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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 2015

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Array THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 6,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUE VIII
SO INSPIRING IT'S CLICHE SINCE 1918
P/03
P/08
P/09
P/10
//
//
//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
Presidential search
will take stakeholders
into account
Laydy Jams singer
releasing hip-hop
album
Op-ed:Land
acknowledgement is
lip service
Thunderbird Sport Clubs
prepare for inaugural
season
ANOTHER PONDEROSA ELEVATOR EXPERIENCES A FALL
AGE 4 // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
BAR
talk
($>^QQ
THURS8
////
BARTALK#17 6 P.M. @THE PIT
Look beyond the lawn signs and learn about the upcoming
election. Organized by The UBC Terry Project and AMS.
FREE
SAT 10
////
SMASH2SCHOOL 10:15 A.M. @ 1KB LEARNING CENTRE
Hosted by the UBC eSports Association, join your fellow students
forasmashing dayofSuperSmash Brothers Melee and 4.
PRICES VARY
SAT 10
////
BLUEPRINT 18TH 7 P.M. @ PACIFIC COLISEUM
Celebrateyourthanksgiving long weekend by partying with
Blueprint at the 18th year anniversary. All ages welcomed.
PL2/S97   VIP/S120
ON THE COVER
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY
Kosta Prodanovic
and Aiken Lao
INSPIRED BY
BEINGSCARED
SHITLESS
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Features Editor
Aiken Lao Arno Rosenfeld
arinteditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer Copy Editor
Peter Siemens Bailey Ramsay
webeditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Vassilena Sharlandjieva,
Matt Langmuir, Josh Azizi,
3ill Situ, Elena Volohova,
Jeremy Johnson-Silvers,
Julian Yu, Sruthi Tadepall
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@ubyssey.ca
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Kenneth Chang
advertising®
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Accounts
Abigail Pelaez
accounts@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Emma Partridge &
Moira Warburton
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
3hoto@ubyssey.ca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
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^ublicatj ons Society or the University of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nerein cannotbe reproducec
OCTOBER 6,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUE VII
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i»^A    -t
=HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/TH E UBYSSEY
After 10 years at Harvard, renowned physics expert lenny Hoffman came to UBC this summer as a Canada Excellence Research Chair.
Harvard's Hoffman adjusts to Point Grey
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
"My toenail is gone," said Jenny
Hoffman nodding at her foot.
Hoffman is fresh off defending
her title as America's endurance
running national champion. That
meant leaving UBC on a Friday
morning, arriving for the race in
Cleveland that night and eating a
can of processed ravioli before going
to sleep. Waking up Saturday, she
ran for 24 hours straight racking
up a total distance of 223 km before
boarding a plane home. She missed
her connection into Toronto because
she was too exhausted to pull her
bag from the luggage carousel.
By Monday morning, Hoffman,
a renowned quantum physics
professor who arrived at UBC this
summer after 10 years at Harvard,
was back on campus lecturing
hundreds of first-year physics
students.
And, somewhere along the way,
her toenail gave out.
But if Hoffman is treading lightly
in a literal sense, the hard-charging
academic has little patience for
what she sees as nonsense at the
periphery of her new institution.
Everyone has been really friendly,
she is happy with her colleagues
and the students are great. Hoffman
emphasizes that she is grateful to
be here. But the scientist chafes at
UBC's teaching assistants' union,
a point she raised early in the
interview.
"TA-ing should be considered a
course not a job. There should be no
union to try and reduce their hours,"
Hoffman said. She added that she
saw the attitude of CUPE 2278, the
TAs union on campus, as a cultural
difference. "I'm coming from a place
where people love their jobs," she
said.
Graduate students at Harvard
began efforts to unionize this past
spring according to a report in The
Harvard Crimson newspaper.
But despite the affinity Hoffman
holds for Harvard where she also
studied as an undergraduate,
Hoffman came to UBC with an eye
toward doing more collaborative
research. UBC has a slightly larger
physics department than Harvard
and a much larger team — around 15
researchers, according to Hoffman,
focused on her sub-field of quantum
materials.
Specifically, Hoffman's work
focuses on building and analyzing
new materials for conducting
electrons — the kind of materials
that end up being used in power
lines, cellphones and computers.
She said Harvard had a focus on
attracting the single best professor
in any given field which meant
fewer total professors in any given
specialty to collaborate with.
"[It's] really nice to be able to
just pop next door and say, 'Hey, I've
got a question about this,'" Hoffman
said. After her move to UBC, she
said quantum materials research is
especially strong at the university.
She was brought on as a Canada
Excellence Research Chair, a
national program focused on
attracting foreign academics. The
federal government will give UBC
$10 million over the next seven
years to support Hoffman and her
research.
But Hoffman, 37, sees her
primary commitment as being
toward students and is currently
teaching an introductory physics
course to first-years. While still
adjusting to using Connect and
iClickers, she said she enjoys
working with students new to the
field.
"I feel like it's my responsibility
to keep them excited and recruit
them to be physicists," she said.
While Hoffman demurred on
how UBC's student body stands
compared to Harvard's ("That's a
hard question," she said after a long
pause), she noted that, "The top
students here are every bit as good
as the top students at Harvard."
She continued that she had found
students on campus here to be more
focused on academics than those
in Cambridge where an unhealthy
obsession with extracurriculars
rules. Hoffman clarified that balance
is important. She added that her
own extracurricular, running, helps
with the pressure of her work.
"You can write a really good
paper and it can get rejected by
some anonymous referee," Hoffman
said ofthe stresses of research. "It's
nice for me to have two things that
I can try and excel at because if one
of them is not going well then maybe
the other one is."
Hoffman has been running since
middle school but has, in her words,
never been very talented. It wasn't
until graduate school in Berkeley
that she started running long
distances competitively. Hoffman
graduated from running marathons
to the 100 mile races during her
postdoc in California and has been
running "ultras" (races longer than
marathons) ever since.
"In any long distance running
you get to a point where it's hard and
painful," Hoffman acknowledged,
adding that it's her competitive drive
that leads her to such athletic feats.
"The longer the race gets, the more
likely I am to win because the more
it's mental and the less it's talent."
A longer version of this article is
available at ubyssey.ca 13
Vancouver
Spine Care
Centre
Chiropractic Specialty Clinic
Spine and Sports Injuries
UBC Student Rates
1678 West Broadway    604-873-6029
www.vancouverspinecarecentre.com // NEWS
BOARD //
Presidental search seeks
stakeholder input
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
= ILE PHOTO DONALD WANG/THE UBYSSEY
The search for the next president is now
underway.
Moira Warburton
News Editor
In this year's presidential search
committee, stakeholder input will
be ofthe utmost priority in finding
a new president said Chancellor
Lindsay Gordon.
"What will determine the
success ofthe search is who's on
the committee," said Gordon. "So
obviously we want to attract the
best possible representatives ofthe
stakeholders."
The committee will be made
up of a variety of representatives
from a wide range of parties across
campus including faculty, staff,
students, alumni and the Board of
Governors.
