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 OCTOBER 13,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUE IX
TICKLEANDFEELSINCE1918
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NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
MD program considers
removing science
pre-reqs
In the front row at
Vancouver Fashion
Week
Editorial: this election,
don't waste
your vote
UBC's quidditch club is
vying for competative
club status
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ELECTION SUPPLEMENT
.' // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
October 14—4:00 pm—AMS Student Nest
?JH
i
*NDP   f| green       Liberal      INDEPENDENT
WED 14
////
QUADRA CANDIDATES MEETING 4 PM @ NEW SUB
A forum for the parties discuss their views on specific issues.
FREE
SAT 17
////
OKTOBERFEST 5 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
Break out the lederhosen. A full day of live Bavarian music, cheap
bzzrand good food.
$5
MON19
////
VOTE! 12-3 P.M. @ OLD SUB
There's a polling station in the old SUB. Do your duty.
FREE AS THE MOUNTAIN AIR
ON THE COVER
ILLUSTRATION BY
Aiken Lao
INSPIRED BY
Angry man buns.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
Coordinating Editor Opinions + Blog Editor
Will McDonald JackHauen
coordinating@ubyssey.ca opinions@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Features Editor
Aiken Lao Arno Rosenfeld
arinteditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Web Developer Copy Editor
Peter Siemens Bailey Ramsay
webeditor@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Emma Partridge &
Moira Warburton
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
ahoto@ubyssey.ca
Web Editor
Jordan Schalm
we b@ ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Vassilena Sharlandjieva,
Matt Langmuir, Josh Azizi,
3ill Situ, Elena Volohova,
Jeremy Johnson-Silvers,
Julian Yu, SruthiTadepalli,
<aren Wang, Jessie
Sterling, Vicky Huang,
OlamideOlaniyan, Henry
Allan, Natalie Morris,
Miguel Santa Maria, Sivar
Spector, Sarah Nabila,
Sophie Sutcliffe
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.They
aretheexpressedopinionofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
\ibli cat ons Society or the Uni-
versiiy of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nerein cannotbe reproducec
OCTOBER 13, 2015 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUE IX
CONTACT
Editorial Office:
SUB 2208
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■
=HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Being shot by bandits during her last year of high school didn't stop Adit "Elizabeth" Abit from completing her exams and coming to UBC.
Adit Abit escaped civil war to study at UBC
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Staff Writer
When Adit "Elizabeth" Abit was six
years old, the Sudanese Civil War
forced her to flee Panyangor, a village
in what is now South Sudan. The
recent UBC graduate spent much of
her childhood seeking safety.
"I spent most ofthe time walking
from place to place, village to village,
camp to camp," she said ofthe
five years before her family finally
settled in a Sudanese refugee camp
bordering Uganda.
There, Abit was tasked with
guarding their unlocked house while
her mother barred her from going
to the local school her older brother
attended.
"My brother would come and say
A, B, C, D,'" Abit recalled. "I didn't
even know what was A, B, C, D' and
I'd feel bad because students would
mock me."
Abit reasoned that without a
house and family possessions to
look after, nothing could prevent her
from going to school. At age nine,
she issued an ultimatum her mother
couldn't refuse.
"I told my mom, 'Mom, you know
what I will do if you don't let me go
to school? I will burn the house,'"
she said.
After completing primary school,
Abit earned a place at a Kenyan
boarding school hoping to secure a
scholarship from World University
Service of Canada, a non-profit
organisation that funds higher
education to Canadian universities
for students from developing
countries.
While she would eventually
achieve her dream of a WUSC
scholarship, her boarding school
years were not free from trauma. In
her final year of high school, Abit
was crossing the border between
Kenya and Sudan when the car she
was in came under attack. Roadside
bandits opened fire on the vehicle,
killing the woman sitting next to her,
she recalled.
"I would say I was lucky because
I was shot in the arm," Abit said.
Still, Abit was determined to
return to school. She made it back in
time to complete her exams while
maintaining a positive outlook on
life.
"I'm very grateful for the
experience I had [at UBC]," Abit said,
noting that her academic program
helped answer questions that she'd
had since childhood.
"Because I had been affected
by war from childhood, I grew
up so passionate about solutions
to war," she said, pointing to
the interdisciplinary nature of
her studies which helped her
understand war and poverty from
multiple perspectives.
One class in particular, the
global politics course taught by
Allen Sens, left a lingering question
in her mind — how does one get
the courage to put knowledge into
practice?
Abit's answer came last winter
when she began efforts to launch
a youth empowerment program in
South Sudan.
"People would tell me ... 'This
is too much. It's too big," Abit
recalled. "But what I actually
would tell them [was], 'It's big, but
you and I are bigger.'"
Abit believes that to end the
cycle of violence in South Sudan,
which has been plagued by
internal conflict since it gained
independence four years ago,
individuals must take charge of
improving their communities.
"People see government as
something that can make everything
workable and successful," she said
of her compatriots. "But how can
you make them understand... that
change within society is your own
responsibility?"
She chose to focus on supporting
South Sudanese youth, who she
believes are most likely to end up
either taking up arms or becoming
refugees. Abit said her organization,
South Sudanese International Youth
Ambassadors, will foster a diverse
team of young people based in
South Sudan and Kenya equipped
to identify and address the needs of
their communities.
"These ambassadors will
come from all walks of life, all
communities, any nationalities,"
said Abit, adding that she would
like to find a role for UBC
students to become involved as
well.
To help Abit's goal of raising
$50,000 to open a resource centre
in the South Sudanese capital of
Juba, UBC charity event organizer
Generocksity is donating ticket
revenue from an upcoming party
to Abit's group. The event is
taking place at 8 p.m. October 17
at the Fortune Sound Club.
Abit's second objective
for SSIYA comes from her
appreciation of UBC's libraries.
Through the "Book Project,"
she hopes to open a library in a
South Sudanese primary school
within the next 12 months, giving
children there the chance to find
their unique interests by learning
about the world through a diverse
set of books.
Abit's proudest
accomplishment with SSIYA
to date was an International
Day of Peace celebration last
month featuring guest speakers
discussing the role of youth in
South Sudan.
"The best thing is getting the
message out," said Abit. "We are
here, this is what we're doing." 'M
20 Double Passes UP FOR GRABS
to the Advance 3D Screening of
PA^ANOR^Ai ACTIVITY
THE GHOST DIMENSION
For the first time
you will see
the activity.
Thursday, October zz, 7:ooPm
Scotiabank Theatre
Opens in theatres October z3
Pick up your Passes at the
Nest Room 2209
OCTOBER in 3D // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015
DOCTORS //
Medicine faculty considers removing science pre-reqs
SruthiTadepalli
Staff Writer
UBC's Faculty of Medicine has
proposed removing the mandatory
science pre-requisites for its M.D.
program.
