
the "new and improved" program
will be put in the hands of the
same untrained and
superannuated non-scholars that
have been strutting about the
department precincts for years.
And at what cost to the
taxpayer!! Take a look at the
budget! Examine the breakdown
of departmental costs per student!
Solution?
Bring in a respected, capable
administrator, a man of scholarly
achievement in Russian studies;
face the impossible task — the
dismissal of tenured faculty
incapable of teaching and
scholarly work for reasons of
inability, "ill health", or
inadequate training; bring in new
people with appropriate recent
degrees from good schools.
Or: close the department.
Names withheld
Slavonic studies
Learn
As there has been another
offensive engineering newsletter, I
would like to say something.
First, people have been hurt,
let me repeat, badly hurt by this. 1
know them, some quite well.
Many others are seriously upset,
and we all feel that this is a case
where the university must act, and
act visibly.
Punishing culprits is only a side
issue, and coming to the aid of
friends and colleagues and
students under attack is not the
whole purpose. Many of us really
do want our students to see how
seriously  we  regard  this matter.
How else but through our actions?
I hope at least some of those
Students who can't see "why the
fuss?" will think and enquire a
little now, and end up perceiving
at least part of the answer. This is
a real education. I would rather
students understood this problem
than mathematics problems.
I, and very many others,
strongly support our colleagues in
the mathematics department who
temporarily suspended teaching
their engineering classes, and
understand their reasons.
Prof. Geo. K. White,
Mathematics department.
Exec
A new arts executive was
acclaimed recently along with
five arts reps for AMS council.
The absence of an election
campaign means most of you
aren't aware of our program but it
also lets us get to work right
away.
We are in the process of
preparing a teacher-evaluation
questionnaire to be distributed to
all arts classes. The questionnaires
will be fairly brief so we're hoping
to get a lot of returns.
The completed anti-calendar
will be ready for September
registration and at that time we'll
also have crisis counselling for
students trying to figure out who
and what are worth taking out
here. And we're planning an
orientation week organized on the
theme of the arts, the university
and society — with speakers,
dances, booths, literature, etc.
Most of this is going to happen
in and around the Buchanan
building. We want to reclaim our
place of work.
Brian Loomes,
Arts president-elect
Flack
In was in charge of one of the
polling stations for an hour
Wednesday, March 15. At that time
I was annoyed by certain special
interest groups who insisted on
campaigning near the station. As
the grads came to vote, these
people tried to give them more
literature regarding their
application.
Usually the material was
turned down since most of the
grads had already read The
Ubyssey and knew how they
wanted to vote.
Isn't this sort of pressure
compaigning undemocratic and
undesirable? I thought it was
policy (in Canada at least) to
remove all advertising on the day
of the election at least around or
near the polling stations. Voters
should be able to vote in peaqe.
Darlene Belford
Arts 4
Yes, there is an Alma Mater
Society referendum rule which
forbids advertising on the day of
the vote. However, it seems to be
common practice to hand out
pamphlets on the day of a vote.
See story page 9.
Planning
The Planning Students'
Association of the school of
community and regional planning
at    the    University    of    British
Columbia recently attempted to
secure the names and addresses of
all persons who have applied to
attend this school next year. The
director of the school refused the
release these names.
It was, and still is, our desire to
provide additional information
concerning the MA program in
planning here. Anyone who has
applied, or is considering
applying, to this school and
would like information in
addition to that offered in the
calendar, can contact us at the
address below.
Planning Students' Association,
School of community and
regional planning,
Univ. of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Complaints
What is more sickening than a
complainer? Not much! This is
the attitude I got when I read an
article in the March 7 Ubyssey.
Apparently it was written by
an unhappy secretary quite
obviously resentful of her
position. It seems to me that it
goes without saying that nobody
made her take that job.
If she doesn't like to type or
get coffee she should not have
taken the job away from someone
who would have been glad to dp
what she was hired for.
To hide behind the women's
lib facade in an attempt to
degrade the people who only ask
to have their paper work done is
hardly acceptable behavior. Is it
really male chauvanism that
requires a secretary to type her
initials in small print after her
employer's initials which are in
capital letters?
I always thought it was a
reference of whom typed the
letter for whom. There is an
alternative if you don't want to
do the work the way it was likely
taught to you. Perhaps women's
lib needs a good stenographer.
It's true a secretary is not just
an extension of her typewrite*-.
She is an extension of her
employer. He hires her to run the
public relations aspect of his
office. She greets visitors and does
the paper work for him/her (ladies
have secretaries too).
If you want more prestige and
responsibility hire yourself a
secretary to do this for you. Then
see how you like it when she
throws a wrench in the works and
complains of the work she has to
do.
It all boils down to the fact
that in this society there is a
system to follow. The man at the
top pays the man underneath to
do some of his work, who pays
the one below him to do some of
his work right on down the line to
the bottom man.
If you don't care for this
system, fine, change it, but until it
is changed do the job you were
hired to do. And that goes for
every other worker who feels that
he is treated unfairly.
If you don't like the set up
where you are employed, resign
and find one you do like. But
remember ony thing, we can't all
be the man at the top.
Gregory Harrington
Arts I
Well, we certainly hope you
make it to the top. There is
nothing worse than a complainer.
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We need student reps. Serious people, please phone 832-5022,
Winnipeg. (Time is obviously of the essence.) Thursday, March 23, 1972
A group of UBC employees becomes wary of internation
science student becomes disillusioned with department i
W
o
r
k
e
r
s
The following discussion of the
Office and Technical Employees
Union and the Canadian Union of
Public Employees constitutional
powers was submitted to The
Ubyssey by members of the UBC
Employees for an Independent
Union.
We need a union. Last year the
average wage increase for
secretaries was 3.5 per cent while
the cost of living rose five per
cent.
And beyond wages that keep
up with living costs, we need
daycare provisions, the kind of
programs and subsidies for study
the Commission on
Post-Secondary Education in
Ontario recommends and job
classifications which fit all we
actually do — all the things we can
only negotiate through a union.
But is CUPE or OTEU the best
solution? What if we are under the
thumb of a union executive that
won't back up what we vote to
negotiate for? What if we as a
local eventually choose to invest
our dues (which would be around
$50,000 to $70,000 a year) not
only in strike funds, but, say, in a
free union training school or in
interest-free loans to projects
within the community? Whatever
we want to do, we must have local
autonomy.
