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Array SEPTEMBER 8,2015 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUE IV
PUKING PURE BOURBON SINCE 1918
I
P/03
NEWS
Getting to know your
student society
P/08
CULTURE
Easiest off-campus
eats on the B-Line
P/09
OPINIONS
Letter: The RHA is
gratuitously self-
indulgent
P/ll
//
SPORTS
UBC eSports stuns
Korea in League of
Legends tournament
THE UBYSSEY // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2015
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
AMS Student Nest
Opening Ceremony
^K^2i Q^^EZZ^EuZSj
WED 9
////
OPENINGCEREMONY4:00PM.@THENEWSUB
The new sub is finally open, officially. Come for an evening of
fun and celebrate with the first Pit Night of the year.
Free
AMS   WELCOME   BACK   BBQ   'Jj
:M
CASHMERE CAT ■   DRAGONETTE
THE    ZOLAS   •    DIRTY  RADIO
MGH!! (GLORYDAYS)
\^~Mr     a       FRIDAY    SEPT   11,  2015   |  2: 30 PM — 9:0 0 PM    |    6190   AGRONOMY   RD.
ALL   AGES   |    $15-30    |   mil   WITH    FIRSTWEEK    WRISTBAND
FRI11
////
WELCOME BACK BBQ 2:30 P.M. @ AGRONOMY ROAD
A great selection of performers for a great price. Make sure to
bring your student card and 2 pieces of government issued ID.
$22 /$30 at the door
SAT 12
////
HOMECOMING4:00 P.M. ©THUNDERBIRDSTADIUM
Scream with 4,000 of your fellow students and alumni while
adorning blue and gold. Go UBC Thunderbirds!
$5
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Kosta Prodanovic
COVER COMMENTS
No free samples:(.
Dr. Jon Page was nice enough to let
The Ubyssey into his lab. The plants
pictured on the cover are hemp, a
variety of cannabis.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
f eatu res@ u byssey.ca
TSthf
UBYSSE
v
^1 1 IlE
I
SEPTEMBER8.2015 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUE IV
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
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News Editors
Online: ubyssey.ca
Emma Partridge &
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Moira Warburton
The Ubyssey Is the official stu
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ay 12 noon the day before In
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flect the views of The Ubyssey
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versity of British Columbia. Al
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Martha Piper, UBC's interim president, sits in her office atop Koerner Library.
=HOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC/TH E UBYSSEY
Interim president Martha Piper sees no evil
Arno Rosenfeld
Features Editor
Martha Piper is a smooth operator.
Just before taking over as UBC's
interim president on September
1, Piper wrote an op-ed for the
Vancouver Sun to contextualize
— critics might say gloss over —
Guptagate, the scandal engulfing
the university in the weeks since
Arvind Gupta mysteriously left his
post as president.
"Martha Piper celebrates
recent No. 2 ranking of Canadian
university, but says it should be
No. 1," the Sun trumpeted. There
was little mention of Gupta
aside from Piper noting the issue
paled in comparison to the Great
Depression and both World Wars.
Piper, whose tactical skill was
widely praised during her previous
term from 1997-2006, is upbeat and
likeable — exactly what UBC needs
as it tries to weather the current
storm.
"The wonderful things about
UBC that make it great are still
there," Piper said in an interview
Thursday. "Nothing has changed."
While she points out that the
university's day-to-day academic
functions and research work has
continued despite the presidential
leadership switch, the notion
"nothing has changed" is belied by
the state of her office on the top
floor of Koerner Library.
The tables are bare and the
shelves empty, evidence of the
hasty leadership transition. But the
new president, dressed smartly in a
powder blue blazer, plays it off.
"I think the weirdest thing is
getting into an elevator," Piper, who
served her first term in a ground
floor office, said with a laugh.
Piper appears unflappable as
UBC does damage control and tries
to ensure stability as it searches for
a permanent president.
"She's a great communicator,
charismatic and whip smart," UBC
public relations director Susan
Danard wrote in an email to The
Ubyssey.
The adjectives certainly fit,
though they hint at what the
university was looking for in
an interim leader: someone to
reassure and present UBC's best
face to the public.
Piper is also, of course, the
real deal and no stranger to
dealing with blowback from her
predecessors' controversial actions.
Almost immediately after taking
over as president in 1997 Piper
was confronted with protests over
UBC hosting the APEC summit
of Asian heads of state, including
alleged dictators. The summit had
been arranged by her predecessor
David Strangway, but Piper was left
to deal with fallout from a brutal
RCMP crackdown on student
protesters.
If the APEC summit was a
low point for UBC's international
outreach, Piper said she is
especially proud of her own global
initiatives including the creation
of student residences on campus
like the UBC-Korea house that host
students from abroad.
"I felt really strongly that we
needed to internationalize the
campus," Piper, herself an example
of the university's global character,
explained.
Born and raised in the United
States, Piper's faint midwestern
accent betrays her Ohio
upbringing. Arriving in Montreal
in the early 1970s when her
husband was offered a teaching
position at McGill, Piper said she
expected to stay just a few years.
Instead, having earned a PhD in
epidemiology and biostatistics
Piper fell into academic
administration after being offered a
director job at McGill.
"I did not sit there as a young
person saying, 'I want to be a vice
president, or I want to be a dean,"
Piper recalled.
Yet Piper did just that, moving
from McGill to be first a dean
and then vice president at the
University of Alberta before
landing the president job in Point
Grey.
Aside from managing an
assortment of scandals during her
time in charge at UBC, Piper is
perhaps best remembered among
students for stories about her
imaginary friend Bort, which she
used to convey metaphors about
the possibilities of university in
speeches to incoming students.
"Well, how do you know
about Bort?" she asked during the
interview before turning to Danard,
the spokeswoman. "Do you know
about Bort?"
"Unfortunately, when we
Google you it comes up pretty
quickly," Danard said, laughing.
(Piper said she hasn't decided
whether to discuss Bort during her
Imagine Day address but added
to The Ubyssey reporters present,
"It's so interesting because none of
you heard the Bort speech, and yet,
Bort still lives.")
After stepping down as
president Piper has remained in
Vancouver, serving on several
non-profit and corporate boards —
including the Dalai Lama Centre
for Peace and Education, Care
Canada, Shoppers Drug Mart
and the Bank of Montreal — and
spending time with her four
grandchildren.
Piper was vacationing in Hawaii
when she received a call from
board chair John Montalbano "out
of the blue," asking her to become
interim president.
"I was literally stunned,"
Piper recalls. "Absolutely no,
categorically no," she told
Montalbano, who asked her to
think it over.
"I know what this job entails.
And it is grinding. And I am
old," Piper, who will be seventy
in November, said of her initial
reluctance.
And yet.
"UBC has been extraordinarily
good to me," Piper said. "I thought,
well... if I can help maybe I
should."
Piper clearly loves the
university and her gushing praise
for, say, UBC Athletics — "I don't
know if you've ever seen the
T-Birds play baseball, but, it's
fabulous! Right?" — is tempered by
her sincerity.
But a certain cognitive
dissonance crept through the
explanation of her new role at
UBC. Piper said she intends to
continue Gupta's vision for the
university, despite the fact nearly
all observers believe he was pushed
out.
"My sense is the board supports
[his] vision and I can assume
nothing other than that," Piper
said.
Piper's sunny defiance in
the face of Guptagate has led
to quizzical comments hinting
toward a naivete unlikely given her
credentials, suggesting instead that
UBC's crisis management efforts
may have subsumed her.