The chancellor admitted that
Gupta's abrupt departure meant
that increased public scrutiny
would be on this year's committee.
"The departure of [Gupta] creates
an additional challenge. But
my perspective would be it's a
manageable challenge and offset
by the fact that this is an amazing
university sought after [by]
leaders," said Gordon.
He refused to comment on what
the committee would be looking
for in a new president or what the
specific process would be stating
that these matters were for the
committee as a whole to decide as
soon as possible after members are
announced.
When asked what measures
would be put in place to make
sure another sudden departure
does not happen again, Gordon
said that, although it's impossible
to say for certain, they will aim
to be as confident as possible
that the next person will be
here for the long haul. "I think
it's perfectly reasonable to have
some questions because of what
happened last time around.
But as for the detailed steps to
ensure what I described as our
goal is achieved, that will be
the responsibility ofthe search
committee."
Gordon will be making regular
updates at Board of Governor
meetings on how the process is
going throughout the next nine
months. On specifics, he pointed
to the best practice of any hiring
process — to not discuss names
of potential candidates publicly.
Meetings ofthe committee will
not be open to the public.
"It's important that [although]
we've got a time constraint... we
not cut any corners. We make
sure that we get full stakeholder
input," said Gordon referring to
Martha Piper's leaving date of
June 30, 2016. "I do believe that
because ofthe strength ofthe
institution that we can, and will,
have a very successful search." 'M
SURVEILLANCE //
Overdue policy on security cameras proposed
Sruthi Tadepalli
Staff Writer
A newly proposed policy aims to
create central guidelines for the
appropriate use of all safety and
security cameras at both UBC
Vancouver and UBC Okanagan.
Security cameras have been
used on both the Vancouver and
Okanagan campuses for many
years, but currently there is no
university-wide policy as to when
they should be installed and how
they should be used.
According to UBC's Chief Legal
Counsel Hubert Lai, most camera
operators will contact the office
ofthe university's legal counsel
to be sure that they understand
the proper way to deploy their
camera. However, "once you get
beyond a certain point, it becomes
important to have a centralized
policy that is published [and]
clear."
This point was reached after
the series of sexual assaults on
the Vancouver campus in 2013.
After these assaults, a Campus
Safety Working Group was formed
to identify ways in which safety
and security on campus could be
improved. One ofthe changes they
recommended was increasing the
number of blue boxes on campus
from the current 17 to 36 and
then fitting these blue boxes with
cameras.
Faced with such a huge increase
in safety and security cameras on
campus, the fact that there was no
policy to govern their use becomes
significantly more concerning.
"With all the new blue phones
and the proposed installation of
video cameras into those blue
phones, the need for a centralized
government framework has become
much more important," said Paul
Hancock, legal counsel to the
university on information and
privacy. Policy 118, when finalized,
should allow a balance between
concerns for both public safety
and individual privacy. Under the
proposed policy, the cameras fitted to
the blue boxes will not be allowed to
record images on a continuous basis.
Only when someone presses the help
button may the camera be turned on
so as to increase the safety of those
who press it. The only cameras that
will consistently record images will
be placed at the bus loop and will be
used for forensic purposes only.
As for other cameras currently
operating on campus, Campus
Security Director Barry Eccleton
said that, under Policy 118, they will
be given a six-month grace period
during which the department in
charge ofthe cameras and will have
to apply for the systems to continue.
If their application is not approved,
the cameras will be dismantled.
Both the AMS and the Student
Union of UBCO fully support the
=HOTO ILLUSTRATION CHERIHAUN HASSUN AND ELENA VOLOHOVA/THE UBYSSEY
Currently there is no policy on the use of security cameras.
proposed policy. Jenna Omassi, AMS
VP University Affairs and Academic,
is happy with the policy for two
reasons.
"Firstly, it means that those blue
phones will be re-furbished and will
be able to be used properly for the
security ofthe campus community
more generally," she said. "Secondly,
it means that there will be more of
an oversight on cameras and we can
ensure that the footage on these
cameras will be used solely in times
when it needs to be used and not
abused."
According to Omassi, the issue of
footage usage is more of a problem
on UBC's Okanagan campus because
ofthe greater number of cameras
present. If passed, Policy 118 will
ensure that camera footage is used
for a more specific criminal set of
incidents rather than for issues
such as academic misconduct
that, as it stands, cameras can
technically be used for without
the policy.
The final set of
recommendations will come
to the Board of Governors for
approval in January 2016 at the
earliest.
Rather than waiting, the
university counsel and campus
security urge the UBC community
to answer the call for comments
on the proposal that should be
made public this week. The
comments period will be open for
about two months so as to provide
members ofthe community time
to provide their input. 'M
CONSTRUCTION //
Board approves Tall Wood rez building
= HOTOCOURTESY/UBC INFRASTRUCTURE
AND DEVELOPMENT
The residence will be one ofthe tallest
wood building in the world.
Vassi Sharlandjieva
Staff Writer
With the final approval ofthe Board
of Governors, the construction of a
new residence to accommodate 404
students is set to begin in October.
Unlike other residences on campus,
this building will be made almost
entirely out of wood.
The main goal is to respond to
the demand for more on-campus
housing. But, said John Metras,
managing director of Campus Infrastructure and Development at UBC,
it also presents a new way for UBC
researchers to learn. "This project
was an opportunity to apply engineered mass timber in an innovative
way in a tall building application,"
said Metras.
Metras said that the idea for this
residence arose from the provincial government's "wood-first"
policy which asks that government
agencies and associated entities
make using wood a priority in
new projects.
The novelty ofthe residence
building is that it will be 18 stories
high, exceeding the current building
code limit of six stories for a wooden
structure. This means that the BC
Building Safety and Standards
Branch had to conduct a special
review on the project. "We expect
that the provincial approval will
come in late September [or] early
October," said Metras. In the nature
ofthe Campus as a Living Lab project, UBC researchers are monitoring and analyzing the structure.
"We've taken incredible precautions in the design to ensure
that the building is perfectly safe
and that we can exceed all code requirements in that regard." Metras
emphasized.
To ensure fire safety, protective triple layers of dry wall will
encapsulate the wood structure.
Large beams, which burn very
slowly, will provide cross-sectional
support. In addition, two concrete
elevator and stairway cores will
provide the residence with structural support to exceed current
building code standards for seismic
performance.
The biggest challenge during
construction, according to Metras,
will be dealing with moisture issues
with the wood. However, durability
against moisture can be achieved
by creating a "building envelope
so that the wood material itself is
not subjected to this moisture,"
explained Frank Lam. Lam is an
expert on wood building design
and construction in the Faculty of
Forestry.
"There are solutions to everything — it is a matter of using the
right solution," said Lam.
To avoid the interference of
heavy rains with the construction
schedule, the wood structure will
be built in the summer months of
2016. It is expected that the wooden
residence will be completed faster
than the typical constructions of
concrete and steel that UBC has
built thus far.
The total project budget is
$51.5 million, with funding
coming from the Canada Wood
Council and various other
sources including Natural Resources Canada, Forest Innovation Investment, Binational
Softwood Lumber Council and
the provincial government.
