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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1971

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Array —brett garrett photos
WHAT WOULD YOU SAY if this was the kind of food SUB served? Well, it's not Mom's home
cooking but it is a step toward liberation as some UBC men learn to cook Thursday noon as part of
the Human Government's orientation program. Below, instructor David Mole samples his own.
Border schedule
This is the schedule of events for today's Amchitka border
protest:
12:30 noon — Buses begin leaving from the SUB traffic
circle until 1:30 p.m. All persons driving to the border
demonstration are urged to stop at the circle to pick up as many
passengers as possible. Drivers head south along Oak Street onto
highway 499 to Peace Arch parking lots.
2 p.m. — Assemble along the international boundary.
Marshals will be on hand to give directions and assistance.
Speakers will begin from a stage set up by the Peace Arch. A
group of people are asked to assemble by the sign along the
coast and two buses will carry demonstrators to the Pacific
Highway truck border a mile east of the Peace Arch.
3 p.m — Several bands will provide music for
demonstrators at the Peace Arch continuing until 5 p.m.
5 p.m. — Speakers will reassemble at the Peace Arch and
continue until 6 p.m.
6 p.m. - Demonstrators will reassemble in their cars and
buses after picking up people at the railway and Pacific Highway
crossings and proceed back to Vancouver. Marshals will
continue to be on hand until the demonstration ends to give
assistance and advice in case of trouble.
'Strongest
disapproval'
at
• •
rder
By SANDY KASS
If you're against the Amchitka nuclear test, be at the Peace
Arch today.
The Peaqe Arch demonstration was initiated last Friday to
protest the underground testing of a five-megaton nuclear warhead by
the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission at Amchitka Island, in the
Aleutian chain off Alaska.
"This is the strongest possible way we can express our
disapproval over the test," said Alma Mater Society president Steve
Garrod.
The warhead is part of the Spartan anti-ballistic missile system,
aimed at detonating enemy missiles headed for the U.S. over Canadian
territory.
However the Spartan anti-ballistic missile system is now
obsolete as it is unable to accurately distinguish between the armed
and dummy unarmed warheads of the Russian system, said professor
Kal Holsti in a political science 204 class Thursday.
The Americans are now working on a new system called Sprite,
which can be used against the Russian missile, he said.
The Spartan is only of use against the type of missile owned by
the Chinese, said Holsti.
With the AMS moratorium on this afternoon's classes still in
effect, Garrod urged all students to meet at the SUB traffic circle at
See page 2: 'NO BUSES'
Gobblers gather at rage for Gage
By FREDDA GOBBLER
Why did the barbecued chicken go to
the Rage of Gage din-dins?
To get to the other side, stupid.
There were also a lot of turkeys there,
but they were mostly sycophantic faculty
members and, not surprisingly, engingears.
(The boys in red have often expressed their
admiration for Wally.)
Well, it was really lovely, you know;
they gave Wally an argillite totem pole (it
can't be blamed, really) and a poster
caricature of himself. It was very, very.
What it was, was Thursday night, of
course, but it was also a reception and
chicken barbecue honoring Wally's 50-year
association with UBC.
And of course all the important persons
were there. There was Doug (The Thug)
Kenny, sometime dean of arts; Ian Cowan,
dean of grad studies; all manner of cackling
faculty, old and young, with and without
wives; and the whole staff from UBC Flack
Services.
It was, I mean really, rather politic to be
there.
And it was all rather spiffy. Gone are
the rumpled tweeds and baggy cords; the
faculty members today, no matter how
senile, are always dressed in the latest
double-knit flares and double-breasted,
side-vented electric something or other
blazers. Faculty wives (a lot of these old
codgers seem to have married much
younger women since last year's Vancouver
Institute meetings) were really putting on
the peacock too at this bash.
But the giggling and gossip seemed to be
the same. In fact the whole affair was
rather kaleidoscopic for this reporter (who
arrived, by the way, too late for the
chicken). I did manage to get down some
of the ebb and flow of conversational
patter though:
"I'm one of your great admirers," was a
constant comment wherever Wally
stopped to chat.
"How was the chicken?"
"Which has its points, in my rather
opinion...
"Flattery gets you everywhere
(ho-ho-ho poke-in-the-ribs)
"Blahblahblah... peas and carrots peas
and carrots...
"What are you doing with that
notebook!?"
And so it went. It was a lovely, gay
evening.
The young, sallow-cheeked student
played very cocktailly music like a
professional, although he claimed not to
have played in all the good lounges. In
fact, he rather insouciantly indicated he
was only doing it for the money.
And, aside from the odd elements of
riff-raff, such as some recently graduated
mobsters who apparently don't have the
good sense or manners to dress properly at
such events, the evening went off
splendidly.
Wally was ever-so-grateful for the lovely
gifts and for the evening itself, and he said
so. He also told a couple of jokes,
apparently, because everyone seemed to
laugh out loud several times.
And for once, yes, it must be said, the
more brazen political elements from the
student faction failed to rear their
defiantly shaggy manes. The ebb and flow
of intelligent intellectuals and so on was a
heart-warming sight to behold.
It rather reminded one of that famous
remark the late Harpo Marx uttered when
faced with a h e r d: of rampaging turtles:
GAGE
... peasandcarrots Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1971
ymmmssmm
Senate approval withheld
on new architecture program
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The UBC senate has refused
to grant final approval to
course changes introduced this
year by the school of
architecture.
Senate has given the school
tentative approval to carry out
their new program for the
coming year, but has withheld
final approval until the
program has been examined by
applied science dean W. D.
Finn, said Henry Elder,
director of the architecture
school.
In giving their tentative
approval, senate chastised the
school for failing to present the
course changes early enough
for inclusion in this year's
calendar.
The school of architecture is
trying to make learning more
creative, so students can relate
to whatever affects them and
knowledge can expand, said
Elder.
"The school of architecture
has always been experimental
in its approach to learning and
we are always looking for more
creative ways to teach," he
said.