For example, a few days after
Gupta's departure Piper made the
odd claim to The Ubyssey that, "I
think it always is surprising when
someone resigns from a position."
But Piper's central message
is that the core of the university
remains strong and she is willing to
grin through the tough questions
until the current scandal blows
over.
Still, despite filling in during the
institution's time of need, Piper was
adamant that she would not accept
a full term as president if offered.
"I'm not appropriate to
lead this institution," she said.
"This institution deserves an
extraordinary leader, someone who
understands and is prepared to take
into its next decade. UBC [needs]
... someone who has the energy, the
drive, the creativity, the thinking,
the ability do that and I'm not that
person."
And though evidently happy to
be back, some ambivalence seeps
through.
"It feels familiar — but a bit
weird," Piper said with a grin. "It
wasn't supposed to happen." 'M // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2015
Emma Partridge
News Editor
ALMA MATER SOCIETY  PRIMER
Whether you realize it or not, as
a student you interact with your
student society daily. So here's a
run down of everything you ought
to know about how your school is
being run.
The Alma Mater Society
(AMS) is UBC's student society;
it's made up of students who
are expected to serve students.
How do they do this? Firstly, they
provide services.
AMS services are run by
students — not the university.
"It's a common misconception.
The AMS runs — autonomously
runs — all of our services [and]
they're all student-run, student-
lead initiatives," said Ron
Gorodetsky, student services
manager. "So we work very
closely with the university but
we're completely separate in what
we do."
Safewalk and the Sexual
Assault Support Centre, things
you've probably already heard of,
are AMS services. Others include
Tutoring, Speakeasy, the Food
Bank, Volunteer Avenue and AMS
Advocacy.
When asked which one
incoming first-years should know
about, Gorodetsky said that AMS
Speakeasy, which offers peer
support, is great for "a lot of first-
year students. Especially if they
don't live on residence, they might
feel a bit isolated, they might feel
like it's a bigger high school with
less friends."
So, who are the AMS? Well,
there are five faces that you may
have seen somewhere already;
these are the executives.
Students elect five students
to exec positions every second
term. Here's who was picked and
what they do.
VP Administration—Ava
Nasiri
The easiest way to think about
what Nasiri does is overseeing
different campus organizations
and initiatives.
"I chair SAC and oversee the
administration of all 372 of our
wonderful clubs," said Nasiri.
"The big thing for me coming
right up is the club's resource and
sustainability centre, so we're
looking at formally launching that
in October."
Nasiri's platform points
included making the AMS more
accessible to students and
fostering collaboration within the
AMS, which she says is taking the
form of expanding the art gallery,
as well as meetings with the
Engagement Commissioner.
"Alongside that, I was in
charge of wrapping up the new
SUB project, now known as the
Nest," said Nasiri.
The new SUB is likely the most
tangible explanation of what falls
to the VP admin's portfolio. The
project was in the works for a long
time. A long time. Construction
for the project began three years
ago, proceeding several more
years of negotiation and planning.
After multiple delays, the new
SUB opened its doors last June.
VP External — Jude Crasta
Crasta liaisons with external
entities, advocating to external
bodies and networking with other
student societies all fall into his
lap.
"I also work on projects like
transit and transportation, policy
and legislation when it comes
to issues that affect students,
like climate change targets or
affordable housing," said Crasta.
Crasta was in charge of
advocating for a yes vote for
the transit plebiscite. Though
the result wasn't what the AMS
had hoped for, Crasta says they
are still working towards the
Broadway line.
"Even though the results were
counter to what the AMS took a
stance on, it helped us highlight
out there a unified recognized
need for transit and improved
transportation," said Crasta.
"It's down to the logistics, not
necessarily the principle."
You'll likely see a lot of Crasta
in the coming months as he
heads up a voter encouragement
campaign for the federal
elections.
VP Academic — Jenna Omassi
Omassi acts as a representative
for students to the university on
virtually any issue they might
have.
"[The VP Academic] works to
support the academic initiatives
of the university, and creates
academic initiatives in the
society," said Omassi. "A big part
of that is sitting on most of the
university committees, is relations
with the Senate and the Board of
Governors and then with all of the
executives of the university."
According to Omassi, her
main platform points were
student consultation, a unified
platform for undergraduate
research and open educational
resources.
With the costs of textbooks
soring, Omassi will be heading
up the #textbookbrokeBC
campaign to push for more open
educational resources.
While Omassi's mandate is to
be a go-between for students to
the university, the 2015 academic
experience survey highlighted
that more students don't know
much about the AMS than do.
"One thing that
communications has done is
really unified the identity of the
AMS with the new brand that we
have," said Omassi, when asked
what she hopes will turn this
around.
VP Finance — Mateusz
Miadlikowski
Miadlikowski was re-elected
as VP finance. Unfortunately,
Miadlikowski is on vacation for
several weeks so was unavailable
to comment directly. But basically,
his role is to manage the financial
health of the AMS.
When Miadlikowski
was running, he pledged to
ensure that the new SUB's
buisnesses are meeting their
goals by working closely with
management, and also that he
plans to implement new financial
systems for clubs.
Besides working with
businesses and clubs,
Miadlikowski chairs the Finance
Commission and sits on the CiTR
Board of Directors.
President—Aaron Bailey
A photograph of Aaron Bailey's
grinning face with beer being
thrown on it was plastered on the
front cover of The Ubyssey and
our website.
"I am responsible for
overseeing all of the activities
of the society, so I kind of have
my hands in everything that we
do all at once, but not anything
completely," said Bailey. "My main
role... is supporting the executive
team and council in achieving the
goals of the society."
The President is the face of the
AMS. Apparently, Bailey hopes to
put a fun face forward.
"The baseline of my
platform was to return a sense
of personability to the office of
the president — basically, not
taking what we do at the AMS so
seriously all the time," said Bailey.
Bailey said he's been spending
the summer doing lots of strategic
planning. Forthe future, Bailey
hopes to expand block party and
demonstrate support for campus
organizations.
Now, the executive doesn't
operate solo. There's a body
known as AMS Council, which
is supposed to make high-level
decisions forthe student body.
They meet every two weeks to
discuss budgets, campaigns,
events and more.
Council is mean to represent
everyone, there's a seat for
someone from every constituent
society on campus. Every student
is a member of the AMS, but only
elected reps form AMS Council -
but anybody can run for election.
There's been some debate
about how to define the
relationship between the Exec
and Council, as was brought up in
last week's Council meeting. But,
basically, the execs are full time,
handling day-to-day and Council
is involved in the big decisions.
Of course the AMS is a large,
complicated entity, but these are
the basics and now you know a
bit more about your society, and
what you should expect from the
people elected to serve you. 'JJ
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for details. NEWS    I   TUESDAY, SEPTEMBERS, 2015
REFORM //
GSS requests reforms to Board of Govenors structure
Emma Partridge
News Editor
Echoing the sentiment of the
Faculty Association earlier this
week, the Graduate Student Society
(GSS) of UBC has asked that UBC's
Board of Governors adopt a number
of reforms to begin the process of
making the Board more transparent.
In an open letter to acting chair
Alice Laberge, the GSS suggested
a variety of reforms, all of which
are grounded in making the Board
more transparent and accountable.
They range from requiring all board
members be given publicly available,
university-issued email addresses to
all meetings being disclosed to the
public.
