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Array SEPTEMBER29,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUE VII
RAPPATACKSINCE1918
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//
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//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
Some find the AMS
exam database
redundant
UBC Theatre adapts
Anne Bronte's
Wildfell Hall
Op-ed: Divestment
is a conversation worth
having
Football falls to
Saskatchewan
45-29
IS THIS HOW WE
SHOULD TALK ABOUT
CONSENT?
PAGE 8 // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
OCT1-3
////
SKATE COMP & BBQ 1 P.M. @ UBC SKATEPARK
Hosted by UBC Skate and The Calendar, BBQ and music will be
provided. Bring yourfriends and have a great time.
FREE
&m£
OCT 3
////
KOERNER'S HOUSE PARTY 8 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB For
the 19+ crowd, come by for a good night featuring
PRESALE $5, ADVANCED $10
THE LONGBOAT
4™, 2015
OSES SEPT 21
OCT3-4
////
DAY OFTHE LONG BOAT 8 A.M. @ UBC REC
Join 3,000 of yourfellowstudents in paddling through the
shoresof Jericho Beach. It'll be very fun.
PRICES VARY
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Aiken Lao
INSPIRED BY
Wired
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor        Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Features Editor
Aiken Lao Arno Rosenfeld
arinteditor@ubyssey.ca     features@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer
Peter Siemens
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Emma Partridge &
Moira Warburton
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
ahoto@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Bailey Ramsay
co py@u byssey.ca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@u byssey.ca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@ubyssey.ca
Ad Sales
Kenneth Chang
advertising®
j byssey.ca
Accounts
Abigail Pdaez
accounts@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It Is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.They
aretheexpressedopinlonofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Dubli cat ons Socleiy or the Uni-
versiiy of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing In
The Ubyssey Is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nereln cannotbe reproducec
SEPTEMBER 29,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUEVI
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
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604.822.2301
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Online: ubyssey.ca
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ay 12 noon the day before Intended publication. Letters received after this point will be
aublishedln the following issue unless there Is an urgent
time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the
Jbyssey staff.
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alacing display orclasslfieciacl-
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ish an advertisement or if ar
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ad. The UPS shall notbe responsible for slight changes
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mpactofthead.
m thout the expressed, writter
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^HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Columbia University Professor Joseph Stiglitz, winner ofthe Nobel Prize, poses for a portrait in the Liu Institute for Global Studies
where he is teaching a Friday seminar on inequality as part of the institute's Lind Initiative.
Famed economist Joseph Stiglitz
talks scumbags and school setbacks
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
Before the interview starts, Joseph
Stiglitz wants to know how often The
Ubyssey comes out. He sees the video
equipment being set up and wants
to know what the viewership of our
videos is.
The Nobel Prize-winning
economist is known for having
a big ego, but his interest in this
newspaper's audience may have
more to do with what has become
a sort of mission for him over the
last several years — getting out his
message on the perils of economic
inequality.
He's written over 10 books and
frequently speaks at conferences,
publishes op-eds respondingto
current issues like climate change
and American political events, and
appears on shows like Real Talk with
Bill Maher and The Daily Show with
John Stewart.
Stiglitz is here to teach a Friday
seminar this term as part ofthe Liu
Institute for Global Studies' Lind
Initiative which is bringing a series
academic celebrities to campus.
Stiglitz, a professor at Columbia
University in New York City, will
be teaching his research and work
concerning inequality.
Inequality, Stiglitz argues, is
nothing short of a crisis imperiling
our societies and driving down our
economies. But the man is not a
doomsday prophet and sees hope.
Inequality has risen to the fore of
the political debate, especially in the
United States, with first the Occupy
protests and now with the rise of
progressive politicians like Elizabeth
Warren and Bernie Sanders.
"Fifty years ago, nobody paid
any attention," Stiglitz notes. "It's
actually worse. There were some
economists who thought it was really
poisonous to talk about inequality."
Now it's inequality itself that is
seen by many as poisonous. As the
dogma of supply-side economics
promoted by Ronald Reagan and
Margaret Thatcher fade from
prominence, there is more room for
Stiglitz to win people over.
He sees the university as a prime
place to promote his message.
"The wealth of knowledge we've
accumulated over the last 100 years
... nobody has the time do [read] all
of it," Stiglitz said. "It's an important
role for universities and university
professors to distill it and to say,
Here is how you can put all of this
together.'"
That formulation can have
a tremendous impact on the
worldview of graduates. To
counteract this, Stiglitz studied
economics at Cambridge, MIT and
the University of Chicago — three
programs known for spanning the
political spectrum from left to right.
"I was always very worried about
others shaping my thinking," Stiglitz
said. "I was aware that there was
that possibility and I always fought
against it."
In the end, Stiglitz fell
somewhere between the dirty reds
ofthe old Soviet Union and the
capitalist swine ofthe United States
who prey on the soft innards ofthe
proletariat.
Stiglitz himself never went
through a Randian phase, but
says he's read her work and was
disappointed on every level. "I
thought, 'How could this become a
bestseller and it's written so badly.'
But I thought also that the ideas
were very, very shoddy," he told
The Ubyssey. "I think it may be
testimony to the inadequacies in our
educational system that so many
people who seem to be well educated
don't understand what's wrong with
these ideas."
As for his own ideas, Stiglitz
believes in equal opportunity
and doesn't entirely write off the
American Dream's potential. But he
says the current economic system
— the set of regulations, taxation,
monetary and financial policies —
quash that potential.
"I tell my students there's one
important decision that you have to
make in your life and that is choosing
the right parents," he said, pointing
to the opportunities missed by
people based on the conditions in
which they grow up.
To help equalize this imbalance,
he wants to see higher education
available to everyone. While that
may require a more comprehensive
reform ofthe educational system, a
minimum tuition should not stand in
the way.
"No system that's exclusionary
should be acceptable," Stiglitz
argued. "In the context of Canada
right now, in the context ofthe
United States, unambiguously we
need to keep tuition — if we have
tuition — at a low enough level that it
doesn't discourage anybody."
Stiglitz is also in the unique
position having worked within
and against the system advising
presidents Bill Clinton and Barack
Obama and working for the
World Bank. However, he also has
stridently attacked White House and
international economic policies.
"I think there are things you
can do within the system," he said,
pointing to laws and policies that
affect the masses. "I feel good about
both the things I've been able to push
and the things I've been able to stop
when I've been within the system."
Still, Stiglitz acknowledges the
system is broken. Over the summer,
he protested outside a meeting room
where international monetary policy
leaders were deciding on interest
rate policy — a room he'd been a
regular in in years previous.
Despite his criticism ofthe free
market, Stiglitz is adamant about
one thing. After examining a Ubyssey
editor's new plastic five-dollar bill,
the world-renowned economist
lamented that counterfeiting — a
perfect example of what Stiglitz calls
society's increasingly anti-social
behaviour — has necessitated the
shift from paper money.
But might counterfeiting be a
solution to economic inequality
and a way to level the playing field?
As Stiglitz descends the
stairs following the end ofthe
interview, he pauses to observe,
"Unfortunately, the Robin Hoods
... they're disproportionately
scumbags."
A longer version is available online. 13 // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
UNIVERSITY//
Langara and UBC sign Aboriginal Transfer Partnership Agreement
Emma Partridge
News Editor
UBC and Langara College have
signed the Aboriginal Transfer
Partnership Agreement between
the two institutions.
The partnership clarifies what
is needed for aboriginal students
to transfer from Langara to UBC.