ELDER
. . . creative learning
First-year architecture
students now begin with an
orientation workshop at which
they meet the faculty and
discover the particular interests
and abilities of each faculty
member.
The afternoons have been
set aside as tutorials where the
student is free to associate with
whichever "tutor" is best able
to assist him in his area of
interest.
The number of tutorials has
also been expanded to give
students a greater choice in the
kind of problems they want to
study.
Elder said the current
university teaching procedures
tend to stifle creativity.
"Part of the reason we had
the workshop this summer was
to teach the students to be
creative," he said. "We noticed
a very definite inverse
correlation between the ability
and the creative ability of our
incoming students."
Thus if a student came to
the school with an overall
academic rating of 90 per cent
his creative ability was very
often minimal.
"We feel very isolated in
the university in our approach
to creative learning
techniques."
He added, "I don't think
our changes will affect the rest
of the university very much."
Co-op to run restaurant?
By BERTON WOODWARD
A Ladner farm co-op will probably run the
Alma Mater Society food restaurant in the projected
SUB expansion.
AMS co-ordinator Sue Kennedy said Thursday
that the Tempura family co-op has tentatively
agreed to run a natural and organic food restaurant.
She said it will work with Arran Stevens and Peter
Harwood of Lifestream Natural Foods Ltd., a food
store in Kitsilano.
Stevens said Thursday he and Harwood will use
the benefit of their experience to run a natural
foodstore and co-ordinate the management. Their
store will sell natural food staples in bulk.
An AMS-run pub and coffee house are also
included in the plans.
However all plans regarding the expansion
depend on the outcome of a referendum to be held
sometime in October, AMS treasurer David Mole
said. The referendum will deal with the use of the
$150,000 SUB reserve fund to finance the work, he
said.
The expansion is expected to cost between
$100,000 and $200,000, he said.
The referendum will likely be held in
conjunction with the October senate elections, he
said
Mole hopes the expansion, to be done behind
the Thunderbird Shop, can be completed by the
beginning of second term if the referendum is
passed.
Stevens said he expected to make a gross profit
margin of 20 to 29 per cent on the food service with
a five to six per cent net profit
The net profit would probably be divided
equally between the AMS and the operators, he
said.
Interior decoration will be handled by the
Tempura family, Stevens and Harwood.
"We want it to be a new world, a different
world with classical and exotic music," Stevens said,
"a place for a little bit of peace."
Architect Don Towers is presently working on
estimates of the cost of converting the "concrete
cave" into a useable area.
Mole said the planned expansion has the
support of the SUB management committee, SUB
finance committee and the AMS council.
'No buses,' says B.C. Hydro
From page 1
noon for rides to the
demonstration.
Garrod said drivers are urgently
needed to take as many people to
the border as possible.
After an attempt to hire more
buses, the AMS could only secure
ten.
"Most bus companies still are
scheduling city tours and have few
buses to spare," said Garrod.
"Funny thing, when I called
B.C. Hydro, they wanted to know
what the buses were going to be
used for. After I told them, they
said they were sorry, but just
didn't have any buses to spare,"
he added.
Most undergraduate societies
are supporting the AMS move,
with the exception of engineering.
Engineering AMS
representative Doug Aldridge told
council Wednesday night, the EUS
would   not   support   the   move
because engineers felt the
demonstration would have little
real significance and would only
annoy persons seeking entry to
Canada at that time.
Aldridge recommended the
demonstration only last for one
hour as an alternative.
"But that's like going on a
hunger strike and just skipping
lunch," said Colin Portnuff, arts
undergraduate  society president.
The education students
association has been circulating
petitions throughout the
education building this week for:
students to sign, indicating their
protest over the Amchitka test.
The petitions will be sent to
U.S. president Richard Nixoa
Garrod sent a telegram to
prime minister Pierre Turdeau
Thursday urging the Canadian
government to sever diplomatic
relations with the U.S. until the
Amchitka test is cancelled.
The demonstration, aimed at
closing the international border to
northbound traffic, is scheduled
to begin at 2 p.m. Speakers
include Garrod, political science
professor Phil Resnick and Homer
Stevens, United Fishermen and
Allied Workers Union president.
A co-operative child care
centre will set up at the border
and demonstrators will be asked
to aid workers for half-hour shifts
during the demonstration.
Garrod said the main group of
demonstrators will remain at the
Peach Arch, but hopes people will
disperse to block the railway
tracks along the coast as well.
Buses will carry a group ot
demonstrators to the Pacific
Highway truck crossing a mile
east, and return them to the main
demonstration site before
returning to the UBC campus, at 6
p.m.
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It contains many unique features not found in any ordinary home, such as
a huge fireplace in the living room and a permanent barbecue in the dining
room; these rooms beautifully panelled with native hardwoods, and with
heavy beamed ceiling. This home contains more built-ins, cupboards, closets,
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It has a wine cellar, zone heating (two oil furnaces), a garden designed for
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If this type of home sounds like your cup of tea, call 266-8903 for
appointment to view. Price: $59,900.00 Friday, September 24, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Alberta enrolment down too
EDMONTON - (CUP) - Enrolment at
the University of Alberta is definitely
-down and unemployment among the
university-aged population is definitely up
— as high as 50 per cent of those
unemployed are people under 25 years.
And the Alberta situation closely
parallels the situation in B.C.
The enrolment figures confirm what
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau said recently
. in parliament about fewer students going
back to school from the ranks of the
unemployed. Or perhaps they confirm that
soon only the privileged will be able to
affqrd to attend university.
Students coming out of high schools are
simply not flooding into the universities
the way they used to when there were still
enough jobs to go around for all the
graduates that were being produced.
This has upset the calculations of more
than a 'few universities who base varying
percentages of their budgets on
government grants which in turn are based
on the number of students enrolled.
Last year the University of Alberta lost
$3.5 million in grants when 2,000 fewer
students than expected enrolled. This year
the provincial government will soothe the
budgetary pain by providing enough
money so that the university will lose only
$500,000.