In the international OTEU
constitution, the president (in
New York) has sole power to
"interpret the laws," e.g. the
whole constitution. The president
appoints all union organizers in
the international union. He must
approve all bylaws of local unions
with the international executive
board (two out of 13 of whom are
Canadian, and at the moment the
one who represents western
Canada resides most of each week
in Seattle). He .even appoints the
delegates to regional councils or
conventions - or the OTEU
representatives at the Canadian
Labour Congress.
The first duty of the executive
board is to "perform such duties
as may be determined and
assigned to them by the president
in carrying out the objectives of
the international union," and
these officials must approve all
strike funds and all investments.
Union funds shall be expended
only "to accomplish the purposes
of the international union." If any
member of a union or any local
union engages "in any activity or
course of conduct which it is
deemed by the executive board to
be contrary or detrimental to the
welfare or best interests of the
international union" that person
or local can be suspended or
expelled.
The president doesn't even
need to wait for the executive
board: "When any situation is
presented to the president which
the president finds to be a matter
of emergency and that the
interests of the international
union reasonably require his
action, the president is
empowered to suspend . . . any
officer or member of any local
union.. ." and further, "to
suspend any local union and
appoint a trustee over its affairs,"
which means that all records,
funds and assets of the local are
seized, "until such time as
procedures hereinafter set forth
are compiled with."
The "procedures" are the trial
procedures in which the president
appoints both the hearing officer
(prosecutor) and the hearing
board (jury), and then makes the
final verdict himself (judge) on
their report. If a local wishes to
withdraw from the international
union, "all its funds, books and
records shall become the property
of the international union," only
to be returned to the local if it is
reconstituted by the international
(on its terms) within one year.
In the CUPE constitution,
there are many of the same huge
powers granted to central
authority, e.g. the national
president is the sole interpreter of
the constitution; in what he
judges are "cases of emergency,"
he can place a local under an
administrator (trusteeship) — but
to each of these powers some
checks are provided. His actions
are subject to review by the
national executive board and the
convention (which meets every
two years, while OTEU
conventions are every three
years).
The national executive board,
made up of regional
representatives, has the power to
suspend locals if it believes the
local "may be dominated,
controlled or substantially
influenced... by any corrupt
influences or that its . . . activities
are contrary to the
principles... of CUPE" (and
these principles are very vague).
This is quite a bit of power in
the hands of 11 regional
representatives (out of a total
membership of 136,127).
If CUPE weren't so large, the
executive board could be made up
of one member per local, which is
the case in the constitution of the
Canadian Association of
Industrial, Mechanical and Allied
Workers, an independent union.
Can local autonomy be a reality in
a bureaucracy of such size?
There is also the problem of
CUPE's affiliation, both in the
B.C. Federation of Labor and the
Canadian Labor Congress, with
many big international unions. In
the Canadian Labor Congress 51.1
per cent of the member unions are
also affiliated with the U.S.-based
AFL-CIO, and another 4.8 per
cent are "unaffiliated"
international unions. How much
pressure can be brought to bear
on either the policies and actions
of CUPE or on CUPE locals by
these giant American unions?
We think our own independent
union is the answer.
We can write our. own
constitution, ensure that it is
democratic and that we can
control our own fate. The
argument against an independent
union is that we would be too
weak to be effective. There are
1,200 of-us at UBC. From our
own dues we will have more than
enough funds to cover all our
needs once we are certified.
Until then, while we are
writing     a    constitution    and
establishing ourselves as a union,
we will be protected. The
Canadian Association of
Industrial, Mechanical and Allied
Workers, simply because it wants
to see more independent unions
happen, has offered us a free
lawyer and a free, experienced
negotiator.
Before you sign a card, think.
Best of all, think with us.
Independence is the best idea.
Come to our general meeting at
5:15 p.m. April 6 in the Lutheran
Centre.
<&l!& Thursday, March 23, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
unions; and a moderate political
yopia. The message of both:
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
s
Moderate students who have
grown tired of the ranting and
raving of radicals about
"corruption" in this university,
may find the following story of
some interest. For I too am a
moderate who finds the
irresponsible storming of the
offices of The Ubyssey the minute
the slightest 'issue' presents itself,
not only tiresome but indicative
of a lack of courage to confront
problems and attempt to solve
them where they occur, namely,
within the departments
themselves.
But I have recently had an
experience which has made me
question the wisdom of the
moderate approach. I have
attempted, without success, to
persuade by means of rational
argument alone, the faculty of the
department of political science to
accept "the principle that
graduate students be allowed
some form of participation in
departmental deliberations" (i.e.
meetings).
The reason why I am relating
my own individual experiences
rather than those of the political
science graduate students as a
whole, requires explanation. I felt
that this year's attempt to obtain
participation in departmental
deliberations should be a one man
effort by a moderate, who has a
reputation for being reasonable
and whose request would be
flexible and negotiable, precisely
because the faculty had given as
their grounds for rejecting a
similar proposal last year: (i) that
the graduate students had 'ganged
up' against the faculty, forcing
them to close ranks; (ii) that the
proposal for parity in department
meetings was too radical;(iii) that
the graduate students seemed to
present inflexible and
non-negotiable demands.
After' I had been given
permission to present to the
faculty my arguments for the
principle of graduate student
participation, and after a week of
private discussions with individual
faculty members (who always
urge us to see them in private
where all reasonable requests will
be granted), I presented these
arguments in a written statement,
one week before the meeting
which would ultimately discuss
them.
The proposal itself was
moderate and flexible: it was
confined to the principle that
there be only some provision for
graduate student participation. I
conceded that there may be
matters on which it would be
unwise for graduate students to
deliberate, and requested that, if
it was not possible to agree on the
principle, before rejecting it
completely, an attempt be made
to agree on some trial scheme.
The arguments in favor of the
principle were presented in a
logical and reasonable way.
The arguments contained in
the written statement should be
made known, not to persuade the
reader of their validity (for they
may be fallacious), but to
illustrate the extent to which the
moderate approach was carried.