"We still strongly recommend
that science courses be part of what
a student brings to the Faculty of
Medicine," said Bruce Fleming,
Associate Dean of Admissions at
the UBC Faculty of Medicine. "But
instead of saying that you strictly
have to have each and every one of
those science pre-requisites, our
admissions committee will... look
at your strengths in an attempt to
open accessibility to the program."
Students will still be required
be required to write the MCAT
exam which, especially due to
recent changes in 2015, Fleming
says it is a good indicator ofthe
knowledge and scientific thinking
of prospective medical students.
The proposal has been a part
of discussions relating to changes
around the medical school
curriculum since 2012. It will
be discussed at the UBC Faculty
of Medicine's next full faculty
meeting at the end of November.
Should the proposal be approved to
move forward, it will then be taken
to the senate to be discussed in
December.
When pre-med students were
asked about the proposal, they,
for the most part, felt it would not
impact their decision to take the
majority ofthe pre-requisites.
Medical students might not need all those science courses anymore.
Fourth-year psychology
major Sara Samani felt that the
requirements allowed her a plan for
preparing for the MCAT and medical
school in general.
"Not only is [the science
requirement] helpful for the MCAT,
it's also helpful to understand what
you're going to be going up against
for med school," said Samani. "These
courses are going to give [students]
an idea of what's going to be ahead."
When current first-year medical
students were asked for their opinion
on the proposal, they said that
they think completing the science
requirement is helpful to them in
medical school.
"There's a lot of baseline stuff I
understand because I took courses
inundergrad," said medical student
Shyama Das.
Another first-year medical
student, Caroline Gardiner agreed
with Das, but added that medical
school seems difficult for everyone —
even those who probably have more
experience in the area than others.
"I've asked nursing students who
you'd think would have the most
practical exposure and they have a
hard time. I think it's so variable. I
don't know if it actually correlates to
what your degree is necessarily," said
Gardiner.
On the other hand, pre-medical
student Jasmine Lewis believes
"the proposal will probably make
[medical school] more inclusive.
Students who haven't paid $500
= ILE PHOTO COLIN CHIA/THE UBYSSEY
per course to take all these science
courses will be able to apply if they
have the pre-requisite knowledge
as opposed to have taken the
courses," said Lewis.
In attempting to make
this proposal a reality, UBC's
Faculty of Medicine's main goal
is to make the program more
accessible to different students.
"To be strong, any discipline
has to draw from a rich
background of applicants. We
feel that there are non-traditional
applicants that maybe come from
a non-science background that
would bring much to the program
and to the profession. We don't
want to close the door to them,"
said Fleming. 'JD
SCHOOL SPIRIT//
How all the pump-up around football benefits UBC
Have a good time at homecoming? Good. So did we.
Moira Warburton
News Editor
UBC is famous for a lot of things
- a beautiful campus, world-class
research facilities and diverse
student body to name a few. But
overwhelming school spirit isn't
the first thing that springs to
mind when thinking of UBC.
The triple threat of David
Sidoo, Robert Morton and
Aaron Bailey plan to change
this, starting with entrenching
Thunderbird football at the heart
of campus life.
Morton is the founder and
director of The Calendar, UBC's
biggest event-planning group.
"We've learned as a campus
how to do these big 'rah-rah' school
spirit events," said Morton. "We
know what it looks like, we know
how to come out to it and we know
that we want it."
It's not the lack of enthusiasm at
UBC that results in lagging school
spirit, argues David Sidoo, just few
opportunities to express it.
"Students want to have a great
pre-party, a great experience at the
game and a winning team," said
Sidoo, ex-Thunderbirds football
player, UBC Board of Governors
member and businessman.
So how does this translate
= ILE PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
into increased school spirit off
the football pitch? The motive
behind the pump-up before each
Thunderbirds home football
game is equally simple— more
connection between students.
Aaron Bailey, AMS president,
sees this going beyond just a
connection between students and
athletics on campus and instead
connecting students to their
campus as a whole.
With their combined
interpersonal relationships with
the various clubs and societies on
campus, the AMS and Calendar
folk working together with the
business acumen of Sidoo and
Athletics can connect a lot of
people.
Compared to last year's numbers,
4,245 came to Homecoming 2014
versus almost 7,000 in 2015.
What's more telling is that the
second game ofthe year in 2015
saw over 3,000 fans - record-high
numbers.
"The biggest thing... this year is
momentum from last year, learning
from our mistakes [and] doing
it bigger," said Morton. "We've
also been a bit more organized
with reaching out to other
organizations."
Sidoo and Bailey, for their
parts, both noted that an easy way
to tell there's been an effect is
the increased number of people
wearing Thunderbird clothing
around campus. Their tangible
focus is football, but the effects can
be seen in much broader ways than
one.
"We focused on football in first
semester because it's almost like
a romantic college experience,"
said Morton. "There's four games
which is a nice thing that people
can commit to. [It's] enough
that you can follow them and
move from just being excited
about school spirit and school in
general... to be excited about the
game."
The organizers hope the
momentum won't stop there.
"We're hoping the campus
transitions itself from a campus
where ... students feel that they're
not connected ... [and] that it
transitions itself to a campus that
continues to push the academic
excellence," said Sidoo. 'M
CONSTRUCTION//
Library garden
to be redesigned
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= HOTO MICHAEL RUFFOLO/THE UBYSSEY
UBC is no stranger to constuction — this
time it will be outside Koerner.
Danni Shanel
Contributor
Watch out UBC, more construction
is coming your way.
The university is putting together
a proposal to redesign Library
Garden as a part of UBC's Public
Realm Plan. The initiative was
approved in 2009 and allots $46
million for the redesign of campus
public outdoor spaces.
Campus and Community
Planning has launched a consultation
process to seek input from those on
campus as to what they would like to
see from the garden.
Through a series of open houses
and two "co-discovery workshops,"
the university has brought together
the Building Working Committee,
Landscape Working Committee,
Planning Advisory, the AMS, GSS
and several other stakeholders to
give their opinions on the proposal.
"There are so many different
perspectives and ideas," said
Consultation Senior Manager
Gabriella Armstrong. "It's got so
much potential and opportunity to
be a number of different things for
different groups."
Campus Landscape Architect
Dean Gregory is in charge of
implementatingthe landscape vision
laid out in the Public Realm Plan.
"Long after you finish your
studies, you forget about the classes,
you know?" Gregory said. "You
remember the friends you made, the
places you hung out in, the landscape
[and] what the place felt like. So
that's our challenge today."
So what is Gregory's overall
vision for the project?
"I want to see this very central,
important piece of campus knit back
into the fabric ofthe campus."
The garden will also be home to a
5,000 square foot Indian Residential
Schools History and Dialogue
Centre.
Gregory said he would like
to acknowledge the area's rich
Musqueam history while also
paying tribute to the designs ofthe
university's first landscape artist who
designed the grounds back in 1927.