"The pressure the GSS can put on
the Board directly is probably fairly
limited," said GSS President Tobias
Friedel. "We are asking to be able to
present on the recommendations we
make at the next board meeting and
to answer any questions the board
members may have."
Friedel notes that more than half
of the board members are appointed
by the provincial government,
which "leaves the option to escalate
the conversation to the next sized
level and advocate to the provincial
government to rethink their choices
for their appointment."
"I don't get the impression that
the GSS wields a huge amount of
power in that situation," said Maayan
Kreitzman, representative for the
Institute for Resources, Environment
The Grad Student Society is asking for more transparency from the Board of Governors.
and Sustainability on the GSS. "At
the same time, like any student
organization - the AMS, the GSS
— I think... when the GSS is strong
and sensible it can improve that
dynamic."
The AMS has released a
statement in response former
President Arvind Gupta's sudden
departure, as well as the ensuing
side-scandal involving the chair of
the Board, John Montalbano, being
accused of breaching academic
freedom.
The statement released by the
AMS did not call for Montalbano's
resignation, as some societies such
as the Faculty Association and the
Canadian Association of University
Teachers, have done.
The GSS also asked that
"closed agendas of the Board ... be
disclosed to the public."
According to both Friedel and
Kreitzman, there had been very
little communication between the
Board and the GSS over recent
years.
"It seemed like the GSS had
only has pretty limited interaction
with the board in the last three
years," said Kreitzman.
Friedel confirmed that the
extent of his communication with
FIILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
the board chair has been one
phone call, and one letter written
in response to a letter that the
GSS wrote to them. According
to Friedel, "this is one of our
concerns."
When asked if he expects
that the Board would adopt the
reforms, Friedel said "I am fairly
optimistic — I don't believe any of
those asks are outrageous. Some
of those asks are really more
reaffirmations of stances that
should be fairly self explanatory
and are just being pulled into
question by recent actions of the
Board." %
RESIDENCE //
How wild do the residences get?
Do first years get as out of hand as everyone says?
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Contributor
Freshmen around the world are
known for plunging into the
wild side of college life with no
restraint. Do UBC residences,
which are filled with first-years
and places to party throughout
the year, live up to that image?
Cate Morrison, assistant
director of Residence Life, said
that although it is common to
hear in the media about first
year students overindulging in
newfound freedom, that is not
the case with the majority of UBC
first years.
"I think [for] a lot of our
students this is not the first time
that they are on their own and for
the ones that [it is], many choose
not to overindulge in anything,"
said Morrison, including alcohol,
drugs and partying in that list.
As some students do party,
residence staff are present to
"educate students on responsible
consumption, support them through
their own decision making process,"
explained Morrison. They also
organize evening activities in which
students can get involved without
the presence of drugs or alcohol.
However, trouble with first years
is actually uncommon, according to
Barry Eccleton, Director of Campus
Security.
Residence staff are present to
"educate students on responsible
consumption, support them through
their own decision making process,"
said Morrison.
Campus Security is rarely
summoned to residences,
according to Eccleton, even
though they "pay special attention
to areas around residence," especially
during the first weeks.
Ultimately, first years' parties
and experiments with drugs or
alcohol are not a prominent concern
to residence staff. Instead, they
focus on helping first years adjust
to other, tamer aspects of their
independence.
"I think that often things that
people fall into are lack of sleep,"
said Morrison. "One of the things
that a lot of people don't anticipate
but one area that we see some
students... struggle with is around
food. They've never had to consider
their own nutrition because meals
have been provided."
Nevertheless, residence staff
prepares themselves for the worst
case scenarios that may arise during
First Week.
"We have an advisor-on-duty
number, so that they can call that
number if they're feeling unsafe or
if they are bothered by something
that is going on their floor," said
Morrison. "As well, our front desks
are open 24 hours a day, seven days
a week in most of our areas."
Safety and security are discussed
during orientation as well as the
first floor and house meetings,
and campus resources such as the
Community Shuttle and Safewalk
are promoted to residents.
"We want [students] to have fun,
but also to look out for each other,"
said Eccleton. 'M
TEXTBOOKS //
Textbook prices,
explained
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
When did these things get so expensive?
Paula Duhatschek
Contributor
High textbook prices, like all-
nighters and Ramen, can feel like
an inevitable fact of student life. But
why exactly do textbooks cost so
much?
Before they arrive on campus,
faculty members decide on the
book they want for their course,
and submit it to the buyers at the
Bookstore. According to Debbie
Harvie, director of the UBC
Bookstore, this process has been
more or less the same for the past
25 years.
The trouble, generally, is that the
Bookstore has very strict constraints
on where it can source its books.
Each textbook is produced by a
single publisher, which means that
these publishers can pretty much
set their prices as high as they want.
"If a faculty member chooses a
specific book, we have to bring that
in at their request. So we don't have
a whole lot of latitude in choosing
where we get the book from," said
Harvie.
According to Harvie, many
textbooks also have a very short
print run, which is an expensive
undertaking for publishers. Further
technical costs— such as printing
colour photos and graphs— can also
rack up the price.
In addition, the endless
production of updated textbook
editions can short-circuit the
market for used books.
Ultimately, it's up to the
instructor to decide whether to
upgrade to the newest version,
but, by constantly churning out
new editions, publishers prevent
students from selling back their
textbooks and force the Bookstore
to buy new books for the coming
year.
"I think... the publishers will
honestly say that they believe the
new edition has better learning
materials in it," said Harvie. "In
some disciplines there is new
research that comes out, and they
certainly try to keep that in there." 'M
I encourage you to take the time to get engaged
with all that UBC has to offer this coming year.
RE-ELECT
MURRAY Tfr*!
VANCOUVER QUADRA      M^XVJVJXCLL
'est Broadway | 604.428.4401 | www.joycemurray.liberal.ca | www.realchange.ca
/mpjoycemurray
kTS.w«HR?T Joyce Murray
@joycemurray
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GPjoycemurraymp
Authorized by the Official Agent for Joyce Murray // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2015
MEDIA//
Where are all the women in media?
Vicky Huang
Contributor
On September 2, Karen Ross, a
professor of media at Northumbria
University, gave a talk on gender
equity and the media at the UBC
School of Journalism.
Globally speaking, the number of
women entering the media industry
surpassed that of men over the past
five to six years, yet women take
up only 31 per cent of all decisionmaking roles at media corporations.
The lack of gender diversity
presented in the media may
perpetuate gender bias and turn
society into a man's world. Ross
hopes that people, journalists and
citizens alike can take it upon
themselves to look at media outputs
critically.
"Every five minutes, there is
yet another new horrible example
of how the media is undermining
or trivializing or commodifying
women.... [I want people to look] at
news and be [like]: 'I've just been
PHOTO VICKY HUANG/THEUBYSSEY
Professor Karen Ross hopes thatviewers assess media portrayls of women.
watching the news for ten minutes,
and I haven't seen one woman,' or
'I've just been watching the news
for 20 minutes, and the only women
I've seen have been victims of male
violence," said Ross.
Some are dismissive of the
hardship that women face
professionally, trivializing the
role that gender plays in their
career pursuits, or even denying
gender as an important part of
their experiences and expressions.
However, to Ross, women's
experiences are different, and they
can use their femininity positively.
According to Alfred Hermida,
director and professor at UBC
Graduate School of Journalism,
gender imbalance in media
management is also a result of
gender discrimination that is not
readily visible.