"We had been assuming that the
proportion of young students entering
university in Canada would continue until
it reached the 50 per cent level of the
United States," said U of A president Max
Wyman.
"Obviously this is not the case" he
continued.   "There   seems  to be  a deep
Pauline Julien in concert
Tickets are on sale for a people's
concert of one of Quebec's foremost
entertainers, Pauline Julien.
Julien was arrested during last October's
War Measures Act and was held for eight
days without charges and her concert to be
held on Oct. 21 coincides with theWMA's
first anniversary.
General admission to the concert which
will be held in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
is $2, said organizer Jeff Marvin.
A free concert on campus for the
afternoon of Oct. 22 is tentatively being
planned as well, he said.
Tickets are on sale in the SUB foyer and
in the AMS office at UBC, at Vancouver
City College, Capilano College, Duthie's
bookstores, Rohan bookstores, the Georgia
Straight, Bouquinoir and the Vancouver
ticket centre.
sociological change involved and young
people are asking some important
questions about their education."
The deep change seems to be
unemployment.
Last year the University of Alberta was
2000 students short of its projected
enrolment and this year it is expected to
be 1200 short. The university expected
19,500 for the 1971-72 term but
preliminary figures indicate that only
about 18,300 will actually be there.
The Universities of Calgary and
Lethbridge are facing similar student
shortages.
In the past when university enrolment
dropped, technical schools and regional
colleges have picked up in enrolment: but
both the Northern and Southern Alberta
Institutes of Technology report that
registration increases have not been as large
as were anticipated.
INS AND OUTS of Opportunities for Youth programs came up for discussion in SUB
ballroom. Anne Petrie, Carol Sadilier-Brown and Carol Sayre (left to right) reviewed
—gary gruenke photo
the programs they participated in under federal funds. Program, which was poorly
attended, was part of orientation week.
Forum reviews 'Opportunities for Youth'
Opportunities for Youth grants should be available to
everyone, a worker on an OFY project said Thursday in
SUB ballroom.
Carol Sayre, who worked on an OFY project, said
students received most of the government funds last year.
She said she hopes that next year welfare recipients and
unemployed people will also get grants.
"Another  problem  with  the program is that the
money from the government has to be spent mainly on
' salaries. You usually can't buy any sort of capital goods
that   will  last   beyond   the  summer.  This puts great
limitations on what you can do," said Sayre.
Sayre belonged to a group studying day care for
children. Their grant totalled $13,800.
At first they tried to help set up day care centres in
different areas of Vancouver. However, because of the
provincial government licence laws these efforts were soon
quashed, said Sayre.
According to these laws, only qualified people are
allowed to run day care centres.
"Qualified" means the applicant must take a two-year
course.
"This course, however, is very elementary and boring,
and would completely turn off a reasonably educated
person," Sayre added.
She said the only centre still operating following her
group's efforts is one run illegally by a commune. Because
it is illegal, it is not eligible for the $240 to $330
provincial subsidy.
Most day care centres at present in Vancouver are run
by women in their homes.
The government apparently feels the children are
better off in an home where they may identify with one
mother figure, said Sayre.
"Unfortunately these arrangements are beneficial to
neither the woman nor the child," she said.
In the home the children are exposed to sexist and
militaristic toys. The television is on throughout the day,
tuned to soap operas and the radio is constantly blaring,
said Sayre.
"The woman is also a victim of the system. She works
10-hour days and earns about 86 cents an hour — half the
'God still loves us'
Despite the fact that man hates God and avoids his
overtures, God still loves man, says Rev. Paul Stevens.
He told a noon meeting of the Varsity Christian
Fellowship that man should make himself available — even
though he does not fully understand — for a personal
relationship with God.
Stevens told the audience at the outset that he did
not mean to talk about God but rather have God address
the meeting through the medium of Stevens.
minimum wage. She also is regarded as a servant by the
parents and totally denigrated to them," she said.
The group has submitted a brief to the provincial
government and plans to put out a manual outlining how
to start a day care centre.
Another women's project with OFY funds was an
investigation of birth control and abortions in British
Columbia.
Carol Sadilier-Brown and two other women sent out
questionnaires to all 1,300 doctors practising outside
Vancouver to find out their attitudes on abortions.
"Girls in centres outside of Vancouver generally come
here to have abortions. This entails a lot of extra costs
that we felt could be eliminated if they were told about
sympathetic doctors near them," said Sadilier-Brown.
Out of the 400 replies from doctors, 25 to 30 were
favorable. These names were given to three women's
groups in the city to be given out selectively.
The group also plans to put out a birth control book
geared to Vancouver. It will be along the lines of the
McGill Handbook, but simpler and less technical.
"Many of the people who need it most don't have the
education to understand many of the complicated terms
used by McGill," Sadilier-Brown said.
There will be 20 lecturers and 27 seminar leaders, she
said. So far there have been more than 400 applicants for
the course and 100 more are expected. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971
The crunch
Maybe everyone is editorially Amchitka-ed to
death by now. . .
But a few more words are in order, because this
nuclear test and our reactions to it as UBC students are
important.
In recent times many Canadians and Quebecois
have started saying no to the U.S. steamroller, whether
it appears as a nuclear test, a foreign war or economic
control.
Our job today is to do more than say the word. It's
to act the word.
Because when the crunch comes, somebody
actually has to lie in front of the steamroller.
Important changes do not occur as a result of timid
tugs at the coatsleeves of those in power.
The dusty files of governments, corporations and
the military are full of such polite requests.
And still the steamroller rolls.
Where it stops has a lot to do with us.
Close the border.
Flackery
UBC Flack Services is dead.
At least as far as the human government caucus is
concerned.
We are referring, of course, to the
administration-funded UBC PReports — the rose-tinted
publication produced by the university's "information
service."
At Thursday night's caucus meeting, members of
the human government decided to have no further
dealings with UBC PReports.
Members heard details of how stories were either
ravaged or killed completely when PReports editor Jim
Banham and Flack Services head Arnie Myers decided
the stories were not suitable for an administration
publication.