He would also like to maintain
the axial-visual relationship
between the two libraries. "It gives
dignity when you have a strong
axis focused on something of
importance. You feel it. It's a
little bit like Paris or the mall in
Washington DC. We don't have the
Washington monument, but we
have the Martha Piper fountain."
He does not want to introduce
formality. Instead, he sees
"erosion, breakdown [and a] more
naturalistic relationship with
building — human scaled spaces."
Proposed designs will be put
forward to the UBC Board of
Governors in spring of 2016. '21 // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015  El
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M  FRHMGHTSxa
Contributor
Fashion is a language that is
shared by all, but not necessarily
understood by everyone.
Films like The Devil Wears
Prada and the price of high-
fashion clothes may act as
a deterrent to some, but the
industry isn't as intimidating
and inaccessible as it may seem.
Fashion is actually very easy to
understand — all you need is to
know are the current trends and
how you can make them work.
Thankfully, Vancouver
Fashion Week was last week
and from the front row we could
see what's to come in the next
few seasons. By taking the styles
from the runway and integrating
them into your daily wardrobe,
you can ensure that you will
stand out and look fashionable
without too much effort.
ACCESSORIZING
The key to making any look
shine lies in the accessories. For
example, a pair of sunglasses
can lift any look and make it
chic. Opt for unconventional
shapes and frames that will
instantly make you high fashion.
Keep watches simple and try
to stay within the gold/silver/
black colour schemes. Hats are
especially great for winter! Look
for faux fur Russian style hats
as they scream elegance on both
guys and girls.
MINIMALISM
This trend has been recurring on
runways for a few years now. It's
a simple concept which says stay
away from over the top prints
and designs. Stick to solid earth
tone colours such as mustard,
browns, greys, navy, pumpkin,
and of course the colour ofthe
year marsala (maroon). You
can also incorporate geometric
shapes into your look to polish
it off.
FABRIC CHOICES
Along with incorporating trends,
also try to be conscious ofthe
fabric choices you use. Opt for
fabrics that contain structure
— loose and flimsy clothing can
often look messy and unpolished.
When trying to dress it up, make
sure your clothing looks stiff
and sharp. A super easy way to
dress up for the holidays is with
velvet. For guys try dressing up
with velvet blazers and ladies, a
simple velvet dress will be ultra
fab.
THE 70s ARE BACK!
So bust out that fringe and acid
washed denim because this
trend will be everywhere next
spring. The 70s aesthetic has
now been shown in designer
collections in all the major
fashion weeks. Lucky for us,
shopping for vintage clothing
is cheap since we can shop
at thrift stores - you don't
need to buy from expensive
designer brands to look
trendy.
The most important trend
of all is staying true to you. No
matter how fancy your outfit
is, your personality will always
outshine it. Wear what makes
you happy, even if it doesn't
make sense to others, because
in the end fashion is art and so
are you. 'JJ QUADRA
TOPIC
LIBERAL                         CONSERVATIVE                            NDP
Joyce Murray                                  Blair Lockhart                                Scott Andrews
>-
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"There's many other ways that we
have already announced measures
tosupportyoung people," said Joyce
Murray, liberal candidate. "A program
to create 40,000 jobs a year for
youth... will be very helpful to people
going to school because some of
those jobs will be jobs that can help
support their tuition or summer job."
Murray said this initiative is restoring
a previous program "the government
cut in half."
The Conservatives have promised
to double the government's
contributions to RESPs. They will
now give 20 cents on the dollarfor
regularincomefamiliesand40 cents
for low income families on the first
$500 put into an RESP each year.
They've also promised to double
federal contributions to additional
Canada Education Savings grants.
"1 actually watched tuition increase
every yearthat 1 was studying at the
University of British Columbia. The
average student graduates now
owing more than $26,000 in debt,"
said NDP candidate Scott Andrews.
Andrews points to decreasing transfer
payments from Ottawa as a causal
factor in this mass of debt. According
to Andrews, an NDP Government
will provide the provinces with
adequate post-secondary
education funding from the federal
government.
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The Liberal's planforsustainability
involves spending $20 billion
on developing public transit
nationwide.
"[The Conservative Government]
dropped their Build Canada Fund
forinfrastructure by87percentfor
two years in a row," said Murray
"We need to do more of investing in
infrastructure because interest rates
are low right now."
Murray said that getting the Broadway
Line is part of her party's plan to
develop public transit across Canada.
South Surrey-White Rock
Conservative candidate Dianne Watts
announced that the Economic Action
Plan's national public transit fund
will provide $700 million for the
proposed $2.1 billion dollar Light
Rail Transit Project in Surrey.
The party has chosen to support
Surrey transit over Vancouver's
Broadway subway line because
Surrey's plan was more advanced,
although they will not close the door
on the east-west corridor.
During his time at UBC, Andrews
would seethe 99 pass him regularly
Andrews says the NDP will improve
transit by providing "$1.3 billion
every year in predictable and
transparent investments across
Canada." "This will also have the
benefit of creating 31,000 good
quality jobs," said Andrews. "Mulcair is
committed to being a good partnerfor
municipalities and regional districts
to make sure we've got a solid urban
transit plan."
>-
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One ofthe main goals ofthe Liberal
Party is to increase the Canadian
government's investment in
sustainable energy Measures
to achieving this include removing
subsidies from fossil fuels and
spending $20 billion on green
infrastructure overthe next decade.
"Canada actually has to transition onto
a green energy platform and away
from fossil fuels in order to meet our
two degree centigrade commitment
to reducing emissions," said Murray.
Conservatives support pipelines
such as the Northern Gateway,
Kinder Morgan, Keystone XL and
Energy East pipelines. They've
committed to reducing greenhouse
gas emissions by 30 per cent below
2005 levels by 2030, although they've
announced no specific plans on how
this will be accomplished. If elected,
they will provide an enhanced tax
credit for remote mining projects to
help support potential mines that face
higher costs because of their location.
Andrews and the NDP are committed
to setting numerous environmental
goals. They intend to appeal the
subsidies on the oil and gas
industry, restore funding to the
Canadian Research Council,
attend the Paris Climate Summit
and reduce C02 emissions by 80
per cent from 1990 levels by 2050.
<
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Murray said that Canada's "prohibition
policies have failed."
"The best way to keep young children
from having access to marijuana is to
have it controlled and regulated
by government, not the gangs," she
said. "That just fuels the gang wars
and violence out on the streets. So if
we want saferstreets and safer kids,
it's important that it's government, and
not criminals, that are regulating and
controlling this drug."
The Conservatives oppose any
attempts to legalize marijuana
and, comparing it to tobacco, say
that legalizing the drug will not keep
marijuana away from children.
"We have spent a couple of
generations trying to reduce the
usage of tobacco in Canada with a
lot of success," Harpersaid at a rally
in Montreal. "Marijuana is infinitely
worse."