It is unclear whether news crews
are discriminatory in selecting
interviewees, but men are more
likely to agree to be interviewed
than women are. "When being
approached for expert advice on a
subject that is not exactly within
one's area of research, a male
professor is more likely to share his
knowledge, while a female professor
is more likely to decline," said
Hermida.
Ross hopes that media
consumers assess whether media
portrayals respond to their
lived experiences and, if not, be
dissatisfied and uncover the basis of
their dissatisfaction. The efforts of
journalists and audiences are equally
crucial in pushing the media to be
more accurate in representing the
diversity and reality of this world,
and in cultivating a more open and
positive social culture. t9
MUSIC//
Campus musicians among best in country
PHOTOCOURTESYNYO
UBC students are part of Canada's most
prolific orchestra for young people.
Karen Wang
Contributor
This summer, 92 musicians
between the ages of 16 and 26
trained and performed with
the prestigious National Youth
Orchestra (NYO) of Canada,
including eight UBC students
and alumni.
The annual seven week long
program has a competitive
audition process, accepting
just 90-100 of the finest young
musicians from across the
country. For the first five weeks,
the musicians trained at the
Wilfred Laurier University in
Waterloo, Ontario starting with
smaller chamber music ensembles
before progressing into larger
orchestral works.
"It was awesome because all
we did was rehearse and practice,
and we didn't have to think about
anything else," said Julia Chien,
a recent UBC alumnus with a
Bachelor of Music in Percussion
Performance. "It was wake up,
eat breakfast, rehearse, eat lunch,
rehearse, eat dinner, rehearse, and
then go and sleep and restart the
next day."
Following the intensive
training phase, the program
finishes off with a two week
Canada-wide tour showcasing
their summers' efforts.
John-Paul Radelet, a third-year
music student at UBC and violinist
in the 2015 NYO, found out about
the summer opportunity when
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he was 10, and first auditioned at the age
of 14, unsuccessfully. During his first year
as a part of the NYO this summer, touring
with the orchestra one of Radelet's most
memorable experiences.
"It's weird to think of musicians as a
sports team but we all lived together for
five weeks in residence and then ate all our
meals together and went on a bus trip and
planes and stuff together," said Radelet.
"So just going to venue to venue as a group
was a cool experience."
"My favourite part of touring was just
being in these music halls that professional
musicians play in," said Lucas O'Fee, a
UBC alumnus with a Bachelor of Music in
Trombone Performance. "It was like being
in a professional orchestra — you'd just go
in through the backstage entrance and set
up your stuff in the dressing room where
all the pros set up."
Chien also found that her experiences
were very close to the professional world.
"When the actual orchestral part
started, our conductor, the maestro, didn't
come in until four days before we were on
for our first concert," said Chien. "[That
was] way closer to the actual experience of
going into a professional gig."
This year, the National Youth Orchestra
had eight performances in four provinces,
including one here at UBC. For the eight
UBC students in the program, their home
concert hall at the Chan Centre was a
special stop, although they were now
playing among a different orchestra group.
Chien, Radelet, and O'Fee were
all members of the UBC Symphony
Orchestra, another group of high calibre
musicians based on campus. For Radelet,
the NYO allowed him to focus all of his
energy on his music, something that was
not feasible while he was studying at UBC.
On the other hand, O'Fee found he
had more opportunities to play major
repertoire during his longer stay at UBC.
"UBC Symphony a couple years ago
did Stravinsky's Rite of Spring," said O'Fee.
"It just wouldn't be feasible to take an
ensemble like that on tour with the NYO,
so the NYO had to do smaller works."
O'Fee just entered his Masters program
in Trombone Performance at the Indian
University this fall, and hopes to become a
professional trombonist.
"I'm hoping that the insane
competition here will help me really put
in the effort I need to put in to take my
playing to the next level." '21
ART//
Relocating Space
PHOTO SWETHA PRAKASH/THE UBYSSEY
One of the many pieces on display at The
Hatch Art Gallery.
Jessie Stirling
Contributor
The Hatch Art Gallery has settled
into its new home in the new SUB
and is marking the occasion with
an exhibit on UBC's past student
spaces that promises to trigger
a feeling of nostalgia in even the
newest of Thunderbirds.
The Hatch Commissioner
Gillian Anselmo believes
Relocating Space is "a good way
to position all the student unions
buildings within the new SUB
and integrate both history and
the future" of our school. Lauding
the Hatch as "a new, bright space
with lots of natural light" that is
"more accessible [than it was the
in old SUB]," Anselmo is excited
for students to visit the art
gallery and to appreciate how our
common spaces have been shaped
by the very students occupying
them.
Titled Relocating Space:
Student Union Buildings, 75 years
in the Making, the art gallery's
premier exhibit features photos
from the university's archives
depicting student life and spaces
from 1939 to the present, the
idea for which is accredited to
Michael Kingsmill, one of the
head architects of the new SUB.
Curated by Alexandra Trim,
she describes the exhibit as "a
chronological archive, starting
with a timeline of Brock Hall
from its conception to the
construction of the old SUB ... all
the way up to the construction of
the new SUB."
The prints hanging on the
fresh white walls of Hatch tell a
story of concerts held in the main
foyer of Brock Hall, of a Miss
UBC pageant whose contestants
were drawn from the different
faculties and lined up outside its
front doors, and the 1954 fire that
burnt down the building's entire
second-story.
Next, you will see blueprints
for the 1968 construction of the
old sub, the bowling alley and
video arcade that resided in the
basement, and the old-timey
diner called Lickety Split that
was a student favorite for burgers
and milkshakes.
For Trim, the most important
aspect of this exhibit is the
"concentration on student life,"
which is she believes Relocating
Space is "a great way to open the
gallery" and to celebrate UBC's
newest student space.
The Hatch is also looking
to feature work from current
and past UBC students, and
are accepting submissions
throughout the year.
The exhibit will be open
to the public from September
1 -18. Students interested in
volunteering at the Hatch are
encouraged to contact the art
gallery. 'M FEATURE    I    TUESDAY, SEPTEMBERS, 2015
Are we ready to fill the knowledge gap?
Moira Warburton
News Editor
From marijuana's potential benefits
for HIV patients to MDMA's healing
potential for people suffering-from
various psychological disorders, UBC
scientists are doing more and more
research looking into the world of illicit
drugs.
After speaking to researchers who
have spent their careers trying to fill the
knowledge gaps with regards to drugs
like marijuana, psychedelics and heroin,
it is clear that two things continue to
pose challenges: money and stigma.
"[It's] a line of scientific inquiry that's
essentially laid dormant for decades,"
said UBC professor Evan Wood, a Canada
Research Chair in Inner City Medicine.
"There's been a small, committed group
of scientists internationally that have
slowly been trying to keep this area of
science alive."
Funding is "competitive and difficult,"
said Jon Page, a geneticist and UBC
adjunct professor in the Department of
Botany studying cannabis. "When you
start saying we need more money to
put in security measures and we have
all these licensing [regulations], it adds
complications to any project," making it
less desirable for potential funders.
As for stigma, few can speak to such
challenges better than Eugenia Oveido-
Joekes, an associate professor with
UBC's School of Population and Public
Health.
As a researcher renowned for
her work on such studies as
the Study to Assess Long-
term Opioid Maintenance
Effectiveness (SALOME),
she has dealt with more
than her fair share
of run-ins with the
bureaucracy that
so often plague
such trials. The
SALOME
study
examined
the
effects
• of
prescribing heroin in specific forms to
chronically addicted heroin patients
who had not responded to other forms of
treatment.
