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The Ubyssey Aug 25, 2015

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Array AUGUST25.2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEII
SHELVED SINCE 1918
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NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
No donor found for
the new Aquatic
Centre
Are online musicals the
face of the future?
Editorial: Where are our
student reps?
Adam Shell, UBC's
new bench boss
FRACTURE
AND
FALLOUT
PAGES 6 &7
"At no time did I intend to impinge her academic freedom.
-John Montalbano, Board of Governors Chair // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18,2015
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
SEPT, SAT 05
////
SIGMA CHI TOGA PARTY 9:00 PM @ WESBROOK
Hosted by Sigma Chi. Bed sheets make great toga substitutes
and make sure to bring your UBC ID.
FREE
SEPT, MON 07
////
GARDEN PARTY 6:00 PM @ UBC FARM
The Calender is hosting a garden party the the UBC farm. Enjoy
a garden full of hidden wonders with old friends.
$5 Tier Two, $20 Final Tier
SEPT
////
UBC REC FREE WEEK @ UBC REC
From September 14-20 enjoy a variety of different classes for
free. No experience required!
Free
ON THE COVER
Breaking
stuff is fun.
PHOTO/ART BY
Kosta Prodanovic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor
Will McDonald
coordinating@u byssey.ca
Design Editor
Aiken Lao
3rinteditor@ubyssey.cs
Web Developer
Peter Siemens
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Emma Partridge &
Moira Warburton
iews@ubysseyca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@u byssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
3hoto@ubyssey.es
Opinions + Blog Editor
Jack Hauen
opinions@ubyssey.ca
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
featu res@u byssey.ca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@ubyssey.ca
Ad Sales
Kenneth Chang
advertising®
j byssey.ca
Accounts
Abigail Pelaez
accounts@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It Is
published every Monday anc
Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Socleiy. We are an autonomous, democratically rur
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versiiy of British Columbia. Al
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AUGUST25.2015 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUEI
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PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Ghoussoub is a professor of mathematics who has demanded for transparency in regards to Gutpa's departure.
Professor Nassif Ghoussoub on Gupta's departure
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
In the scandal that has engulfed
UBC since university president
Arvind Gupta resigned several
weeks ago, one professor has
made his frustration very public.
Nassif Ghoussoub has used
his personal blog and Twitter
account to demand transparency
surrounding Gupta's departure,
defend his colleagues' right to
academic freedom and even call
for John Montalbano, chair of the
Board of Governors, to resign.
Ghoussoub, a professor of
mathematics who served on the
board as a faculty representative
from 2008-2013, has long had
a frank style of communication
which runs counter to the
careful diplomatic language that
normally characterizes university
affairs in Point Grey. He has
used his platform to advocate
for a faculty housing plan to
allow the university to attract
top talent and clash with the
federal government over research
funding, among other causes.
But his public persona was
never a given. Ghoussoub
came to UBC in the late 1970s
to conduct graduate studies
and has been here ever since.
Until the early 1990s, though,
Ghoussoub said he was focused
solely on his academic work and
avoided faculty committees and
administrative issues.
"I was very possessive of my
research time," he said. "Most
faculty members are—that's why
they don't stick their necks out
too much."
Starting in the 1990s,
Ghoussoub became engaged
in the fight to bring research
funding and academic prestige
to western Canada through the
creation of the Pacific Institute
for the Mathematical Sciences
and later the Banff International
Research Center.
"Western Canada needed to
develop its own infrastructure and I
knew this wasn't going to happen if
one university did it trying to stand
on its own," Ghoussoub said. "You
don't have the concentration here
as in southern Ontario or Montreal,
where you have four universities all
at one subway station."
The Pacific Institute brought
together universities from
across western Canada and
the northwest United States
to provide the critical mass of
academics needed to attract
serious attention. Similarly, the
Banff Center hosts 48 weeklong
workshops a year on different
kinds of quantitative science in
order to draw professors who
otherwise would not make the
trek to western Canada.
But even as his profile rose
through work on these projects
and others, Ghoussoub said his
non-academic writing simply
began as a lark. Sick with a fever
five years ago, Ghoussoub said he
was messing around on his laptop
when he decided to create a blog,
Piece of Mind.
"I was restless, so I started
writing and I never stopped," he
explained. "It's not like it was a
conscious decision."
For someone who clearly
expresses his convictions and
studies one of the most empirical
of the sciences, Ghoussoub wants
to discourage reading too much
into his emergence as a faculty
advocate.
"Sometimes I feel all the
decisions I've made in life were
just random," Ghoussoub, whose
current research focuses on
partial differential equations,
said.
Born into the Lebanese
diaspora in Africa, Ghoussoub's
mother sent him from his
birthplace in French Sudan,
now Mali, to boarding school in
Lebanon at the age of two after
his nanny fell ill with small pox.
He studied in Lebanon during the
years leading up to that country's
disastrous civil war and moved
to Paris for university on the
heels of the violent 1968 student
protests which gave voice to a
fervent antiauthoritarianism
brewing among the younger
generation. After graduation he
toyed with the idea of accepting
a teaching position at a Beirut
University — "I would be dead
probably," he said — before
coming to the United States
to do his graduate work in a
country still reeling from the
Vietnam War. Arriving at UBC in
Vancouver he found himself in
the company of American draft
dodgers who had sought refuge
north of the border.
"I was raised in anarchy
wherever I went," Ghoussoub
said. "I feel some people are
compelled to feel turmoil and
change more deeply than others.
I categorize myself as very
sensitive to societal events."
Ghoussoub has certainly been
affected by the recent turmoil on
campus, pining for a return to
the stability of former president
Stephen Toope's term.
"The guy is a class act, a true
intellectual, so I really miss
Stephen," he said. "We all miss
Stephen Toope now."
Ghoussoub also got to know
former president Gupta through
their work at MITACS, a
foundation that creates academic
partnerships with the private
sector, and would like to see him
returned to the presidency. More
broadly, Ghoussoub wants a board
more attuned to the university
setting rather than the business
world.
Gupta, Ghoussoub said,
received hundreds of letters from
minority students heartened
to see a non-white leader at a
major institution like UBC. He
doubts the psychological impact
of unceremoniously dismissing
Gupta — on both the university
community and those who looked
up to him—was even considered
by the current board leadership.
"We need humanists on the
board, not just rich people and
bankers, who are fine — but we
need humanists too," Ghoussoub
said, suggesting businesspeople
were not properly attuned to the
community.
"All of the sudden—bang! —
he is gone," Ghoussoub said of
the jarring impact of Gupta's
departure. "I'm sorry...the bankers
didn't see it!"
As for why he is one of
only a handful of professors
speaking publicly about the issue,
Ghoussoub said faculty workload
is only part of the equation.
"People really aren't very
courageous," he said. "Maybe I'm
just crazy, but life is too short. If
you don't stand up for a few basic
principles that you believe in,
what is it good for?" % // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, AUGUST25,2015
CO-OP//
Reviewing the Arts co-op program
Edmund Henry
Contributor
As an Arts student, finding a
job after you graduate without
previous workplace experience
can be frustratingly difficult. The
UBC Arts co-op provides the
experience that might help the job
hunt.
Co-op participants get
experience relevant to their field
at various placements while
completing their degree. As a
result, students in the program
receive 12 to 16 months of paid
work experience by the time they
graduate.
With the new school year right
around the corner, we took a look
at some of the data the program
gathered over the past school year.
A majority of the placements
are within non-profit (27.5
per cent), private businesses
(26.3 per cent), and provincial
agency sectors (23.2 per cent).
Placements within the federal
government followed at 12.9 per
cent.
While work terms are offered
abroad, placements for this past
year were mostly in the local area,
with 82.4 per cent of placements
taking place in British Columbia,
and 90.8 per cent in Canada.
The program grew this year
to 8 per cent in overall student
participation; a total of 448
undergraduate and graduate
students were involved in the
program.
Arts co-op gives participants the opportunity for paid work while they complete their degree.
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Aaron Sanderson, alumni of
the program, was financing his
education on his own and found
himself in need of workplace
experience in order to afford the
coming semester.
"I knew what subject matter I
was interested in, but the actual
practical applications of that
subject was a whole other thing,
so I thought by going to co-op I
would get a chance to refine that
more before I graduated," said
Sanderson.
The program also provides
support for students that include
improving resumes, staging
practice interviews and polishing
cover letters.