The statement put two
questions to the faculty: "Firstly,
what are the characteristics or
respects in which you gentlemen
are all equal to one another but
different from those members of
the department who are not yet
permitted to take part in
departmental deliberations?"
The statement rejected the
possible claims that: i) the
possession of unique skills is the
characteristic (on the grounds that
skills are confined to subject
areas, so that many graduate
students are more skillful in some
areas than many present
participants); ii) only teachers are
allowed to participate (on the
grounds that no teaching assistant
has yet attended a department
meeting; and on the grounds that
the more advanced a student
becomes the more actual teaching
he does and the more actual
learning his adviser does); faculty
members have a greater
self-interest to deliberate
responsibly because of their
supposed greater stake in the
betterment of the department (on
the grounds that graduate
students seem to have an even
greater stake in the department's
betterment than the faculty: "It is
we who have to go job hunting
with a UBC degree ... It is we
who have to meet the
requirements of the courses,
comprehensive examinations and
theses.").
In answer to the first question,
the statement concluded that the
respect in which faculty members
are in fact equal to one another
but different from graduate
students is the method by which
they came to be the sole
participants in departmental
deliberations. They participate
because, and only because they
were "chosen or invited by
previous participants."
It concluded that faculty
members are a self-perpetuating
group while graduate students are
a group whose existence depends
solely on the rational and moral
judgments of this
self-perpetuating group. On the
second question, the statement
concluded that it is indeed unjust
for a group, whose only unique
characteristic is its
self-perpetuating    nature,    to
exercise the tremendous power it
does over graduate students.
My shock and dismay at the
treatment this statement received
at the faculty meeting a week
later (March 7) is beyond
expression.
It is therefore with a sense of
sincere regret that I feel
constrained to make public the
way the faculty responded to
what in retrospect almost total
absence of even an attempt to
weigh the merits of the different
arguments in the statement. Each
member seemed simply to say the
first thing that came into his head.
Only on one or two minor points
was there even any reference to
the arguments that had been
presented, so that I never knew
(and still do not know) whether
these arguments were rejected out
of hand, or whether they were
accepted but ignored.
No one suggested that faculty
members were more skillful than
graduate students, although one
member did suggest that a
relationship of inequality exists
between teachers and students.
But no one went on to argue that
only teachers should take part in
departmental deliberations.
The claim that faculty
members have a greater
self-interest in the department's
betterment, was not referred to.
The overwhelming body of
individual opinions actually
seemed to accord with the
statement's conclusion that the
criterion which at present
determines participation is
co-option.
But there was no attempt by
anyone at all to co-ordinate these
individual utterances into a
rational statement on the unique
characteristic^ that all participants
must in fact possess. So for their
failure to respond reasonably to
an attempt at reasoned argument,
for their failure to co-ordinate
their individual prejudices into
some rational answer to my first
question, I accuse the faculty of
intellectual incompetence.
Far more seriously, however, I
feel constrained to accuse them of
lacking moral integrity. For while
the individual opinions suggested
that the faculty accepted the
statementt's conclusion to the
first question, no one raised the
question whether members of a
group, whose sole unique
characteristic is their
self-perpetuating nature, have any
moral justification for their
absolute control over students'
academic lives. No one even
indirectly referred to the
argument that self-perpetuation is
not a morally relevant criterion
for determining participation in
deliberations that hinvolve such
tremendous power over students.
Instead, faculty members
merely stated that if the
characteristic which determines
participation is changed from one
of co-option, the highly valued
(by the faculty members)
harmony and equality among
faculty members would cease. The
presence of students in
departmental deliberations would
make these deliberations less
harmonious and so drive real
decision making in the
department into the office of the
chairman.
I was staggered by the
complete absence of concern for
any lack of harmony that may
exist between faculty members
and graduate students, by the
faculty's sole preoccupation with
the "friendliness" of discussions
in department meetings which I
now believe they attend in order
to indulge themselves in
intellectual and moral decadence,
and by their inability or
unwillingness to begin to look at
the question from the students'
point of view.
I left the meeting fully
convinced that the proposal
would be rejected without more
than a few dissentient voices. But
the crowning act of hypocrisy was
yet to come. The final vote in
favor of maintaining present
practice was carried by only 8 to
7, and had two members who
supported my principle not left
before the vote was taken, that
motion would have been defeated.
I am completely unable to make
any sense of all this; nor am I even
able to guess the motives of more
than a few of the nine potential
supporters.
What I do know is that I am so
disgusted by the faculty's lack of
moral and intellectual integrity
that I no longer feel under
anything other than a prudential
obligation to submit to any of
their opinions on moral or
intellectual matters. I no longer
believe that the likelihood of a
request being granted has
anything to do with its
reasonableness, but only on the
degree to which it involves the
faculty's comfort. It is because I
now have no doubt in my mind
that factors other than reason and
a sense of decency govern faculty
decisions, that I abandon the
moderate approach as naive.
Now that I have discovered for
myself what my radical colleagues
told me almost two years ago, I
know that there is only one kind
of "language" that can transform
the political science department
from one in which prejudice,
viciousness and irrationality
prevails into a community of
scholars whose sole purpose is to
search for truth and to act
according to it.
This is the language of power,
and the only way of learning this
language is learning to organize.
So when we call on students to
join our boycotts and campaigns
against particularly reactionary
faculty members, to support our
public statements, and so on, I
would ask moderates to remember
this story. It is not only a
frustating waste of time to repeat
my mistakes, but it also results in
an unnecessary delay in
promoting reform.
My own stubborn
unwillingness to listen to the
experiences and advice of my
more mature colleagues has
undoubtedly contributed to the
slowness with which the political
science department is obtaining
what even the most conservative
departments have had for some
time.
May     future    attempts    to
promote reform not be frustrated
by the stubborness of moderates!
Rob Steven,
Graduate student,
Political science.
P.S. I would be interested to
know whether any faculty
member feels that my decision to
abandon the moderate approach
was made on a basis of less than
all "the evidence". Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1972
Engineering jobs plenty, but
won't fall from sky, says pro
This year's engineering graduates will
experience an almost balanced employment
situation, professional engineer R. S. Phillips said
Tuesday.
Phillips, who is western manager of the
Technical Service Council for engineers, spoke to
about 200 engineering students in Civil 201.