"Nobody wants to hear this bad news:
people are going to use drugs," Oveido-
Joekes said, with a broken, humourless
laugh. "People use drugs. Period. I don't
want it, I don't like it, but they do. So
everybody's looking for the research
that's going to bring the vaccine that's
going to stop everybody injecting heroin
or injecting cocaine in the streets."
According to Wood, the stigma
and funding challenges have serious
repercussions for public health, saying
that the prohibitions have forced most
research to focus on more traditional
pharmaceutical drugs.
"That hasn't been a particularly
fruitful endeavour from a healing
perspective," said Wood, noting that
scientists have struggled in treating
people suffering from depression,
addrction and other maladies with the
legal drugs currently available.
The prohibitions and the resulting
stigma surrounding illicit drugs,
influenced in part by past unethical
research - Project MKUltra, for example,
codename for the infamous tests with
LSD carried out by the US military in the
1960s - has led to a blind spot in drug
research.
In 1971, as an undergraduate student
at UBC, Denis Doyle experienced such
questionable research firsthand as a
participant in a government experiment
on the effects ofmarijuana on driving
based out of Point Grey.
"You would smoke a cigarette and you
wouldn't know what was in it, whether
it was placebo or marijuana itself," said
Doyle of these experiments. "Then they'd
follow you out to the car... and then
they had an obstacle course set up with
cones."
Researchers say some of the current
controversy surrounding drug research
is a product of these types of studies,
decades ago.
"When they're being portrayed in a
way that brings back the fears of the
1970s ... then you could still touch a
nerve with some people. But that's just
not the reality," Wood said.
Doyle said that he later suspected the
results of the study - that marijuana did
not have a seriously detrimental impact
on driving - have been suppressed.
Now, with proper ethical controls
available, in place and a search
for serious medical treatment at
stake, scientists are frustrated
with the lack of research
that has been done in the
intervening years.
"There's still this
knowledge gap,"
said Page. For him
cannabis is "fertile
ground" for
study, given
the few
resources
being
dedicated to learning its effects.
"There's all these questions that
haven't been answered.... Society is
still coming to grips with its uses as a
medicinal plant."
The search for answers also drives
M-J Milloy. an assistant professor
at UBC, in his research on medical
marijuana. "We need to answer the
question " said Milloy. "Is this of
medical benefit or not?"
Despite the hurdles, Page and
Milloy are both optimistic. According
to Page, the field has "totally changed
in the sense that people now phone
me up and say 'Hey, how can we work
together?"' whereas they formerly
viewed him as a loner on the fringe of
academia.
Milloy recently received a major
grant from NG Biomed to start clinical
trials on medical marijuana. In a world
where funding for research in any field
is cutthroat and competitive, the grant
is incredibly encouraging for those
studying illegal drugs.
As the public conversation around
illicit drugs and the mental health
issues they may be able to treat slowly
opens up, researchers like Oveido-
Joekes, Milloy, Wood, Page and
others see new hope in dealing with
already-stigmatized illnesses such as
depression, PTSD, HIV and addiction.
"We're talking about HIV and
addiction which take a terrible toll on
people," said Milloy. "We're fortunate
in Vancouver that people are looking
to these drugs as ... agents that could
benefit people.... I think students
should be really excited to be in an
institution [like UBC] that supports
this."
ii   There's still this
knowledge gap. There's
all these questions that
haven't been answered....
Society is still coming up
to grips with its uses as a
medicinal nlant.
Jon Page
Still, things are not changing fast
enough for people like Oveido-Joekes.
The struggles she and her colleagues
face are significant obstacles in the
fight to close the knowledge gap and
change the multitude of problems
when it comes to treating mental
illnesses and HIV.
"The other day somebody comes and
says to me, 'now that SALOME is over,
we need people like you doing research
in psychedelics!'" said Oveido-Joekes,
who estimates 95 per cent of her work
on the heroin trial was ensuring the
study precisely followed government
regulations, and only five per cent on
actually doing the research. "And I
looked at him and I say 'are you crazy? I
can't wait to not be doing this anymore.
I'm done. I'm exhausted of going
against the system. I'm exhausted.'" "Jl AMS FAIR AT REZ
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DRUMS//
Striving for social integration through drumming
PHOTO COURTESY FRASER VALLEY KOREAN ARTS SOCIETY
"Modni" stems from the Korean term for "one who has everything."
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
Modni — a Vancouver Korean
drumming project who performed at Jump Start — was
created in July of this year by
English language student Joon
Rho to illustrate a cultural
harmony for Korean-Canadians.
"Modni" is derived from the
Korean term meaning "one who
has everything," or "everyone."
Rho chose the name to focus on
the broad perspective that can
be obtained from exposure to
multiple cultures, creating a natural co-blending of Korean and
Canadian cultures.
"The reason I made this group
as a Korean-Canadian outlet is
that I don't really identify with
Korean culture, nor do I fully
identify with Canadian culture,"
said Rho, whose mother exposed
him to a wide variety of musical activities from a young age
in Abbotsford. The bridging of
loyalty and commitment — highly
important in a Korean culture
— is contrasted with the more
individualistic style of Canadian
upbringings through the drumming group's music.
"It's a very emotional outlet
in terms of the art itself," he
said. "At this point it's very raw,
almost to the point of being
aggressive, especially my style
of playing. The music is really an
outpour of what you're feeling at
the time," he said.
Leading the 10-strong group
of drummers, Rho said that the
music, although influenced by
Western rhythms, is actually
closer to the oldest tradition of
Korean drumming.
"What we're playing is the
same as the very traditional, at
the very original roots to Korean
drumming," he said. "They
had no set rhythms, just played
together, whatever they wanted."
The rhythms used are irregular and stem from the mood felt
in the room or stemming from
the performance of others in the
group. Improvisation practice
is key to becoming closer as a
team and only improves the more
groups perform together.
"After the Jump Start performance the group had a little
reflection time, just to see what
people thought about the team
and how it's affected them so far,"
Rho said. "The interesting thing
was how everyone got something
different out of it — we're almost
taking it into a new direction,
having multiple perspectives
within one small area of society."
Rho sees the group as a bridge
between Korean and Canadian
cultures. "I wanted to really help
people to interact more with
their community, become more
involved, so that's where we want
to bridge that gap," he said. "To
do that, if we're going to be the
bridge between the two cultures,
we need to be really grounded in
our own identities, beliefs and
ideals." 'tJ
GIGS //
Free music from CiTR in the new SUB
PHOTO OLAMIDEOLANIYAN/THE UBYSSEY
Andy Resto is bringing free music to students in the first two weeks of the semester.
Olivia Law
Culture Editor
UBC's radio station CiTR is central
to campus music and cultural
life, and to kick the new year off
they are back with Live @ Lunch
— a series of free gigs held at the
new SUB from 12-2 p.m. from
September 8-18.
CiTR's digital music director,
Andy Resto has programmed a
blend of different genres to suit the
diverse UBC population.
"One thing we try look for
when booking bands and artists
is something that is, in a sense,
welcoming," he said. "We want
for people walking around to hear
music outside it won't send them
running away."
This year the music is a mix of
pop, folk and indie rock, largely
made up of local groups.
"Seven of them are from
Vancouver and one of them, the
Back Homes, is from Victoria,"
said Resto. "Of those, two or three
are student bands — we try to
keep the focus on local Vancouver
bands. Also this year, the last
one on Friday is an artist who's
touring from New York originally.