"Without the awareness of
the job market and all of that
huge support, I think it's really
hard, especially for arts students
to be able to learn all that and to
get that access to all those job
opportunities," said Shannon
Hogan, an international relations
major currently on a work term at
the Litigation Management and
Resolution Branch of Aboriginal
Affairs in Calgary.
However, while the program
is beneficial for students getting
work placements, being accepted
into one may prove difficult.
"It's pretty competitive, it's
quite similar to real life in terms
of when you're having to search
for jobs ... you're competing
against other really qualified coop students," said Amber Dukart,
an Asian studies major who is
working her first placement at
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese
Garden for the summer. "It
requires a lot of hard work to get
that first job."
Also, students can't always be
selective on the location of their
work placements, which may be
troublesome for those without the
finances to relocate. In addition,
while the placements are paid,
students enrolled in a co-op work
term still pay what's essentially a
course fee associated with the job.
However, co-op alumnus, Annie
Tsay, says it is all worth it.
"It helped me discover what I
enjoy doing and what I didn't like
doing and just the opportunity to
try out different sectors," said Tsay.
"You may not land the perfect job
or the most ideal job right away but
you never know how one position
may lead to other opportunities." 'M
AQUATIC CENTRE//
UBC Athletics set to absorb $11.4 million of Aquatic Centre project cost
The Aquatic Centre is set to be completed in the fall of 2016.
Moira Warburton
News Editor
UBC Athletics is set to absorb 29
per cent, or $11.4 million dollars, of
the cost of the new Aquatic Centre
construction project due to a lack
of donors being found.
"[UBC Athletics has] a prospects
stream and they're looking at a
list of potential donors, but they
don't have any major commitments
at this point," said John Metras,
director of UBC Infrastructure
and Development.
In lieu of a donor being found
to cover the majority of the $11.4
million, UBC Athletics has taken
out a loan of that amount from the
university which they will pay back
with an annual interest rate of 5.75
per cent.
The original Board of Governors document detailing the budget
stated that "significant fundraising
work has been undertaken to date,"
and that the UBC Development
Office is "confident in the ability to
raise $2.5-4 million and is working
to identify a naming donor for the
facility to cover the balance."
However, currently no significant
amount of funding has been raised.
69 per cent of the project cost, or
$27.5 million, was agreed to come
from land development revenue,
or money that comes from the
profits made by the university
off development (of housing,
for example) that occurs on
university land.
"That made up a large portion
of the project," said Metras. "The
remaining number was meant to
come from fundraising — understanding, though, that if they
weren't successful in fundraising
that the Athletics budget could
absorb the cost to pay back a loan
over a period of time."
Metras said that even if a donor
is not found until after the comple-
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
tion of the project, the university
and UBC Athletics would continue
working together to find a donor.
"We've always had this back-up
plan, and Athletics has the capacity to do that," said Metras.
According to Metras, it's not
unusual for a project to rely this
heavily on donor funding — Allard
Hall balanced more than half its
budget with donations.
As well, "the performance for
the project is quite good, in terms
of the revenue-generating capability," Metras said.
The Aquatic Centre is set to be
completed in the fall of 2016.1
SERVICES //
Satisfaction for
ESP services
FILE PHOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
Opinions on ESP services have improved.
Bill Situ
Contributor
According to the 2015 Academic
Experience Survey Report, student
satisfaction for the services
provided by Enrolment Services
Professionals (ESP) has improved
overall in comparison to last year.
71 per cent of UBC students
who completed the survey
expressed that they were satisfied
with ESP services, which was a
seven per cent increase from last
year. The percentage of students
who strongly agreed that ESP
services were satisfactory went up
from 19 per cent last year to 38 per
cent this year.
"To have 71 per cent of our
people speak positively and 15
per cent neutrally to our service
levels, so over 85 per cent of people
that are neutral or positive to the
services that we offer, is quite
high," said Darran Fernandez,
Director of UBC Enrolment
Services.
According to Fernandez, the
current system that Enrolment
Services operates on, where every
student has an assigned ESP, has
only been in implementation for
the past three years. He attributes
the improved results of this year to
how Enrolment Services has now
adjusted more fully to its current
system.
"Learning takes time, as well as
other things just becoming more
streamlined, so I'd say the first
year, there was still the confusion...
whereas now, it's a bit more of a
cultural norm," said Fernandez.
Previously, Enrolment Services
consisted of separate units
responsible for different areas of
student services, which Fernandez
describes as having been very
inefficient in that it constantly
redirected student inquiries. In the
current system, a single ESP can
address the inquiries of his or her
assigned students.
While ESP services have
achieved a noticeably higher level
of satisfaction from students than
last year, there were still one sixth
of UBC students who did not know
that they have an ESP.
Fernandez said that the fraction
of students who were not aware
of ESP services is possibly due to
the fact that those students were
not in need of them. He said that
this is not indicative of any flaws in
Enrolment Services, but rather that
there is room for improvement.
Fernandez hopes to continue
increasing student recognition for
Enrolment Services. Some possible
initiatives in achieving this include
continuing the use of information
sessions as well as distributing
Enrolment Services brochures on
public buses. 'M NEWS    I   TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2015
CENTENNIAL//
What's in store for UBC centennial celebrations?
Karen Wang
Contributor
On September 30, 2015, UBC will
be turning 100. The date marks the
official centennial anniversary of
the first day of classes at UBC.
In commemoration of the
milestone, UBC's year-long
centennial celebrations will kick
off with a ceremonial service for
the official opening of the Robert
H. Lee Alumni Centre, followed
by events and festivities in the
afternoon. The official closing of
the centennial is projected to take
place during Alumni Weekend
2016, which will be on May 28.
"[The centennial is] a chance
for us to celebrate and grow
awareness of UBC's impact on
the world and highlight the
contributions of our students,
our alumni, staff and faculty,"
said Gerald Calderon of the
Centennial Office.
One of the events planned
is a large scale photo operation
recreating an iconic photograph
from the end of the Great Trek in
1922, where students gathered to
form the letters "UBC." This year,
current students will be enlisted,
with the help of AMS president
Aaron Bailey, to spell out "UBC
100."
Last year, there was a call
for proposals for the Centennial
Initiatives Fund. Project ideas
UBC campus circa 1937, with considerably less construction cranes.
submitted by student, alumni,
and community groups were
adjudicated by an 11-member
committee.
"We think of that as the
engine of the centennial because
that's where we get university-
wide participation," said
Calderon. "[The response] was
overwhelming, but I was very
pleased with that."
Committee representatives
included Tanner Bokor, former
AMS president, Rachel Kuske,
Senior Advisor to the Provost on
Women Faculty, and Line Kesler,
Advisor to the President on
Aboriginal Affairs and Director of
First Nations House of Learning.
"What the committee
decided from the very beginning
was that they really want the
proposals to mean something."
said Calderon. "It wasn't about
throwing a party or having a gala
or something of that nature ...
The primary objectives for the
centennial really [is] to engage
PHOTO COURTESY LEONARD FRANK/UBYSSEY ARCHIVES
the community on issues that are
important for the community."
Already, Calderon believes
that the centennial is bringing
people together.
"What I'm starting to see
is because of these various
initiatives that are happening
all over campus, a number of
units are starting to partner
together... [The centennial]
somehow enhanced all [of] these
opportunities for collaboration and
opportunities for partnership." '21
RESIDENCE //
Party in residence: when does it break the rules?
UBC residence contracts outlines what makes a party.
Joshua Azizi
Contributor
Living in a university residence can
be an opportunity for students to
meet new people, experiment with
alcohol or just have a great night
with friends.
For many students, not every
Friday night will involve actually
leaving the dorms: some prefer
to socialize within their own rez
building. However, as the student
residence contract points out, you're
technically not allowed to have
a party unless you have a special
permit.
According to Residence Life
Assistant Director Tiffany Mintah,
"a social gathering with a maximum
of 25 people is permitted if it is
pre-registered.... The private space
in individual apartments makes it
possible, with necessary coaching,
for a resident to safely host a larger
gathering without significant
disturbance to others."
Since permitted parties are
restricted to suite-style rooms,
parties are not officially permitted in
Totem and Vanier.
According to the residence
contract, a social gathering is
considered a party if two of the three
following are occurring: seven or
more people are present, alcohol is
being consumed or you are noisy
enough to attract attention or
distract others.
Mintah says this rule is in place
because "the size of the room means
that reasonably, when a group
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
exceeds seven members, it becomes
more challenging for the host to
manage the situation - particularly
when alcohol is being consumed —
without disrupting others in their
community."