Andrews says it is clear that Harper's
Waron Drugs is not working.
"The current unregulated market,
it'sfailed. It produces violence,
stigma and unfortunately control
by organized crime," said Andrews.
"Our marijuana laws need to be
modernized. They need to be based
on evidence and public principles so
the NDP would begin this process
immediately by decriminalizing
marijuana." FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2015
POLITICIANS ARE
w TOOLS, ELECTIONS ARE
BROKEN—BUT YOU
SHOULD STILL VOTE
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
Rolling out of Koerner's late
Tuesday night, AMS VP External
Jude Crasta led a crew to paint
the Engineering Cairn. Normally
defacement ofthe Cairn promotes
competing faculties or clubs crude
jokes - purple for Arts, bright
orange to promote a Calendar
Halloween party, F-U-C-K in large
letters, and so on - but Crasta had
something different in mind. Until
someone else comes around with
their own can of paint, the concrete
monument in the center of Main
Mall is promoting Champion the
Vote, the AMS' "get out the vote"
effort for this month's federal
election.
Along with a website, social
media outreach, debate screenings,
pub talks and even cup sleeves
handed out at Uppercase and other
AMS restaurants, Crasta has been
working hard to ensure students
know how to vote and why it's
important.
And he's not alone. Every
election cycle the same stories
emerge about the "apathetic" and
"disengaged" 18 to 24-year-old
demographic, which regularly sees
voting rates below 40 percent. But
while experts agree that turning
out young people to the polls is
crucial in order to improve the
political situation in Canada, they
say youth have every reason to tune
out ofthe political process.
"There is a misapprehension
that young voters are being
apathetic, not caring, too plugged
into their gadgets," said Max
Cameron, a political science
professor at UBC. In fact, "youth
look at the political process and
they say, 'Well, I don't see myself
reflected in it.'"
Among Cameron and others
working to turn out the vote on
this campus and across Canada
there is a broad consensus that
political parties have failed to
attract young voters across the
board. Parties are more invested
in securing the support of seniors,
who are more populous and vote
in higher numbers; parties are
failing to present grand visions of
a better Canadian society; parties
are in a perpetual campaigning
process that turns governing
in a spectacle that makes the
political process look crude and
unappealing. That, coupled with
an electoral first-past-the-post
system that encourages strategic
voting, rather than supporting the
party you would like to see form
a government, and it is easy to see
why UBC students and others turn
away from elections.
"It's more and more becoming a
show of theatre, of who can be the
most sensationalist," Crasta said of
Canadian politicians.
The smoke and mirrors of
rhetoric bouncing around during
campaign season are a key reason
why students and young people fail
to turn out to the polls. While voting
itself may only take a few minutes,
Cameron said many people simply
don't feel prepared to cast their
ballot and see getting caught up on
all the issues as a daunting task.
Of course, those trying to
encourage youth turnout are quick
to point out there are a variety of
easy ways to learn about where the
parties stand on issues voters care
about. Vote Compass, operated
by the CBC, is the best-known
example of such an educational tool,
with users answering a series of
questions and the website spitting
out a suggestion of which parties
align best with their views. But
smaller applications and websites are
stepping into the void seeking to help
specifically younger voters.
Pollenize is a beautifully
designed website and mobile phone
application first created to educate
voters about the Toronto mayoral
race last year and now being applied
to the federal election. Each party
is broken down with a barebones
summary of their policies on a series
of issues from justice to pipelines
and aboriginal issues and makes it
easy to compare a single issue across
the parties and reminds readers at
the bottom of each page that "It only
takes 42 seconds to register for the
42nd Canadian Election" with a link
to sign up.
"It's really hard to get to the core
ofthe style that all these politicians
use," said Miguel Barbosa, one of
Pollenize's co-founders. Barbosa said
his team has tried to cut through
the political rhetoric, only including
party positions that have specific
plans tied to them and citing their
sources clearly. "We want to hit the
user who has no interest in politics
at all."
iCanParty is another attempt
to reach prospective youth voters
through technology. Run by a team
including three UBC students,
the website offers a less polished
but more in-depth breakdown
and comparison ofthe four main
parties' stances on issues like
combatting the Islamic State and
Quebec sovereignty.
Recent UBC graduate and
iCanParty cofounder Jonah Brook
said the idea for the site came out of
a conversation with a friend, where
the two disagreed over a party's
stance but found the actual positions
not to be easily found.
"I found it surprisingly hard to
look up and find what parties were
arguing for and supporting," he said.
"I feel like most people get bogged
down in these big ideological ideas
and what parties stand for or how
much they like the leader."
But if these
projects and
others help close
the information
gap for youth
voters, that
only addresses
one aspect of
disillusionment
with the political
system in Canada.
Cameron, the
political science
professor, said
he thinks the shift on the part of
all parties to gearing their policies
towards improving the economy and
keeping up with other countries has
led to a lack of vision. With parties
pledgingto get out ofthe way and let
the private sector drive the country,
he said it is hard for leaders to argue
they will improve Canadian society.
"As governing gets more and
more limited, politics becomes less
and less attractive," Cameron, who
is the director ofthe Centre for the
Study of Democratic Institutions on
campus. "There's sort of less to offer
people."
If parties used to fight over grand
ideals of what Canada should be -
the terms in which young people
often think about futures they would
like to see - Cameron said they are
now reduced to fighting over the
centre, reduce campaigning to a
series of fights over insignificant
wedge issues like the niqab where
politician can score cheap political
points while dodging more serious
questions.
The smoke and
mirrors of rhetoric
bouncing around
during campaign
season are a key
reason why students
and young people
fail to turn out to the
polls.
But, as crazy as it may sound,
none of this is to say you shouldn't
vote.
"Encouraging young people to
vote is absolutely essential," said
Tessica Truong, who works for
Simon Fraser University's Public
Square initiative and has lots of
experience engaging youth civic
engagement. She herself has had a
great deal of frustration with feeling
as though none ofthe political
parties adequately advocate for the
Canadian future she would like
to see. However she said that just
means we need to do more than
vote - not sign away our voice
altogether.
"You can reward the politicians
that are advocating
on behalf of the
issues that you feel
are important, or
in certain cases
punish or not
reward the political
that are doing
work against the
public interest,"
Truong said, adding
that it is work
done between
elections that holds
politicians to account the most and
moves democratic reform forward.
Likewise, the AMS VP Crasta
said that despite the valid
disillusionment many students
feel, staying at home doesn't
communicate any message to
those in power and leads to the
population being written off. But
if instead UBC students vote in
large numbers it will allow the
AMS to flex its muscles when it
comes to advocating for student
interests in conversations with the
government.
"It gives politicians a reason
to see that students should not
be taken for granted and student
issues should not be taken for
granted," Crasta explained. "It
helps the case later on to... say,
'Look, we have a lot of students -
52,000 of them - they are voters.