"One hundred per cent ofthe
tall wood premium is covered by
other external funding sources," said
Andrew Parr, managing director
of Student Housing & Hospitality
Services. He confirmed that students
can expect to pay the same rent in
the Tall Wood Building as for similar
types of accommodation on campus.
The plan is to open the new
residence in August 2017. 'M
UBCTHEATRE&FILM
pioo
OTaMSiM®J
WIILDIFELL HALL
Based on the novel by Anne Bronte
October 1—17, 2015 Frederic Wood Theatre  Tickets-, theatrefilm.ubc.ca 4    I    NEWS    I   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
RESIDENCE //
The elevator in Ponderosa Maple house has been acting up, much like the elevator in Arbutus house last lanuary.
= HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Elevator in Ponderosa Maple house experiences a fall
Emma Partridge
News Editor
Elevator malfunctions have now
befallen both Ponderosa houses
in the residential complex on
campus.
Over the last academic year,
the host of problems plaguing
Ponderosa Commons, which
opened in 2013, has become a
running gag among the general
student community. For residents,
though, that joke was their home.
Ponderosa has seen over 40
noteworthy maintenance issues
according to a spreadsheet from
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services obtained by The Ubyssey
through a freedom of information
act request. Some of these were
commonplace such as a fire alarm
going off when there was no fire,
but they extend to "room entry
possible by other cards" and "no
hot water in building."
Then there were the students
stuck in elevators.
One resident described getting
stuck in an Arbutus elevator,
which free-fell one floor, in
a public Facebook post. "The
elevator reached the 16th floor
and it was about to open and
instead it fell an entire floor," the
student wrote last January.
Emilee Northwood, a resident
of Maple House, had a similar
experience recently on September
13.
"I live on the eighth floor and
then I pressed the elevator like I
was going down... basically, it kind
of free fell a floor," Northwood
told The Ubyssey. She said the
elevator's strange behaviour didn't
end there. "Then it sent me back
up the eighth floor again [and then]
took me down to the end floor."
Northwood said these
incidences are "concerning" in
terms of residence safety. However,
a representative from Kone, the
company which manufactured the
Ponderosa elevators, said "free
fall" may be the wrong way to term
these incidences.
Public Open House
Library Garden - October 1 and October 8
UBC is undertaking a process to redesign the public green space between Memorial
Road and Agricultural Road, in front ofthe Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. This central
location will bring together students, faculty, staff, residents, and visitors and will
house the new Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre
Date: Thursday, October 1, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm
Place: 2nd Floor Foyer, The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
Date: Thursday, October 8, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm
Place: Main Lobby, Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd
The introduction of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue
Centre to Library Garden provides a unique opportunity to re-envision
one of the largest outdoor public spaces on campus
Please join us at the public open houses to learn more and to tell us what is
important to you about the space and what opportunities you see for its future.
Can't attend in person? Online consultation will run from
September28 -October 12. Visit planning.ubc.ca to learn more
For additional information, contact: Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior Manager,
Consultation, at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984,
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
tm&&&nmiM., %Mm&&mfo,
0| 3*1 fe S&« n|S =t= Sife tafl SM7| #0| Sl^MLih.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
According to Kone spokesman
Patrick O'Connell, guides along
the elevator shaft tell the elevator
when a floor is being approached.
If for some reason the elevator can't
find the appropriate guide, it will
skip to the closest one.
"[It] is very rare and almost never
happens, but it's going to calibrate
back down to that [last floor] and
that's where you might actually feel
the sensation of coming down — but
you're never falling," said O'Connell,
noting that student safety has
never actually been in jeopardy.
Managing Director of Student
Housing and Hospitality Andrew
Parr acknowledged, "It's not a
pleasant situation for somebody
who rides and we're completely
empathetic to that and equally
frustrated with the students about
the challenges of this elevator."
That frustration is partially
because Ponderosa elevators are
notorious for more than giving
their occupants a scare — the
elevators were out of service
before the January's fall and then
were closed again in March.
"There's been times when the
elevator's been broken for three
months. And then also they'd
have random days ... where the
elevator's been out of service,"
noted Northwood.
According to Parr, residence
elevators get more use than
most elevators, which "requires
greater preventative maintenance
programs that typical residential
or office building type elevators
would require."
When asked whether the
elevators in Ponderosa are out
of service more frequently than
others due to maintenance
inspections, Parr said, "We all
recognize the elevators at the
Ponderosa phase 1 are a greater
problem than our other elevators
for sure. There's no doubt about
that and we're monitoring those
more closely."
Parr also noted that this is
uncommon situation and that they
"are putting a tremendous amount
of pressure on Kone to do a deeper
diagnosis on this to determine why
this continues to repeat itself."
That diagnosis has yet to yield
any answers. As for Arbutus, once
a proper inspection was underway
Parr said that "literally thousands
of trips" were ran and no fault was
found. The elevator was put back
into service only after the tests were
complete and the elevators were
approved.
According to O'Connell the
most common explanations
for malfunctions is an error in
installation ofthe floor guides.
However, O'Connell also said
that this is something they would
discover very quickly after
installation.
Jake Mullan was president of
the Ponderosa Commons Residence
Association when the elevators first
experienced problems last January.
According to Mullan, the elevator
wasn't taken out of service for an
appropriate amount of time after it
fell, which he called "deplorable."
"Magically in the morning, my
vice president and I awoke and the
elevator was back working again
and then they said, 'Oh shoot, it
shouldn't be,' and then they turned it
off again," said Mullan, adding that
it was opened without inspection by
government safety inspectors which
violated protocol.
Parr confirmed that protocol
dictates that a malfunctioning
elevator is to be taken out of
service and poor communication
led to the elevator being reopened
prematurely.
"What I can I say? It was an error
made at that time," Parr said, noting
that proper protocol was followed in
the September incident.
As for Ponderosa phase 2, Parr
said they will not be using the same
Kone elevators that were used in
Maple and Arbutus due to a change
in contractors.
"Phase 1 and phase 2 were
treated as two separate projects
from a tendering perspective. We
actually have a different general
contractor on the two projects," said
Parr.
UBC Properties Trust manages
the tendering process, but were
unavailable for comment at this
time as the man involved with the
Ponderosa project is on vacation.
According to O'Connell, it would
be possible to replace the elevators
but he couldn't give an estimate as
to what this would cost as it varies
from building to building.
In the meantime, we have yet to
hear any rumors that residents want
a slide built in Maple. 1 // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
PETITION //
Short film comes under attack as "LGBT lobby propaganda"
Jessica Yang
Contributor
The production ofthe short film
Limina, has recently come under
attack by a transphobic right-wing
petition originating in Europe.
The film, about a gender-fluid
child, aims to start a conversation
about the natural, but often
oppressed, gender fluidity of
children. Filmmakers Joshua M.
Ferguson and Florian Halbedl
had intended to GhaLimina in
the magical and diverse villages of
Switzerland. Having decided to film
in Vancouver instead due to financial
and logistical reasons, Limina is
attracting top talent across Canada.