Of these three points, the most
crucial one is if the social gathering
is creating noise — or to be more
precise, if it is creating a disturbance.
When asked about any possible
flexibility in the "two out of three"
rule, Mintah stressed that that the
occurrence of a disturbance is what
will draw the attention of an RA who
would deem the party a problem and
subsequently shut it down.
"Usually what draws our
attention is that it is causing a
disturbance, right? We don't go
knocking on doors to see if there's
a party taking place," says Mintah.
"If it's not causing a disruption, I
don't know how it'll be brought
to any staff attention to do
something about, but if it is causing
a disruption, then that is the
challenge."
At UBC Okanagan, the rules
behind parties are relatively similar.
Suite-styled residences are run
by the same "two of the three"
rule with the exception of parties
that are pre-registered. Parties
are also not permitted in first
year residences, but unlike UBC
residences, there is no specific
definition of what constitutes a
party.
According to the UBCO Director
of Business Operations Shannon
Dunn, a social gathering in a first
year residence is deemed a party
and effectively shut down if it is
causing a disturbance.
"What's driving policy is really
about disturbances of other people
in the community or other residents
in the community," said Dunn. "If
somebody is having a gathering in a
traditional building in a small space
— in one of the rooms and it isn't
disturbing others, then that's a bit
of a non-issue for us."
However, Dunn also notes that
parties in the first-year residences
aren't as common at UBCO as in the
suite-styled residences.
According to Mintah, having
an outlined definition of what
constitutes a party has helped
clarify the rules with students.
"I think part of wanting to
provide that clarification is why
there is a specific definition of
that, and so the definition is quite
clear." 'tJ
AMS//
AMS accepting bids
for new software
The university has begun hearing proposals from software companies.
Emma Partridge
News Editor
If you make a habit of sitting
through the entirety of AMS
council meetings, you'll start to
notice how long they can run. With
the hopes of avoiding more time
wastage in the future, the AMS is
updating their digital software.
The AMS has issued a request
for proposals (RFP) from software
companies, as council meetings
move from their old haunt into the
new chambers of the Nest. The
process of accepting proposals
begun last week.
"The RFP itself outlines the
sort of software features we'd
be looking for in something that
can support boardrooms and our
meetings," said AMS president
Aaron Bailey. "Something that is a
goal of mine personally... is how
to make council more efficient,
make sure that the meetings take
less time, meeting members are
more informed, have access to the
materials."
According to Bailey, there are
a number of ways that a software
upgrade could help cut down
inefficiency of meetings. The most
significant improvements would
be that online materials could
be curated to one place where
councillors have access to the
documents, as well as a streamlined
method of voting.
"Our software we currently use,
Voice, has been good in providing
that service to us, where within
the iClickers you're able to sort
of do run off voting," said Bailey.
"However, Voice is quite fickle
... we really want an up-to-date
software system that has those
voting functionalities."
When an RFP is issued, UBC
begins accepting proposals
from different companies in a
competitive bidding process. The
highest the university will go?
$20,000.
The number seems steep, but
Bailey is hoping that a competitive
ceiling of $20,000 will actually
keep the cost below that. He says
that many companies may not
chose to start at the full price lest
someone outbid them in terms of
cost and features.
"My special projects assistant
and I... took those quotes that we
received from that company as sort
of a baseline starting point," said
Bailey. "By doing an RFP we're
hoping that we can actually drag
down the costs a little bit more."
The costs will be covered by the
capital projects fund, which doesn't
only cover physical alterations to
the student union building, but
software changes and upgrades as
well, •a // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, AUGUST25,2015
INTERNET//
YouTube musical: the future of theatre?
The UBC grads had under a month to write,
Andrea Gonzalez
Contributor
With the explosion of dating websites and mobile dating apps such
as Tinder and OKCupid, it seems
that relationships nowadays are
moving towards a digital platform,
aided by technology such as Skype,
Snapchat and FaceTime.
In the midst of this boom, the
new musical film Finding Face
Time provides a hilarious insight
into the evolution of modern
relationships in this technology-laden world. With catchy
tunes and a hilarious plot, the
10-minute YouTube musical
examines the trials and tribulations of online dating and using
Skype to communicate with
people around us.
Directed and produced by
recent UBC graduates Deborah
Vogt and Sarah Harrison, Finding
Face Time follows a couple who
have been dating only long-distance for a year. The day the
musical takes place is the day of
an intended proposal, but connection issues ensue and provide
an escalation of problems for
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOCVIC/THE UBYSSEY
direct and film their YouTube musical.
the couple.
From the camera freezing to
the sound not working properly and the dropped calls, the
light-hearted musical showcases
multiple communication errors
with more than a generous dosage
of wit and humour.
FindingFace Time was the
winning selection from In Tune
2015, a musical theatre event run
by the Arts Club Theatre and
Touchstone Theatre.
"In Tune asked for pitches
for a 10-minute musical for any
ideas that have to do with YouTube, rather than theatre, that
are appropriate for the internet as
opposed to being live," said Vogt.
Swiftly after the winning
announcement, the talented
group of artists, including recent
UBC graduates, embarked on a
month-long race against time to
make the musical come to life.
Bringing their different strengths
forward, producers Harrison and
Vogt, composer Kerry O'Donovan,
actors Erin Aberle-Palm, Erik
Gow, Natasha Zacher and Naomi
Vogt and graphic designer Braden
Neufeld collaborated in the pro
duction of the musical.
"It was such a fun collaboration
between people from different
schools. In the Vancouver theatre
community, it seems that people
often stick to their own program,
so it's really fun to bring people
together from different schools
and backgrounds," said Vogt.
However, the creation of
the musical was not without
its challenges.
"We had three days to write
the music and one day to learn
the music, and over that time
we had a couple of days to edit
the music and two days to film
everything. Most of us also come
from a theatre background, not
a film background, so when we
started it was a collection of us
trying to figure out how to do it
all," said Vogt. "Thankfully, we
had a couple [of] meetings with
filmmakers and a lot of generous
people lending us their equipment
and providing us with their time."
What emerged is a brilliant, refreshing musical film that provides
us with a glimpse into the struggles
of online dating through Neufeld's
own version of Skype — FacePlace.
"You get to peer into these
people's lives, their secret lives essentially, and there are a lot of inside
jokes and humour that goes with
these personal relationships," said
Erin Aberle-Palm, who plays Annie
in the musical. "What was really appealing to me was that the musical is
super relatable in this technologically advanced age where people are
using dating sites like OKCupid
and PlentyofFish to date and find
people and I think that that's
relatable to everyone who is just
so busy in everyday life."
Added into the mix are
energetic contemporary tunes
inspired by the Skype digital
sounds. Prepare to watch the
video, download the soundtracks
and listen to the songs over and
over again. 'M
MUSIC//
Time out to tour
Esmee Colbourne
Contributor
A melody can connect a whole
room by a common thread. Noah
Derksen's spiralling sounds make
the listener sift through their own
thoughts and disappear into an
introspective, contemplative form
of folk.
Derksen, a final-year BSc student and member of the 2013-14
varsity volleyball team is embarking on a 22-day summer tour
spanning the four western provinces. The tour will be focusing
on exploration, and promotion of
his debut album, Man That I Am,
released in January of this year.
Derksen had initially planned on
a smaller scale tour but, excited
for the adventures his tour would
bring, decided that bigger was better and extended his journey from
a week to almost a month.
"I made my way down to the west
coast/I put my feet in the sand/I
waved goodbye to the old ghosts/
And hello to the man that I am."
The title track of Man That I Am
shapes the narrative of the entire
album: Derksen's development,
the challenges he met along the
way, and an inevitable farewell to
the past and places he has outgrown. His inspirations come from
everywhere, but many stem from
discovery. The song itself is about
being internally guided, moving
from Winnipeg to Vancouver at
18, independence and having no
connections.
This being said, balancing a love
for science and music, UBC's music
community's support and connection has been instrumental in the
development of Derksen's music, especially in his positive interactions
with BVP, CiTR, and other spaces
such as open mics at the Gallery.
"Thinking of where I was a year
ago today, I wouldn't have done
any sort of recording, I had no
intention of recording an album.
If I could go back now, and just
see where I am, I wouldn't have
SflR^fc,
PHOTO COURTESY NOAH DERKSEN
Derksen blends science and folk music.
imagined it to be [like this]," he
said. "That's a really sweet thing,
to see development and to see how
tangible that is, and it leaves me
very optimistic for the future, that
there is still an enormous room for
growth."