She's playing here in Vancouver
the night before, so she's going to
play Live @ Lunch the next day.
That's something we haven't really
managed to do before. We're pretty
excited."
Late Spring is a band with three
UBC alumni, and the members are
looking forward to coming back to
campus to perform in the new SUB.
"Live music is more than what
is advertised, and what's on the
radio, so I think that's exciting,"
said KC, lead guitarist for the band.
"Performing for new students gives
them recognition of new kind of
freedom of expression. I think in
university you're in the beginning
stages of finding what's right for you,
and that's a good place to be."
Ace Martens is performing their
"noise lounge" at Live @ Lunch
on September 11, bringing their
influences from English groups in
the late 80s and early 90s.
"In university there are a lot of
people who aren't from here and
maybe new to town," Martens said.
"They're interested in different sorts
of things and want to know how
to get involved so it's also a great
opportunity for them to check out
CiTR and other opportunities."
Vancouver singer Ora Cogan's
newest EP has been played a lot
recently on CiTR, and the self-taught
musician has been touring in Europe
and the States for the last seven
years.
"Being a part of indie music scene
as it were in Vancouver and getting
exposed to all sorts of different kinds
of bands and different approaches to
music is pretty inspiring," she said.
"Playing for students is always fun
— CiTR support a lot of good indie
music and I know there are a lot of
good bands lined up."
Resto is looking forward to the
first two weeks of the semester. "It
makes it a warmer environment," he
said. "It really opens the space."
CiTR will also be broadcasting
the performances every day on 101.9
FM.'tJ
LITERATURE //
Poetry for an
outdoorsman
'  Hi
PHOTO OLAMIDEOLANIYAN/THE UBYSSEY
Foreign Park's influences come from
Steudel's main passions.
Keagan Perlette
Contributor
Mount Robson looms in vintage
postcard sepia from the cover
of Vancouver poet Jeff Steudel's
debut book, Foreign Park. Steudel's
book begins here, at Mount
Robson, close to the headwaters
of the Fraser River. The poems
follow the river, both symbolically
and geographically, until the water
meets the ocean here in the city.
Ecology and domesticity are
inseparably interwoven in Foreign
Park. "The poems came from...
places where the energy is in my
life, and what I think about. And
that is family and the environment
and how those things intersect,"
said Steudel. "Our relationship with
nature is sometimes very similar
to the relationships [we have] with
other people and with ourselves."
Steudel is an active
outdoorsman, and though he
grew up on the leeward side of
the mountains — in Edmonton —
Foreign Park is entirely influenced
by his current west coast life.
"I spend a lot of time walking,
and I spend a lot of time in the
woods here," he said. "My family
moved to Hornby Island for half a
year and I did a lot of writing there,
and since then... there are quite a
few poems set on Hornby Island."
The title of the collection
is from the Rainer Maria Rilke
poem, In a Foreign Park While
Rilke's poetic structure influenced
Steudel's own, it is the concept
of the foreign park derived from
our current ecological situation
that Steudel explores through his
poems.
"[The poems] are political in
terms of the environmental view.
And I think the conservative
government are almost
environmental terrorists... things
are being pushed through in a
thoughtless way, in which, really,
we find ourselves in this foreign
park, a foreign environment." '21
Places to make a B-Line for
Elysse Bell
Food columnist
Ah, the 99. If you have
yet to experience its
pneumatic sighs, its
sweaty, tightly-packed
confines, and its
hurtling death speeds
down University Boulevard, I highly
endorse the 99 bus as a staple of the UBC
experience. One bus driver even wrote a
song about it.
Perhaps because it is so quintessential
to UBC, it is also a direct route to many
student-friendly places to eat. Some on
this list are old classics, and some are
relatively new to the area — nevertheless,
I'd like to recommend the
following cheap and delicious
places to eat along the Broadway
corridor, organized according to
their proximity to a 99 stop.
SASAMAT
Sun Sushi
Don't bother going if you're
one of those people who
complains about a heavy-handed
rice to fish ratio in your sushi:
you get what you pay for. You
can even phone in an order right
before you get on the bus and it'll
be ready by the time you get off
at Sasamat.
Candia Taverna
This place has been here for
40 years and I'm quite sure that
the decor and the music have
never changed — but why mess
with perfection?
The Kitchen
A small, unassuming
Korean restaurant that serves
homemade food to order. Tea
is complimentary and the
beef bulgogi made me want to
abandon all common sense and
lick the cast iron platter.
ALMA
Sushi Gallery
This is the sophisticated
older sibling of student sushi,
and if you're sharing with a
couple of people their party
trays are a great deal.
Thai Basil
Thai food tends to be
surprisingly expensive, but this
is a lovely exception to the rule
with no sacrifice to quality.
MCDONALD
Harvest Deli
Harvest Deli has some of the
biggest, meatiest smoked meat
sandwiches I've seen outside of
Montreal. If you can't make up
your mind, go with whatever is
on the blackboard.
ARBUTUS
Sushi Aoki
Their dinner for two is
possibly the best deal in the
city. It may not look like
much, but this sushi place is
incredible.
GRANVILLE
Bob Likes Thai Food
It's hard not to like Bob's
enthusiasm for Thai food, as it
results in some funky but well-
executed takes on traditional
dishes.
CAMBIE
La Taqueria
The lineups can be long but
the pace is quick and it's kind
of fun to watch people in suits
narrowly mis dribbling tacos
down their shirts. These are
tacos at their most classic. 'M // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2015
ADVICE //
Ask Natalie: How to get
over first-year jitters
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
I'm a new student from out of
province who's really worried
about everything. Classes, friends,
dorms - I'm worried I'll be doing
something wrong Can you help a
lost first-year?"
Nearly every first-year has the same
worries at some point.
But for me, and most first-years,
none came true.
Here's the thing to remember
when you're moving your stuff into
your dorm: everyone else is the exact
same position.
Dorms
The best way to get to know new
people! Leave your door open and
smile — it's impossible not to meet
people in residence.
If you hate your roommate, I'm
sorry. You can put in a room change
form, but from what I hear, unless
you have someone to switch with, it
may be a lengthy process. Your RA
(Residence Advisor) will be there to
help if things get out of hand.
On the topic of RAs, just remind
yourself they aren't there to punish
you, they're there so the huge group
of first-years who just left home and
now have control over their own life
don't kill each other or themselves.
You're going to do some dumb
things, and sometimes an RA is just
someone who has the sense to go tell
you not to be dumb.
RAs see some strange things, and
they are totally unfazed by things
like walking into the floor lounge
to find a resident drunkenly eating
microwave mac and cheese watching
a French nature show alone in the
dark at 3 a.m. I mean, not that I
would know, specifically.
There are a few things they can't
overlook, and they will go over this
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION KOSTA PRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
with you on your first floor meeting,
but generally it's the basic "Four Ds":
drugs, drinking games, disruption,
and douchebaggery.
Friends
Look around your floor when you
move in; in many cases, these are
your friends now. During the first
few weeks everyone is really nice
and you want to be best friends with
them all. Then, everyone stops trying
so hard and you fall into groups.
And sometimes that doesn't
happen — or your group breaks up —
or you just don't like anyone. That's
fine. You can become friends with
people in your classes (this is easier if
you're in a program like Arts One or
CAP) or clubs.
Clubs Days are fast approaching,
which is a great time to find a group
of people you can get involved with.