Translation: "We print all the news that's good for
the administration."
Human government members decided not to deal
with this type of publication, though the idea of
banning UBC PReports from SUB was rejected since it
was presumed that insulted and enraged students would
doubtless see through the administration house organ
and conduct ritual burnings and trashings of the
offending copies.
The Alumni Chronicle also came under fire, and it
too has ceased to exist as far as the human government
is concerned, though a distinction was made between
the magazine and its more progressive sponsor, the
Alumni Association.
We think these are sound moves.
Meanwhile, maybe it will dawn on the
administration and UBC PReports that if their views are
right, they need not distort or suppress a truthful view
of the university.
MWSSW
SEPTEMBER 23, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Kathy Carney told Ginny Gait to stop raving or else, but before John
Andersen could ask what, the scene changed and we were all jumping on
Lesley Kreuger's head and sticking pins in the Paul Knox doll, that is, after
Sandy Kass turned on the lights and there we were in The Ubyssey office
after all with old familiar Greg Deacon and Berton Woodward and Sandy
Shreve putting on the water for tea.
Gerry Gruenke made the pudding and David Bowerman saw stars for
a minute until Brett Garrett started smoking darkroom chemicals and
yelling he could fly right over Chris Harvey's and Jan O'Brien's and Tricia
Moore's heads, and he would too, if they didn't like his pictures.
Sue Nicolls was drooling over Kent Spencer who was eyeing up Lynn
Pollock until the three all left together, arm in arm.
Ian Lindsay said he didn't believe one word of it, but before Leslie
Plommer could throw a grapefruit at him Vaughn Palmer proclaimed the
end of the world, seconded by Mike Buck, Jerry Goalscore and Gord
Gibson. The motion carried and it was all over but not before John Kula
and Fred Cawsey asked everyone to hold that pose. Mike Sasges just kept
on typin'. And we all went to the border. (And if anyone got left out
blame city desk.)
Letters
Found
I wish to make two comments
in regard to the article on page
two of The Ubyssey (Sept. 21)
regarding the theft of personal
articles in the library.
First of all in the fifth
paragraph Stuart-Stubbs is quoted
as saying that "the library sends
everything turned in to it to the
lost and found office in SUB."
Perhaps Stuart-Stubbs or
yourself has forgotten that the
lost and found office in SUB is no
longer in existence. As you will
remember, last year it was part of
the AMS co-ordinator's office and
was transferred in the last month
of last year to room 230A where
it suffered a short life-span.
Secondly in regards to the coin
lockers in the library it might be
added, to those students who may
not know, that the 25 cents
inserted into the locker is
returned automatically upon
reclaiming articles. In this sense
the wary student does not have to
pay for security.
Ralph Christie,
Arts III
The lost and found now resides
in the former AMS executive
office - SUB room 236 - but it is
only a lost and found for SUB.
Where this leaves Stuart-Stubbs
we don't know.
Fzzk! (# 3)
We found the letter which was
published in the Friday, Sept. 17
issue and signed by "A Moderate"
to be in extremely poor taste. It
makes us wonder about the
section on the same page which
states that "The Ubyssey reserves
the right to edit letters for reasons
of brevity, legality, grammar, or
taste."
We do not think that people
who are studying on the UBC
campus should have to be
subjected to this kind of language.
What is worse, it is creating a very
poor image of the university in
the surrounding community.
We call for a response from
concerned students to urge the
paper either to live up to the
editorial standards which the
paper itself states, or else to
publicly declare that these are not
the views of the majority of the
student body and that the student
body does not wish in any way to
be associated with this kind of
language. 20 signatures
What's all this loose talk about
the "student body"? Who is this
person, and why are you
oppressing her or him with this
objectifying language?
But that aside, we do indeed
edit letters for "brevity, legality,
grammar or taste." However, taste
is the least of our worries. Good
grammar and brevity are lacking
in many of the letters we receive.
Legality is usually not a problem,
except when anonymous writers
send in letters containing
unsubstantiated charges about
people in power.
As for "taste" — we never said
anything about our "standards",
and pleasing the "community"
has never been one of our stated
goals.
The people who control The
Ubyssey and determine its policies
are Ubyssey staffers - all 30 to 50
of them. Although we welcome all
criticism, comments and
contributions from students,
people who really wish to exert
influence on the paper should
come and work with us.—(Ed.)
Reply
Fuck both of you.
A Moderate
LETTERS:
(Continued on Page 13)  What Can I Do?
Germaine Greer slashes myths
By GLADYS HINDMARCH
I know that, I do that, I did, was, am now. That's
how I feel as I read The Female Eunuch which pulls me
into me at moments, and at others I stand outside the
past and the present details of a
crowded-many-relationshipped life and see.
What I see is that we do not happen to be the way
we are. Most of us make few choices in our lives, many
of us refuse to struggle with the people we live or work
or play with because we fear, several of us assume
we've failed because we accept the love image which
surrounds us since birth.
What 1 see are dependent women who see
themselves as independent because they work or think
or buy or believe since they are less dependent than
other women they talk with that they themselves are
free. I hear the sadness of what-can-I-do, see the
loneliness of thwarted nongrowing destructive
relationships: people who quarrel or blank, nag or
martyr, make love with everyone or no one: circling in,
circling in.
Greer's contention is that we have been sold a
middle class love-life image (the one and only or many
but separately) which castrates our energy, prevents
our being. Most women do marry, do lock their men
into the capitalist-nuclear-private goods-and
-space-consuming-get-get-get system. And most are
unhappy.
Stuck. In an apartment or house. A child. Two.
Buy, buy, buy. Live alone while the kids are young. Be
a mom. A super-mom-wife-lover-serf. Accept isolation
and tedium. But most work is tedious. His may be
slightly more interesting. At least it's social. Maybe
jobs would change women's attitudes, but what, which,
low paying or part-time and not much movement for
self.
And what happens to the kids?
Horrible daycare centres with only health facilities
not little beings, children, in mind. Or babysitting.