"Contemplative Folk" is the
subgenre that Derksen has created
to describe his album. It reflects
his process of song writing, and
experience of life.
"I spend a lot of time in thought,
so my songs stem from extended
times, [and] extended periods of
critical thought.... When I perform
and I play for other people, that's
my way of inviting people to engage
in that level of contemplation, or
that level of critical thought as
well... The songs themselves are of
[that] nature: of looking inside, of
just wresting with different questions and different experiences."
This thoughtful aesthetic is
reflected in his approach to all
things. "Science and analytics and
that style of thinking" has shaped
his style of creativity and how
he approaches the artistic world.
His current plan is to take time
off indefinitely after graduating,
and pursue music wholeheartedly,
while keeping in touch with the
world of science.
Man That I Am pairs a folksy
west coast feel and coming-of-age
narratives to a simple acoustic
sound that successfully provokes
reflection while staying in tune
with Noah Derksen's intense creative style. Who knew analytical
thinking could bring out something
so emotive? '21
FUNDRAISING //
Music for Bowen Island library
Torben Mortensen
Contributor
Libraries are underrated. They
are huge buildings filled with free
books, heating, electrical outlets
and people. The Vancouver
Public Library has 22 branches
spread across the city and offer
support programs, workshops
and summer camps for children
and adults. All of this can only
take place with funding from the
public. Even university libraries,
such as Koerner and 1KB on campus are reliant on funds from the
Friends of the Library groups and
endowment gifts.
With a population of just
over 3000, Bowen Island Public
Library is one that can sometimes
be overlooked in funding. Desperate to expand their services, they
are in the process of constructing a new room to display local
art and conduct seminars and
readings in.
Violist Thomas Beckman is
helping the Bowen Island Public
Library in funding these plans
with his new EP. The donation —
which will be 100 per cent of the
record's sales — is to Beckman,
the answer to the question many
artists are asking:
"How can I make a real impact
with what I do by helping something bigger than myself?"
He wants to encourage other
artists to consider this question
when they're listening to the EP.
Music for Bowen thrives on
its geographical connections
and was written while Beckman reflected on a trek through
the wildly beautiful country
of Namibia.
Naturally, the new release,
dedicated to the Island, is intimately connected with it, but also it
has a broader scope beyond space.
"It's supposed to be an EP for
the times," said Beckman. Current unresolved and contentious
political issues are the subject of
the album's sonic explorations.
Take "Whale Cry," described
by Beckman as a "lament of the
whales," where the viola's tones
emulate conversations taking
place over hundreds of kilometers
between these remarkable marine mammals. In British Colum
bia, an increase in tanker traffic
could disrupt a critical humpback
whale habitat, and part of that
disruption, that facet captured
in "Whale Cry," might occur via
noise pollution impeding the
whales' communication.
"We seldom think about what
we put other animals through
when we make massive decisions," said Beckman on the
relationship between his music
and the environment around us.
Farther from home, "Amazing
Grace," written as a response to
recent events in Baltimore, confronts the current state of social
justice, policing, and gun control
in America. As a response to
these problems, Beckman praises Bernie Sanders — a Senator in
the running for the Democrats'
presidential candidate nomination — with "Run." In talking
about climate change, income
inequality and by supporting
free education, Sanders sets
himself apart from other American politicians.
Music for Bowen is, like
Sanders' progressive campaign,
Music for Bowen is "an EP for the times."
rooted in a belief in community.
"Getting ahead is getting
everyone else ahead," said Beckman on the importance of community relationships. Pursuing a
career in the arts, or the sciences
or what have you, need not be an
egoist's project.
With that in mind, Beckman
reached out to potential contributors to help make Music for
Bowen. The EP was made in col-
PHOTO COURTESY ERICSACZUC
laboration with Jude Neale, who
on the record's last track recites
her award-winning poem, "Wild
Berry" and with assistance from
Vogville Studios.
"We're social creatures,
we're not born on islands: we
live together," said Beckman,
commenting on his own creative
process and on his aspirations for
creating a communitarian ethos
within and beyond his art. 'M 6    I    FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,2015
Emma Partridge News Editor
IF.
there is one thing that
made Jennifer Berdahl's blog
post harmful to UBC, it was
John Montalbano calling her to
say the post could be harmful to
UBC.
Berdahl is the Montalbano
Professor of Leadership Studies
in Gender and Diversity at the
Sauder School of Business. As
an academic focused on how
institutionalized racism and
sexism affects high levels of
leadership, Berdahl posted
a speculative argument on
her blog about why former
President Arvind Gupta may
have resigned.
"Did President Arvind Gupta
lose the masculinity contest?"
read the headline. The post
posits that Gupta, who is not tall
and non-white, was the victim
of stereotypical ideas about who
looks the part of a good leader.
The post got some attention
and was viewed quite a few
times, according to Berdahl.
But, on the whole, Berdahl's
post was one of many
speculations being
presented in
the aftermath of Gupta's sudden
and unexpected departure.
By the following week, the
post would be the focal point of a
national debate.
"[Montalbano] called me
at home Sunday morning and
proceeded to tell me ... how
upset he was by the post, how
embarrassing it was to him and
how it called into question my
academic credibility and how
he'd been speaking to my dean
about it," said Berdahl.
To sum up, the chair of
UBC's Board of Governors,
John Montalbano, called a
tenured professor to discuss
her blog post and during the
conversation, "expressed my
concern that the blog had
the potential to damage UBC
based on its assertions," said
Montalbano.
Berdahl responded with
another post. This time she
detailed the
conversation she had had
with Montalbano, as well as
similar criticisms she received
from various members of
UBC's administration. Despite
numerous attempts to have
UBC's Public Relations connect
The Ubyssey with Berdahl's dean
at Sauder, no one responded.
The two successive blog
post have sparked both a debate
on academic freedoms and an
investigation into their possible
breach.
"His contacting her is an
absolute and abject failure of
understanding the mission of
academic freedoms, open speech
and the role of a professor
in criticizing and trying to
understand how a university is
run," said psychology Professor
Chris Crandell of the University
of Kansas, who wrote to
Berdahl's dean to demand that he
immediately and publicly make a
statement in support of Berdahl's
rights and freedoms.
"It's not just inappropriate,
it's wildly inappropriate. It's an
'I should resign now, because I
don't know my boundaries'," said
Crandell.
Albina Gibadullina is a fourth-
year student in the Sauder school.
In her opinion, it seems that the
way the Board viewed the post
"or the way John Montalbano
[did] is [as] a personal offense on
him."
"She's committed all her life
to understanding how gender,
race and equality show up in the
workplace," said Gibadullina. "So
what she meant is that there's
a bigger issue going on, UBC
doesn't have enough diversity in
its leadership ... [and] this could
be one of the reasons why Gupta
was not as successful."
On August 18, the day after
Berdahl's second blog post
was released, the Board held
an unannounced, in-camera
meeting. Now, discussion about
Board transparency, or lack
thereof, is growing in conjunction
with the debate on
academic
freedoms.
The media statement that
came out of the August 18 Board
meeting affirms a commitment
to the principle of academic
freedoms, and "all members of
the UBC community recognize
and value this fundamental
principle."
It was also announced after
this private meeting that an
investigation into allegations of a
breach of academic freedoms will
be undertaken. The university
has yet to say who will be
conducting the investigation.
When the question of who
would conduct the investigation
was raised in the last council
meeting of the UBC Vancouver
Alma Mater Society (AMS), no
specifics were provided but Ava
Nasiri, VP Administration, and
Aaron Bailey, AMS President,
said that it would be conducted
by an external arbiter.
Some have speculated that
a personal blog on the internet
does not constitute an academic
argument and therefore may not
be an infringement of academic
freedoms, but, as Amy Ryder,
a third-year Political Science
major points out, censorship is
censorship.
"Whether or not it's
academic freedom
it's still TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 2015   |    FEATURE
freedom of opinion ... no
matter how you look at it,
whether or not that can be
considered academic," said
Ryder.
Though Montalbano
has expressed that he is
engaged in the process of the
investigation, he denies that
he infringed on Berdahl's
academic freedom by
contacting her to discuss her
posting.
"At the start of her
conversation... [I said]
'before I go any further, are
you comfortable discussing
the blog? Because I have
concerns that you may see
it as an infringement on
academic freedom.' And her
response was, 'no, I don't have
concerns,' and I said 'look, if at
you feel that this getting close
to an infringement will you
stop me?' And she said that she
would," said Montalbano.