According to Kristen Harvey,
Associate Director of Strategic
Aboriginal Enrolment Services
for UBC, this agreement "helps
us meet our goals of creating
pathways to UBC for aboriginal
students."
"It's a way to encourage
aboriginal students entering
Langara to begin thinking very
early on in their studies about
whether they would like to work
towards a degree at UBC," said
Line Kesler, Director and Senior
Advisor to the President on
Aboriginal Affairs. "The way it
does that is to define very clearly
a way in which they can transfer
... and then also provide some
additional financial incentives."
The partnership grew out of a
pilot program that began in 2012
according to Harvey. Only arts
participated in the pilot. Since
then, six UBC faculties have joined
the effort to create a pathway
to UBC for aboriginal transfer
students.
"This particular transfer
partnership I think really speaks
to those who chose to start their
education somewhere else in a
smaller institution," said Acting
President Martha Piper in a speech
at the signing last Friday "Line
[Kesler] and I were speaking
about the special relationship that
I think Langara and UBC have
experienced over time and I think
this agreement... represents what
those kind of relationships can
yield."
According to Kesler,
discussions over the last 18 months
have pushed the initiative further
after the pilot's success up until
when the agreement finally was
signed.
"I think the reason people are
quite committed to this program
or willing to join it is that the ...
success [rate] of students who
transfer [from] Langara ... [to] UBC
is very high," said Kesler. "They
UBC and Langara signed an agreementto encourage Langara's aboriginal students to begin thinking abouta UBC degree early on.
= HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
have a success rate equivalent to
students who've been at UBC for
their entire career."
Each faculty sets their own
requirements for guaranteed
admission to programs at UBC.
The faculties who are involved at
present are Arts, Science, Sauder,
Applied Science and Land and
Food Systems.
When asked whether all
faculties would eventually
participate in the partnership,
Harvey said, "What we're trying
to do is create a framework that
faculties can opt into if they wish.
It's not the only pathway to UBC
and so some may chose ... other
strategies."
According to Clayton Munro,
Dean of Student Services
at Langara, this is the first
partnership of its kind at the
college.
"We have a lot of students.
From what I understand,
more students than any other
college [go] to UBC in terms
of transferring. It certainly
makes a lot of sense for our two
institutions to work really closely
together," said Munro.
When asked what needs the
partnership is aiming to fulfill
that may not currently be met,
Kesler spoke of the financial aid
that is guaranteed for students
who meet specific admission
requirements as "always fulfilling
a need no matter how much we
arrange."
Kesler also noted that a highly
important part of this partnership
is promoting accessible transfers
to UBC early on in the careers of
Langara aboriginal students.
"There are students who're
coming to other institutions
such as Langara, which is one
that many aboriginal students in
the city choose ... when they're
trying out post-secondary
education," said Kesler. "The
problem is that if they're not
thinking about it, they can spend
a couple of years at Langara
and then begin to think about
transferring and realize they
have not taken the courses
that would make transferring
possible."
Munro agreed that
transferring to UBC can be
"daunting" for any student, so
while this pathway does create
access what the agreement
also speaks to is academic
success by helping students
feel "as welcomed and ready as
possible." 'ffl
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come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized online courses, then move on to bigger
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open, online, everywhere.
go.athabascau.ca/online-courses NEWS    I   TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2015
PHILANTHROPY//
Nature's Path donation to help fund
constuction of new building at UBC Farms
The money will help the farm continue their research on organic farming methods.
Sivan Spector
Contributor
Nature's Path Cofounders Arran
and Ratana Stephens just donated
$2 million to the UBC Farm. Several
years ago when the UBC Farm was
at risk of being turned into condos,
the Stephens' were part ofthe
community that saved the farm.
The donation, which is a personal
gift from the Stephens', is their
commitment to helping further
the farm's vision of providing an
example for sustainable agriculture
as well as doing research on organic
farming methods.
The $2 million will go towards
the construction of a building on
the farm that will have offices,
classrooms and labs from several
faculties including Science, Land and
Food Systems and Forestry.
"Sixty classes come out here
a year from UBC," said Hannah
Wittman, UBC Professor and
Academic Director ofthe Centre for
Sustainable Food Systems. "We have
no classroom, we have no laboratory,
we have no space for teaching to
happen."
Additionally, the AMS Brewery,
which was passed as part of last
January's referendum, will be inside
the new building on the farm.
It has been difficult for the
research that the farm is doing about
organic farming to happen efficiently
without the infrastructure.
According to Wittman, a large
problem for farmers is lack of access
to knowledge about organic farming
methods. The UBC Farm strives
to be an example for sustainable
agriculture both through its actual
practices and the hands-on teaching
it provides to UBC students and the
greater community of Vancouver.
"We need to increase the scope
of our research as well as share
our solutions on a regional and
global level," said Wittman. Having
a building would "beef up the
=HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
academic instruction as well as the
research."
"We're really excited to discover
what a large group of committed
scientists, farmers and students
there are at UBC who are invested in
sustainable food research and share
our vision for an organic future,"
said Justine Sanford, the marketing
and communications specialist
at Nature's Path. "The UBC Farm
is really giving a voice to organic
agriculture in academia."
Nature's Path is a Vancouver-
based organic food company that
markets itself as a sustainable and
environmentally responsible food
producer.
"We're always looking for ways
to advance the cause of people
and the planet," said Sanford. The
Stephens' donation is an important
resource to help the farm achieve
its full potential for inspiring a more
environmentally conscious and
responsible food industry. 'M
Public Open House
Library Garden - October 1 and October 8
UBC is undertaking a process to redesign the public green space between Memorial
Road and Agricultural Road, in front ofthe Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. This central
location will bring together students, faculty, staff, residents, and visitors and will
house the new Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre
Date: Thursday, October 1, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm
Place: 2nd Floor Foyer, The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
Date: Thursday, October 8, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm
Place: Main Lobby, Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd
S *©/ The introduction of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue
Centre to Library Garden provides a unique opportunity to re-envision
one of the largest outdoor public spaces on campus
Please join us at the public open houses to learn more and to tell us what is
important to you about the space and what opportunities you see for its future.
Can't attend in person? Online consultation will run from
September28 -October 12. Visit planning.ubc.ca to learn more
For additional information, contact: Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior Manager,
Consultation, at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984,
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
itba^&-ir«s#fm, mm&&mfo.
oi »*it g&a °ia ^ ait gas SM7i *oi ai^M^.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
AMS//
Exam database in operation
but lacking in content
LLUSTRATION JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
Professors haven't been too impressed with the database.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Adam Waitzer
Contributor
Last year, UBC saw the creation
of an online archive for old
exams, but the website still lacks
content.
The database is a collaborative
effort between the AMS and the
Centre for Teaching, Learning
and Technology (CTLT). According to AMS Associate VP Academic Daniel Munro, the CTLT
handles the technical aspects
while the AMS oversees the
general strategy and publicity of
the project.
In its current state, the database is sparsely populated by a
handful of exams. Munro attributed the website's slow development to several issues.
"First, using the database
takes extra time for faculty who
are already very busy using Connect and other course websites,"
said Munro. "Second, many faculty who already provide extensive exam prep material to their
students do so through Connect
and we often hear them saying
that this database is redundant."
Having already spent approximately $80,000 on this
resource, the AMS hope to convince professors ofthe benefits
of using the database.
"Content in the database can
be available to the broader community ... both in and outside a
course," said Munro. "Most importantly, pointing students to a
resource that is specific to exam
prep content is a way to open
conversations with students
about assessment practices and
expectations."