Fxploit other women for 50 or 75 cents an hour since
you don't make much yourself. But the job (unless
you're of the elite) ain't any piece of piss either. It
don't give much satisfaction. What DO you want. What
do YOU want? Goods, goods, the answer (for most) is
more.
It doesn't work. You, WOMAN, nothing's enough.
So bitch, so hate, so drink, so dope, so eat, so clean
clean clean, so save money for his boat he can only use
on weekends plus two weeks a year, so redecorate the
house, so health-food freak, do anything with this
energy (compulsive for some) or lack of (sleepy dopey
numb) but question the myth and how we live so alone
(amongst our objects) so separately.
And the buying happy as two myth is everywhere:
rooted in church in state in law, propagandized by
commercials by pop songs (her references are from the
fifties: love and marriage go together like a horse and
carriage, little things mean a lot, our love will last
though years may go) by movies by TV by love story
books and women's magazines and by education
starting in kindergartens where many kids are still
told/shown how they should behave inside static sex
roles.
In her it's-never-happily-ever-after-chapter on the
middle-class-myth-of -love-and-marriage, she says:
most women who have followed the
direction indicated by the myth make
an act of faith that despite day-to-day
difficulties they are happy, and keep on
asserting it in the face of blatant
contradiction by the facts, because to
confess disappointment is to admit
failure and abandon the effort. It never
occurs to them to seek the cause of
their unhappiness in the myth itself.
And  although Greer does throughout her book
slash the myth, the question I ask is: how to get out of
it? Here Greer is not so good.
Throughout the book she speaks for community
and against nuclear monogamous relationships (the
deadness) from an individualistic single girl's viewpoint.
She has no sense of struggle within long-term
relationships or groups or state. She is for self
examination (perhaps through books like hers), she is
for non-monogamous relationships. That's her solution.
But, my god, children, the race. She has some
fantasy of a commune in Italy (sounds bourgeois to
me) where the father and mother can somehow afford
to go several days? weeks? a year and where the
housemother and housefather bring up the children.
Stem family. Not nuclear. And the adults commute
from wherever it is they are in the world.
And just what does the intellectual heterosexual
woman who is on the left do with her sexuality? She
mentions truck drivers, working class men, don't be
hoity toity, maybe you can even spread the revolution
or change of consciousness that way. Sounds romantic
to me. She simply replaces the mess of what she sees
with an individualistic image change of where somehow,
magically, joyfully, 'women's souls change so that they
desire opportunity instead of shrink from it.'
In her fuzzy last chapter she says that:
the chief means of liberating women is
replacing the compulsiveness and
compulsion by the pleasure principle.
Cooking, clothes, beauty, and
housekeeping are all compulsive
activities in which the anxiety quotient
has long since replaced the pleasure or
achievement principle.
And that:
the fear of liberty is strong in us, but
the fear itself must be understood to be
one of the factors inbuilt in the
endurance of the status quo.
And:
women's liberation, if it abolishes the
patriarchal family, will abolish a
necessary substructure of the
authoritarian state, and once that
withers away Marx will have come true
willy-nilly.
It seems to me that the life-as-spontaneous-as-it-
can-possibly-be idea with the kids off somewhere in
dreamland and the adults all free of crappy love images
so meeting when they want to meet and withdrawing
when they want to withdraw and the women somehow
working for peace by not fucking soldiers is an
avoidance of community and change in a larger sense.
That is, I get an image of millions of heterosexuals (her
bias) making love with absolute freedom and no
responsibility except to self. And with no sense of
continuity, or actual struggle to change the daily
patterns of work, loving, money, playing, buying and
education, in community and state.
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971 * ■?
By ANNETTE KOLODNY
At the end of chapter 12 "of The
French Lieutenant's Woman, John
Fowles leaves his central female
character, Sarah, -crying on a balcony.
The last words of the chapter ask, "Who
is Sarah?" and "Out of what shadows
does she come?" Chapter 13 opens with
the .authorial confession,. "I do not
know," followed, somewhat later, by the
comment. "Modem women like Saiah
exist, and I have never undei stood iliem.""
My initial leaction. llieieloie. wav to
accept'the implicit masculine ery."l (.aril
understand women." as Tow lei' dilemma
and leave it at that. However, when 1
reread Edith V\hai ton's WH) Pulitzei
Prize winning novel. The Age of
Innocence, lecenlly. I was struck by the
similarity ol presentation between
Wharton's Counter Olenska and Fowles'
Sarah: both aie women whose life styles
threaten, ihe norm:, of their society
(Countess Olenska finally removing
herself to Paris and away from the
hypocrisies and genteel repressions oflate
nineteenth- centuiy New York high
socieiy. and Saiah rejecting the
expecuuons of Victorian Fngland for a
failed rather miserably with the female.
Which is not to say that western literature
is marked by. a dearth of believable
female characters, Obviously,
Shakespeare's stage.gave us a world of
women, from the delightful to . the
pathetic, the cowering to the heroic and
tragic; arid Chaucer, with a few master
strokes, created in the Wyf of Bath or the
Prioress women whose reality we~~nevra-
question. What ( Wish to point out,
however, is that their characters' validity
lies within the conventional frames of
their times and genre; and that, with the
twentielh century and, especially, with
the advent of modern psychology, the
conventions changed radically. Nowadays
we unthinkingly take it for granted that
out playwrights and novelists will give" us
some insight into the motivations behind
their characters' actions; we expect to
discover something about the killer's
childhood in any good movie thriller, and
we assume the stage piostitule is going to
break down; somewheie in Act ii or iii
and icveal a latent desire for her old
college loom male or, at the very least; a-
paieinal rape. (Even !■'. Scott Fitzgerald'
felt    compelled    to    validate    Nicole's
intuit the unplumbed mysteries of the
female psyche, they do not have either an
, adequate   psychology   to  explain  what
. they    perceive,    nor   a - fully   enough
developed, vocabulary  of symbols  and
myths through which to communicate it.