However, that isn't good
enough for the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers (CAUT), who,
last Wednesday, called for
Montalbano to resign until the
university has completed its
investigation into the claims
of infringement on academic
freedoms.
"His statement is rather
telling because he does admit
that there was a call, he does
admit that he raised the issue
of academic freedom, he does
admit that he talked about
funding," said CAUT executive
director David Robinson.
"So he admits a lot of what
Professor Berdahl is alleging,
but what he essentially says is
because she didn't raise any
concerns I therefore didn't
affect or didn't infringe upon
her academic freedom."
Alongside CAUT's open
letter asking the chair to resign
was one from the UBC Faculty
Association. The letters were
published on the same day, and
them together.
Headlines and social media
feeds were filled were words
such as "Pressure grows on UBC
board chair John Montalbano to
resign."
The case raised by the
Faculty Association (FA) does
differ somewhat from that
of CAUT. According to the
letter, the FA was shocked that
Montalbano himself spoke,
issues in which he is implicated.
According to the President of
the FA, Mark Mac Lean, this
"thwarts the natural processes
that we have."
"We have the Chair of
the Board, who is now the
spokesperson for the university
on this issue, up front there
doing a media release in which
he's also giving testimony,"
said Mac Lean. "So he's clearly
with those of the university."
Though CAUT and the FA
have made it clear that they have
officially lost confidence in the
chair of the Board, the highest
body of student governance,
the AMS, has taken a different
position.
On Thursday, August 20
the organization released an
official statement outlining
their position on the issues at
hand. Point 3 reads, "we do not
currently call for the resignation
of the Chair of the Board of
Governors during this turbulent
time due to a lack of public
information."
The other three points iterate
that the AMS demands an
investigation into the possible
breach of academic freedoms,
they are working towards more
Board transparency, and that
the AMS asks the "media and
members of the university
to avoid speaking on
behalf of the student
community."
Despite the
AMS officially
asking that
members of UBC, including its
media groups, avoid speaking
for the student community at
large, it should be noted that
a full comment on Gupta's
resignation and the subsequent
controversies was not released
until 13 days after Gupta's
resignation was announced.
Though Montalbano would
not speculate on whether this
situation is unique because
he provided the funds that
made Berdahl's professorship
possible, it has made for a lot
of speculation. Montalbano
donated the $2 million that
allowed for Berdahl's position in
the university.
"There's definitely the
implied threat, or threats in the
message, about my reputation
[and] about my funding," said
Berdahl. "To me it was not
like he was curious about my
perspective."
A parallel could be drawn
to an employee-employer
relationship, in which one
person is paying the other for
services provided. Though
Montalbano would not
speculate on whether the
position he holds in relation
to Berdahl makes this a
particularly unique situation,
Robinson said that "if your boss
calls you into his or her office
to say, I want to talk to you
about that email you send
yesterday, that's not a
friendly chat."
That
differential is what is prompting
many of the calls for the
resignation. Robinson called it
completely inappropriate for
Montalabano to call her because
of the "relationship of power."
"He's the chair of the Board
of Governors, you know, the
chair of the Board of Governors
doesn't just make casual phone
calls to professors," said Ryder.
automatically because of who he
is, and inquiring about that blog
post... automatically suggests
the university's not happy with
it."
However, Montalbano has
remained firm on the argument
that his calling Berdahl was a
legitimate effort to learn about
the post.
When asked whether he
believes Berdahl has the right
to openly speculate on Gupta's
resignation, Montalbano
answered "I think Jennifer
has the right to speculate on
anything and with respect
to the board I just wanted to
understand how she reached
that conclusion.... When you
in a field claiming a process that
may have been racially biased,
I think it's important for us to
learn from that."
Now the question becomes,
was Berdahl's stipulation that
problems
arose due to a lack of board
diversity correct, and is that why
Montalbano reacted the way
that he did?
"It was their reaction to
her blog post, which may be
an accurate understanding of
what happened... [that] lends
credence to the underlying
argument that she was making
in the blog post," said Crandell.
just under half of the board and
there is some racial diversity,
though Caucasian members do
make up the majority.
However, There seems to
be a trend in terms of political
leaning, as nine out of the 11
provincially-appointed board
members gave substantial
donations to the BC Liberal
party.
"My concern has been
also that many of the
political appointments and don't
necessarily reflect that you
would need as a board member,"
said NDP spokesperson, Kathy
Corrigan.
So fast-forward to today, and
you have serious questions about
whether the board has enough
diversity and transparency, as
well as about Montalbano's
efficacy as chair.
And still, no answer about
what happened to former
president Gupta. 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,2015
COMMUNITY//
How well do you know your neighbours?
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
"The people that I liked and had
not met went to the big cafes
because they were lost in them and
no one noticed them and they could
be alone in them and be together."
So says Ernest Hemingway in A
Moveable Feast.
If you counted how many new
people you spoke to today, you'd
probably be able to do it on one
hand. Even though Canada is
notably one of the world's friendliest countries, our daily conversations never seem to go past
greetings and small talk. Belonging in Vancouver, or any big city,
is not easy.
The Belonging Project,
brainchild of philosophy student
Zakir Jamal Suleman wants to
introduce Vancouverites to their
neighbours — introducing six
Vancouverites of first or second
generation immigrant families
through a series of short videos
released online.
In 2012, the Vancouver Foundation conducted a series of surveys
to investigate how widespread the
feeling of social disconnection is
in our city. They found that 31 per
cent of those surveyed had a difficult time making friends in Metro
Vancouver, a figure that was
almost double among people who
had recently arrived in Vancouver.
"When you live in a city there's
all this hustle and bustle," said
Suleman. "You run by each other
and around each other and it can
be kind of disorienting and kind of
alienating."
Highlighting just six people in
the whole city is only the smallest
of slivers, but the Belonging Pro
ject's aim is to honour everybody
as individuals while establishing a deep connection to the
community around.
The first video focuses on
jewellery maker and performer
Tien, a first generation immigrant
from Singapore. Moving to Vancouver allowed his gender identity
to evolve and through the video,
he reveals his strategy for belonging. He was 18 when he came to
Canada, but prior to his move felt
discontented and unhappy with
his life. In the video Meet Tien,
he refers to himself as "a unique
being that didn't seem to fit into
what [his parents] wanted their
child to be."
"When people are only interested in knowing what gender you
are, you could be saying the most
amazing things but they're not
present with you," Tien continues
in the voiceover. "For me, I find
that so sad and lonely knowing
that they aren't even listening."
Like many students, Suleman
has worked in the service industry for many years to support
his degree.
"When you work in a service
job there's that same kind of alienation," he said. "I find the moments that pull me out of that are
the moments when people share
something with me, and I do try
to have face-to-face conversations
every day."
The Belonging Project aims
to provide intimate connections
between thousands of people via
their social media campaign.
Tien said in his video that
coming to Vancouver allowed him
to truly accept and flourish with
who he is. "I'm not a master of one
thing; I'm a master of hundreds of
things," he said. "Being seen and
acknowledged really is a part of
belonging."
And being seen he is. The
videos, which are released online
every week, will celebrate their
completion with a final event
to celebrate people coming
out of their virtual worlds and
into the real space, starting to
make connections.
"If somebody wants to share
something with me, that's really
personal and I've learned a lot
about people by just being able to sit
down in those circumstances," said
Suleman on the Belonging Project's goals.
When asked about the inevitable
comparisons he will face with the
immensely popular Humans of
New York photo series, Suleman
acknowledged that the comparisons are expected, but takes it as a
compliment.
"I think they're similar in some
ways and different in others," he
said. "They both seek to highlight
people from the city. What I really
like about Humans of New York
and what I think that the Belonging
Project does is try to take all the
hustle and bustle right back to a very
human connection, face to face."
The Belonging Project isn't just
purposed towards the first and
second generation immigrants that
it focuses on, however.
"Everybody has these lives that
they lead around each other and
they're really busy and everyone
has their own struggle," he said."
The advantage of being in Vancouver is that...everybody is doing
the same thing because all of our
histories come from elsewhere
— that's what i'm trying to tap
into." fH
Zakir Jamal Suleman is introducing Vancouverites to their neighbours.
PHOTO COURTESY FRANZISKA WERSING
FOOD COLUMN //
Lettuce eat: simple summer salads
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey'sfood columnistsharessome delicioussummerrecipes
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
Sad to see summer go? Swap out
your summertime sadness for
some summertime salad-ness!