According to Munro, the AMS
plans to move forward by focusing on more "detailed, one-on-
one conversations with professors" as opposed to sending out
mass emails.
Richard Anstee, a math
professor at UBC, echoed AMS
concerns. The new database is
particularly redundant with
regards to the math department,
according to Anstee.
"Our department uploads a
huge number of exams on our
website. It has a relatively large
array of past exams ... as early
as 2004 - 2005 - which is very
comprehensive. I'm very pleased
with what math has done," said
Anstee.
However, the problem with
the database goes beyond professors' reluctance to work with
yet another website. According
to Anstee, "Nobody really knows
about the new database."
The structure of an exam
archive has existed for years
despite the recent facelift.
In the paper age, print copies
of UBC exams were on file and
available to students at Brock
Hall. This database was then
digitized and moved to UBC
Library's cIRcle repository —
somewhere along the way, the
files were lost.
"Nobody seems to know how
to access them anymore ... the
university or the AMS lost them.
Given the past history of this
university initiative, we would
loath to give up control of it for
fear that it would be lost," said
Anstee. "I can see some merit
in [a universal database], but we
already do it in a different way.
Why would we upload?"
Evidently, UBC professors'
lukewarm responses to the database is not simply a product of
ignorance and apathy, but mistrust as well. Although student
support for the database has
been strong, the AMS will need
to help faculty see its advantages
before real progress is made. ^ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2015   |    NEWS
IT//
Root cause of Connect
slowdowns unknown
FILE PHOTO ASHER ISBRUCKER/THE UBYSSEY
Everyone's favourite homework buddy has been acting up again.
Sophie Sutcliffe
Contributor
It can seem as though Connect is
never working when you need it
to. Problems with the site have
been as disruptive as ever as
UBC Connect completely shut
down on September 14 and has
been experiencing intermittent
distributions since then.
According to Chief
Information Officer for UBC
Jennifer Burns, solving the
problems is not that simple.
"We have a lot of control
over network, over firewalls,
over servers and the other
infrastructure components that
the application rests on," said
Burns. "But when we start to get
into the actual software code
or how the application runs,
then that is something that
Blackboard [Learn, the service
provider], has to address."
According to the Academic
Director for the Centre of
Teaching, Learning and
Technology Simon Bates, an
applications team has been able
to mitigate issues and decrease
problems although they have yet
to find the root cause.
"It's not immediately
apparent what specifically is
causing the slowdowns. We've
made a number of changes to
try to address the symptoms,
but we realize we're not able at
this point to detect the cause,"
confirmed Burns.
For some students though,
the dissatisfaction with Connect
is not just about the recent
service delays.
"Connect is garbage. It's just
not a very good user interface.
I found it really difficult to
learn," said Tessa Grogan, a
second-year arts student. "And
for some reason, I hadn't even
heard of it before I came to
UBC. So the first time I ever had
an assignment, I came to class
and my friend asked if I did the
homework and I said, 'What
homework?'"
However, UBC may not be
using the system that much
longer. According to Bates, UBC
has a licence with Blackboard
Learn up until 2019. "We are
actively beginning to think about
what happens after that license
period expires."
Bates said that the complex
mechanisms involved in running,
hosting and supporting a system
makes the process of switching
to a new system a slower one.
But by the end ofthe next
calendar year he said that "the
university will have to take a
decision on what they're going
to do beyond the end of that
licensing period."
In the meantime, Burns
suggests avoiding "the really peak
high periods [such as the] start of
class and 8 p.m. at night... Even
if the system [is] not having any
issues, those are still difficult
times and they may normally see
lots of load, so it's a good idea to
try to plan around that." 'M
CONSTRUCTION //
Engineering Student Centre
opened its doors last Thursday
Sarah Nabila
Contributor
After years of hard work, the
Engineering Undergraduate
Society (EUS) and the Faculty
of Applied Sciences officially
opened the new Cheeze on
Thursday.
The Engineering Student
Centre (ESC) totals 10,000 square
feet — four to five times bigger
than the old Cheeze according
to Scott Pidzarko, EUS VP
Administration. Pidzarko also
noted that this is the first time
in years that EUS executives will
have offices.
"We used to have our offices
in the attic ofthe old Cheeze.
It wasn't really accessible for
students, but now students would
be able to come by and chat with
us," said Pidzarko.
Some ofthe special
architectural features include
wooden beams and trusses
which were made of recycled
materials from the old Cheeze —
the building has an LEED gold
certification for sustainability.
Overall, it took eight years
to develop and build the ESC. A
referendum on constructing the
new building was passed in 2007.
Architectural firms were consulted
from 2008 to 2009 and in 2014
construction ofthe new building
began.
"It's kind of cool. We finally
get to see this eight year project
[pay off]... we can't wait to see as
many students as possible [take]
An eight year process has culminated in the new Cheeze.
= HOTO COURTESY EUS
advantage of this building," said
Alan Ehrenholz, the president of
EUS.
Unlike the old Cheeze, the
ESC will not be mostly controlled
by students. After lengthy
negations with the Board of
Governors, "Our governance
agreed that it's going to be 50
per cent controlled by the faculty
and 50 per cent by the EUS and
students," said Ehrenholz.
"In the past, buildings had
been built for student societies
that were run or governed by
their faculties and we did not
really want the Faculty of Applied
Science to be controlling our
student space," said Pidzarko.
The final budget was estimated
close to $5.2 million. However,
it slightly exceeded the initial
budgets of $4.9 to $5 million due
to some delay during construction.
The main costs were covered
almost 50-50 by either students
and sponsorship or donation.
Both Ehrenholz and Pidzarko
agreed that the ESC space
does a good job of representing
engineering student life.
"I think the big part of
engineering is work hard and
play hard. This space offers the
opportunity for students to study
in quiet and safe environment as
well as be social and have fun," said
Pidzarko. fH // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
WRITING //
Granville Island a literary paradise
Authors at Writers Festare taking inspiration from lifetime experiences.
Keagan Perlette
Contributor
The Vancouver Writers Fest is the
biggest event ofthe year for the
city's literary scene. Each fall, the
festival transforms Granville Island
into a literary paradise — a place
where authors from every genre
can intermingle and readers can get
up close and personal with their
favourite writers.
Yet again, the festival features
over one hundred authors — local,
Canadian, and international — who
will be presenting and reading
their work throughout the week.
Among these authors are UBC
Creative Writing professors Sheryda
Warrener and John Vaillant.
Warrener will be reading from
UBCTHEATRE&FILM
her second book of poetry, Floating
is Everything, for the Pure Poetry
event. It is her first year reading
at Writers Fest, but she has been
an eager attendee for many years.
Warrener was abroad in Stockholm,
Sweden when she began the
collection of poetry that became
Floating is Everything.
"We had this really lovely
apartment that had lots of beautiful
light," she said. "I was sitting at the
kitchen table looking at that light
looking out that window and so a lot
of... the book came from that."
A new challenge for Warrener in
this poetry collection was mastering
a long narrative poem about a
cosmonaut.
"The real person who it's based
off of is the person who has been
flOO
WILDFELL HALL
Dased on the novel by Anne Bronte
October 1—17, 2015 Frederic Wood Theatre  Tickets: theatrefilm.ubc.ca
= ILE ILLUSTRATION INDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
in space the longest ever, which
is 438 days. I put myself in his
body and I put him at the table in
Sweden."
John Vaillant is primarily a
non-fiction writer and journalist
who also pushed himself out of his
comfort zone in his most recent
book, The Jaguar's Children, which
was released this past January.
Vaillant's first two novels are
works of non-fiction, but The
Jaguar's Children is Vaillant's debut
piece of fiction.