It also occurs to .me that Ms. Millett
unnecessarily labored her readers' time
and patience with questionable:, appraisals
"-of D.-H. Lawieu'ce. Heni> Miller. Norman
-  Mailer and Jean (jenet when she might
more profitably have  iollowed  ireud's
voice   and   turned   to   some   ol   oiu
contemporary women wiiters. Foi theie.
amid the razoi-edgc prose of Joan Didion
Or. the electric-shock imagery of Sylvia
Plath, to name only two, a new language
is slowly and painfully being born: the
language of twentieth-century feminine
experience.   In   a   sense.   Joan   Uidion's
spare prose is an emblem of the female
psyche   lorn   loose   I mm   its  mooiings,
knowing only thai, within ihe contest of
established     norms    and     conventions,
"nothing applies.'" Maria, focal chaiacter
in the novel. Play it as it Lays, describes
-...her mcaiceiation in a menial institution
as the fruitless puisuit ol ' icasoiis    Ioi
questions    that    themselves    ha\e    no
never ask"). Such symbols don't apply to
her — no more than the rules of crap:
What would apply she cannot conceive
... and that is the agony we, as readers,
experience as we follow her through the
empty desert.of her days.
Sylvia Plath can't quite tell us what
applies, either; but at least, she suggests
what is no longer valid. The girl whom we
see bieaking down in hei only novel, The
Bell Jar, is as much the victim ol her own
bioken psyche and its I ragmen led images
as she is ol the societal demands Io which
she cannot conloim. She expenences the
demand that she pose with a lake rose
befoie a cameia and smile, "to show how
happy it makes you to wnie a poem," as
another symptom ol the lack of
authenticity and postunng which
permeate the woild tluough which she
moves ... and in which she I inds herself
incapable of the right postuie at the right
time. But the novel, compaied to her
later poetry, is only a quiet denial of that
world; the poetiy annihilates it.*
We are viitually forced Io leconsider
all our comfortable images o| wifely
domesticity    when,   in   a   poem   like
Literary Reflections on Kate Millett
life within the Rosetti citcle"). and both
are women whose reality, while accepted
and even applauded, is not fully
comprehended by their cicatois.
The problem, I began to suspect, had
nothing to do with the sex ol the author,
but was, instead, implicit in the natuie ol
the character they were trying to present.
For. the women who openly flaunt
society's expectations or admit theii
inability to cohere within the established
patterns remain shrouded in mysteiy,
then thoughts unknown to us, and only
then    external   manifestations then
journeys, their dress, facial expiessions
and body movements are available foi
our inspection. But what precisely then
frustrations, then anxieties, their hopes
and dreams are made of, these we never
know. In contrast, the other main female
.protagonist in each novel is fairly clearly
presented, as aie the men. Ernestina. as
the embodiment o\ upper class Victorian
England's social pioprietie*, is painfully
available to lis in hei tiembling and
almost pitiable vulneiahilitv, while May
Welland, as hei husband resignedly
acknowledges, is ihe unimaginative and
abysmally innocent, but, withal,
admirable pioduci ol hei ca>te. lhai each
also'possesses lesources beyond the social
virtues'to which she has been named is
tantalizingly suggested; 'but these
hinted-at'reserves are never consistently
or tangibly delineated; and they seem to.,
offer rio real opening-up of the women's
choices in life. The men, on the other
hand, derive their personalities, frbrri the ;
tension between their own inner sense of
possibility and the constraints imposed,
upon them by the expectations of.their
narrow social spheres. ';■■
Simply put, each novelist seems -to
have been in complete control of a
psychological sub-structure and verbal
fluency'*-with which to present the
tensions between the inner and outer man.
in their central male figures; but, while.
they could take for granted and even-
know, the terms of the longings for
freedom within their women. Insofar as
their beautiful young ingenues comply
with the demands of their, societies, but
they are knowable arid describable; but
that part of their psyches which goes
beyond or is even in conflict with societal
expectations must be hinted at, and then
only with hesitation..
I think what we are seeing in these
novels is one of the central problems of
the twentieth-century novelist: if
psychology seems to have provided us
with believable and acceptable patterns
for understanding the male psyche, it has
meaning'tor hei:
Dul   because    the   pursuit   ol
■reasons is their business here, (hey
ask hie questions. Maria. yes oi no:
I see a cock in this inkblot. Mam.
.ye?1 or  no:   A  large  numbei   ol
■': people  are  guilty of bud   sexual
schi/.ophienia in Tender is the Night by
postulating a sexual liason between father
and daughtei.) That a number of authors
in iccent years have begun to spoof and
ridicule   such   expectations   does   not'
mitigate   their  force;  in  an  age only
beginning to awaken from the dream of
scientific  infallibility, we still .insist ftp?   y/Umdw.,   I   believe   my   sins   aie
wanting to know why, and, with regard*' \jj Unpardonable,    I    have    been
to human beings at least, we still clingiQ   // 'disappointed in love. How could I
the illusion that psychology has or'wilt X'    answer?    How   could   it   apply.'
unravel all their mystery. ' .( j,  NOTHING APPLIES, 1 pi nil with
u  ■ .■      ..... .,• -t-       .» !■*•   j' • U    the magnetized IBM pencil.
Had Kate Millett s Sexual Politics done .V-   *».,. „,.„..,„.. .,.i..,-.,.., ...■
nothing else, then, it would have proved
ilsell    an    invaluable   text   for   having
popularized (in the  best sense of that
woid)   the   shortcomings   of  Freudian
tlieones of lenuninily. While I have never
tell enlucly comfortable with Freud's
earl> insistence on the Oedipal experience
for men. I am consoled by the fact that
both Freud and many ol his followers
have since altered such formulations,,
providing a far more flexible psychology
with which to understand the
development of a "masculine
personality" (if there is such a thing). But
howevei uncomfortable psychology may
have felt with the formulations
concerning women theta have
unfortu.'.iiU'ly remained hisically Ihe
same, :•    <hai  even such geneu>us and
egalitar I'lcudiaris .is I nk 1-iikMin
ahdKai '. limn v in nil m many ways,
bound ■ '* tli' pitiu.i^ ot passivily,
masoch m mil ran.is u i.i which Freud
.enuncia' 'I
Willi M. Millett s unique is ncilhei
original o' .i* thorough as some whirl)
preceded il, il does tumidly and clearly
expose i'ii' pseudo-scieniiln. piesciiplious
of "ir ii.'i spate,' penis envy and
.mother lod-.is-tiillillment which have
pretty ve'l ohscuied lot us whafevei
may, in . ic:. be the genuine components,
of the I ri'iiniie psvelie Bnofh. Ms.