At this time of year I have an
aversion to using my stove; on a
hot day when I already don't feel
like making dinner, it's easier to
do a little bit of chopping and
have something ready in half an
hour.
(Bonus: if you have extra, you
can have it for lunch for the next
day).
Here are two refreshing salads
to make on a summer evening:
CAULIFLOWER CHOPPED
SALAD:
(serves four generously)
Note: this salad keeps well overnight, even when dressed.
Salad:
1/2 large cauliflower, broken
up into 1/2 inch or small
bite-sized florets
1 bunch radishes, halved and cut
into half-moon slivers
1 can chickpeas, drained
and rinsed
2 green onion stalks, sliced on
a bias
1/3 English cucumber, quartered
and sliced into triangles
1/4 green or red cabbage, cut into
thin, long strands
Finely diced red onion to taste
1/4 cup roasted sunflower seeds
(extra flavourful if you toast
them before serving)
Salt and pepper to taste
Dressing:
1 small shallot, minced, or 2 Tbsp
minced red onion
Vi cup plain yogurt
Juice of half a lime
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp feta cheese
Freshly ground black pepper
to taste
Directions:
1. Wash and chop all vegetables
and put them in a large bowl.
Drain and rinse chickpeas and
combine with other vegetables.
2. If toasting sunflower seeds,
set in a pan on low heat for 5-7
minutes. Be sure to watch them
carefully and jostle them around
every couple minutes so they
don't burn. Remove from pan
and let cool for a couple minutes
before adding to salad.
3. Make the dressing: put all
dressing ingredients in a food
processor or magic bullet and
blend until smooth. Taste and
adjust ingredients as desired. If
you want a thicker dressing, add
more olive oil.
4. Toss salad with dressing, then
add sunflower seeds on top. Serve
and enjoy!
LEAFY GREENS SALAD
(serves four)
Note: Tofu, chicken, or quinoa
would make great additions to
this salad.
Salad:
2 generous handfuls of arugula
2 generous handfuls of kale (either
use baby kale or slice into thin
ribbons)
5-6 Brussels sprouts, bottoms chopped off and outer
leaves discarded
1 pear, apple, or Asian pear,
thinly sliced
1/4 cup roughly chopped roasted
almonds, or roasted pumpkin
seeds (extra flavourful if you
toast them before serving)
Dressing (makes enough for a
lightly dressed salad; double this
recipe if you like more dressing):
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar or
white balsamic vinegar
1 tsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tsp honey or maple syrup
Freshly ground black pepper
to taste
Directions:
1. Rinse kale and arugula and dry
well. Without washing the Brussels sprouts, chop off the bottom
ends and remove and discard the
outer leaves. Peel the inner leaves
off one by one and put them into
a colander to rinse. When the bud
gets too small to peel leaves off, cut
off the tough bottom and cut the
remainder of the sprout into small
rounds to use in the salad. Rinse the
Brussels sprout leaves and pat dry.
Combine only the Brussels sprouts
and kale in the salad bowl.
2. Make the dressing: combine all
ingredients in a small jar or tightly
sealed container and shake until
combined. (If the honey is too thick
you may need to microwave it or
the dressing for ten seconds in the
microwave to make sure it mixes
properly.) Taste and adjust ingredients as desired.
3. Dress the kale and Brussels
sprouts: pour all of the dressing over
and gently massage it into the leaves
with your hands. Let sit for at least
five minutes.
4. If toasting almonds or pumpkin
seeds, set in a pan on low heat for
5-7 minutes. Be sure to watch them
carefully and jostle them around
every couple minutes so they don't
burn. Remove from pan and let
cool for a couple minutes before
adding to salad.
5. Cut the pear, apple, or Asian
pear and add to salad with the
toasted nuts or seeds and the
arugula. 'M // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, AUGUST25,2015
GOVERNMENT//
Student reps have been disappointingly silent
■1.
UBYSSEY STAFF
Editorial
We have three elected students
who are supposed to represent
us on the Board of Governors
and almost 50 students on AMS
Council tasked with representing
our best interests. Neither group
seems willing to take on the Board
of Governors.
Let's start with the Board of
Governors student reps. Though
elected by students, as soon as they
take office, their allegiance to the
Board trumps their allegiance to
their constituents. When asked for
comment repeatedly on what was
happening at the Board, they were
= ILE PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
apprehensive to talk to us in the
first place, saying approval to speak
would have to come from the Board
secretary. After multiple requests
for comment, all they were willing
to say is that they have a place at
the table and are engaged in the
conversations the Board is having.
Board Chair John Montalbano said
exactly that about the student reps
in a separate interview. Either they
think exactly alike or the lines were
rehearsed, neither of which is a
comforting thought. (In fairness,
perhaps our student reps have all
done a stunning job representing
us at the Board, but they are so
muzzled that we have no way of
knowing.)
Now, to the AMS. The body has
little power to change anything at
the Board of Governors, but does
have the ability to at least make
symbolic gestures for students. If
the smarmy statement they spent
hours on Wednesday symbolized
anything, it was the desire to
play nice with the Board, rather
than take a stand. The statement
included language that wouldn't
warrant any angry phone calls from
Montalbano, featuring phrases such
as "considering institutional stability
to be paramount." The statement
also contains gems such as asking
media to stop discussing the
situation and asserting they are the
only organization that can represent
students. If students want anything
now, it's answers, transparency and
representation — none of which that
statement will accomplish.
The Board of Governors is the
most powerful organization at
UBC. They hold the reins on just
about everything, including how
secretive they are. The current level
of secrecy and power at the Board is
nothing new, and neither is general
student apathy or student politicians
who want to make friends in high
places. But as we see in the Board
of Governors, a seat at the table
doesn't mean much for students.
If student politicians were more
concerned with taking a stand for
their constituents than being able
to quietly voice concerns at private
meetings, perhaps we might see
some real pressure for change. '21
RIDESHARING //
Should the AMS pursue a relationship with Uber?
OLIVIA
Has anybody tried hailing a cab in
Vancouver? Good luck — there's a
small chance you'll get into a taxi
within 20 minutes. As good as we
have it when it comes to transit,
you'll likely have a long wait in the
rain for a bus, followed by a lengthy
ride and then a walk in the dark to
get to your front door.
Now, imagine a second scenario:
you're about to leave the bar
with your friend, who is pretty
intoxicated. Usually you'd take
the bus, but it's busy and you're
too tired for a 40-minute journey
home. Maybe they aren't even
running anymore. Luckily, you've
downloaded Uber, using a code from
a friend, which gives you money
off of your first journey. A driver is
nearby — you look at their profile
and see that they're rated a full
five stars. You can see a photo of
the driver and the car, as well as an
estimated cost to get you home. The
driver pulls up to the bar within a
couple minutes of the request, you
and your friend hop in and you're
home, outside of your front door,
within 15 minutes.
In total, this costs you less than
the fast food you might have picked
up while waiting for the bus.
Last year, the AMS spent a
significant amount of money on
their TransLink voting campaign,
involving a lot of groups on campus
and using a wide variety of means to
promote their "vote yes" message.
Although ultimately the referendum
did not get enough "yes" votes to
pass, this shouldn't mean the AMS's
work in this area is done. The AMS
supporting an Uber campaign
should mean safer transit options for
students who don't live on campus
and aren't lucky enough to benefit
from Safe Walk.
People argue about the safety of
Uber — but there's no hard evidence
to suggest it's any less safe than
hopping in a cab. As The Atlantic
reports, "The narrative about
ARNO
ridesharing and
public safety is largely anecdotal."
Spending the summer in Europe,
I took a lot of Ubers in a number of
different countries. Every single ride,
I was picked up within two minutes
of requesting the ride, and was
always pleased with the experience.
I can't even count the times I've
witnessed cab drivers be rude or
impatient with customers — because
really, they have nothing to lose.
If you have a bad experience in an
Uber car, your complaint can be
seen by hundreds of customers
immediately, which leads to
improved customer service
experiences.
So again, consider this:
which of these options
would you rather?
Wait 20 minutes
for a bus,
take the
30-
minute
ride
to the
nearest
stop to
your
house
and
walk ^W     several
blocks back
home? Take a taxi which
would cost the same as a weekly
grocery shop and have no guarantee
of a pleasant experience? Or be able
to mutually accept your driver, be
picked up in minutes, split your fare
with your friends, and be dropped
exactly where you need to be?