You should probably listen to
what they say because if you don't
respond well they're probably not
going to rehire you in the next
election.'" '21
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UBC
AND THE
FEDERAL ELECTION
ILLUSTRATIONS BY AIKEN LAO     V
-     ';
Political clubs and their relationship to the parties
Sophie Sutcliffe
Staff Writer
With the 2015 election season
upon us, no one has been more
active around campus lately than
UBC's student political groups.
More than anything, these
students are trying to make UBC
students do the unexpected —
vote.
"It's assumed that youth aren't
going to vote [and that] youth
aren't going to care. So a lot of
parties don't campaign towards
youth," said Amy Ryder, Election
Coordinator and Treasurer of
the UBC NDP club. "When youth
aren't voting, these parties have
no reason the create policies
which benefit students. But
when students are voting, then
parties actually have to pay
attention to what they need."
For political parties, these
clubs can be a great tool. They
increase voter turnout, engage
young people in politics and
campaign for the party on
campus. How much the parties
actually use this resource though
varies.
When asked what their
involvement was with the Liberal
Party of Canada, President ofthe
UBC Young Liberals of Canada
Robin Asgari said "[We] are
considered an affiliate. So we're
actually allowed to go to policy
conventions and things and meet
MPs ... but technically no, we're
just an AMS club."
According to Asgari, members
of parliament have attended
events in the past. In terms of
the frequency of these events,
Asgari said, "It's hard to get
MPs [because] they're always in
Ottawa, so it's not too often."
There seemed to be more
opportunity for involvement for
the UBC NDP club.
"We're affiliated with the
national [party], but we're also
affiliated with the Young New
Democrats — the youth counsel
ofthe provincial party," said
Kayla Fast, president of UBC
NDP. "It works to basically
facilitate training, campaign
training and it works to
incorporate the youth voice into
the making of provincial policy
under the NDP umbrella."
The campus Conservatives
could not be reached for
comment.
Despite their differences in
structure and belief, both the
Liberal and NDP student groups
agree that getting students to
vote is important.
"Check out all the parties,
check out their policies," said
Asgari. "Just go vote because if
voter turnout among youth is
even 60 per cent this election,
regardless of who wins, in the
next election all parties are going
to be paying attention." 'JJ
UBC weighs in on the NDP student debt plan
Samantha McCabe
Contributor
Last month, the NDP announced
a new plan to phase out federal
student loan interest over the next
seven years beginning immediately
should they be elected.
Allegedly, this would save the
average student about $4,000 while
repaying their loans.
The NDP will also create
approximately 74,000 new grants
for students, a total investment
of around $250 million over four
years, with low-income families
receiving the most assistance and
focus.
"Compared to just making
tuition free ... what you want is
exactly having enough of a grant
system such that people that are
coming from different backgrounds,
where they have no family
support... can be helped to go
to university and are not falling
into debt," said Paul Beaudry,
economics professor at UBC.
Today, two million Canadians
are struggling to manage a
collective $20 billion in student
loans (a jump of 36 per cent
since 2006, the NDP claims).
Yet, tuition keeps rising - last
year, almost 425,000 students
were forced to take on loans in
order to finance their education,
according to the Canadian
Federation of Students.
"I feel that every student
should have the equal opportunity
to be able to attend university based
on merit rather than financial
strength or weaknesses," said
Isabella Tang-Graham, a second-
year arts student, when asked
about her thoughts on the rising
debt of Canadian students.
B.C. students are especially
affected. The province's interest
rate on student loans is currently
the highest of any in the country
— a staggering 2.5 per cent
above prime. This interest starts
accumulating onto a student's
debt right after they graduate with
no grace period like some other
provinces.
However, other parties are also
realizing that the younger vote is
extremely important. They are all
creating policies aiming to reach out
to youth aged 18 to 24.
Justin Trudeau, party leader
for the Liberals, states that if his
party gets elected, graduates would
not have to begin paying off their
student loans until they earn at least
$25,000 a year.
Trudeau claims that to
financially cope with these changes,
he will balance the budget in 2019
after three years of modest deficits.
At the same time, Steven Harper
is promising a greater amount of
money returned on the dollars that
low and middle class families invest
into their children's RESPs.
Each of these plans, no matter
how extensive, has an economic
feasibility that derives from
where this repurposed funding
comes from. "A lot of things
are feasible," said Beaudry.
"The question is whether it is
desirable and who is paying for
it."
Concerning the Conservative
Party in particular, Tang-Graham
added, "[It seems like] it doesn't
encourage equal opportunity
and access for every student
regardless of their background."
While student loan interest
rates are not the only platform
factor that young people
will consider, they are a key
component in the financial future
of Canada's students and recent
graduates. 'JJ
Vancouver Quadra candidates debate climate change
Aidan Qualizza
Contributor
Climate policy is one ofthe
main topics of discussion as the
October 19 federal election day
approaches.
Last Tuesday, a group of
students, faculty and community
members met at UBC to hear a
panel of political candidates and
environmental experts speak.
Candidates for the Vancouver-
Quadra riding also attended.
The topic under discussion
was the importance of climate-
informed voting.
George Hoberg, associate
professor in the department of
political science, spoke ofthe
current global community's
environmental trajectory which
"puts us in a very alarming future.'
Hoberg said if we don't
work hard to decrease carbon
emissions, "Many ofthe systems
that we see on the plant earth that
support human civilization in a
way that we're accustomed to will
be radically altered."
Similarly, Kathryn Harrison, a
political scientist and chemical
engineer, spoke of greenhouse
gas (GHG) emissions within
Canada, what their sources
are and how they are linked to
climate policy.
According to Harrison,
Canada's GHG emissions are
divided into two groups — the
first half are big industrial
polluters, a quarter of which
is the oil and gas industry.
The second half is made up of
"million and millions of small
sources" such as farms, buildings
and personal vehicles.
"We need to actually take our
target seriously," she said, noting
that the Canadian government
has had seven different GHG
emissions targets since 1990 —
all of which have failed.
Cooperation between parties
became a clear goal of all three
federal Candidates participating
in the debate featuring Joyce
Murray ofthe Liberal Party,
Scott Andrews of the New
Democrats and Kris Constable of
the Green Party.
Blair Lockhart ofthe
Conservative Party declined her
offer to attend the debate.
Murray and her party see
the ability to collaborate on
every bill as the main issue the
Canadian government needs to
deal with.
"We have a very consensus
oriented party," she said. "We
have weekly legislative meetings
where we talk it through ... we
actually reach consensus as a
group. I am very proud of the
approach that we take."
Constable explained that
he is "the only candidate that
is standing ... that can say
authentically that [he] will
vote for you" in Ottawa. Party
discipline in his point of view is
undemocratic.
The event led students and
community members to further
develop their opinions as they go
to vote.