Like Warrener, Vaillant also
found inspiration as an expat
living in Oaxaca, Mexico for a year.
The Jaguar's Children is a literary
thriller that follows Hector, a
Zapotec escaping Mexico in the
empty tank of a water truck. He
and the other illegal migrants are
abandoned in the middle ofthe
desert by the smugglers, with no
way out ofthe sealed water tank.
"I was really moved and
impressed by what I was seeing
down in the south ofthe country,"
he said of his inspiration for the
book. "I'd been reading [fiction]
that got me thinking about how
[stories like that] might apply to
Mexico and, truly, this voice just
came into my head very clearly —
the voice of Hector."
For both writers, the festival
serves as a hub for Vancouver's
diverse writing community.
"You have all of these people
that you [might] never have access
to, and you can see them read and
you can go up afterwards and tell
them that you loved their work,"
said Warrener. "I think community
is essential, no matter however you
find that community"
The festival is a place for the
writers and readers of Vancouver
to come together and support each
other's work.
"We need to support each
other," said Vaillant. "People aren't
doing it for the money so... you
get closer to a kind of purity there.
I like being around people like
that, [people] who are committed
at that level and... I think it's
a privilege to spend time with
people like that." 'M
AMS//
FilmSoc audiences grow tenfold
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Film Soc President Turner Stuart poses for a photo in The Norm.
Bailey Ramsay
Copy Editor
With unlimited free movies all
year for members, the UBC Film
Society has been able to breathe
some new life into the old SUB.
Only five dollars for
membership, students can now see
a wide selection of their favourite
films. Movies are screened twice
nightly Wednesday to Sunday.
"It's honestly such a motivator.
I find that a lot ofthe time I feel I
haven't seen enough movies and
I've fallen out ofthe habit. It's so
inexpensive, it's right here," said
first-year student Aidan Welsford.
Once a second-run theatre,
the film society has transitioned
this year to showing a selection of
handpicked films tailored to the
desires of students. The campus
cinema has a large variety of
programming balancing many
genres of movies from art house
and cult film to classics and
student favourites.
"Everyone loves Wes Anderson.
Everyone loves [Quentin]
Tarantino - but we're all too
young to have seen those films in
theatres. When else are you going
to get an opportunity to see Pulp
Fiction in a cinema?" said Dionne
Copland, Head Programmer for
the UBC Film Society.
The most hotly anticipated
events produced by the UBC
FilmSoc are their monthly beer
gardens. While they are 19+ events,
tickets are best purchased in
advance as they have a history of
selling out. Every November for
the past 12 years, the film society
has featured The BigLebowski as
per tradition to a roaring success.
"It's a lot of fun because not
only do we show the film, but
we have an intermission and we
usually do some activity... We
have a costume contest for The
BigLebowski and the person best
dressed like The Dude will win
something," said Copland on the
legendary event. "We do White
Russians for The Big Lebowski
which are very popular ... every
year the White Russians sell out
first so you have to get your drinks
early!"
Tickets are currently on sale
for the film society's upcoming
October beer garden, Wet Hot
American Summer.
"Since they do a talent show in
the movie, our halftime activity is
going to be a talent show," she said.
"If anyone has a weird talent, make
sure you come out and you can win
some prizes!"
Despite the new SUB's shadow
cast over the old SUB, the film
society has kept the club spirit
alive inside the building.
"We're really transitioning
from being less of a passive
attraction to being more of a
destination," said Computer
Operations Manager Mackenzie
Shopland as he expressed his
fondness for the old SUB. "We're
kind of steeped in history here.
You know they like to say that
UBC is a place of mind - well a
mind has lots of memories and so
does this building."
Not only is The Norm Theatre
home to some pretty killer
popcorn and comfy seats, but it is
also equipped with 16 mm, 35 mm
and the highest quality 2K digital
projector.
"We've got incredible
projection capabilities here...
When it comes down to it, we
are one ofthe best equipped
independent cinemas in
Vancouver," said Turner Stewart,
president ofthe UBC Film Society.
Interested? The good news
is that there are plenty of
opportunities to get involved
with the film society. Whether
you want to just see movies or
volunteer at events, the FilmSoc
offers a welcoming community
for cinephiles who are passionate
about film. Many opportunities
are available such as video
production workshops that are for
free for all film society members.
"If you're even in the slightest
bit interested in film society,
just come by the cinema 10 to 15
minutes before a movie starts,"
said Stewart. "We'll sign you up
and you're good for the year." 'M TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2015
VIFF //
Nephew: shifting the bonds of
familial relationships
The film intercuts the main storyline with documentary-style interviews.
= HOTO COURTESY BLAKE DAVEY
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Contributor
Later this month, a short film
written and directed by David
Findlay, a recent graduate ofthe
UBC film production program,
will have its premiere at the
Vancouver International Film
Festival (VIFF).
The short, titled Nephew,
follows a young man (Eric, played
by Noah Cohen) as he decides
whether or not to reconnect with
an estranged uncle (Yves Jacques)
after having seen him at a bus stop
for the first time in many years.
The film will screen as part of
the "Blood is Thicker" program
at VIFF — a compilation of short
films that, as its title suggests, will
explore the shifting bounds and
bonds of familial relationships.
The idea for exploring
an avuncular relationship
in particular came from
Findlay's own experience of
re-encountering his uncle at a
funeral two years ago for the first
time in over 10 years.
"When I met him, it was really
strange because I thought, 'This
guy is a total stranger, but he
looks like my dad and he looks
like me ... I can totally sense the
familiarity,'" said Findlay on the
experience.
Not long after the meeting,
Findlay wrote the script creating
a scenario that doubled as a
personal fantasy of sorts and a
way of exploring that particular
relationship.
"Ultimately I wanted to make
a film about family but from a
different perspective that I don't
think we've seen a lot in movies,"
said Findlay. "Where parents
obviously have responsibility
towards their kids, an uncle or an
aunt doesn't have that... But either
way, it's like a big influence on who
we are."
The film intercuts the main
story with documentary-like
interviews of two additional
characters (played by Louise Portal
and Philip Wrangberg) who recall
similar relationships in their own
lives. Aside from complementing
Eric's own predicament, the
interviews also manage to disarm
by the virtue of their candor
creating a bracing intimacy within
the film's universal themes.
Aside from getting the
support of Panavision in
order to shoot on 16mm
film — an increasingly rare
occurrence, especially for
younger filmmakers — Findlay
and his collaborators also
looked to Kickstarter to fund
post-production costs. They
successfully raised about $6,300,
over a $1,000 above their goal.
Both Jacques and Portal are
well-known Quebecois actors
that Findlay recalls seeing on
TV and in films while he was
growing up as he was raised in
Quebec City himself.
"Being on set, working with
these great actors... it felt like my
first real filmmaking experience."
Finlay had always been
interested in making movies as well
as snowboarding and skiing films
when he was in high school. But it
wasn't until he took a film studies
class with Mark Harris, a UBC
professor who passed away two
years ago, that he began to seriously
pursue film production.
"Taking his class was like, 'Oh
wow, this is what I want to do,'"
said Findlay. "And since first-year
university, that's all I've been
involved in — producing and
making movies."
Before beginning work on
Nephew, Findlay helped produce
Light, a short film that premiered
at TIFF last year written and
directed by Yassmina Karajah (also
a producer on Nephew). As Findlay
looks forward to the VIFF premiere
of Nephew, he is currently working
on a script for his first feature film
while also preparing for production
on Karajah's next short film.