"About 4,000 of the 4,500 engineering
graduates will find jobs by the end of 1972,"
Phillips said.
Although employment prospects are good
Phillips, warned the students not to expect the jobs
to present themselves.
"In the last two or three years industry has
experienced a slowdown in the rate of development
due to the slackness of the American and Canadian
economies," he said.
"This has changed the perspective of finding
jobs for graduate engineers. Whereas before the
companies came looking for graduates now the onus
is on the students to find a prospective employer."
Phillips attributed the more competitive job
situation to the large number of technologists who
are displacing engineers.
He emphasized the need for engineers to
become more scientifically oriented in order to
compete more effectively with the technologists.
"One of the engineers' greatest assets is
flexibility and versatility in the engineering
profession. An engineer must be capable and willing
to change disciplines if the need arises," Phillips
said.
He supported his assertion by showing that
from the 94 per cent of the mechanical engineering
graduates that entered mechanical engineering in
1960 only 23 per cent remained in 1969 with about
three per cent having left engineering altogether.
"When you go for an interview you have to
convince the interviewer that you have something to
offer. You have to be a bit of a salesman," he said.
Phillips told the students that the best reference
one can get is experience in the field of the
student's chosen discipline.
"Many students take high-paying labor jobs in
favor of engineering jobs. These students will likely
find themselves unemployed when they graduate,"
he said.
He urged students not to look for big money
now if they are interested in an engineering career.
Science requirements probed
from page 3
Chitty said his committee
accepted pharmacy's request
because it was similar to the
requests received from faculties
such as medicine and dentistry,
which are permitted to set their
own entrance requirements.
However, he said a science
request for raising marks
requirements from 50 to 60 per
cent had far deeper ramifications.
He said the request couldn't be
granted without a study of
province-wide standards, of
post-secondary education, a
consideration of the problems
that might be faced by students
wanting to transfer from other
departments into science and a
look at experimental programs
which might be adapted to
science's problems.
The pharmacy request was
approved, however science's
request was referred back to
Chitty's committee after science
dean George Volkoff said
additional data is now available.
Commerce   prof   Noel   Hall,
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) -
Three hundred smorgasbord
blorgs gathered in this island
kingdom today to read the longest
Pango-Pango in the history of The
Abyssey, the island's oldest and
raggiest rag.
"A very vile scandal sheet,"
they commented, in one voice,
shaking the surrounding hillsides
with the vehemence of their
assertion.
Meanwhile, back at the palace,
the even viler banana blorg
dictator, Melvin Crumb, head of
the island's melon-juice power
corporation, was beating his wife.
"Beat, beat, beat," he said as
he beated.
Crumb later commented to
mauve blorgian reporters that the
length of the historical pango was
of no concern to him.
"I am shocked and dismayed,"
he said.
"But I would rather beat my
wife.
"And besides, I am more
concerned with the length of
other things."
Before carving Crumb up with
a pair of scissors, Crumb's wife
agreed.
chairman of the committee
studying the medical faculty's
clinical clerkship program, which
was formed after the cut-off of
provincial government stipends
for the fourth-year program and
was brought before the Feb. 23
senate meeting, made his first
report.
Hall said his committee would
be considering the fund cut-off,
the duration of the 62-week
program, the balance between
class time and that spent at the
hospital, and the extent to which
the academic content could be
more clearly defined.
Hall's committee will be
working in conjunction with a
medicine faculty committee also
studying the program, the current
session of which began on March
20, with none of the provincial
government's $1,800 per student
forthcoming.
Hall said his committee will
make another progress report at
the next senate meeting.
BIRD CALLS
NOW ONLY
25
*
The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
A Souvenir of
Your Year on Campus
Available While Stock Lasts at
UBC BOOKSTORE - THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE IN SUB
BETTER BUY BOOKS
PvAo" CASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, PAPERBACKS, ETC.
Largest Selection of Review Notes in B.C.
MONARCH, COLES SCHAUAAS
AND MANY OTHERS
Located Near The Varsity Theatre At
Open 11 a.m. Phone
tospm     4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE   224-4144
CHILD OF THE WEEK:
Likeable deaf twelve-year-old Patrick is looking for
a sports-minded family. Patrick will be continuing
school at Jericho Hill but can no longer reside
there. Average height, sturdy good looking Indian
boy Patrick enjoys swimming and soccer. He likes
to help people and responds best on a one to one
relationship. He tries hard to communicate by lip
reading.
Patrick urgently needs a home for the Easter holidays.
SHANI LEVIN at CATHOLIC FAMILY and
CHILDREN'S SERVICE will be pleased to discuss
Patrick further with you.
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* Thursday, March 23, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Urban environment
studies provide jobs
Two UBC research projects will provide some
summer and fall jobs for students this year.
One UBC project underway is the building of a
computer model of Greater Vancouver, formally
known as an Inter-Institutional Policy Simulator.
This project, aimed at enhancing citizen
discussion of Lower Mainland urban-planning
projects by providing computerized data on topics
such as land, economy, transportation and
population, will provide "dozens of summer jobs for
students", Michael Goldberg, a project co-ordinator,
said Monday.
The UBC commerce professor said most of the
jobs would involve interviews and surveys.
Interested grad and undergrad students should
apply to Goldberg at the resource science centre,
hut B-8.
The second UBC project, a $67,000 city
environment study of the Greater Vancouver area, is
being financed by the federal urban affairs ministry.
Psychology professor John Collins, a project
co-director, said Friday most of the money will be
used for salaries.
He said students are already conducting general
interviews to gather information for questionnaires
which will be compiled this summer.
Geography professor Walter Hardwick, also a
project co-director, said these interviews are
non-paying jobs and most of the available summer
questionnaire-compiling jobs are taken.
But there will be jobs available in September
for more than 100 graduate students.
The jobs, which involve interviewing some
2,500 Vancouverites with the prepared
questionnaires, will only last for a few weeks and
probably will pay about $3 per hour, he said.
Students interested in these jobs should apply
to project manager Joe Horseman, c/o Walter
Hardwick in geography and geology 125.
The project is aimed at discovering what kind
of a city people want Vancouver to become,
providing the professors involved with data for their
own research and providing the urban affairs
ministry with information on research techniques
which might be implemented in similar studies
throughout Canada, said Collins.