Kimberley Wong, a second-
year geography student, said
that she attended last night's
lectures and debate because she
was divided on if she wanted
to vote strategically or on her
fundamental beliefs. She said
that last night's debate was "the
deciding factor" in how she is
going to vote on October 19.
UBCC350 hopes that
whoever gets elected into office
will effectively represent the
concerns of residents in the
Vancouver-Quadra riding.
Concerning the Conservative
Party in particular, Tang-Graham
added, "[It seems like] it doesn't
encourage equal opportunity
and access for every student
regardless of their background."
While student loan interest
rates are not the only platform
factor that young people
will consider, they are a key
component in the financial
future of Canada's students and
recent graduates. 'JJ 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015
FLEA MARKET//
Eastside Flea Market is more than just plaid shirts
The Eastside Flea Market brought in vendors from all of Vancouver
Elena Volohova
Staff Writer
The annual Eastside Flea Market
is back in the new SUB and
this year is welcoming back old
favourites and new friends.
Tea Lani is an organic tea shop
run by Mayumi Sugano, tea lover
and Chinese herb expert.
Mayumi is on a mission to
educate people about real organic
tea.
"For me, tea is a way of
relaxation and socializing. I found
many cultures have this tradition,"
she said. "It is sad because many
people drink artificially produced
tea which is not good."
With an aspiration to change
that, Mayuni, after working at
a tea shop in Victoria, took an
online course to learn more
about herbs and started her own
company.
Mayumi's goal is to show that
artificial flavouring is unnecessary
because purely organic teas can
taste just as good or even better
while also nourishing the body
and improving the health.
Specialized in brewing her
hipster brew of choice, kombucha,
Biota Fermentation is an organic
fermentation company. They
also provide a variety of pickling
vegetables such as kimchi,
sauerkraut, pickled beets and
cucumbers.
Passionate about food and
fermentation, James Kidd and
Bradley Henderson, having a total
of 30 years in the food industry
between them, founded the company
in February 2015 and had finally
began brewing and pickling the
following March. Both former chefs
working together side by side at
three different restaurants, Kidd and
Henderson found their passion in
organic fermenting.
"Biology and food put together —
it's beautiful," said Kidd.
The Biota Fermentation booth is
living proof of the fact. Along with a
delicious variety of kombuchas, they
are offering seasonal sauerkraut and
brussels sprout kimchi — fermented
using local probiotics and crafted
with love. Currently developing
their own mustard recipe along
with working on Christmas specials,
= HOTO JARRI ULLAH SHAH/THE UBYSSEY
Kidd and Henderson are hoping to
establish a retail space of their own
one day to share their passion with
their customers.
Bringing the "flower power"
to the people, Ron Pobran is a
founder ofthe mobile store Simply
Neglectable which specializes in
desert plants. A fourth generation
farmer from Saskatchewan with 11
years in farming experience, he is
on a quest to fight against chemical
pesticides and genetically modified
fertilizers. Pobran uses nothing on
his plants that he wouldn't use in his
own home.
Through Simply Neglectable,
Pobran hopes to share his passion
for organic farming and prove that
sometimes it can be done effortlessly.
"I realized that people don't want
to water their plants all the time
and be married to them. So I started
working with desert plants which
are very forgiving," he said.
A large variety of desert plants
are available for sale at Simply
Neglectable. They are a strikingly
beautiful, diverse and colourful
spectacle of organic farming proving
that nature got it just right. 'M
Interested
in teaching?
Earn a Bachelor of Education in 12 months
Apply by January 31 for the 2016/17 program
INQUIRE
GINE
AWARDS//
Professor receives
Governor General's Award
PHOTO COURTESY LAURA SAWCHAK
Dr. Barman will be presented with her medal on October 16.
teach.educ.ubc.ca
Mischa Milne
Contributor
A little-known piece of British
Columbia's history is being
recognized at the national level.
Dr. Jean Barman, a now-retired
UBC professor, was awarded the
gold medal for scholarly research
for her book French Canadians,
Furs, and Indigenous Women in
the Pacific Northwest, published
by UBC Press in 2014.
The prize is given to the non-
fiction work of Canadian history
published each year that is judged
to have made the most significant
contribution to the understanding
of Canada's past. It is presented
by the Canadian Historical
Association and administered by
Canada's History Society.
What makes the book unique
is the exploration ofthe impact
of French Canadians and their
Indigenous partners on British
Columbia. Making up the bulk of
workers in the fur trade, Barman
argues that they played a large
role in the Hudson's Bay Company
- and by extension, the British
government's determination to
keep BC part of Canada rather
than relinquishing it to the United
States.
"We often think of history
as being created through white
men in positions of power, and
these were men not in positions
of power but ordinary young men
from Quebec who decided they
wanted to have an adventure, who
wanted to leave home and get a job
... I'm arguing that they mattered,
by virtue of being who they were,"
she said.
A significant challenge to
completing the six year research
and writing process for the book
was the fact that the subjects
- French Canadian men and
the Indigenous women they
married - were, for the most
part, illiterate. Information was
collected from colonial records
preserved in places as far away as
the National Archives in London,
or as nearby as local provincial
archives. The majority of these
records were for left by British
officers who controlled the fur
trade, requiring Barman to glean
information through the eyes of
others.
"In this case, the people I
was able to write about most
thoroughly were the daughters
of chiefs, because they were ones
whose families intrigued the
English men who were in charge
and who were writing the books
and telling the stories, and from
that you could infer something
about their daughters."
Initially, Barman had intended
to focus on the men that moved
to the Pacific Northwest to work
in the fur trade, as much of her
previous historical work has
focused on women. However, she
discovered very early on in her
research the significance ofthe
partnerships and family life had
in keeping the workers in British
Columbia.
She was helped in her
research by UBC grad student
Genevieve Lapointe, who was
working on her Master's degree
in Sociology at the time.
"The information I was able
to find from the perspective of
French Canadians, and through
them of Indigenous women, took
me in a direction I didn't expect
to go," said Barman. "It's actually
finding out something, and
coming to understand something,
that you really had no idea
existed in the first place."
Dr. Barman will be presented
with the gold medal by Governor
General David Johnston on
October 16 at Rideau Hall in
Ottawa. She is already planning
her next book. 'JD // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015
ADVICE //
Ask Natalie: On sex,
virginity and friends
with benefits
"Dear Natalie,
I'm one of those saps who fall in
love easily and, unfortunately
for me, Cupid struck early this
year. We're a month into school
and I'm already head over heels
for this boy on my floor. He's
made it fairly clear he's not
interested in a relationship
but would still be down for
something like friends with
benefits. Should I take it? I'm
usually a relationship gal, but I
really, really like this guy and I
kind of want to just take what I
can get.
— Hopefully Hopeless"
Dear Hopefully Hopeless,
I don't know your history or
views on some fairly important
topics that are really relevant to
this situation, but I can give you
my personal advice. In my honest
opinion, don't do it. You can't start
a relationship (even one that's just
"friends with benefits") thinking
you can change the other person.