"After making enough short
films, you just have to go in with a
mindset of equating success with
[the] completion of a project,"
said Findlay. "Because if you think
success means a bunch of festivals
and awards and whatever, it can be
pretty tough to find the motivation
to do the next thing."
Nephew screens as part ofthe
"Blood is Thicker" shorts program at
VIFF. 'xH
IMPROV//
All-stars on Granville Island
LLUSTRATION COURTESY VIIF
VIIF is bringing some of North America's best improv stars to Granville Island.
Jessie Stirling
Contributor
The Vancouver International Improv
Festival returns to Granville Island
for its 16th year and will feature
some ofthe best improv groups from
all over Vancouver, Canada and the
United States.
Taking over three stages and
offering 40 different shows over the
course of a week, this year's festival
is guaranteed to draw big crowds and
elicit even bigger laughs. Some of
Canada's best improvisers got their
start right here in Vancouver. VIIF is
proud to be showcasing tons of local
talent including several UBC alumni
- two of which are Allie Entwistle
and Michael Augustine.
Augustine's passion for improv
was sparked here at UBC when
he visited the UBC Improv booth
during Clubs Days in 2009.
Augustine had just moved to
Vancouver from California and was
looking to meet people on campus.
He auditioned and was accepted.
"After I got in I never really did
anything else," he said.
Augustine has been working
with VIIF since 2010 and is excited
this year to be performing as part
ofthe Vancouver Ensemble — an
all-star team comprised of 16 local
improvisers. Augustine believes
it's bound to be a fun show simply
because ofthe incredible amount of
local talent on one stage.
"It's a show you just can't afford
to miss," he said.
Entwistle's career in improv also
began during Clubs Days. She joined
UBC Improv in 2010 "because [she]
needed a club to join and the improv
people looked the most attractive."
After graduation, she joined the
Instant Theatre Company as well as
two independent groups — National
Anthem and Grad School Improv.
This is Entwistle's first year
with VIIF and she is performing
as a member of one ofthe two
International Ensembles, Team
Echo. She describes Team Echo as "a
group of really talented people from
around Canada and the States who
do improv together, probably for
only one time ever."
"If you've ever wished you could
see good comedy right here in
Vancouver, this festival is a fantastic
opportunity," said Entwistle. "If you
come here you will be blown away at
what people can do with improv."
Promising a week's worth
of mind-blowing displays of
improvisation theatre and world-
class comedy, VIIF will leave
audiences counting the days until
it returns once again to Granville
Island.
The 16th Annual Vancouver
International Improv Festival runs
from October 6 to 10 at Performance
Works, The Waterfront Theatre
and the Improv Centre on Granville
Island. 'tJ
UBC Science
KILLAM
TEACHING
PRIZE
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
Every year UBC Science awards five Killam Teaching Prizes to
acknowledge excellence in undergraduate teaching and to promote
the importance of science education. This is your chance to
recognize a professor, instructor or lecturer in any of the Faculty
of Science's departments and units. Students, alumni or faculty
members are welcome to submit nominations, including a brief
supporting rationale, to:
bchan@science.ubc.ca
Please include "Faculty of Science Killam Teaching" in subject line.  '
DEADLINES
October 11 and January 15.
science.ubc.ca/killam 8    I    FEATURES    I   TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
•
r^B'i i*
▲
• •
• Transitioning away from 'No Means No,' universities have been trying to
figure out how to raise awareness about the importance of consent.
The Ubyssey reports on how UBC has tried to navigate a minefield of thorny issues with their current campaign featuring the
cute smartphone emoticons we all know so well.
BY OLIVIA LAW 10    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
THEATRE //
UBC Theatre season opens with The Tenant ofWildfell Hall premiere
Themes of female independence, true love, passion, pain and loss are abound in the Bronte adaptation.
= HOTO COURTESYTIM MATHESON
Andrea Gonzalez
Contributor
Suspense, intrigue, comedy and
passion — these are only a small
sliver of what the UBC adaptation of
The Tenant ofWildfell Hall is gearing
up to serve in its upcoming world
premiere this October.
Based on the novel by Anne
Bronte, The Tenant ofWildfell
Hall follows Helen Graham, a
mysterious and beautiful young
woman, as she moves into the
small country village ofWildfell
to escape her obscure past. Soon,
suspicion and rumour surround
Helen as she fails to adhere to
the strict gender norms and
expectations in the traditional
religious society in which she is
enmeshed.
Adapted by Professor
Jacqueline Firkins and directed
by MFA directing alumna
Sarah Rogers, the play has been
produced through a collaborative
and immersive class project.
Francis Winter, fourth-year
BFA student who plays Gilbert
Markham, delves into the
development of The Tenant of
Wildfell Hall.
Check out our
spiffy new digs.
U BYSSEY.CA
"This play was actually really
interesting to work on because we
began with a workshop to work
the script. It is a new script by a
member of faculty here at UBC ...
[the actors] had a chance to get
together before the production
of the play had begun to go over
it and work with her on it, iron
it out and make sure we were all
really happy with it," said Winter.
While honouring Bronte's
intentions with the original
novel through themes of female
independence, finding true
love, passion, pain and loss, the
adaptation has been produced
to resonate with contemporary
audiences.
"The play seems to sort of
stretch itself in many different
directions trying to fit in that
quality of Jane Austen ... into
something that has conventional
themes about relationship and
sacrifice and marriage and abuse
in relationships," said Thomas
Elms, returning BFA alumnus
playing Arthur Huntington,
Helen's husband. "So for that
reason alone, I think that it is
different. It lives in the past while
reaching out to people in the
present."
There certainly is a dark
underbelly that serves as the
foundation for the play.
"Something that I found
interesting was that the
original novel by Anne Bronte
is really a social critique of
the permissiveness of certain
behaviours in the time," said
Winter. "Anne Bronte saw a lot
ofthe obscure side of human
behaviour through her brother
who was a cad and a drunk while
she was working as a governess
in the same house as he was the
tutor. I think those themes of
permissiveness through a lens
that values some individuals
higher than others really shines
through and I think that those are
the types of themes that will still
resonate with audiences today,"
said Winter.
Even with its serious
undertones, the show delivers
more than a generous dosage of
wit and humour from the ongoing
banter between the characters
to hilarious and relatable family
dynamics.
"Our director Sarah has done
a wonderful job of adding a lot
of physical comedy elements to
that as well that aren't present
in the script which really help to
brighten the scenes," said Winter.
For the actors, the work is
challenging and exciting while
propelling them to delve deeper
into the psyche of their characters.
However, while the production
process has offered up a vast pool
of learning opportunities for the
cast, conflicting visions have posed
some obstacles along the way.
Meegin Pye, a fourth-year
UBC BFA student plays the
independent female heroine Helen
Graham.
"I think the process has been
challenging and unique just
because it isn't yet a published
play. Many people have stakes in
this as well as different visions
that aren't always cohesive,"
she said. "From an actor's
perspective, negotiating between
these visions and trying to make
them happen has been a bit
challenging because, as well as
having our own visions of these
characters and how the story
happens, it is also the playwright,
the director and teachers'."
Given that the original novel
is renowned as one ofthe world's
first feminist novels, perhaps
the most enticing aspect of this
production is its emphasis on
female independence. According
to Winter, one key factor
that differentiates this play
from others produced by the
Department of Theatre and Film
are the rigid gender dynamics
that predominated the 19th
century.
"In this production, the
female characters really tell
their own stories. They speak for
themselves, think for themselves,
talk for themselves," he said.