Union to hold referendum
Labor organizer Madeleine Parent's March 9
talk at UBC on international unions has had some
far-reaching effects.
Because of her talk and the subsequent
withdrawal of five UBC organizers for the Office and
Technical Employees Union from its campus
membership campaign, a referendum will be held
"to find out where we stand", said OTEU Local 15
secretary, Opal Skilling.
"We have to find out if just five or as many as
500 people are dissatisfied with out efforts," she
said Wednesday.
The referendum ballot will be mailed today to
campus workers who have applied for OTEU
membership.
Lori Whitehead, one of the first organizers to
abandon the OTEU, said Wednesday at least 20
organizers have quit and "many workers who
applied for memberships have lost interest."
The organizers withdrew because they became
dissatisfied with the international union's
constitution after investigating Madeline Parent's
claims that American-based international unions use
Canadians for their own benefit.
Whitehead said the OTEU membership
applications are not legally binding because no dues
have been collected.
She said the union was waiting until it had the
51 per cent of workers required for local
certification before it collected the $4 membership
fees.
Skilling said if the referendum indicates the
majority of applicants no longer want OTEU
representation, its six-month campaign will be
abandoned.
Boobop band to play Friday
Contrary to what the posters
say, Friday is the night cheap
dances return to the SUB
ballroom.
The arts undergraduate society
is presenting a rock and roll light
show and cartoon extravaganza
Friday night from 9 p.m. to 1
a.m.
The band is Daily Planet,
which recently played some good
rock    and    roll    at    a    Pender
auditorium benefit dance,
according to a Grape review.
Admission is only 50 cents, in
line with the arts policy of
presenting cultural events as
cheaply as possible, said arts
president Brian Loomes.
"We get our money from fees
the students have already paid,"
he said.
Elsewhere in arts, anti-calendar
work continues. More students are
Abortion vote passes
A referendum asking students whether they favor repeal of
sections of the criminal code dealing with abortion was approved by
80.5 per cent of those who voted Wednesday.
About 2,000 students voted on the question in one of a number
of similar polls being held at universities across the country.
Newman club members handing out anti-abortion literature by
the abortion referendum polls were violating the Alma Mater Society
constitution, AMS treasurer DAvid Dick said Wednesday.
Members of the campus organization for Catholic students
handed out quantities of a pamphlet called The First Days of Human
Life at education, Buchanan and SUB polls Wednesday.
"AMS referendum rules forbid advertising on the day of the
vote," said Dick.
"These people are allowed one poster by every poll but they
can't give out literature on voting day, especially not near the polls."
A student handing out pamphlets in SUB said he was a member
of the Newman club and stated that the club was distributing the
literature.
"However, 1 think there are people handing them out who
aren't club members too," he said.
"There's not much we can do about it except tear some of their
excess posters down and stop their distribution," Dick said.
"The Newman club is only loosely affiliated with the AMS, if at
all. We haven't heard from thern for about three years."
needed to help distribute the
questionnaires. They can be found
in Buch 107 along with charts of
courses, times and room numbers.
Five arts reps were recently
acclaimed to sit on AMS council.
They are Jim Schoening, Vicki
Obedkoff, Dan McLeod, Keith
Richardson and Dave Fiddler.
"We intend to work closely
with the arts executive to produce
a coherent program," said
Schoening.
OPPORTUNITIES TO STUDY ON BURSARY
ENGLISH LANGUAGE SUMMER SCHOOL
(at Toronto, Ontario)
ORAL FRENCH SUMMER SCHOOL
(at St. Pierre et Miquelon)
A Federal-Provincial grant has made available a number of bursaries to be awarded to full-time students who wish to study
either  English   or  French as a second language  this summer.
Address inquiries for further information and application forms
to:
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
Division of University Extension
84 Queen's Park
Toronto 181, Ontario
(416) 928-2400
4k
*
LULU'
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
i FRI. &SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
There's a plan that
can solve more than
just your money
worries.
It's called the
Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP).
It's a plan that pays
your tuition expenses
while you earn your
degree in Engineering.
Sciences. Or Arts.
It's a plan that solves
your summer employment
problems by paying you
every summer while you
train to become an officer.
£&?.
It's a plan that
guarantees you an interesting, well-paying career
when you graduate. As a
commissioned officer in
the Canadian Armed
Forces.
It's a plan that gives
you 30 days paid vacation
each year.
Consider ROTP. Contact your local Canadian
Forces Recruiting and
Selection Unit at:
Building No. 104
4050 W. 4th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
Ph: 666-3136
J_&&i
P THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
FOR STUDENTS
JOB
•
To market essential teaching aids
EARNINGS
•
Averaged over $4,000 for our students last summer
STUDENTS
•
Are trained in sales and marketing psychology
•
Are willing to work long hours
•
Are willing to travel throughout British Columbia
and Alberta
•
Have a reliable car
CONTACT STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
For Interviews on
Monday & Tuesday, April  10 <S  / 1,  1972
Teaching Aids Division — Grolier Limited Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1972
Hot flashes
Scholarships
in the USSR
If you're a Canadian citizen
with a university degree and a
working knowledge of one of-the
USSR languages you are eligible
for a year-long scholarship to an
institution of higher learning in
the USSR.
A number of unrestricted
post-graduate or research
scholarships, each worth tuition,
living allowance and the cost of
international travel, are available
to those who qualify for the term
starting Sept. 1, 1972.
Application forms are available
in the graduate student centre
office and must be completed and
returned by 5:00 p.m. April 4.
Super memory
Nand Jehman will talk on
Super Memory Through Mental
Multiplication at 2:00 p.m. Friday
in Eric Hamber secondary school,
rm. 308.
An understanding of the
lecture will enable students to
remember 50-digit transcendental
numbers, log tables, and use an
analytic method to multiply
multi-digit numbers.
The process is based on an
ancient memory — development
art, using a technique called
mental multiplication.      *
Phone 327-2907 for more
information.
Mo more war
There will be a meeting at
noon Friday in SUB 215 to form
a student committee to organize
activities for the National Student
day of protest against Vietnam,
March 29.
Anthropology prof Bill
Willmott, chairman of the UBC
teachers Vietnam committee will
speak.