Uber is reliable, inexpensive and
the future of private transportation.
I have every confidence that the
service will be perfect for students
and truly believe that an AMS
partnership would be extremely
beneficial to the UBC community.
Olivia Law is a third-year English
major and Culture Editor at The
Ubyssey. 'O
^
Uber is reliable,
inexpensive
and the future
of private
transportation."
-LUSTRATION AIKEN LAO/TH E UBYSSEY
Breaking the
law is built
into [Uber's]
business plan."
The AMS should
waste not an iota of its limited
resources promoting the interests
of the phenomenally wealthy
American corporation valued
around $50 billion.
Summoning a cheap taxi ride
from a phone app on your phone
and having it arrive minutes later is
awesome, but Uber is a uniquely bad
actor in the world of "ridesharing."
Breaking the law is built into their
business plan and they consistently
endanger both drivers and riders.
Two French Uber executives
were arrested in July after
France's parliament
barred Uber from using
drivers without a
taxi license and the
company declared
it would simply
pay their illegal
drivers'
tickets.
Meanwhile
in
California,
Uber
suspended
at least 12
drivers in
January for
following the
law by registering their cars
commercially.
Uber has sued one American city
to halt the release of the company's
driver insurance policy. That policy
proved controversial after an Uber
driver hit and killed a six-year-old
girl walking in a crosswalk. Uber
said they weren't liable because their
drivers are "not employees."
Last fall, a woman in Los Angeles
was kidnapped by her Uber driver
and taken to an empty lot where he
locked the doors and refused to take
her home. Uber apologized only for
the driver's "inefficient route" and
eventually refunded her fare.
Another LA woman reportedly
woke up in a motel next to her
ROSENFELD
shirtless Uber driver after passing
out in his cab the night before. A
passenger in DC had his Uber driver
get into a high speed police chase
and refuse to let him out of the car.
Closer to Vancouver, a woman
in Seattle reported being sexually
assaulted after her Uber driver
stopped in a park and forced the
woman to get out of the car in the
middle of the night.
Then there was the San
Francisco woman whose Uber
driver pulled her from the car and
smashed her phone on the ground.
Or the driver charged with hitting a
passenger with a hammer.
After the first few of these
stories came out, Uber started
tacking on a $1 "Safe Ride Fee."
But the district attorneys of San
Francisco and Los Angeles have
actually repeatedly sued Uber for
misleading customers about just
how "safe" those rides are.
The lawsuits allege Uber lied
about the effectiveness of driver
background checks and charged
illegal and fraudulent fares.
Competitor Lyft was accused of
some similar bad practices but
simply agreed to fix the problems.
This week Uber was sued again
for allowing a convicted murderer,
unlicensed drivers, drivers with DUI
convictions and drivers convicted
of sexual assault and rape to drive
passengers in California cities.
If the AMS wants to make
ridesharing part of their renewed
transit planning efforts, they should
make clear to the province that
companies using apps to connect
drivers and riders are welcome and
would provide an important utility to
students. But at the same time, they
should demand the province and
Metro Vancouver refuse to permit
Uber from prowling the streets of
Vancouver.
Arno Rosenfeld is a fourth-year
political science major and Features
Editor at The Ubyssey. n // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, AUGUST25,2015
THE AVIARY
The Aviary is officially open.
The new, state-of-the-art climbing wall is tucked into a corner
on the second floor of the new SUB, features 25 routes with 25
more on the way, top roping, lead climbing and a ceiling and it is
open to everyone. The best part? It's one-thirteenth of the price of
local climbing gyms.
The wall is run by the Varsity Outdoor Club and is currently
open 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday
through Thursday but hours will be extended come September.
The wall is open to everyone and is 100 per cent volunteer run.
Go check it out and learn to climb or, if you already know how,
hone your skills. Be sure to watch out for a climbing competition
coming this fall.
Things to do in Vancouver
Jl-^3
PHOTO KOBY MICHAELS/THE UBYSSEY
Jenny Tang
Contributor
It's summer! No midterms, no
papers, no finals (yet); you've got
all the time in the world. And if you
work, play hooky. In a place like
Vancouver, you're a little spoiled for
choice, so we've picked out some
things to do in Vancouver before the
school year starts, fit for a high-
spirited student on any budget.
Hiking
Outside the city, there are
picturesque views surrounding
Vancouver that can only be reached
by foot. Suggestions include Norvan
Falls (for the less experienced hiker),
Lynn Peak (for those liking more of a
challenge) and of course, the Grouse
Grind. Bring a couple of friends, put
on your hiking boots and explore the
back country!
Biking
A popular tourist activity is to
take a stroll along the Seawall in
Stanley Park. Rentals bikes can
range from $10-20 per hour, and the
Seawall takes about 2 hours, but it's
a breathtaking coastal cruise that is
worth the money. Bonus points if
you spot UBC across English Bay en
route.
Yoga
Vancouverites are practically
synonymous with yoga. There are
yoga studios on almost every block
on West 4th. Despite it's overrated
reputation, yoga is still a great way
to channel your inner chill and relax
while still working off the post-finals
high. Flexibility, while helpful, is not
a requirement.
Beach Days
Summer is the perfect time to
kick back and feel the sand between
your toes. Kits and Jericho Beach are
a stone's throw away from campus
and are easily accessible by bike or
public transit. What better way to
enjoy the heat than grabbing some
friends, a Frisbee or beach ball and
having some fun in the sun?
Water sports
If you're looking for a more
water-themed activity to spend your
time off, then why not try water
sports? You can rent a kayak or a
paddle-board from rental companies
on Granville Island, Kits and Jericho
Beach, downtown or in Deep Cove.
There's nothing like beating the heat
by surrounding yourself with water
and friends!
Community Centers
If you find yourself wanting
to join a club, but can't afford the
equipment or the fees, then why not
try your local community center?
Most will have a drop-in session
where you can meet people who love
the same sports or activities as you,
plus there's minimal fees and you can
go with friends or by yourself. It's an
easy way to find a sports buddy who
lives in the neighbourhood!
Make the most of your last few
days in of freedom before lectures,
labs and exams are back for good. 'M TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,2015   |    SPORTS    |   11
ATHLETES//
What's next for Nixon: life after the 'Birds
Henry Allan
Contributor
Tommy Nixon cuts to the basket,
but he's held back by his defender,
a man much shorter and older
than Nixon with no plausible
way to defend the 6'6" forward
without fouling him. Unperturbed,
Nixon moves to the other side of
the court, and settles in a patch
of sunlight just beyond the three
point line and waits.
The ball is eventually kicked
out to Nixon. He looks down at his
feet, a good foot behind the line,
and only inches from the grass
that surrounds the Kits beach
courts. He looks at his defender,
who is timidly standing four feet
back. Then in one smooth motion,
Nixon brings the ball up and
launches a three. The rim doesn't
make a sound as the ball soars
through it. UBC Alumni go up by
12.
Nixon's calm on the court, and
ability to hit threes isn't news to
Thunderbird fans. Now that Nixon
is Thunderbird career is over, it's
time for him to move on.
In the NCAA, the stars of major
basketball programs are all but
guaranteed a spot in the NBA or
a premier league in Europe but
CIS stars settle into more modest
career-paths. So what have our
hoop-stars been up to, and what
will Nixon do next?
"I'd like to keep playing," said
Nixon, "but I'm also thinking
about further down the road too ...
basketball doesn't last forever."
If Nixon fully commits to
playing professional basketball,
the odds of him doing so are
favourable. In the last five seasons,
UBC has sent seven players to
the pros. Doug Plumb, captain of
PHOTO COURTESYWINSTON BROWN/THE UBYSSEY
Nixon is moving on from the 'Birds to pursue everything from basketball to bartending.
the 2012-13 Thunderbirds, played
professionally in Hungary. O'Brien
Wallace ('13) now plays in Germany.
All three graduates of the year
before; Nathan Yu, Balraj Bains, and
Kamar Burke, played professionally
in Hong Kong, India and Canada
respectively. And the season before
that, both Alex Murphy and Josh
Whyte went on to the pros too, in
Denmark and Ontario.
But there's a blemish to these
success stories: only Yu and Wallace
are still playing. "It's very standard
just to play for a couple of years and
come back," said Nixon. "Pro careers
rarely do last long; it's not a special
case to UBC athletes."