?Millett Lujvj hct allack ..n twu poinis.
that Freud's own foimuUl ions were
based upon the hysterical and
maladjusted women lie saw as patients
and upon whom he easily loisied Ins own
masculine/psychological picconcvption*:
and upon the Confusions inheient .n
seeing biological function and culiiuaily
defined social roles.as true explosions of
internal psychological and emotional,
patterns. Which brings me to the single
truth Ms. Millett does quote frpm Freud:
"If you want to' know more about
femininity, you ... turn to the poets."
For, what novelists like Fowles and Edith
Wharton, and so many others,' are
everywhere telling us is that, while they
The simplest solution, of loiusc. is to
■ write the character off altogether.
, cfjolking up her problems to a dilhcull
, childhood,   neurotic   paients   oi   early
traumatic Sexual expenences.' But Joan
Didion doesn't let us <>it the hook that
■ easily; Maria had only mildly ecccntnc
parents, and loving and likeable at that.
But, for all their loudness, they have not
"provided    her    with    any     way    of
Understanding  the woild in winch she
moves nor her own ielation  in ii. The
metaphor becomes cleaiei  as the novel
'Closes: the gambling "mles" she has been
■ taught will no more help her survive than
any'other "rules'" she learns:
■.  When I was ten yeais old my
fathi-i   'aiulii   me   '->   is>.sn  quite
rapidly the si' tKi" pmhib l'tio*. oi.
a  cups   layout    I   could   lt.u,i   .:
layout in iiiv sleep, ihe Weld heie
and  the pjss hm a.' .irotmJ   "ven
money    oi     [)■;    Si*    m    r ..h
flVB-IOI-llIlJ oi.   \u    s  .  n    \'v I
when E pl.i    I' i I   in    ii'.       .mi
it is with i p   ■     , ■ 11      pi'
as it Li'.s, il <i  i .1    n   I,, h ■ .I ■
My faihei advised me llu' '.      -   ■
was a (.rap t ime   m v, t  o'k        I
two lesson   I  en- ed ..s j „h   I   11,
olhei wjs .lu1 iim riur'ii'i.
was api to l'.l'J a   atiLs    ,      \
lessons go ilidv  "v,.> s.j.-n ■    |, |,|
up. hut nop   > .pp.y
In    ihe    p'.'cv *s    i I
hauntmgly   e.'i'gmanc   p.
Uidion    pJji      ' i.
convention^ \.\\> ..'■•'
hei .suci.ess. aii'l ■■; i     ;■
models ovci  i.    ■ i   .'.
comment   ih.i'     i.     ■   ■
malevolen.   w. i
levicwei   'iad   'ii .
Ll.'dllilg       lllld
pe:». . .flity, Joan
■'■ . 'all our
\ i index of-
I ■ ■■■ if Freudian
( o^mopolitan's
■■ I t'ortrays "a
lli( osmopolitan's
i 'i / accepted
Maria's opening statement,-"What.makes
Iago evil?;, some people ask," and her...
repeated assertion that she has no fear of
snakes as indicators of evil; the, point here
is that, while snakes may represent all
sorts of evils in Freudian constructs, for
Maria they have no such significance. Nor
does she ask, "What makes Iago* evil" ("I
"I esbos." even Ihe most oidinary scenes
shock and disturb:
I'iciousiuws in the kitchen!
The potatoes hiss.
And how can we reconcile out pieties
about the lull illment of motherhood with
. .. my child -look at her,
face down on the floor.
Little iinsining puppet,
kicking io disappear -
Why she is schizophrenic.
Her face red and white, a panic / ?/
Admittedly, these are not easy authors
to iead: their perceptions consistently
attack ail our "normal" preconceptions
and expectations. But it we aie to
discover the components oi the integnty
we denominate as "feminine,'Mhen the
path may well lead through madness
(note how many contcmporaiy women
writcis deal with the experience ol
bieakdown Doris Eessing and Anne
Sexton, to cite only two moie) and, in
the process, forge a new vocabulary of
myths, symbols and images through
which to tell the tale. Foi ihe power of.
Joan Didion's novel is haidly in its plot or
variety of its chaiacleis: u is in the*.
l-jnpii:i«c as spaie and culling and
dead's priinc as prose can he. And Sylvia
IMjiIi s i, not a triumph of death, as too
hum ulii is would have us believe, but a
ii.: ph "l !anguage:
'i- V uh ■
tin  , i   n   Jsh
II >. i<   Ii "iy red hair
\i .'/1 / ■• en like air.
III in    jiume, Ariel, 'will devour us
i'in   .ve need it ... arid annihilate
> .i  '-id' f comfortable "truths." '
s i. ■ mse, Kate Millett was right to"
u>l Ii ■ I" ■ k with "literary reflections."
Km I. ■ nee ntratirig on particular male
ni V- . 'cultural agents" responsible
lui anapuig "the'vast gray stockades of
.. . sexual reaction," she momentarily
loses sight of her earlier observation that
then have been just as victimized by- those
"stockades" as women, and, perhaps
more important, she ends up retelling the
literary version of the persecution instead
of seekingout the first, real signs of its
reversal. When children and potatoes and
kitchens begin to bring forth reactions we
could never have previously anticpated,
then there are revolutions going on in
people's heads. And; if we are lucky and
the revolution succeeds, then someday
maybe we will create "a world we can
bear out of the desert we inhabit," as Ms.'