Ferguson and Haldedl are preparing
for production to start in October.
On September 8, an anonymous
petition in German surfaced on
the online platform "CitizenGO."
It attacked the film for its binary-
breaking message, labeling gender
fluidity as a sickness and the film
as propaganda for the "LGBT
lobby." The petition now has 12,000
signatures from around the world.
Certain supporters have spoken
up publicly against the film such
as professor and publicist Roberto
de Mattei who stated that Limina
is "an attack on childhood with
disastrous psychological and social
consequences."
The petition appealed to several
governmental representatives in
Switzerland asking them to not
The attack on Limina has sparked interest i
provide funding for the film in
hopes to end the production process
before it had begun. In reaction to
this attack, the filmmakers said,
"Religious dogma should never
have the power to influence cultural
production," marking the petition as
a clear attempt at censorship.
The representatives,
specifically Head ofthe
Education and Culture
Department Franz Enderli,
stated that the petition will not
affect the film's application for
governmental funding and that
decisions will be made solely on
the quality ofthe application.
"We had very positive and
supportive meetings with many
people in Switzerland about
internationally.
Limina while we were there this
past summer," said Ferguson.
"The Transgender Network of
Switzerland is in full support
of Limina and denounces this
petition."
Though there are many in
support ofthe LGBTQ+ community,
transphobic attacks like this petition
can still have a detrimental effect on
individuals. The petition uses a study
by Cecilia Dehjne as support for
their transphobic position.
However, Dehjne rejects this
use of her work. "This petition
incorrectly uses our research
to attempt to prove that gender
confirmation surgery increases the
suicide rate for transpeople," she
said. "I denounce this petition's
= HOTOCOURTESYUMINA
dangerous and misguided use of
our research... This misuse is what
actually could harm trans people
and by that increase the risk of
suicide."
Gillian Creese, acting director
at UBC's Institute for Gender,
Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
condemns the intolerance ofthe
petitioners.
"The attack on the film and
its producers is a clear example
of transphobia," she said. "We
should all condemn this kind of
hateful intolerance and bigotry."
The filmmakers urge
supporters to consider
contributing to their film and
help Limina to create a cinematic
space for gender-fluid children. 'M
SOCIETIES //
UBC Debate Society silences nothing
UBC Debate Society began in 1906, before UBC itself.
Bailey Ramsay
Copy Editor
If your idea of Debate Society is
a room full of aggressive argumentative people shouting at each
other, you couldn't be more wrong.
The Debate Society instructs and
mentors students on how to be better speakers as well as cultivating
their quick-thinking logic skills.
It's actually very rare for people
to become passionately heated
about a topic and throw logic to the
wind.
"It just makes you a more
understanding and logical person.
You're forced to engage with things
that you don't agree on in debate,"
said Pia Lim, VP Marketing ofthe
UBC Debate Society. "I honestly
think debate has made me a
better person. Without it, I would
have just stayed argumentative
and closed minded. You can't
afford to be closed minded in
debate."
The Debate Society began
in 1906 - predating UBC itself.
Back then, men and women
were segregated into separate
societies. The women's suffrage
movement and women's right to
vote were still hotly contested
topics. Even to this day, no topic
is safe from debate no matter how
controversial.
"You want to debate topics
that are controversial, but you
= HOTO OLAMIDEOLANIYAN/THE UBYSSEY
don't want to go into a debate
where someone is triggered
and can't talk because they are
uncomfortable," said Lim. "We
want to talk about these topics
that are happening in news now,
we don't want to shy away from
it."
Students are challenged by
engaging with a topic or stance
that they might not necessarily
agree with.
"You don't really know what
your beliefs are until you can
argue against them," said Masao
Dahlgren, a first-year arts
student.
A big focus for the community
is to teach and cultivate the
individual skill of debating
and public speaking. Novice
members are matched with "Pros,"
experienced members, to develop
a mentorship. Members also do a
lot of outreach by volunteering in
various Vancouver high schools.
"A lot of the coaches in the
Vancouver high school circuit
are UBC debaters who are
volunteering their time ... The
school who have coaches are
private schools that can afford it,"
said Lim.
While cultural stereotypes
and film characters might suggest
debaters to be overtly competitive
individuals, this is not the
case. Tournaments are a huge
networking opportunity.
"There is a big social aspect
to debate — debaters have a lot of
friends all across the province and
all across the country and down in
the states as well," said Lim.
It is free to attend meetings,
training sessions and to participate
in open debates.
"The only reason people pay
is because we subsidize people
to on trips around the world ...
For $10, you have further access
to more training days that are
more intensive, socials, and
tournaments located all around
the world," said Lim
If you're considering whether
or not the Debate Society is for
you, Dahlgren encourages you to
give it a try.
"If you're on the fence about
joining, you're already having a
debate with yourself! So you might
as well come to the society and do
it with other people." 'M
Eat, Pray, Cram
LLUSTRATIONSOPHIASLOAN/THE UBYSSEY
How to survive midterms.
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
As midterms begin to rear their
ugly heads and the thought of
how you are going to feed yourself
through the frenzy starts to weigh
on you — fear not! Late night
takeout for a week straight, or
worse — ignoring the demands of
your physical form entirely, are
not your only options. Provided
that you plan ahead a little, you can
eat well in the midst of this horrid
paper tornado we call October.
I admit that I often find it hard
to balance both my budget and diet
when school gets busy. Despite my
intentions to eat well, stay on target
with my spending and maintain
good grades, I often find that
studying takes precedence — as a
student, it kind of has to. However,
I worry when reaching for the
takeout menu becomes automatic
because, while it's a quick and easy
option, it's not the only way to meet
both of those criteria. It's certainly
not the cheapest or healthiest way
either.
First off, plan things out. It
might seem like this is taking
precious time away from
studying, but it doesn't have to be
comprehensive.
Next step: grocery shopping.
After checking your fridge and
pantry for what you already have,
arm yourself with your ingredients
list from meal planning and do a big
grocery run.
Now that you've stocked
your fridge and pantry, do some
advance prep-work. Packing
lunch (and/or dinner and
breakfast) the night before will
keep you well-fed for long hours
in the library and you won't have
to scramble in the morning to
get everything together. Here
are some things that you can mix
and match for easy grab-and-
go meals and are also great for
throwing together dinner in a
pinch:
Rice and potatoes are easily
reheated — make a big batch for
the week to keep in the fridge.
Cooked proteins, like meat and
tofu, will keep for several days.
Hard-boiling eggs are even
easier and cheaper.
Roasting vegetables is
surprisingly hands-off once the
chopping is done.
Make a batch of homemade
hummus to last you the week for a
source of protein in a pinch.
Cut fruits and veggies into
snack-size portions.
If you're feeling ambitious (or,
like me, you relieve your stress by
baking), make a banana loaf or a
batch of muffins to take as snacks.