Elms agrees adding,
"Hopefully modern audiences
will think that, thank god, we
have come leaps and bounds since
this time period where a woman's
place is fixed and a man's place is
whatever he chooses it to be."
The Tenant ofWildfell Hall
will be playing from October 1-17
in the Frederic Wood Theatre. 13
have a great idea to
build community during
UBC's Centennial?
$1000 Community Grants available to be won.
Apply for a UTown@UBC Community Grant, and you could be awarded
up to $1000 to create a fun and inspiring community-building project on campus!
This year we are pleased to celebrate 100 years of UBC with a
special Centennial Grant category
Information available at utown.ubc.ca/grant // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
OIL//
In response to Alex Chow's letter on divestment
FILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Warburton and Prodanovic argue that Chow's arguments were nonsensical.
MOIRA WARBURTON, KOSTA PRODANOVIC
Op-ed
We've got a few things to say about
a letter by Alex Chow that this
paper published last week on why
divestment is a bad strategy for
UBC.
Chow writes that "a fossil
fuel divestment campaign led
by UBCC350 has convinced a
number of students and faculty
members that divestment is the
answer to the climate crisis." No
one ever said this. No one has
ever claimed that divestment
will single-handedly solve the
greatest sociopolitical issue of our
time. Divestment is, however, a
necessary step towards combating
climate change.
Furthermore, Chow points
out that "studies have shown that
the majority of greenhouse gas
emissions are actually released
at the point of
consumption.
The solution to
climate change
is to reduce the
amount of fossil
fuels consumed
rather than
oppose the
companies who
produce them."
Chow, like many
other critics of divestment, argues
that the onus is on consumers to
change.
But the market doesn't change
on its own — A precedent needs to
be set. When a huge institution like
UBC moves to divest, it pressures
people to rethink their habits at
the consumer level. When we start
to invest in sustainable energy and
make it more accessible to more
people, only then do we change the
market. Until we put pressure on
these companies to change, they're
not going to.
Chow goes on to point to
prominent institutions like
Harvard and Columbia University
as places that have come out
against divestment as a reason
why UBC shouldn't. Name-
dropping respected universities
in this instance is a flawed appeal
to authority. There are over 300
signatories on an open letter from
Columbia's
The power of divestment lies in
its ability to create
public discourse.
Let's lead that
conversation, not
stifle it."
faculty to the
administration
in favour of
divestment.
Harvard has
one ofthe most
vocal student
organizations
pushing for
divestment in
the continent.
There are students and faculty
at Harvard, NYU, Columbia -
every institution Chow uses in
a vague attempt to strengthen
a fundamentally flawed and
confused argument - who
are vehemently pushing for
divestment. There is a robust
debate at those institutions much
like there is here.
In regards to UBC, Chow
cites the AMS referendum last
year saying that "the campaign
claims to have 'overwhelming'
support from students when, in
fact, only 6,786 students voted in
favour out of a population close to
60,000." That doesn't mean that
90 per cent of students are against
divestment. It means that the
vast majority didn't care enough
to voice their opinion (which is a
serious — but completely separate
— issue).
The power of divestment
lies in its ability to create
public discourse. Let's lead
that conversation, not stifle it.
Divestment campaigns remove
the social license granted to fossil
fuel companies by consumers.
Twiddling thumbs and mumbling
about supply and demand is a
pretty spineless position for a
global research institution like
UBC to be taking.
Divestment doesn't claim to
save the world. It doesn't claim to
be the only answer to a massive
problem. It only claims to be one
part of a movement towards the
change we so desperately need.
Framing it as anything else is
a discredit to the intentions of
the movement and to the debate
around how to deal with climate
change itself.
Kosta Prodanovic is a fourth-
year English major and Photo
Editor at The Ubyssey. Moira
Warburton is a fifth-year political
science and News Editor at The
Ubyssey. 'tJ
MONEY//
Last Words:
Death to Perch
Forget Bring Back The Gallery,
students should be calling to
"Take Down the Perch." While
we wholeheartedly support The
Gallery and would be happy to see
it back, it's insulting that Perch
exists in the first place. It features
food far beyond the price range
of your average student with
offerings such as Twice-Cooked
Duck Leg for $18 and Grilled
Flank Steak for $24.
The space itself is premium
as it is located at the top ofthe
building and having purportedly
cost millions to build — nevermind
the high operating costs they will
undoubtedly incur to keep the pork
cheeks and potato confit fresh.
This seems like a business set up
to fail. But if by some miracle the
AMS is able to not lose a fortune
on the restaurant, the question
remains: How does this serve
students? There are already plenty
of expensive places to eat both on
campus and in Vancouver proper.
Rather than imitating the fine-
dining type of restaurants that
serve only people who can afford
to blow $16 on artisanal cheese,
the AMS should be giving students
something they can only get from a
cheap student pub - a community
of friends built around cheap food
and drinks.
"Last Words" is The Ubyssey's
weekly, informal editorial column
centred on current events at UBC. 13
YOU HAVE
OPINIONS
%1'a hear 4em
ion@ubyssey.ca
Perch offers little to everyday students.
LLUSTRATION ELENAVOLOHOVA/THE UBYSSEY
Register and vote October 5 - 8 at UBC.
Vote for Real Change! You can make it happen.
RE-ELECT
MURRAY TjKS.ai
VANCOUVER QUADRA      J-ilLJvJA Cll
roadway | 604.428.4401 | www.joycemurray.liberal.ca | www.realchange.ca
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TXwWHRff Joyce Murray
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@Quadralibs
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EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
FOOTBALL//
UBC opens $3.5 million baseball training facility
Bill Situ
Contributor
After three months of
construction, UBC baseball has
officially opened its $3.5 million
indoor training facility.
"The players and coaches feel
a tremendous sense of pride ... We
also feel lucky to have this space
to gather as a group and play
and practice and get better," said
Chris Pritchett, the newly-hired
head coach of UBC baseball.
Located directly beside the
current baseball field, the new
12,500 square foot building is
air-conditioned and contains
four batting cages along with
a pitching area. The facility is
equipped with vavrious state-
of-the-art video cameras and
simulators to analyze the batting
and pitching performances of
players. The design ofthe facility
also allows for a high level of
versatility in the drills that can
take place inside.
"It's a highly functional place
because the netting is so uniquely
drawn up ... You can really get a
lot done with a little creativity,"
said Pritchett.
Terry McKaig, director of UBC
baseball, describes the technology
inside the new building as "a
video game where you actually
get to hit the ball." He said that
in addition to monitoring the
progress ofthe players, the
The $3.5 million facility has four batting ca
technology would make baseball
practices more engaging.
"You have to have a place that
when the [players] come and
experience it for the first time,
they want to come back because
they have something that engaged
them and made it so fun," said
McKaig.
Another advantage of this
indoor facility is that it will allow
for players to train even when
ges, video analysis and simulators for playe
weather conditions are unsuitable
for outdoor practice. Since
baseball players typically do not
get the chance to practice on the
field during winter, this facility
would maximize the amount of
practice time that players get
throughout the year.
"We don't have venues here in
Vancouver ... If you can get kids in
here hitting way more than they
ever have before, they are going
rs to use.
to be better players next summer
out on the field," said McKaig.
The training facility is open not
just for the varsity baseball team,
but it will offer training sessions
for youth programs in the area as
well.
The proposal for this facility
was the result of a sports review
in 2014 that gave hybrid status for
UBC. Funding for this facility came
from an anonymous donor and
= HOTOVANESSAMINKE-MARTIN/THE UBYSSEY
construction began in May 2015.