Noon shakes
The arts and politics
symposium sponsored by the
Union of Radicals in the
Humanities, will feature two
noon-hour events this week.
Doug Nickel, co-editor of
Freespace,  a magazine  published
in Vancouver last summer, will
talk today on Perspectives in
Communal Architecture in Buch.
106.
And on Friday B.C.'s own Joe
Irving and his band (which goes
by the name Joe Irving and his
band) will play in the SUB
ballroom.
Keep watching Hot flashes for
information on next week's arts
and politics events.
lifeguard work
The Surrey purks and
recreation board is looking for
head and assistant-head lifeguards
to work from May 1 to Labor
Day.
Required qualifications are
Red Cross and Royal Life-Saving
Society instructor certificates,
RLSS award of merit and Red
Cross examiner's certificate, all of
which must be current (less than
two years old.)
Applicants must be 21 with
three years experience.
Starting wage is $3.37 per
hour. For further information and
application forms contact the
department at 596-5111
(extension 315) or 14245
Fifty-Sixth Ave., Surrey.
Ukrainian 400
Starting in September 1972,
the Slavonic studies department
will be offering an introductory
Ukrainian course. The course,
Ukrainian 400, requires two years
of another Slavonic language or
special permission from the
instructor.
A meeting of all those
interested in taking the course will
be held at noon Thursday in SUB
105B.
Flying saucers
Now hear this — the chance of
a lifetime! All you ever wanted to
know (and we know you've
always wanted to know a lot)
about flying saucers, will be
revealed not once, but twice. Yes,
twice.
John Roughneen, who
researched flying saucers in
Montreal, Ireland, England and
Vancouver for the last two years,
'Tween classes
TODAY
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
General      meeting,      noon,      clubs
lounge.
VSM
Robert Cruise on theory and tactics
of  the  Canadian   revolution,   noon,
SUB 207.
VCF
Christ   in  the  concrete city,   noon,
SUB ballroom.
URH
Doug    Nickel    on    perspectives    of
commune architecture, noon, Buch.
106.
ACEI
Panel discussion, noon, Ed 201.
FINE ARTS
Princeton     prof      R.      Martin     on
Rubens, noon, Angus 110.
FRIDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting  about  proposed  Ukrainian
course, noon, SUB 105B.
IH
Music jam, noon, IH upper lounge.
HILLEL CLUB
General      meeting,      noon,      Hillel
House.
URH
Joe    Irving   and   Company,   noon,
SUB ballroom.
will talk at 7:30 p.m. today and
Friday at the' YMCA, 730
Burrard.
His research was inspired by
Dino Krospedon's book My
Contact With Saucers published in
1957 and his talks will
concentrate on same.
Fred Quilt meet
Why is Fred Quilt dead?
That's the question being
posed at a Friday evening seminar
on the death of the 55-year-old
Chilcotin Indian who died in
Williams Lake Nov. 30.
Sponsored by the Fred Quilt
Committee, which alleges Quilt
died as a result of a beating by
two RCMP constables, the 8 p.m.
seminar will feature talks by
committee chairman Norman
LaRue and secretary-treasurer
Shirley Smith.
It will take place at 1208
Granville.
Grad vote
Graduate students will vote
Tuesday for a president for the
first time in two years.
Running for president are
former arts president and student
senator Stan Persky, a philosophy
graduate- student and Michael
Balakshin, grad studies 7.
The rest of Persky's Student
Action slate were acclaimed
Monday, the closing date for
nominations.
They are Barb Coward,
assembly co-ordinator, Heather
Wagg, secretary, Jim Bledsoe,
external affairs and Maureen
Sager, internal affairs.
Project Contact
Project Contact, a language
service for non-English-speaking
residents of Grandview-Woodland,
will hold an open house from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at the new
multilingual information centre,
1126 Commercial Drive.
The centre provides
information on employment,
housing, and available daycare as
well as advice on language classes,
medical plans, old age pensions,
unemployment insurance and so
on.
FRED QUILT COMMITTEE
Speakers   on    why    is    Fred   Quilt
dead? 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Action Canada, noon SUB 111.
MONDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Annual    general   meeting,
SUB council chambers.
7   p.m.,
Beautiful
clothes. .
jot-
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
PINK FLOYD
DOBS   THE   SOUNDTRACK FORI
JPENDER HUD.337PEN.MAR £t*£5
/7*M0M*1 FWSBYEYEBfliU<ICKS\
Announcing
CS.A.
ELECTIONS
For the Offices of
PRESIDENT
and
STUDENT COUNCIL REP
Tuesday March 28, 1972
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
ERAD CENTRE FOYER
Tfcnsar
Pottery
Leather
weaving
candles
pipes
jewellery
2002 W. 4th
732-7721
General Meeting At Hillel House
Friday, March 24 at 12:30 p.m.
(behind
Brock)
TO DISCUSS AFFAIRS AT HILLEL - and
FUTURE PLANS FOR HILLEL
Elections of Officers for 1972/73 to take place TUESDAY,
MA RCH 28th at 12:30 P.M.
NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING TAKEN
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Campus — 3 linos, f day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commardal — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30*? 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone ami me peyebie
i« advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.txu, the day before publication.
-  Publications Office, Room 241 _$.&&, UBC* Van. St.'BC
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LAST   DANCE   AT TOTEM   PARK
Sat.,     March     25. 0:00-1:00.     Full
facilities.      $".00 couple.       Band
Sunshyne.
Lost & Found
13
FOUND: ONE MAN'S WRIST-
watch, March 15, East Mall Annex,   ['lease  call   228-2268.
Special Notices
 15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished   condominium   opposite  Gondola,  224-0657  eves.
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested phone 224-1910 or 684-
7750. 	
JOAN HAACK^ PLEASE CALL
Capitol Theatre, Thurs', March
23.
16
Travel Opportunities
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'6a VW VAN CAMPER. EXCEL-
lent tires, recent engine work
new muffler. Great shape 731-
0943
MUST  SELL 1970 FIAT   124  CONV.
Perfect    condition     Yellow,    radio
17,000   miles.   Offers.   731-3706.
on v'Ar xmij. .M'.>--.>n i.\ <;• 'oi <
condition,  Gary,   434-6157.