The more forethought you put
into your food, the more stress you
will save in the end. If you find
yourself floundering amidst piles of
pizza boxes, it's never too late to sit
down and get organized if you want
to. Now, if only we could say the
same for midterms... '21 6    I    FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
LONGBOAT
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15001
Public Open House
Wesbrook Place Lots 27 & 29 Faculty & Staff Rental Housing
You are invited to attend an Open House on Thursday, October 8 to view and comment on the
proposed faculty & staff rental residential development in consolidated Lots 27 & 29 in
Wesbrook Place.
Date:
Place:
hursday, October 8,2015
4:30 - 6:00PM
mmmm
Crescent
West
Representatives from the project team and Campus
+ Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project. The public is also invited to attend the
upcoming Development Permit Board Meeting for
this project.
Spirit       /
Wesbrook Mall
Ultima Magnolia DaNia
H°use House Nobel
House
*e
Date/Time: October 28, 5:00 - 6:30PM
Location:     Classroom, Tapestry Building
3338 Wesbrook Mall
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be
accepted from Sept. 23 to Oct. 18. To learn more or
to comment on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
For further information, contact:
Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
TtiSA^W?. &*!* a*h =l urn aemfe H&m S2i»w7i huh^.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ben Gardiner
Contributor
The 2015 edition of UBC Recreation's Day ofthe Longboat event saw
an all-time attendance record buoyed by the commendable efforts of its
passionate organizing team.
Despite the somewhat diminished participation over the past two
years largely due to adverse weather conditions, figures over the October
3-4 weekend surpassed all previous records for individual participation
and team registration. Longboat has steadily grown to become UBC
Recreation's largest event since its inception 37 years ago where
participating teams built their own longboats to navigate at sea. This past
weekend, the world's largest voyageur event hosted 347 student teams and
over 3,500 total participants.
Notably, organizers indicated that the "Just For Fun" classification had
a significant boost in registration over previous years. This reflects UBC
Recreation's recent strategy shift to encourage active living on campus in
addition to promoting purely competitive events. A shorter route for racers
as well as a relaxed competitive atmosphere provided an ideal setting for
casual teams hoping to partake in the signature UBC event.
Featured in Longboat 2015 was a corporate heat in addition to the
student, faculty and alumni races. Georgia Sakurai, Sponsorship Assistant
Director, explained that "Day ofthe Longboat offers a team-building for
local companies. It's a chance for external organizations to see the events
that students are involved with and engage with the UBC community."
Organizers plan to build upon the corporate heat in future events which
was considered a benchmark success for this year.
To accommodate hundreds of participant teams, tremendous planning
and organizing was required by UBC Recreation. The largest Longboat
organizing team to date was comprised of over 100 volunteers led by two
directors and nine assistant directors.
Directors Stefanie Suderman and Lauren La Prairie planned for
months prior to Longboat weekend including undertaking a 40-hour week
workload since September. Suderman explained that her group wanted
to take every different aspect ofthe event to the next level with many
organizing team members staying at Jericho from 5 a.m. until 7 p.m. on
Saturday and Sunday.
The event this year had a distinct aspect of school spirit tied in. This
was possibly related to the buzz around UBC's Centennial celebrations.
Day ofthe Longboat continues to be a defining memory ofthe UBC
experience for thousands of students each year. Key developments
initiated by this year's organizing team created a record-breaking event for
all UBC students to be proud of — especially as centennial celebrations
continues on campus. 'M TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2015   |    FEATURE
pllOtOO by BRANDON LAI, KOBY MICHAELS AND JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS
Jackson Runkle
Contributor
It's a crisp fall morning, the sun is shimmering on the water at Jericho
Beach and you can hear the pump-up music blasting from UBC
Recreation's sound system. This is my fourth year at UBC, but my first Day
ofthe Longboat.
I'm with a team of people from all different faculties and friend groups.
We've organized ourselves to wear the Thunderbird blue and gold and
painted each other's faces. It's fitting with our team's main goals as we
signed up in the "Just for Fun" category, after all. Or so we thought.
After chatting with an opposing team, they seemed to think that if
we're racing this early that we must be in the competitive category. I could
tell they were in the competitive category between the war chants and
bulging muscles. I was wondering why they were here and not rowing for
the Canadian national team.
So at 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning, standing in line to run and jump
into our longboat, our team realized we were competing against UBC's
die-hard athletes.
When we pushed off, nautical mayhem exploded between the boats.
Luckily, our team managed to grind ahead of another longboat we collided
with and set off ahead ofthe pack. Our team captain kept us rowing in time
with a war-like "STROKE!" chant. Since it was so early, we glided across
the glassy ocean without threat of capsizing.
As we set off for the final marker on our race, we gave a valiant effort
to pass the overly-enthused athletes ahead of us. Even with power-strokes
and cheers of encouragement, we couldn't quite gain on them before the
finish.
As we approached the far beach to grab our baton, we almost got
soaked. Our runner leapt out ofthe moving vessel as soon as he could
reach land which sent the left side leaning dangerously close to sea level.
Luckily, our squad managed to stabilize ourselves before we lost any more
balance.
We did place second though. As our gong rang out along the shore,
we felt a collective sense of accomplishment. We had a lot of fun and
although some of us didn't know one another very well, we were closer
because of it.
I guess the whole point of an event like Day ofthe Longboat is to
promote bonding between students through an activity that wouldn't
be easily accessible to people outside ofthe school. I have to say, it
was a really cool event and one I wouldn't have actively sought out on
my own. The team component encouraged you to reach out and get
to know people you may not have met otherwise and it guarantees an
exciting, if unexpected, experience. '21
Universite d'Ottawa
University of Ottawa
X
afog *M~m
Study Law
in the National Capital
Obtain a uOttawa JD degree in either English or French:
• Rigorous and stimulating training
• Diverse internship and practicum opportunities
• Concentrations and specializations available
Take advantage of our many combined programs, including,
• Opportunities to earn both common Law and civil law degrees;
• A dual JD program with US Universities, allowing you to obtain Canadian
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University's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.
We also offer LLM and PhD programs.
Application deadline: November 1,2015
For more information: www.commonlaw.uOttawa.ca 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
MUSIC//
Missy D releases hip-hop/soul album
Diane Mutabaruka has been performing all over Vancouver both with her band and solo.
= HOTO JOSH UAMEDICOFF/THE UBYSSEY
Elena Volohova
Staff Writer
"Give me a microphone and I'm
in my happy zone," is no ordinary
phrase to hear. It only proves that
Missy D is no ordinary girl. Hip-
hop and rap artist, femcee, singer,
songwriter, slam poet, member of
UBC's Laydy Jams and combined
major in sciences - this is Missy D.
Diane Mutabaruka, also known as
Missy D, is a vibrant mix of cultures,
languages and interests. Growing
up in Zimbabwe, she is of Rwandan
and Cote d'lvoire origin. Bilingual in
English and French, she draws her
inspiration from classics like Jean de
La Fontaine and Nina Simone as well
as from contemporaries like Missy
Elliot and J. Cole. She has performed
on various stages like UBC Totem's
Got Talent, Imagine Day Pep
Rallies, UBC Alumni Achievement
Awards and the Chancellor's lunch
reception. She has also worked on
multiple occasions with the Black
Vinyl Project, AMS, The Calendar
and200BPM.