Friends aren't hard to make, but
you'll need to put yourself out there.
Classes
Profs and TAs vary as much as the
students do, and it's sometimes hard
to match your pace with the prof's.
If you're terribly worried about your
profs, talk to them about the class.
Most are willing to talk to students
with questions.
Be aware of the distance between
the normal student and prof,
especially if you're in lectures of
100+. They aren't going to know your
name, and chances are you won't
even have a conversation with them
the whole term, unless you go to
office hours. Your TAs are usually a
better bet for this kind of stuff.
Remember: if you don't know
what you're doing, that's okay. You
can always talk to academic advising.
UBC may be big and full of
confusing buildings (looking at you,
Buchanan) but it's also beautiful
and super fun. Enjoy your time here
because for what we're paying for it,
we all deserve an amazing four (or
five or six) years here. '21
RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION //
The RHAs self-indulgence hurts students
Vancouver
Spine Care
Centre
Chiropractic Specialty Clinic
Spine and Sports Injuries
UBC Student Rates
1678 WEST BROADWAY     604-873-6029
www.vancouverspinecarecentre.com
JAKE MULLAN
Letter
As the founding Ponderosa
Commons President, I'm well-
known for being critical of UBC
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services (SHHS) and their inaction
when it comes to dealing with
residents and their residence
associations. This letter, however, is
directed at the very organization that
I was part of — the Residence Hall
Association (RHA).
The RHA is the student
association that represents the
residents of all SHHS-operated
residences. It's composed of
respective residence council
presidents and an executive team of
four elected residents. Our councils'
and executive board's purpose is
twofold: to be the unified voice for
residents at UBC, and to promote
social interaction by putting on
events for those residents. As such,
we receive a pretty generous budget
from SHHS based on the number
of residents in each respective
residence. That budget is often
FILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
referred to as "residents' money" —
to be spent in the best interests of the
residents.
I believe the RHA spends too
much time and money celebrating
themselves, instead of putting more
effort into making UBC residences a
better place to live.
The RHA, while
being essentially
a student-funded
organization like the
AMS, operates more
like a self-indulgent
social club."
While councils spend the
majority of their money on events,
a lot of money from each residence
council is fed back to the RHA. This
is so that they can send a select few
of its many council members to
residence hall conferences across the
US three times a year. Put another
way, roughly $23,000+ of "residents'
money" per year is put towards
giving approximately ten residence
council members and execs a free
trip to places like North Dakota or
California to indulge in seminars,
boardrooms and pep rallies that have
given very little back to the residents
of UBC.
Another big theme in the RHA
is self-recognition — so much so
that there is an entire national
conference dedicated to it. The No
Frills Conference focuses on writing
pleas for awards months beforehand
in hopes that the UBC RHA is
recognized at a national level. This
single conference costs the RHA
more time and money than most
events their members put on. Heck,
they do this internal bid writing
process all year, and recognize one
another for their efforts by writing
page-long essays every month.
I've sat in RHA meetings where
we argued that we didn't have
enough money for big exciting
inter-council events, and as a result,
we'd have to scale back spending
on said event. Yet no one (besides
me) has ever stood up to say that
the RHA shouldn't be funnelling
over $23,000 into conferences that
do not directly benefit residents.
The RHA, while being essentially
a student-funded organization like
the AMS, operates more like a self-
indulgent social club.
The RHA puts on some awesome
events, and has made great strides
in advocating for its residents —
but I never wanted to be PCRA
President so that I could have an
all-expenses-paid trip to Pomona,
California. I urge this year's RHA
executive committee to seriously
reconsider whose interests they
have been elected for — their
residents, or their own.
Jake Mullan is the former
Ponderosa Commons Residence
Association President and a recent
UBC graduate. 1
public consultation
climate action plan 2020
UBC is beginning the process to develop a new Climate Action Plan for the Vancouver
campus. Our climate action target for 2020 is to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions from 2007 levels by 67%.
Over the next 4 months, we will be seeking input from the campus community on what actions UBC
could take to achieve this ambitious target. We want to hear what your ideas are for reducing campus
GHG emissions, particularly on:
■ Energy supply options • UBC-owned vehicles
■ Energy use in buildings (e.g. building      • Individual behaviours
design, maintenance and operations)
UBC is on track to achieve the 2015 reduction target set out in the 2010 UBC Climate Action Plan.
Join the conversation and help us set the stage for climate action success in 2020.
submit your ideas!
When: September 14 - 27 Where: planning.ubc.ca
Questions? Please contact Gabrielle Armstrong, Senior Manager, Consultation
at gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
a place of mind
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Campus + Community Planning // SPORTS+RE C
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER8,2015  |H
PLACES TO BE
S*«
--■^fa^
BY KOBY MICHAELS
It imposes on the already formidable
skyline of the Sea-to-Sky. It stands
vanguard; this giant, volcanic, blackened
pinnacle that beckons and tempts. Black
Tusk has been on my mind since I first
saw its jagged peak almost two years
ago. It sticks its mighty head above the
surrounding mountains and I, gazing from
the window of the car, knew I was going to
climb it.
Music pumps in the background and
mingles with drunken laughter. I lay my
head back, resting it on the cool glass of
the window behind me. I lazily reach out
for my beer and bring the cold glass to my
lips, sipping slowly. The drink goes to my
already exhausted brain and a smile creeps
onto my face. Someone cracks a joke at the
table and everyone starts laughing but I'm
in my own world, the long day running
through my head over and over again.
The day started off with a very different
kind of drink — the caffeinated kind. It
was to be a long day so the start was early
and the warm, energy-filled fuel of Galileo
Coffee Company was a welcome stop on
the two hour drive to Garibaldi and the
trailhead. Everyone grouped up, clutching
their coffee's tight, as the last minute
details were ironed out. Then we packed
back into the cars and onto the highway.
The keys clatter on the concrete of
my doorstep. I am too tired to hold onto
them as I fit them in the lock. My body
creaks as I lean down to pick them, my
legs threatening to collapse from under
me. Finally, the lock clicked and the door
swung open. I stumble in and unpack the
few supplies that accompanied me up the
mountain.
The trail is deceitful. It starts gently,
slopping up over several kilometres. The
trail is a highway of switchbacks, slowly
working its way up to Lake Garibaldi. The
long weekend had attracted the crowds
and the characters hiking up to the lake
to spend their weekends lounging and
camping by the water. It was great to see
such a diverse crowd out exploring BC
but I couldn't help but chuckle at families
lugging up grills, inflatable boats and lawn
chairs.
As I pull of my sweaty clothes, I wince.
The clothes have stuck to my sunburnt
skin. Blood is caked on one knee and the
other elbow. I slowly peel my socks off to
reveal my destroyed feet. 30 kilometres
later my feet are feeling it. I've ripped a
hole in the side of my boot and a rock has
lodged itself into my toe.
After the switchbacks, we headed
towards the lesser-travelled path towards
the tusk and left the crowds behind. The
forest opened up and the Tusks peaked
its mighty head above the surroundings.
I stopped to catch my breath and stare
down the peak. The sun was shooting
down on the open trail, my water supplies
were already running low and a blister
had formed, digging deeper and deeper
into my foot. I stood back up and do a 360.
Lake Garibaldi stands, the deepest of blues,
below me with its namesake rising to the
clouds above it. I turned back around and
keep onwards, up towards the volcanic
goal.