'69     FIAT ~850.      EXCElT      CONDI-
tion.   Best   offers.   Sporty.   Econo-
 mical.   731-3919.	
'57      PONTIAC:      REL.
U.mil        tires.       -	
paint   (?).   738-1195.
TRANSP.
or,     metis
Typing—Cont.
40
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION -
al typing;. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.    Reasonable   rates.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis typist. Beautiful work
Mrs.   Ellis  321-3838.	
ESSAYS. THESIS, MANUSCRIPTS,
Term Papers. Fast, accurate.
Near   list   &   Marine   Drive,   266-
5053.	
ESSAY   TYPING
19th   and   Dunbar
 733-5922	
PROFESSIONAL     BILINGUAL     —_
typing. IBM Selectric, open days,
evenings, weekends phone Madeleine at 73S-3S27 reasonable rates
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ai
WANTED:       ATTRACTIVE       GIRL
with afternoons off to work 1-5
in Law Office — some typing,
shorthand, and reception skills
re.[Hired — good deal of time for
study availahle - - call 731-2101.
STARTING SEPT. 1972. MARRIED
student Io manage Totem Park
Canteen. IP tailing expor. rdi'd.
Sotn. knoe. lodge of vending,
bookkeeping, etc. useful but not
essential Please apply in writing
I iv M.iivh :_oth giving full particulars of experience, etc. to: The
.Manager. Totem Par:, <.'an teen,
670H   V \>      Marine   Dr.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Special  Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
\\ eek Spring session starts April
:l register early Limited enrollment.   G.  Alfred,  261-4764.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
HEAVY MECHANICS — GROOVY
prices —- Hans et. al. now repair
Mazda, Toyota and Datsun cars
in addition to B.M.W., Volvo,
Porsche, Mercedes and Volkswagen. Try us, 8914 Oak St. (at
Marine in Marpole) or phone us
at  263-8121.	
DON'T ISOLATE YOURSELF
with snowflakes on your shouiuets,
get the RK Dandruff Shampoo at
Corky's Men's Hairstyling. Money
back guarantee if it doesn't cure
your isolation :;644 \V l_h at
Alma.   731-4717.
Typing
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call -Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235, evenings and weekends 263-
4023.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from: 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.
Tutoring Service
 63
, T< )RING CENTRE CLOSES
Friday. March 24. Your last
chance now to g-et help for exams.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
TI
•RKO" 12 - STRING ACOUSTIC
guitar with electric amp. pick-up
$55.00.    Phone   732-0795.
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone   Directory
Now only 25c
at the  Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and  AMS  Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM, PRI-
vate bath, in lovely south Granville home for responsible male
student. On bus line. No cooking.
Quiet, conducive for study. Available  May   1st.   Phone   224-6090.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Thursday, March 23, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
SPOR TS
The art of frisbee
FROM THE MARTLETT
THE THROWS
The basic throw, of course, is the inside toss,
the frisbee held with thumb on top, four fingers
underneath, the disc thrown with a flip of the wrist
from near the hip on the same side as the throwing
arm. This is the most common shot for beginners,
since it is easy to control. But it has little power.
For more distance the same shot can be thrown
from the opposite side of the body, the arm
whipping across as the wrist snaps it out.
The basic thing about throwing is the snap of
the wrist. Also important is the flat release of the
frisbee. A combination of a weak wrist snap and a
platter thrown at an angle to the ground will cause
it to turn over and drop. The wrist snap gives it the
spin it needs — the gyroscope effect — for stability
as well as distance.
Once the basic tosses are mastered it is time to
try something fancier. For example, the sidearm
throw. This is done very similarly to the way a good
softball pitcher throws.
THE SIDEARM throw is done from the
two-finger grip. This is just like the beginners', the
thumb on top, but the frisbee is held on the bottom
with just the index and middle fingers. This reduces
friction, on the release and increases distance.
The hardest part of this is the flat release of the
frisbee as the arm whips through into its final wrist
snap. Virtually all throws can be done with the
two-finger rather than four-finger grip, once you get
it down.
Trick shots include the behind-the-back, the
skip shots, the question mark, and the upside-down.
(The frisbee, not the thrower).
THE BEHIND-THE-BACK - the disc is held in
the two-finger grip and the arm whips it out,
obviously, behind your back. Wrist is even extra
important in- this shot, since the human anatomy
doesn't permit as great an arm whip behind. Arching
the back some will help give you the necessary
clearance.
For more power and distance, the throw can
begin with a discus thrower's run and spin. As the
body whirls the arm whips behind the back and the
frisbee is released with a strong snap of the wrist.
This is especially important. To get a strong snap,
don't just flick the wrist outwards, but bring it back
immediately in one fluid powerful motion.
THE SKIP - This can be done from any type
of throw. The idea is to get the frisbee to bounce
and come up again, so it is easiest to do it on a
concrete surface. The frisbee is thrown at a
deliberate angle so that it will hit the ground. The
longer the throw, the smaller the angle you will
want to throw it at.
THE QUESTION MARK - This is a ground
toss, best done off the sidearm or underarm release.
Hold the frisbee concave side out. The frisbee rolls
on its edge in a big question mark shaped curve,
winding up at your partner's feet. Easiest to do on
concrete. Both this throw and the bounce are hard
on the frisbee.
THE UPSIDE DOWN - This is a very difficult
shot. The frisbee is held with the thumb underneath
the lip, the index and middle fingers on top. The
frisbee, concave side up, is thrown sort of like the
amateur throw, but instead of being released inside
the hip, it is thrown from alongside the neck, at the
same side as the throwing hand. It takes a really
strong wrist snap to keep it from wobbling or
crashing, which is its natural tendency when flying
upside down.
All these throws require some practice to get
down right. But if you've got the time, what the
hell. It gets you out in the fresh air, well anyway,
out in the air.
Revamped 'Birds host yanks today
"All I have to go on is what
they tell me, and they said that
they were in the best in
California."
The 'they' referred to by UBC
soccer coach is the University of
California at Davis soccer team
And 'they' are at UBC to play the
'Birds in a game at noon today in
Thunderbird Stadium.
"I'd expect them to be a very
good team," said Johnson. "They
have a lot of graduate students
from England on their team, and
are generally acknowledged as
being very good."