"Name a place downtown and
we've performed there," said
Mutabaruka about her work with
the Laydy Jams.
Mutabaruka's relationship
with music began early in life.
Coming from a musical household,
she always loved music. As she
started to write poetry, she fell in
love with hip-hop. When the first
performance came along the same
year, she also realized her love for
performing.
"That was exactly what I
wanted to do ... there was no stage
fright, I felt the microphone was
my friend," she said.
Along the way, music has shaped
Mutabaruka's life. Hip-hop helped
her overcome the insecurities of
transitioning between languages and
changing schools as well as finding
herself in university. On coming to
UBC and leaving home for the first
time, she said, "Either I was going
to be somebody or I was going to be
somebody in the crowd." Graduating
in May 2015, Mutabaruka was
starting a new chapter in her life.
"I felt so much pain... and since
music has always been my therapy, I
started writing."
As a result, she ended up
recording her debut single entitled
Too Many Feelings.
"This song was what I needed to
hear at the time and it helped me a
lot," said Mutabaruka. "I thought my
music could help someone else and I
knew that I needed to put the album
out."
Describing her style as
"uplifting rap and soul,"
Mutabaruka puts her heart and
feelings into her songs.
Her debut album will be
entitled When Music Hits You,
You Feel No Pain, reflecting on
Mutabaruka's relationship with
music.
"That's how I feel when I listen
to music. That's how I feel when
I make music. That's how I feel
when I am performing... I'm in my
happy place," she said.
Keeping her mind open,
Mutabaruka is just at the very
beginning of this stage in her life. '21
VIDEO //
Hip-flipping with Nardwuar
IT'S OUR FAVOURITE TIME OF FEAR.
\
FRIGHT NIGHTS
WESTERN CANADA'S SCARIEST HAUNT
POSSESSES I
upgrade to
a RAPID PAST
^..^   *       i. J\.   .    TT
and 5Ri<T
FAf
fALKUS
M$>i3
E-PLAYLAND PNECLIPS
OCT 9-NOV1
(OPEN SELECT NIGHTS)
Admission includes unlimited access to
7 HAUNTED HOUSES
15 RIDES, INCLUDING THE BEAST
E MONSTERS OF SCHLOCK
GRUESOME COMEDY ACT
RADIANT HEAT FIRE
PERFORMANCE
.VE ON FRIGHTPASSES AT:
M   FRHMGHTS.CA
. jnsters of Schlock will not be performing Oct 9-11
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Nardwuar's Video Vault showed some of his most popular interview moments.
Alex Lenz
Contributor
OPENS THIS WEEKEND!
Vancouver's legendary music
reporter, Nardwuar the Human
Serviette, graced UBC students
with his presence at CiTR on
Friday, October 2. "Nardwuar's
Video Vault" was an event
showcasing video clips from
Nardwuar's prolific career in
interviewing musicians and
politicians. The event was
free, open to all and offered
a bevy of weirdness that was
uncharacteristic ofthe usual day-
to-day happenings at UBC.
For those of you unfamiliar
with the quirky workings of
Nardwuar, imagine a short,
middle-aged man with long,
scraggly dark hair and attire
straight out of a Wes Anderson
film. His voice is unusually high-
pitched. He sports large-framed
glasses, a signature tartan hat and
tartan pants as well. Embedded
within this art project of a man is
an Energizer Bunny who seems to
never run out of energy - ever.
As a prominent music journalist
based out of Vancouver, Nardwuar
conducts interviews with just
about everyone he can get to
speak into his microphone. His
interview style is characterized by
his extensive research, his peculiar
gifts that he gives to interviewees
and his hyperbolic personality.
As a MuchMusic host, Nardwuar
reigned in the heydays ofthe
90s music scene and maintains
a consistently firm grip on
Vancouver's pop culture scene.
The event took place outside
just outside of CiTR's office in
the new SUB and lasted about an
hour and a half. There were always
about 50 people present as viewers
were able to come and go as they
pleased. Nardwuar began the event
by telling a humorous narrative
about his run-ins with Courtney
Love, the lead singer of Hole and
Kurt Cobain's wife at the time.
"Nardwuar's Video Vault"
was somewhat of an ode to
Nardwuar's humble beginnings
at CiTR and UBC. CiTR is UBC's
on-campus radio station which
offers alternative programming
to the Greater Vancouver Area.
Nardwuar began his career in
music journalism at the station
and still hosts a show at CiTR
every Friday from 3:30 to 5
p.m. Throughout the event, he
consistently encouraged people
to become involved with CiTR
and Discorder Magazine (CiTR's
affiliated music magazine).
At one point, Nardwuar stated
that CiTR saved his life. When
he was 31 years old, he suffered a
brain hemorrhage which had him
hospitalized in critical care. He
thanked CiTR for their support
during this difficult time. It was
at this point in the event that
it became evidently clear that
Nardwuar is infinitely passionate
about what he does and stops at
nothing to bring forth new and
exciting programming to viewers.
In one clip, Damon Albarn
of Blur asks Nardwuar why he
calls himself a Human Serviette.
Nardwuar casually responds by
saying, "Because I help serve the
youth."
Beyond Nardwuar's unique
humour lies a man who has
been criticized and undermined
by mass media for his comedic
and light-hearted approach to
interviews. In one portion ofthe
event dubbed "Nard Danger," the
audience was exposed to moments
of Nardwuar confronting the
nasty side ofthe media. In one
clip, we see him being bullied
by David from Blur. David takes
Nardwuar's hat and glasses and
torments him. In another clip, we
see Nardwuar being dragged away
by Stephen Harper's security
team after asking Harper to do the
"Hip Flip." It should be noted that
every other prominent politician
agreed to the "Hip Flip" including
Justin Trudeau and Thomas
Mulcair.
One ofthe central dogmas
of Nardwuar's interviews is the
reception that interviewees have
to Nardwuar himself. Nardwuar
conducts his interviews as such
that the gut reactions to his antics
become central to the interview.
Because really, who isn't struck by
someone who refers to themselves
as a Human Serviette?
Doot Doola Doot Doo. Doot
Doo. 1 // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
FIRST NATIONS //
Land acknowledgement
nothing but lip service
MOIRAWARBURTON
Op-ed
The Board of Governors meeting
at UBCO on Tuesday, September
29 included a presentation from
Dr. Jeanette Armstrong, assistant
professor of Indigenous Studies
in Kelowna. She told the board
members about the Indigenous
Studies program they have
cultivated at the Okanagan campus
and spoke about how important
community-based programming
is. It's hard but worth it because
there are many people, in that
area particularly, living with the
aftereffects ofthe carnage incurred
on generations of Canadians by the
residential schools system. They
need to be engaged in programs
like this.
John Montalbano had the
distinction of being the only
person in the room who asked
Dr. Armstrong a question in
the discussion period following
her presentation. He said that
he had been to a lot of land
acknowledgement ceremonies
and that they all felt hollow
somehow. However, the resigning ofthe agreement between
the Okanagan First Nations and
UBC on the tenth anniversary
of this campus, he said, felt
meaningful. This one felt genuine.