The peak was within my grasp, but the
loose, piled igneous rock slides out from
under me, threatening to start a rockfall
with my every step. I top out on one rock
pile and traverse the ledge over the the
crux move of the scramble, the chimney.
The chimney is a narrow scar that leads
to the peak of the mountain, serving as the
only way reach the peak. I crawled into the
crack, sliding my body between the rocks.
I avoided looking down or turning around
to see the 1700m drop to the bottom of the
mountain. I reached my hand over the lip
of the chimney and pull myself up. But now
I have to jump across the chimney. I shake
out my sore legs and take a deep breath and
... I didn't move. I took another deep breath
but I'm frozen; I couldn't jump. Another
few minutes of deep breaths and false starts
before I make the jump and scramble to
the top.
It was worth the pain and the fear and
the exhaustion. I'd made it to the top of the
Tusk. Now I just had 15 more kilometres
before the car, my bed and sleep.
The hot water soothes my sore muscles
but does little to clean the volcanic dust
off my skin. It's caked all over my legs and
hands. I've wiped it into my face, under
my eyes and in my hair. I scrub, but I'm
too tired to bother pulling all the dirt off. I
crawl into bed and fall into dreams of the
next mountain, the next objective and the
next challenge. '21 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBERS, 2015   |    SPORTS    |   11
LEAGUE OF LEGENDS //
eSports beat Koreas
CTU, win big at AICC
FILE PHOTO VICTOR HOGREFE/THE UBYSSEY
UBC eSports has proven themselves to
be a world power in collegiate eSport.
Olamide Olaniyan
Contributor
The UBC eSports League of
Legends team defeated Chunnam
Techno University (CTU) 2-0 in
Gangnam, Korea, in the finals of the
AfreecaTV International Collegiate
Championship 2015 (AICC),
bagging yet another prestigious
tournament on Saturday, August 22.
The tournament, hosted by
the Korean streaming company
AfreecaTV, was a round robin in
which four teams, representing
North America, Korea, Japan
and Taiwan competed against
each other for two days in the
group stage. The top two teams
from the group stage then played
against each other in the finals.
UBC represented North America
after beating Georgia Tech in
the Collegiate Starleague AICC
qualifiers earlier in August.
UBC initially lost to CTU in its
first game on August 20.
But the eSports team bounced
back the next day, beating the
Japanese and Taiwanese teams on
the Friday and managed to secure
their place in the AICC final
against CTU on Saturday. After an
hour and thirty minutes of focused
and intense gaming, UBC emerged
victorious and became the first
ever AICC League of Legends
winners.
Chunnam Techno University
is well-known as an eSports
university and famous for
developing world class athletes
like Lee Jae-wan (Wolf), Lee
Jong-Beom (Peekaboo) and Ha
Seung-chan (Hachani) — athletes
who have gone on to play for
Korean bigwigs such as SK
Telecom Tl S and the KT Roister
Arrows. For many, it came as no
surprise when CTU crushed UBC
in the first game of the AICC.
The UBC team played in a
country where eSports were
mainstream long before they
even reached North America.
The Korean eSports managing
body, KeSPA was approved by the
Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports
and Tourism as far back as 2000.
In 2011, the Korean government
passed the Shutdown Law which
banned teenagers below the age of
16 from playing online games past
midnight, because online gaming
addiction was such a widespread
problem.
The UBC eSports team,
as the sole North American
representative, not only had to
face the domineering CTU team
on their home turf, but also had to
handle post-flight fatigue during
their first game. To make matters
worse, they were unable to scout
the Korean team before the game.
"On the first day, we weren't
really sure what to expect because
scouting for one thing is really
hard, just because we pull up
different servers and everything is
in a different language. So its hard
to research other people," said
Wesley "Daijurjur" Lee, the top
laner for the UBC team.
"We went into the tournament
completely dark," he said.
Despite the stacked odds,
the team stayed optimistic about
their game against CTU and the
tournament as a whole.
"[It was a] 50:50 toss-up
depending on how well we
played," said Lee about playing the
Japanese and Taiwanese teams.
"We were pretty confident that we
could win."
"I just kept reminding the guys
that even though we lost really
terribly, that 'it's still okay, we've
lost like this before, we can still be
positive and we can bounce back,'"
Lee said after losing 2-0 in two
games CTU dominated.
When the team stepped out
of their gaming booth, after their
win against the Japanese team, the
crowd that had come to watch the
tournament was dead silent.
"They were just shocked.
We surprised them because of
how dominant they were on the
first day against us. Most people
thought we were going to just lose
but we played much better on the
third day and we won," said Lee.
Having won everything worth
winning for a North American
team, from the NACC to the AICC,
the team might actually decide to
"dial back" on League of Legends
for now. And they deserve to.
With yet another tournament
under their belt, their sixth
tournament win, this year's roster
have established themselves as
collegiate greats, and maybe even
the best team in North America. '21
ATHLETES //
Record-setting race walker sets sights on Rio
PHOTO KOBYMICHAELS/THE UBYSSEY
Thorne holds the Canadian 20km record.
Koby Michaels
Sports and Rec Editor
Race walker Ben Thorne has had one
hell of a season. Team Canada, which
is comprised of Thorne and former
Thunderbirds Inaki Gomez and
Evan Dunfee, finished one point off
third at the most recent World Team
Championships. He finished first at
NAIA Championships in the 5km
race walk. Then he finished third
at IAFF World Championships in
Beijing in the 20km race walk.
Thorne, a third-year mechanical
engineer and former Thunderbird
track athlete, has been working for
a longtime to win a race walking
medal. Thorne has run for UBC, off
and on, due to eligibility issues, since
he first came to Vancouver five years
ago. Training six days a week, for 60
to 90 minutes each day, race walking
at the international level is no easy
feat.
Western Canada has built a race
walking program with Thorne,
Gomez and Dunfee under coach
Gerry Dragomir. The team is on
track to be one of the world's
most competitive with all three
athletes medaling in international
competition this summer and
trading off the Canadian record for
the 20km race walk.
"Race walking is a discipline
where you walk as fast as you can,
basically," said Thorne. "There's
two rules: you have to have one foot
in contact with the ground at all
times, and you have to have one knee
straight when you first contact the
ground."
A series of judges surround the
track and watch the walkers. If they
break a rule, they get a red flag. If you
collect three flags from the judges
you are disqualified.
Thorne was hoping to finish
in the top eight in Beijing, where
the prize money starts. He, and his
competitors, never expected him
to finish third. Ranked as Canada's
third fastest this summer, behind
teammates Gomez and Dunfee,
Thorne finished 20th in the
20km race walk at the last world
championships in 2013.
The World Championship race
started slow and Thorne said he was
feeling good for the first 10km.
"At about 12 or 14k, the pack blew
up," said Thorne. "And I was like,
What the heck is going on?'"
Thorne ended up in around
seventh or eighth when the pack
blew up, right on his goal pace. Then
a racer doubled over, throwing up.
"Next thing you know, I'm in
fourth," said Thorne. "I chased the
guy in third for about a lap. He got
disqualified right in front of me; a
guy shoved a red paddle in his face....
I actually almost hit him.
"For a 20k walk that last 90
minutes, it was pretty exciting."
After finding himself in third,
Thorne held his position and
finished for a bronze.
"I got a medal. I only really
dreamed it would happen," said
Thorne.
With the win, Thorne is turning
his sights to the 2016 Olympics,
where he is now a medal contender,
along with Gomez and Dunfee. 'M
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