The 'Birds have had trouble of
late, not in scoring goals, but in
getting careless and letting a few
soft ones past them late in the
game.   To counter  this Johnson
has    completely    revamped    his
defence.
Rick Gunn will be moved from
JOE JOHNSON ...
... foot in mouth?
the right side to the left and two
new faces, Maurice White and Len
Lendvoy, will fill the other two
spots in front of goaler Greg
Weber.
There is one other newcomer
on the starting 11. That is Al
Collings who will be on left wing
today. For Collings this will be his
first starting assignment for the
'Birds.
Johnson said the 'Birds are in
as good condition physically as
they have been all year.
"If it comes down to simply
being a Qjatter of conditioning in
deciding ifdav's game we'll win
it."
Johnson thought for a while
then added, "but maybe I'm just
putting my foot in my mouth."
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 23, 1972
Talking
in code
Butter wouldn't melt
in their mouths
By ROBERT CHODOS
Last Post News Service
OTTAWA -- Language that says one thing and means
another has long been an indispensable tool of public
affairs.
It is traditionally the particular preserve of the
diplomats, who speak and write almost entirely for each
other and assume no one out in the world beyond is
listening anyway, and hence feel justified in talking in an
argot as intricate as Cockney rhyming slang and as
impenetrable as Egyptian hieroglyphics before the
discovery of the Rosetta Stone.
Thus, in the recent Sino-American joint comminique,
the United States announced that it "acknowledges that
all Chinese on either side of the Taiwan Strait maintain
there is but one China and that Taiwan is a part of China"
and furthermore that it "does not challenge that
position."
"Not challenging" is something different from and
somewhat less than unequivocal acceptance of the Chinese
claim to Taiwan. But it seems to be a step ahead of the
Canadian position, taken at the time Canada announced
its recognition of China, that it "takes note" of the
Chinese claim. And it is a hop, skip and several jumps
ahead of the previous American policy of recognizing
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek as the legitimate ruler of
all China, and waiting only for the appropriate time to
"unleash" him onto the Chinese people.
Any more detailed analysis of these niceties, however,
is not a job for the layman. And if the layman turns away
from the high considerations of the diplomat to the more
mundane concerns of politicians and bureaucrats, he will
find his task no easier.
\__yccasionally the code is fairly transparent and, as a
result, harmless. In a speech given on March 1 in Chicago,
trade minister Pepin spoke of "our very special . . .
bilaterial relationship" and "our ties (which) are closer
than those of any other two countries in modern times" —
the standard euphemisms for American domination of
Canada.
He went on to give examples: "We exchange more
goods. ..", "We exchange more capital. . ." (here he
quoted statistics showing that Canadians invest more per
capita in the United States than Americans do in Canada,
demonstrating, again Disraeli's dictum that there are three
kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics), "We
exchange more people . . ." and finally, "We exchange
more ideas. .."
It was with this last that Pepin give himself
completely away. For he said that "this exchange takes
nearly as many forms as the ideas themselves. We watch
each other's television programs, often on each other's
television stations."
Even the American businessmen who formed the
minister's audience must have been aware that U.S.
programs have been the staple of every TV freak in
Canada since images flickered uneasily onto the first
fourteen-inch screen, while Americans who watch
Canadian television consist of a small band of dedicated
souls in Detroit who turn to the CBC's Windsor affiliate
for Saturday night hockey.
But there are other times when the use of code is
actually intended to cover something up. The 1971 annual
report of the department of regional economic expansion
contains a description of the "Social and Human Analysis
Branch" — itself a code name.
"The purpose of this branch is to assist in developing
plans, programs and projects to help disadvantaged people
in slow-growth areas to respond promptly and effectively
to opportunities for improving earnings in existing
activities, to help them prepare for new employment, and
to facilitate their access to gainful employment
opportunities."
If that sounds frightening, it's because it is. The
report explains that the branch is "responsible for the
provision of technical advice on social adjustment aspects
of ARDA and FRED projects and the Newfoundland
Resettlement Program".
The Newfoundland Resettlement Program, a ruthless
forced movement of people in the great tradition of the
Enclosure Acts which drove the people off the land in
Britain during the industrial revolution, has succeeded in
turning whole communities of formerly self-sufficient
people into welfare cases. So much for "facilitating access
to gainful employment opportunities."
It is in discussions of the most contentious area of
Canadian life that the use of code comes into full flower.
There are few practitioners as deft as Prime Minister
Trudeau, as he showed in October 1970 — and since.
Speaking to a Liberal Party dinner in Toronto on March 1,
Trudeau described his administration as "a government
which was not fearful or hesitant to act promptly in the
best interests of all Canadians when the need arose."
The language is remarkably similar to the kinds of
statements he made in those (unfortunately)
long-departed days when his popularity edged up toward
60 per cent. But now, Trudeau went on almost
immediately to another topic. Now is not the time to try
to recapture the hysteria of that period. Just a touch, a
stroke of the paintbrush, is enough. Stir up vague
memories, stimulate the juices a little, and then let them
die down.
Oome of Trudeau's Tory opponents are not so
delicate. On Feb. 28, the last day but one of the Throne
Speech debate (which is always conducted largely in code
and has become as ritualistic in content as in form), J.
Patrick Nowlan (PC - Annapolis Valley) attacked the
disproportion of money and power that had gone to the
department of the secretary of state (headed by Gerard
Pelletier) and the department of regional economic
expansion (headed by Jean Marchand). And then A. D.
Alkenbrack (PC - Frontenac-Lennox and Addington)
followed with a broadside against the government's
language policies.
The two Conservatives hammered the message home.
The basis of Alkenbrack's attack was that "the official
languages program has already been corrupted and has
become outright French Canadianism." Nowlan spoke of
the great tradition of broad regional representation in the
inner circles of the cabinet and said that by contrast "the
ministers who have the ear of the Prime Minister and his
administration have a very narrow background."
Nowlan talked of "one Canada" and Alkenbrack said
the "we are all Canadians."
It was about as subtle as a white southern politician
talking about states' rights.
There is a federal election campaign approaching and
it seems inevitable that we shall hear more of this. Not
only can't you tell the players without a scorecard, but
you can't follow the game without a glossary of terms.
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