Montalbano asked her, "How
can we learn from that? In your
opinion, is there anything we can
take away from yesterday and
apply it to other places?"
I know what he meant.
Reasons are rarely given as to why
we do the land acknowledgement
(the Board doesn't do one at
all). If we never explain why
we say that acknowledgement,
when will anyone learn? It has
become a lip service — you and
I have heard the word unceded
so many times that anything we
may have learned from it has long
since been washed away in the
repetitions.
Armstrong told him that
there is community engagement
here. First Nations leaders
are able to communicate why
their communities should care
about this university and what
it does for them. It's about real
engagement from the institution
to try and understand.
She looked around at the rest
ofthe Board - the cell phone
glows, the open laptops, the
empty seats with their occupants
pouring coffee and picking out
= ILE PHOTO COLIN CHIA/THE UBYSSEY
pieces of banana bread. "I want to
get to know each and every one of
you," she said.
We learn French. We know
the face ofthe Queen. We can
recite the names of Jaques
Cartier, Samuel de Champlain
and Captain Vancouver - do you
remember the name of a single
Musqueam chief? I don't. This
is a university. Coming to terms
with the fact that our country
You and I have
heard the word
unceded so many
times that anything we may have
learned from it has
long since been
washed away."
is built on the broken backs of
others is a challenge like no other
because it forces you to not only
see others differently, but to see
yourself differently.
UBC is not like other
universities. It squats on the land
of others with powerful limbs
and moneyed robes. Because of
this, it is in a unique position
to challenge and teach its
community in a way that most
other universities don't. It can
give tangible examples of why
empathy, respect and meaningful
understanding of other
perspectives are valuable skills
to have — not just acknowledging
them, but really understanding
them and being able to relate
them to your own experiences.
The land acknowledgement is
a good start, but there is so much
more than just repeating words
that could be done.
Moira Warburton is a fifth-year
political science major and Web
News Editor at The Ubyssey. 1
YOU HAVE
OPINIONS
1t2t'a hear 'em.
opinion@L
OH LOOK, IT'S THE FUCKING ELEVATOR THING AGAIN //
Last Words: Goddamned elevator bullshit
Free fallin'
"What can I say?" asked Andrew
Parr, managing director of Student
Housing and Hospitality Services,
after acknowledging that workers
failed to follow safety protocol
after an elevator in the brand new
Ponderosa Commons free fell.
A lot more than that!
With construction projects
dotting campus like fleas on
a mangy stray and university
funds sapping student morale
straight out of our wallets, it is
disconcerting to say the least that
the safety of new structures may
be lacking.
Student Housing and elevator
company officials seemed rather
unfazed by the students injured
by falling elevators. In the words
ofthe Kone elevator spokesman
Patrick O'Connell, he insists the
students were not "free falling,"
but just "feelpng] the sensation of
coming down" or "calibratpng]."
This is the same person who
insisted that the effect was "very
rare and almost never happens."
The simple reality is that
with Student Housing charging
students exorbitant rates to live
on campus and passing other
residence construction costs onto
the rest ofthe university, there is
no excuse for something as crucial
as an elevator behaving in such an
unsafe manner. Even if living costs
were anywhere near reasonable,
one would expect basic safety
measures to be in place.
That UBC has such a cavalier
attitude toward nightmarish
scenarios described in this week's
cover story is somewhere between
discouraging and downright
frightening.
Come one, come all
Med schools around the world are
moving away from only accepting
students who have suffered through
organic chemistry and physiology
while they move towards accepting
students of all backgrounds. No
longer are medical students expected
to learn the entirety of medical
knowledge in their first two years,
and then start clinical training.
What top schools like the
University of Michigan and the
University of California are doing is
teaching communication, teamwork
and problem-solving, rather
than rote memorization. UBC is
considering doing the same, and
we're onboard.
Science prerequisites should be
done away with to allow students
from more diverse backgrounds,
schools and interests to become
doctors. Organic chemistry
professors may get a bit lonely
without med school hopefuls to
torture, but they'll survive.
= ILE PHOTO JULIANYU/THE UBYSSEY
FREE BZZR
Free beer has been mysteriously
showing up around campus
surrounding football games, and it's
doing a hell of a job getting people
stoked on the Thunderbirds.
Homecoming saw a record-
breaking attendance of almost
7,000 follwed by last weekend's
attedance of 2,500 fans who
showed up to the Thunderbird's
loss to Saskatchewan. Those are
bigger numbers than UBC football
has seen in a while and the free
beer is certainly playing a part in
drawing a crowd. But it's sort of
strange, isn't it?
Some rich person buying
college kids free beer so that they
go to football games made a few of
us initially uneasy. But honestly,
who cares? If they're buying, let's
be honest, we're drinking.
"Last Words" is The Ubyssey's
weekly, informal editorial column
centred on current events at UBC. 13
have a great idea to
build community during
UBCs Centennial?
$1000 Community Grants available to be won.
Apply for a UTown@UBC Community Grant, and you could be awarded
up to $1000 to create a fun and inspiring community-building project on campus!
This year we are pleased to celebrate 100 years of UBC with a
special Centennial Grant category.
Information available at utown.ubc.ca/grants. // SPORTS+RE C
SOFTBALL //
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015
What's next for Alana Westerhof:
life after the Thunderbirds
= HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Alana Westerhof hopes to help coach the Thunderbirds with her fellow teammate, Carlyn Shimizu, this January.
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Henry Allan
Contributor
August 27, 2015 - it's 8 p.m.
in Enschede, Holland. Alana
Westerhof walks through the
rain across the Tex-Town Tigers'
home field. She walks up to the
soaked pitcher's mound which
has the consistency of soup. She
stands in the middle of it trying
to wipe down the ball with her
jersey. Once the ball is dry, or as
dry as it's going to be, she shifts
her focus towards home plate.
Westerhof holds the ball
straight out in front of her. Then
she winds the ball back in a
quick windmill and launches
it at home plate. As she lunges
forward, the mud on the mound
splashes up her white knee-high
socks staining and soaking them
through. The rain covers the fact
that Westerhof is on the verge of
tears — this is her last game and
not at all how she'd envisioned it.
Westerhof became the first
Thunderbird Softball player to
go pro when she suited up for
the Tigers this summer. Starting
where she left off with UBC, she
quickly became one ofthe Dutch
league's leaders in home-runs,
recorded 72 strikeouts and a
no-hitter, was selected to the
all-star game and even garnered
attention from the Dutch national
team. But she left Holland midway through the season. So why
did she leave? What's next for
Westerhof?
Westerhof is now enrolled in
UBC's Bachelor's of Education
program. "I grew up always
wanting to be a teacher," said
Westerhof. She applied to the
program in January right after
receiving her BA in geography
and psychology. "I told [Tex-
Town], 'I really want to play for
you, but I applied for the teaching
program and if I do get accepted,
I'm going to leave early.'"