You two are looking for different
things and, regardless of what you
think you will feel, it will be a lot
harder than you think.
At least if you're not together,
you won't have to try to convince
yourself you're happy with the
situation you're in. You won't have
to pretend it doesn't bother you
when you see him flirting with
someone else or confused if people
ask you if you were a couple.
You won't feel guilty when you
flirt with someone else at a party
because you won't be together. At
least you can give the rest ofthe
world an honest go.
Friends with benefits can work
in certain circumstances, but I
would never recommend it when
you're starry-eyed for the other
person. That's just not fair to you.
= ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
"Dear Natalie,
I'm a virgin and I'm starting to get
embarrassed by my lack of a sex
life. I feel like everyone is leaps
ahead of me and I can't really add
to conversations with my friends.
Any advice?"
Are you telling me all your friends
talk about is sex? How old are your
friends?
Being a virgin is nothing to be
ashamed of. It should have no impact
on your everyday life unless you
make it a huge deal. If you want to
get laid, go out and get laid. If you
want to wait until marriage, go ahead
No one should
judge you for your
sexual experience
or lack thereof"
and wait. Hell, if you never ever want
to have sex, that's a valid choice too.
No one should judge you for your
sexual experience or lack thereof.
If your friends are making fun of
you, then tell them to cut it out. If
they keep doing it, then drop them
like you're hot and move on to people
who don't judge you by your sex life.
I have friends who are very sexually
active and I have friends who have
never been kissed — those facts have
no bearing on how I feel about them.
So you're a virgin. What does it
matter? So are tons of other people.
Some surveys report up to half of
entering first-years are virgins. But
regardless, being one (or not) doesn't
change who you are as a person.
Need advice? Contact Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@ubyssey.
ca and have your questions answered
in an upcoming issue. 13
ELECTION //
If you want a non-Conservative government, these are your choices.
GRAPHIC JACK HAUEN/THE UBYSSEY
Don't waste your vote
UBYSSEY STAFF
Editorial
The Ubyssey editorial board could
not come to an agreement on a
specific party to endorse in the 2015
federal election, but the unanimous
consensus was that we would rather
see any one of them in power over
the Conservatives. To achieve that
goal, UBC students must a) vote and
b) vote strategically.
Students here are
overwhelmingly centre-left to
left-wing, and as such, we have a
tendency to split our vote between
the Liberals, the NDP and the Green
Party. Apply this vote-splitting
nationally and it becomes a major
problem. Because our electoral
system can so easily become
fundamentally unrepresentative
of a democracy in which there are
multiple parties, Conservative MPs
are often elected in ridings where
the majority of people would rather
elect a left-wing candidate.
This is where strategic voting
comes in. Take a look at the voting
history and current polls in your
riding. If you'd like to see someone
other than Stephen Harper at 24
Sussex for the next few years, vote
for the non-Conservative candidate
who has the best chance of winning
— in Vancouver Quadra, where UBC
and Point Grey are situated, that's
Liberal Joyce Murray. You might
feel like Thomas Mulcair would
be the best leader for Canada (or
you might just love a good beard),
but if your riding's NDP candidate
is polling at 10 per cent while the
Liberal and Conservative are neck-
and-neck, you'd only be throwing
your vote away on the New
Democrat.
Voting as a UBC student is
easier than ever and the outcome
of this election could decide some
very important aspects of our
lives in the coming years. For all
its imperfections, Canada is still
a democracy and we all have a
responsibility to participate. 'M
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15032
Public Open House
Totem Park Residence Infill Phase 2
You are invited to attend an Open House on Thursday, October 22 to view and comment on a
proposed new student residence building south of the existing Totem Residence to house 350
first and second year students.
Date:
Place:
ursday,October22,2015 4:30-6:30 PM
r, Coquihalla Commons Block, 2525 West Mall
MM
Thunderbird
Residence
I     =3	
1     F/SC
	
^r
F/SB
West
:/S A      Westchester
Meeting
Iff    Location
Totem
=ielc
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Plans will be displayed for a new 8,900m2,
student residence with 350 beds. The facility will be
comprised of a 6-storey dormitory block and a
single-storey shared amenity building.
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
For more information or to comment on this project,
please visit:
plannine.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russel
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #^l^sa»°ia^sl^sa&sa7h#oi si£M^.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
campus+community planning // SPORTS+RE C
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015  Hi] TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13,2015   |    SPORTS    |   11
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Olamide Olaniyan
Staff Writer
Last year, the UBC Quidditch team
finally achieved a goal that it had
been gunning for since its inception
in 2010 - They made it to the
Quidditch World Cup in South
Carolina.
With third position in the
Northwest division and ranked first
in their region, the UBC Quidditch
team snagged a spot amongst 80
teams beating a sizeable amount of
American teams for it. They went
on to represent UBC and the rest
of Canada for the first time at the
World Cup. Western Washington,
UBC's regional rivals across the
border, was the only other team from
the Northwest that competed in the
World Cup.
This was a considerable
achievement for them considering
that only five years ago they were
still a fledgling team struggling
to achieve recognition within the
UBC community. Only a few people
showed up to practice and hoops
were duct taped to the ground. Now
they are about 70 members strong
with two competitive playing teams
striving for international and regional
prominence.
A  Making waves  m
The team does not play in the
Canadian Quidditch League though
— mostly because of a need for
exposure and a lack of strong
competition in Western Canada.
Instead, they choose to play in the US
Quidditch league (USQ). There are a
few teams in Alberta, the University of
Victoria and Simon Fraser University
that compete in Western Canada,
but UBC "routinely squashes them,"
accordingtothisyear'sQuidditchClub
President Elizabeth Benoy.
"In American Quidditch, there
are four other teams that are right
across the border. We decided it
would benefit us in terms of our
understanding of Quidditch and
playing style to play with American
Quidditch [teams]," said Brandon
Rivas, the beater captain for the
A-team roster.
Benoy said that the team is
"arguably the best" in Canada. This
is arguable because a sanguinary
decider match between the UBC
and McGill teams ended in a tie on
March 29. The Canadian nationals
were happening in Burnaby and both
teams, eager to show off their skills,
organized an exhibition match to see
who was the best once and for all.
"Both us and McGill really wanted
thattitleofbestteam/Wewerewilling
to do anything for it," said Rivas. "A
nice friendly match was the intention
but it got physical really quick, so we
called it."
t
Real as it gets
f
Watching several twenty-something
year olds run around in the rain
with broomsticks tucked in between
their legs is enough to make anyone
pause. But after watching a little
longer and seeing the fierce tackles,
heavy body checks and dodgeballs
received squarely in the face, one
would realize that it is a full-contact
sport that requires just as much
exertion as traditional sports.
Quidditch is the wizarding-
child of basketball, flag football and
dodgeball. It's a full contact co-ed
sport — possibly the only one in
existence.