An $8 million 1,000-seat stadium
is also currently underway for the
baseball program.
The baseball took to the field
this weekend for their first home
game ofthe season. They took
on Thompson River Wolfpack in
back-to-back doubleheaders on
September 26 and 27, winning
all four games 6-1,12-0, 6-0 and
6-0.'(J
TRACK AND FIELD//
Laurier Primeau returns to UBC as head track coach
Laurier Primeau was an assistant coach at U BC from 2002 to 2009 and is now taking over the team.  PH0T0 K0STA prodanovic /th e ubyssey
Kenneth Pittman
Contributor
For the first time since 1987, both
the UBC cross country and track
and field teams will have a new
head coach — his name is Laurier
Primeau.
"UBC is a very attractive place
to coach," Primeau said. "It's [a]
top 30 school in the world and,
with the surrounding area, it opens
a lot of recruiting opportunities,"
he said. He is taking over the top
job from legendary Thunderbird
coach, Marek Jedrzejek, who led the
programs for over 25 years.
After a quick look at Primeau, you
will see a coach who is extremely
passionate about his sport.
Primeau has coaching
experience from high school through
to university including at a national
level. However, the road to where he
is now has had a lot of bumps along
way.
He started as a track athlete in
high school where his coach left a
long-lasting influence on him. After
graduating high school, his former
coach suddenly passed away from a
brain aneurism.
"I was asked by my high school
principal to come back and coach
my high school's track team... what I
discovered was that I loved coaching
and I was pretty good at it," said
Primeau.
Primeau attended Simon Fraser
University for his undergraduate
degree. It took him seven years to
graduate because he fought two
bouts with cancer. He then went on
to complete a second degree from
Auburn University in Alabama
before returning to Vancouver
to complete his schooling at
UBC. While here, Primeau ran
for the track team at the CIS
championships.
Primeau's first collegiate
coaching job was here at UBC
where he served as an assistant to
the team from 2002-2009. Post-
UBC, he had the opportunity to
be the head coach ofthe Scottish
national team as well as at Trinity
Western University.
When he was given the
opportunity to return to UBC
as the head coach, Primeau was
overjoyed to return to where
he was given his first coaching
opportunity.
Taking over from legendary
track coach Jedrzejek, Primeau
said he feels a responsibility
to "continue his legacy." He's
thankful to Jedrzejek for giving
him his first coaching job at the
collegiate level.
Primeau wants to develop good
programs here at UBC, but he also
understands that — at this school
in particular — there is heavy
influence on the student part of
the student-athlete.
This past weekend at the
Sundodger Cross Country
Invitational, the UBC women's
cross country team placed sixth
and the men's team placed
seventh. Primeau thought it was a
good kick off to the season.
"We were the top NAIA
(National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics) school,
which is important. But also, the
athletes who attended last year
saw improvements in their times
so we know we are moving in the
right direction."
"I don't want to put a lot of
emphasis on outcome-oriented
goals. The goal as a coach is
to focus on the process and
make sure that the athletes are
improving everyday both in the
classroom and on the track," he
said.
Primeau's next chance to
watch his team run is the Charles
Bowles Cross Country Invitational
hosted by Willamette University
in Salem, Oregon on October 3. 'M
Vancouver
Spine Care
Centre
Chiropractic Specialty Clinic
Spine and Sports Injuries
UBC Student Rates
1678 West Broadway    604-873-6029
www.vancouverspinecarecentre.com 14    I   SPORTS    I    TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015
FOOTBALL//
Thunderbirds disappoint
against Saskatchewan
PHOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
Troy Hansen, a first-year linebacker, gets taken down by a Husky.
Soren Elsay
Contributor
It may be time to hold off on the
parade planning for the UBC
Thunderbirds. After a flying start
to the year that saw them beat the
powerful Laval in the preseason
and open up the regular season 2-1,
the sixth ranked TSirds were dealt a
sobering 45-29 defeat at the hand of
the visiting Saskatchewan Huskies.
"I hope it wasn't taking the
Saskatchewan program for granted
because, as an experienced coach,
I know that they are going to come
out and play hard and physical," said
Head Coach Blake Nill.
After winning a high-scoring
affair last week in Manitoba 51-48,
the Thunderbirds' offence did not
come out looking as sharp and the
defence looked as vulnerable as ever.
Michael O'Connor threw for 335
yards and scored a touchdown for
the T-Birds, but never truly seemed
comfortable. The Perm State transfer
uncharacteristically missed several
throws high, one of which led to an
early interception.
After taking their opening
possession into the end zone,
the Huskies capitalized on
the aforementioned O'Connor
interception to take an early 14-0
lead. The damage was not done
there however.
Facing second down from their
own 40 yard line, wide receiver
Liam Haime had the ball ripped
from his hands by Saskatchewan's
Dylan Kemp who promptly returned
it to the house. This stunned the
crowd of 2,650 who watched the
home side fall into an early 21-0 hole.
After a safety and a Quinn van
Gylswyk field goal brought the
score to 21-5, Huskies running back
Jarvis James scampered in from
five yards out for the first of his
two touchdowns ofthe night. The
fourth-year tailback would finish the
night with 155 yards on 26 carries.
The Thunderbirds' headed into
the half on a high after wide receiver
Will Watson scored on a one yard
hand off just before the break. The
momentum appeared to be swinging
back in the home side's favour. The
opening drive ofthe second half
produced a field goal for UBC and
cut the score to 28-19.
Needing an answer,
Saskatchewan turned to James and
the ground game to stem the tide.
With the crowd back into it, the
Huskies embarked on a 75 yard
drive that was capped by James'
second score ofthe game.
Not to be outdone, UBC's Trivel
Pinto returned the ensuing kick
95 yards to the Huskies 10 yard
line. O'Connor quickly converted,
finding Malcolm Lee on a slant
to make the score 35-26 halfway
through the third quarter.
However, as they had all night,
Saskatchewan found an answer.
Fourth-year quarterback Drew
Burko, who had been sharp all
night, rolled right and lofted a
hopeful ball into the back corner
of the end zone looking for Tevin
Godfrey. The Huskies receiver
made a fantastic, one-handed catch
with the UBC corner draped all
over him. The highlight-reel score
ignited the visitors' sideline and it
began to feel as if this would not be
the Thunderbirds' night.
With 10 minutes remaining,
down by 16 and threatening inside
the red zone, UBC faced a make-
or-break third and seven from the
Huskies 11 yard line. O'Connor's
pass fell incomplete and the 'Birds
comeback attempt was cut short.
The loss dropped the T-Birds
to 2-2 on the season and the
has brought up some serious
questions as they prepare to head
to the University of Alberta next
weekend. The defence, which
gave up 48 points to Manitoba
last week, was gashed time and
time again both on the ground and
through the air. They allowed the
visitors to rack up over 500 yards.
"We're going to have to
realize that the athletes that
we have maybe can not play the
kind of defence we're asking
for the entire time," said Nill.
"We're going to have to go more
of a bend-but-don't-break type
approach."
Pinning tonight's loss squarely
on one side ofthe ball would be
an inaccurate portrayal of events.
Overall, the team lacked a general
crispness to their game and, on
both sides ofthe ball, there were
key breakdowns and mistakes that
proved too much to overcome. If
the T-Birds are to return to their
winning ways, Nill knows he is
going to need more out of his
veteran players. 'M
RECRUITING //
Hockey recruits join new coach Adam Shell
The new recruits all have WHL experience
Matt Langmuir
Contributor
The men's hockey regular season
premiere is just around the corner
and Head Coach Adam Shell is
hoping the new recruits will help
bring UBC deep into the playoffs
this season. With a total of eight
players joining the team — all of
whom have Western Hockey League
experience — expectations are high
for this year's Thunderbirds.