Otherwise Westerhof would still
be there, helping the Tigers battle
their way through the playoffs.
During the 2016 season,
Westerhof won't play for the
Thunderbirds either. She has
exhausted her eligibility, but
still hopes she can help out. The
current Thunderbirds pitching
coach will be on maternity-leave
come the season's start in January.
Westerhof hopes she might be able
to step in and help out alongside
former teammate, Carlyn Shimizu,
who will also return to mentor the
Thunderbirds. Coaching is nothing
new for Westerhof.
"I've coached all growing up,
and I really enjoy it," she said.
In the past, she has coached her
former club teams in Delta and,
more recently, the junior Tex-Town
Tigers. "I'm now in a teaching
program hoping to help kids
learn... so I definitely see myself
coaching... But I wouldn't want
to make a career out of it I don't
think."
The end goal and dream job
for Westerhof is still to be an
elementary school teacher.
Even as she makes headway
with her eventual career, the door
is still wide open for Westerhof to
play again. The Tigers' coaching
staff has made it very clear she is
welcome back.
"I'm still in contact with every
single one of them, and they
are all encouraging me to come
back and play with them again,"
said Westerhof. The Tigers even
told her to watch out for other
Thunderbirds who might be
interested in playing pro.
After she thrived in the Dutch
pro-league, the national team
suggested Westerhof look into
getting her Dutch citizenship
(Westerhof's grandparents
were born in Holland) so she
could represent the team at next
year's world championships — a
tournament to be played in Surrey,
B.C.
In the meantime, Westerhof
plays in a local women's rec league
for the North Delta Sunfire keeping
her limber should she decide to
take Tex-Town or the Netherlands
up on their offers.
"As long as I'm healthy, I
think it's always an option," said
Westerhof. "If I have a summer
free ... I'm always open to the
opportunity of going back to
Holland and playing for them
again." 'M
Love sports? You should write for us.
SPORTS@UBYSSEY.CA
SportOpolis
2862 West 4th Ave @ MacDonald
Vancouver BCV6K1R2
604.732.1564 www.Sportopolis.ca
Your local
destination
for sports!
Rugby
Soccer
Volleyball
Yoga
Training
More TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6,2015   |    SPORTS    |   11
CLUBS //
UBC competitive sports clubs begin inaugural season
Jenny Tang
Contributor
After the sports reviews two years
ago resulted in teams being stripped
of their varsity level status, UBC
Athletics and Recreation have
collaborated with nine clubs to
form an alternative competitive
stream for AMS-recognized sports
clubs. The stream will allow the
clubs to compete under the UBC
Thunderbird name in competitive
non-varsity leagues. The new
student-run teams will be able to
compete for UBC in sports that are
not available as varsity sports at the
university.
"It was shown that there was
a need for the competitive club
stream," said UBC Athletics and
Recreation Competitive Clubs
Coordinator Erin Connelly-Reed.
"It came from a need for further
representation from the university."
Reed's position as the liaison
between the sports teams and UBC
Athletics and Recreation has only
been in place since July. However,
the idea has been in the works since
May 2012. The club stream was then
suggested in 2013 and was officially
implemented in September 2015.
After the initial review in 2013 to
secure varsity status for the current
sports teams, the AMS conducted
a survey which identified support
services needed and preferred for
their competitive club strand. The
following February, there was an
open invitation for clubs to apply for
competitive club status.
Many factors came into
consideration when choosing
teams for the new stream such as
competitive success, progression in
the team, support for competitions
and training, community support,
traditions, partnerships with UBC
Athletics and Recreation and
representation ofthe university
mission.
In 2014, the successful clubs were
named.
Unlike varsity level athletics,
UBC Thunderbirds Sports Clubs are
student-led and compete in non-CIS
and non-NAIA competitions. Each
team has to comprise of a club leader,
a financial officer, a marketing and
communications officer and a travel
and safety officer. UBC Athletics and
Recreation also requires that they
be financially responsible to be in a
competitive league.
Varsity level athletics will not
be affected. UBC Athletics and
Recreation are more interested in
being able to provide more support
for non-varsity level teams.
"At the end ofthe year, we're
looking for competitive clubs to be
successful on the pitch, or in the
pool, or on the ski hill and have
represented UBC to the best of their
abilities," said Reed.
=HOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY PHOTO JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS/THE UBYSSEY
Currently there are nine competative sports clubs: men's lacross, fencing, sailing, synchronized swimming, tennis, triathalon, men's and women's ultimate and wrestling.
The clubs that have been
selected are alpine skiing, fencing,
field lacrosse, nordic skiing, sailing,
synchronized swimming, tennis,
ultimate frisbee and wrestling.
Previous considerations were given
to the women's Softball team who
had since appealed to the sports
review and were restored to varsity
status at the beginning ofthe
summer.
"The hardest part is that all
the clubs have different schedules
throughout the season and I'm the
one competitive club coordinator. So
it's probably just [about] getting all
the clubs together in this inaugural
year."
The aforementioned clubs
were selected in March 2014 by a
committee of AMS and Athletics
and Recreation Department
representatives. They were already
competing in a variety of community
or inter-collegiate competitions.
Others such as coaches, UBC
administrators, Thunderbird Alumni
and student leaders contributed as
well in the implementation.
With this new status, the teams
will now receive support from
UBC Athletics and Recreation and
services such as coach honoraria,
improved access to training facilities
and opportunities for student
leadership training. These are all
key goals that UBC aims for with
this new stream. However, they
cannot compete in CIS or NAIA
conferences or championships.
There are still over 30 AMS sport
clubs for students to enjoy. However,
UBC Athletics and Recreation are
looking to expand their competitive
club repertoire and have more teams
representing UBC in competitive
intercollegiate leagues. There is a
recruiting period during October and
an application period in November
for potential clubs to apply for
competitive level status.
The potential sports clubs in
question would have to be backed by
the AMS. They must also show that
they are in a competitive structure
which can be shown by being in
a league or the opportunity to
attend provincial or national level
competition.
"Every year we'll have the
open application period for those
AMS clubs and hopefully we'll
double or triple our numbers,"
said Reed. "We're looking to have
more options available because this
program is for any UBC student."
As the various sports seasons
start, the stream is already proving
to be effective. The UBC men's
lacrosse won their first game 7-0
two weeks ago.
With this stream, UBC Athletics
and Recreation aims for three main
goals - to raise UBC's reputation
as a leader in competitive sport,
to grow the UBC Thunderbird
legacy by continuing to attract
top-student athletes and
to encourage campus-wide
participation in sports.
"As a competitive club, these
athletes are now recognized as
UBC athletes under this umbrella.
We're looking to bring all UBC
students under that umbrella."
For general inquiries into team
try outs, visit the UBC Athletics and
Recreation website at or contact sport.
clubs@ubc.ca. %
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for details. 12    I    COMIC + GAMES    I   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2015
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Justin is ready to lead. Are you ready to vote?
You can do it NOW - at the old SUB. Your vote matters!
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SEPTEMBER29 ANSWERS
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COMIC PATRICKMURRYAND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY

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