So if pro careers are short
lived, what do our hoop-stars do
next? Many make the short move
over to the sidelines. Plumb now
coaches full-time at the Vancouver
Basketball Academy. Burke founded
DIPP basketball, a youth basketball
academy in the Okanagan. And
Blain Labranche, of the 2009-10
Thunderbirds, now coaches college
basketball at the Northern Alberta
Institute of Technology.
Nixon has already dabbled
in coaching. This summer, after
representing Canada at the World
University Games, Nixon coached
the Triple Threat U-17 girls team,
travelling with them to tournaments
in Washington, California and
Nevada. "Coaching is something I'm
always interested in," said Nixon.
"But in terms of doing it full time
right now, I have too many other
ideas in my head to do that."
Nixon is considering going back
to school so he could someday teach
— and coach — at the high school
level. Returning to school after
basketball though isn't something
our hoop-stars do often. Since 2009,
Bains is the only Thunderbird to
have done so, enrolling at UBC
Law after playing professionally
in India.
But that isn't to say our
hoops-stars don't put their
degrees to good use. Andrew
McGuinness and Tonner
Jackson, who played and
graduated alongside Nixon this
year, have both decided to leave
basketball behind. McGuinness
has used his degree from Sauder
to get a job at Ernst & Young,
while Jackson has used his
degree, also from Sauder, to
get a job at Antisocial Media
Solutions.
Nixon's degree is in
Kinesiology, which he plans to
use to teach physical education.
But Nixon is in no rush and
said he is looking to take acting
classes and get back in touch
with music. In high school,
Nixon was an accomplished
violinist, playing for the
provincial orchestra.
After living and breathing
basketball for over 10 years,
many don't know what they
would do without it, but
understandably for some it
is time for a change. Nixon
has pursued a professional
basketball career by sending
out tapes of himself to teams
in China and Taiwan, but
has yet to commit to the idea
completely.
"I've pretty much had some
of the most special experiences
in basketball that I could," said
Nixon, talking more about the
friends he has made than the
sport. "Who knows if it gets any
better? I'm just looking to find
something that will continue to
give me experiences like that." '21
BASEBALL//
Meet Chris Pritchett, UBCs baseball coach
Prichtett is a former Red Sox scout and Vancouver Canadian.
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
Chris Pritchett, a former Vancouver
Canadians MVP, Major League
infielder and UBC's newly hired head
baseball coach is looking to pick up
where Terry McKaigleft off.
Pritchett was hired this summer
after it was announced that McKaig
would be filling a brand new position
as director of baseball, where he will
focus on expanding the program
as well as fundraising and other
initiatives.
Pritchett was an Ail-American
UCLA player and was drafted to
the California Angels in 1991 before
coming to play for the Vancouver
Canadians. Pritchett played over 60
games in Major League Baseball and
has since acted as the Canadians'
hitting coach and an international
scout, based in Canada, for the Boston
Red Sox.
Though never officially a
Thunderbird, Pritchett has a
long history with the program.
While at the Canadians, Pritchett
trained at UBC's facilities and
volunteered, helping McKaig
coach in the 90s.
"I was always impressed with
what they where teaching their
players. I thought it was really
advanced and that they were
doing a great job," said Pritchett.
"I've been around the program,
but not directly involved in it for
quite a while."
This will also be Pritchett's
first time as head coach.
Pritchett sees his experiences
as a player in all levels of
baseball, from collegiate to pro
ball, and his recent recruiting
work in Canada as assets to his
coaching.
"It's going to really help
on the recruiting side," said
Pritchett. "I've been blazing
these trails looking for pro
players but the trails are still the
same."
As the new head coach,
Pritchett will be working closely
with McKaig to developing the
baseball program. Pritchett sees
the future closely following the
model of the past with some
exciting twists. An indoor
training facility should be
opening in September and a new
stadium is being planned that
should be finished in the next
two years.
The line between head coach
and director of baseball has yet
to be clearly draw but Pritchett
sees the mutual respect between
UBC baseball's two frontmen as
fundamental to moving forward
and called McKaig a mentor.
Following in McKaig's
footsteps will be no easy feat as
McKaig has built baseball into
one of Canada's best programs
that often sees players drafted to
the pros and has won five NAIA
West Grouping Championships
in seven years.
Pritchett, who said he is
pleased to be returning to the
collegiate atmosphere after so
many years in the pros, also
hopes to see baseball draw bigger
crhowds and win over students
as fans.
Pritchett will be UBC's
second baseball head coach. 'M
HOCKEY//
Shell is UBC's
new bench boss
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Shell, a veteran coach for the RMCis
coming to UBC.
Matt Langmuir
Contributor
UBC Athletics has hired Adam
Shell as hockey's new bench boss.
Shell was brought in to replace
Tyler Kuntz, who left the team
abruptly last month for an assistant
coaching position with the
Vancouver Giants.
Shell previously coached at
Royal Military College in Kingston,
Ontario for eight years and believes
his familiarity with college sports
will be beneficial for his new
position.
"I understand the league," said
Shell. "I understand how athletics
departments work and the role of
the hockey program within the
athletics department. I understand
the student athlete; I was one. So I
get that. It helps the learning curve
in the sense that I just have to learn
the players and get familiar with
the opponents."
Despite heavy criticism of
UBC Athletics over the last two
years, Shell chose to focus on the
positives of the program.
"I worked in an environment
significantly more treacherous in
many ways than UBC," said Shell.
"I love the people at RMC and
my direct bosses were great but
working in a military environment
is not easy... Coming here, yeah
there's issues everywhere but
that's in the past. I was given great
confidence by the alumni in the
program and the department that
this program is part of the future
and I'm going to be part of building
it."
In addition to coaching at
RMC, Shell also coached the
Serbian National Team to a bronze
medal at the Division 2A World
Championships in 2008 which
gave him a different experience
that helped expand his horizons.
"What [the experience] also
does is help you prepare for short-
term tournaments. Our goal here at
UBC hockey is to make the national
championships which is a very
similar short-term tournament so
having experience and having some
success in it will hopefully help me
prepare for that," said Shell
Last year, Kuntz nearly took
the Thunderbirds to the national
championships but came up short,
losing in the Canada West semifinals.
"The experience they got last
year losing to Alberta...left a bitter
taste," said Shell. "But it showed
them where this team can be so my
job's going to be to take them to the
next level," said Shell.
Shell will look to start off his
UBC tenure strongwhen the 'Birds
face SFU on September 10.1 12    I    GAMES    I    TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,2015
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AUGUST 18 ANSWERS
AUGUST 18 ANSWERS
ACROSS
31-Krypton, for one;
56-Nothing, in Nantes;
6-Sicilian resort;
33-Makes amends;
1-Go by;
33-City official: Abbr.;
57-Lair;
7-Not allowing light to pass
34-Great;
7-Leftover;
34-Total;
58-About;
through;
35-Run-of-the-mill;
10-Letter opener;
37-Ave. crossers;
62-Old-fashioned exclamation of
8-Happen again;
36-Unordered;
14-Fame;
38-Suffix with glob;
surprise;
9-South American monkey;
44-Dancer Duncan;
15-Architect I.M.;
39-Foot digit;
63-Gidget portrayer Sandra;
10-Emitting odor;
45-Girl in a Beach Boys
song
16-Pout;
40-Employ, utilise;
64-Reflecting surface;
11-Column style;
46-Showered;
17-Dried grape;
41-Shoebox marking;
65-"David Copperfield" wife;
12-Total;
48-Begat;
18-Tread the boards;
42-Conscription org.;
66-Append;
13-l'm outta here!;
49-Buddy;
19-Feminine ending;
43-Legendary king of Thebes;
67-Humbly;
21-Sounds;
50-Chucked weapon;
20-State of being tranquil;
45-Numbered hwy.;
22-Acred;
51-Cornered;
23-Dense element;
46-Hosp. staffers;
DOWN
23-Code name;
52-Uncanny;
26-      Gang;
47-Oceans;
1-Be off;
24-Fill with joy;
54-lcelandicepic;
27-Foil maker;
48-"Peter and the Wolf" bird;
2-Meadow;
25-Curt;
55-Soccer star Mia;
28-DesignerCassini;
51-      kwon do;
3-Tropical cuckoo bird;
29-Wrong;
59-Vase;
29-For shame!;
52-Aheadoftime;
4-Mail charge;
30-Healing plants;
60-Cambodia's Lon     ;
30-Some;
53-Reduced to poverty;
5-Eddy;
32-Composer Mahler;
61-Boring;

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