"Tyler [Kuntz, the previous
coach,] did an outstanding job,"
said Shell. "This recruiting class is
outstanding. The five guys at the
back end are all terrific — they really
upgraded our talent."
Josh Connolly is one of those
five newly recruited defensemen.
Along with Kyle Becker, they are
regarded by Shell as potential all-
stars. Connolly, the Prince George
native, posted a career-high of 45
points for the Kami oops Blazers
during the 2013-14 season and
and are looking to make an impact.
already has a UBC preseason goal to
his name.
"I've played [in the WHL] for
four years. It's a pretty competitive
league," said Connolly. "The guys
here are a lot bigger [and] a lot
stronger, but I'll just take what I
learned from [the WHL] and just
kind of use it here and hopefully do
whatever I can do to help the team
win."
Devan Fafard, Raymond Grewal
and Riley Guenther are the other
three newly acquired defensemen all
of whom Shell believes will be solid
Canada West players.
One ofthe more locally well-
known players to join the squad is
centre Joel Hamilton who spent a
season and a half with the Vancouver
Giants racking up 75 points during
his brief tenure with the team.
Hamilton pointed out that his
love for the city was the reason he
decided to join the Thunderbirds.
"[During] my time out here with
the Giants, I just really enjoyed
^HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
the city and living here," said
Hamilton. "I guess I couldn't
really get enough of it and that's
kind of why I wanted to come
back here."
Hamilton hopes his ability to
play a 200 foot game will give him
the chance to help his team win.
He emphasized his hard work
and penalty killing abilities as his
main attributes.
The other two forwards in
this year's recruiting class are
Austin Vetterl and Chase Clayton
who previously played for the
Kootenay Ice and Saskatoon
Blades respectively.
"All eight ofthe incoming
guys are great people which
fit into this mix," said Shell.
"You've got guys who can fit in
nicely — a little different role for
each of them, but they all bring
something different and will all
contribute heavily to our lineup.
I'm really lucky to have inherited
that recruiting class for sure." 'M
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15001
Public Open House
Wesbrook Place Lots 27 & 29 Faculty & Staff Rental Housing
You are invited to attend an Open House on Thursday, October 8 to view and comment on the
proposed faculty & staff rental residential development in consolidated Lots 27 & 29 in
Wesbrook Place.
hursday,October8,2015 4:30-6:00PM
/esbrook Village Welcome Centre, 3378 Wesbrook Mall
Representatives from the project team and Campus
+ Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project. The public is also invited to attend the
upcoming Development Permit Board Meeting for
this project.
Date/Time: October 28, 5:00 - 6:30PM
Location:     Classroom, Tapestry Building
3338 Wesbrook Mall
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be
accepted from Sept. 23 to Oct. 18. To learn more or
to comment on this project, please visit:
planning, ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information, contact:
Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| S*I^S&S°li! ^Sl^sa&Sa^ScH si£Mr4.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
campus+community planning TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2015   |    SPORTS    |   15
VOLLEYBALL//
What's next for Perry: life
after the Thunderbirds
Ian Perry is spending his post-Thunderbird time coaching and working towards a masters degree.      file photo goeff lister /the ubyssey
Henry Allan
Contributor
Kyle Donen, head coach ofthe
University ofthe Fraser Valley
volleyball team, tells his players to
take their places at the beginning
of practice. Everyone in the gym
is dressed in the greens, greys,
whites and blacks ofthe Cascades
athletic program. Donen explains
he's going to demonstrate forearm
passing and calls for his assistant
coach, Ian Perry, to stand on
the other side ofthe net. Perry,
captain ofthe UBC volleyball team
for the last three seasons, wears a
forest green t-shirt, emblazoned
with the white UFV logo on his
chest. The only thing that looks
out of place in the gym are the
bright blue Thunderbirds shorts
Perry still wears.
Donen throws the ball up high
over the net. The players watch
Perry as he takes a stance and
readies himself to receive the ball
— practice begins.
Perry was asked by Donen
to help coach the Cascades this
season before the two had ever
even met. The request was based
solely on Perry's career at UBC
during which he lead the team to
three straight Canada West final
fours, represented Team Canada,
was an academic all-Canadian and
finished with the second most digs
(preventing the ball from hitting
the ground) in CIS history (only
behind fellow Thunderbird, Blair
Bann). But now that Perry's CIS
career has finished, what's next?
"I never planned on coaching
this year — that was totally out of
the blue," said Perry. The plan was
to play professionally in Norway.
After the 2014-15 season ended,
the UBC coaching staff put Perry
in contact with a Norwegian
coach who, after watching Perry's
game tapes, offered the libero (a
defensive player) spot on his team.
But Perry chose to stay.
"It would have been an
amazing experience to go over
there and play," said Perry. "But
for me, it's just not a career." Had
he gone pro, Perry would only
have played for a few years and
have had to work a coaching job
on the side to make ends meet. So
Perry decided to stay and make
headway with a career he would
eventually have to fall back on
anyway.
Now Perry is working towards
becoming a sports psychologist.
He'd previously considered
coaching volleyball, but Perry
explained that there are no
domestic pro-leagues and only a
handful of paying jobs at the CIS
level making job prospects pretty
low. "That's kind of why I went
with the sports psychologist side
of it," said Perry.
As sports psychologists don't
tend to limit themselves to one
sport, their potential client lists are
enormous. In B.C. alone, there are
thousands of high-level athletes
competing at the college, university
and professional levels.
Branching out to other sports is
something Perry is familiar with.
He was on the Yale Secondary
basketball team that took the
provincial title in 2008 and played
on Yale's Ultimate team too. During
his summers growing up, Perry
played soccer and baseball as well
as later coached tennis. Add a
varsity Thunderbird pedigree and
Perry has pretty solid credentials
to coach all manners of athletes on
the mental side of their games. All
that's missing is a qualification.
To compliment his Bachelor's of
Kinesiology, Perry hopes to enrol
in a graduate kinesiology program
specializing in sports psychology
at UBC next fall.
Between now and then though,
Perry plans to travel — right now
he's in Europe with his family and
aims to travel again in the spring
to Southeast Asia. To help pay
for that, Perry works for the City
of Surrey's Roads and Drainage
department (another previous
summer job) which he juggles
with coaching at UFV.
But Perry's playing days aren't
necessarily over. Perry regularly
acts as a player in UFV practices
and participates in recreation
leagues filled with ex-university
and college players. Both keep
him ready should he want to
return to organized volleyball.
"Some ofthe players who are
playing pro are in their 30s, so it's
not like volleyball is a sport you
have to be under 25 to play," said
Perry. "If something came up in the
future and I really missed [playing],
I definitely feel that I could go over
and give it a shot." 'M
Register and vote
at UBC
Ready to vote in the federal election?
From October 5 to 8, Elections
Canada offices will be open on
campus to provide information,
registration and voting for students
before the October 19 election day.
Bring ID with your home address.
Register and vote
°n campus
October 5-8
Nearest location:
Student Union Building
Ballroom
6138 Student Union Blvd.
Hours: 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
There are other times, places and ways
you can vote. Visit elections.ca or call
1-800-463-6868 (gTTY 1-800-361-8935)
for this information and the list of
accepted ID.
Ready,
toyote
October 19,2015
Elections Canada 16  I  GAMES + COMIC  I Tuesday, September29,2015
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hat;
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COMIC PATRICK MURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY
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