Not only that, the team also
prides itself on its sense of
community and inclusiveness.
"Quidditch itself is a co-ed
sport and it is inclusive of all
genders. There are strict policies
in the rule book that insure that
everyone is included. No one gets
discriminated or left out so we
really work to support that," said
Benoy.
The World Cup was in South
Carolina on the East Coast being
very much out ofthe way. Between
the plane tickets for the A-team
roster and accommodations, their
overhead price came to about
$11,000. Apart from their inability
to get a consistent and inexpensive
field to practice on at UBC, this
was probably the biggest problem
the team faced last year.
Rivas offered up the styling
of his beard for their World Cup
Indiegogo campaign in that he had
to sport a pinkish-red beard for
the entire competition. Many of
the players also offered themselves
up on dates — enough evidence
that this was a dream that they
all wanted to see achieved. They
ended up raising $2,325, about 22
per cent of their total cost. Their
trip was also subsidized by an AMS
grant of $3,000. While this was not
enough to completely fund their
trip, the team was eventually able
to pay their way to the World Cup.
t
Wanting more
t
Now, with enough collegiate and
international recognition, the team
has another goal in their sights —
to achieve competitive club status.
"Competitive clubs at UBC get
funding from the AMS and also get
access to the varsity gyms. And for
us, it's really important because
we're really trying to promote a
strong sense of athleticism in the
club," said Benoy.
The problem is that, in the
past, the Quidditch Club was not
considered sustainable in the eyes
ofthe competitive club committee.
They didn't have enough turnover
of leadership which meant that
a poor leader in the future could
lead to a floundering club or, even
worse, a failed one.
The club's recent success both in
BC and abroad might have changed
that perception not just for the
competitive club committee, but
also for the UBC campus as a whole.
"This year is really about proving
ourselves because we've changed
captains completely and so my
co-captain Cameron [Cutler] and
myself are really going to try to
show people what we're worth,"
said Rivas.
"Since then we've really
developed as a club. We've had
turnover of leadership and we
think that we're a strong candidate
for competitive club status," said
Benoy who is also a chaser for the
team.
Every year, everyone that is
interested in being on any ofthe
teams tries out for positions that
they are interested in. They also
have practices throughout the
PHOTOS BY KOSTA PRODANOVIC
year on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m.
and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. for two
and a half hours each. They aren't
open practices so you need to get a
$20 membership. Benoy says that
the first step to getting involved
with the club is to first like their
Facebook page. She assures that
this isn't a "promo thing," but
rather a way to keep up with latest
news and practice times for the
teams.
Although not an age-old
organization decorated with
trophies or even bestowed with
varsity status, the UBC Quidditch
team is still gearing up for the new
season like any ofthe others.
"[There's] more competition,
more games. We travel all around
the states, we're just hoping to
really develop our club and become
the strongest team in Canada." '3
Breast
Cancer...
not just a
disease of
older women
Shanna (Shan) Larsen was
only 24 when she lost her
life to breast cancer
Risk Factors
♦ being female and increased age
♦ strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer
♦ early start to menstruation
♦ some benign breast diseases
♦ use of oral contraceptives
♦ poor lifestyle choices over time
Funded by
Canadian
Breast Cancer
Foundation
BC*YUKON
i*
visit or contact us at
teamshan.ca
facebook.com/team.shan.ca
@TeamShan
&
w 12    I    COMIC + GAMES    I   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2015
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CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS
1- "Dancing Queen" quartet:
5-Strike breaker;
9-Components;
14-Steering wheel;
15- Shipping deduction;
16-Give merit;
17-1998 Sarah McLachlan hit;
18- Pond organism;
19- Levels;
20-Make lurid;
23-Dance move;
24-Collector's goal;
25- Govt, property overseer;
28- Smokers receptacle;
31-One time;
34- Brown-furred aquatic carnivorous mammal;
36- Bard's nightfall;
37-Give for one's money;
38-In spite of;
42-Canal of song;
43- Like Phoenix in summer;
COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
44-Desert havens;
45-VCR button;
46-Cock;
49-Superlative suffix;
50-Small batteries;
51-Black cuckoos;
53-Agent;
60-Mr. Moto portrayer;
61-Sensible;
62-Tel ;
63- Alloy of iron and carbon;
64-Agitate;
65-Welles role;
66-Noted duck;
67-Pouches;
68- Steven Chu's cabinet dept.;
DOWN
1-Cries of discovery;
2- "Venerable" English monk;
3- Russian pancake;
4-Accumulate;
5-Declares;
6- Ruler of the Islamic world;
7-Golden Fleece ship;
£
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nvu$
Public Workshop - October 24
Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood Design Vision
UBC, working with the UNA, is undertaking a process to develop a more detailed
design vision for the Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood.
This process follows upon a commitment UBC made to the UNA to develop a more detailed design vision
for Wesbrook Place. With just over half of Wesbrook Place built, it is now time to check with the community
and confirm the design vision to support the development of the remaining sites.
Date: Saturday, October 24, 2015      Time: 10:00am - 1:00pm
Place: Wesbrook Community Centre, Room 201, 5998 Berton Avenue
Registration for the workshop is required. Email info.planning@ubc.ca before Octob
ier 21.
The workshop will include a walking tour and small group discussions on
neighbourhood design, including building shape and character, open space
and landscape design, streetscapes, and other ways to enhance livability
through design
Please note that no changes to the UBC Land Use Plan and no net change
to planned overall residential floor space within the Neighbourhood Plan area
are being considered for this planning process.
Online consultation runs from October 19- Novemberl at planning.ubc.ca
For additional information, contact: Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior Manager,
Consultation, at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984,
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
im&&$mmiM., im&4s&®fo.
oi »*it g&a °ia ^ ait gas ss^ mo\ ai^M^.
a place of mind
THE UNIVERSITYOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Campus + Community Planning
8-Pinto or lima;
9-Conference;
10- Expect;
11-Mock;
12-Family portrait?;
13- '60s campus gp.;
21-Maker of Pong;
22-Yoga posture;
25-Dead duck;
26-Grocery, e.g.;
27-Room at the top;
29-Trials;
30-Notemp.;
31-Spring up;
32-Melodies;
33- Emo anxiety;
35-Baa maid?;
37- Nabokov novel;
39-That group;
40-Boo follower;
41-Water wheel;
46-Seldom;
47- Pertaining to tea acid;
48-Goes in;
50
52-
53
54
55
56
57-
-ski:
Post;
Roster used to assign duties;
... saw Elba;
Flat sound;
I could horse!;
Lendl of tennis;
58-Grape plant;
59-Constantly;
60-Leary'sdrug;
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COMIC JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
There are fuls in here?'
Have oo fear! you'll
be fends in no -hme(
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OCTOBER 5 ANSWERS
COMIC PATRICKMURRYANDMIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY

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