Millett so fondly hoped, a year ago.
Friday, September 24, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 A Revolution Based on Sex
By ANNE PETRIE
The Sexual Revolution is one of the
books on the Women's Studies course,
The   Canadian   Woman:   Our   Story
which starts on September 28, 7:00
p. m. in the SUB Ballroom.
A sexual revolution is not just
sleeping with one person and enjoying
it or sleeping with a lot of people and
enjoying that. Such definitions forget
the operative word in the phrase
"sexual revolution" — the noun
"revolution". We have strange aversion
to connecting sex with politics; after
all, sex is "personal", sex is "private"
and we prefer to ignore the' word
"revolution" or translate in the
vaguest humanitarian terms as "sexual
freedom", "sexual reform" "sexual
gratification".
When Wilhelm Reich entitled his
book The Sexual Revolution, he
meant what he said ... a revolution
based on sex. And just as all
revolutions, a sexual revolution means
a total restructuring of the economic,
and therefore, the power system. What
that means, and it's hard to take when
you're sleeping with someone you care
about, is that sex and power and
money cannot be separated from each
other.
The best place to start explaining
what Reich means is to examine not
sex itself, but the biological product of
sex which has been, at least for that
part of history we are most familiar
with, the nuclear family. Most of us,
who'll otherwise talk about most
anything, often get quite edgy about
discussing the family that is, when
someone is suggesting that the family
is a socially reactionary and
destructive institution. Even when, as
is true for many of us, our family
situations have been unpleasant, we
still assume that the family is
necessary, is somehow intrinsically
good or right.
Now the idea of a family, two
people who joined in love wish to live
and work together and to produce and
raise offspring, is inspiring. But the
reality of the family is far different.
Instead    of   inspiration,   it   usually
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produces despair, neurosis and sexual
maladjustment for most of its
members.
When I was very young, my girl
friends and I used to have long and
wonderful discussions about how we
would get married for "love". And
then along came the so-called sexual
revolution so none of us had to get
married any longer in order to sleep
with someone. But we all still did get
married or we lived with somebody for
a while and then we got married. Why?
To put it succinctly, we all got married
for money, because we didn't have any
money of our own and we didn't have
much chance of getting any. Even
when we had university educations, it
was still our typing speed that
counted. And forty hours a week of
mindless work and $280.00 a month
doesn't mean you have any money.
The so-called "sexual revolution"
only clouded the real issue which
always has been money for women
and power for men. You can be as
sexually liberated as you want, but
when it comes down to it, in
permanent relationships with men,
unless you have been very fortunate,
you always trade your sexual favours
and biological ability to bear children
for economic security. As long as you
are in a relationship where one person,
and it is, in almost all cases, the man,
has economic power, you take a
subordinate position so that it
becomes a relationship not of equals
or of "love" but of simple power, just
like in business. And it is unnecessary
to say that a relationship based on
power, by definition, denies love. Not
only does a power relationship deny
love, it also denies sexuality. Marriage
offers sexual gratification with one
hand and then takes it away with the
other and enforces an unnatural and
perverse morality. A woman, in a
marriage or permanent relationship
where economic power is concentrated
in the hands of the man, cannot afford
sexual gratification.
While it is possible that two people
might want to live together for the rest
of their lives, it is unrealistic and
highly romantic to assume that sexual
gratification with only one partner will
be complete. A man can have
temporary relationships with other
women at no risk to his marriage,
because his wife can do nothing about
it. With no money of her own, she
cannot leave him and is forced to stay
in his home and under his authority.
But if she looks outside of the
marriage for a temporary partner, she
runs the risk of being cast out by her
husband, of having her economic
security taken away from her. If this
does happen, she must then look for
another man to provide this security
and the process starts all over again.
That is why "liberalized" divorce laws
mean little when the financial position
of the woman and the children makes
divorce economically impossible.
So sexual revolution is coincident
with economic revolution, and not an
economic revolution based only on
inequality of economic distribution
between classes but between men and
women. The social prerequisite of any
lasting relationship between a man and
a woman is economic independence of
both parties. For women this
economic independence will mean not
only the availability of cash but
realistic social assistance for the care
and education of her children.
Should this ever be accomplished,
then the family, that is, a unit of
mother, father and children may
continue to be able to exist because of
the very changes the sexual revolution
will insure.
Reich talks a great deal about the
sexual repression that marriage' and the
family structure engender. And sexual
repression means neurosis and the
damming up of creative vital energies.
For the parents, marriage allows them
to have sexual intercourse legally, then
denies them any real gratification
because both inside and outside the
marriage, sex becomes an economic
consideration for women. Thus you
end up with sexually unsatisfied
parents who naturally affect the sexual
development of their children.
By the time they are fifteen or even
earlier, young people are biologically
ready to enter into sexual relationships
but are denied them usually because
they are not "mature" enough,
although it is not often clear what that
means. So they have to undergo years
of sexual frustration which we politely
call "adolescence" until they can get
married, and start another family
which repeats the same procedure. The
term Reich uses is "compulsive
marriage". What he demands for youth
is full access to contraception and
something else which most of us have
entirely failed to consider. Young
people can have all the facilities to
avoid conception, but the problem
remains as to just where they are going
to avoid it. That is, because they are
economically, dependent, and do not
have a place of their own, cannot
afford or are not allowed to go to
hotels or rightly feel disgusted in the
back seats of 1956 Chevrolets, where
are they going to have this sex that is
offered to them? How many parents
are afraid to really know that their
children are having sexual intercourse,
much less give them the physical
freedom to do so, like allowing them
the use of their own home or
bedroom.
Reich published The Sexual
Revolution in 1928. Although he
resisted much of the pervasive
Freudian influences of that time,
especially the master's dictums on the
"nature" of women, some of his
discussions of oedipal complexes and
infantile sexuality are a bit difficult to
listen to seriously if you don't believe
that your entire life was irrevocably
settled for you by the age of 6
months. And although implicit in his
discussion of the nature of sexual
repression is the economic
powerlessness of women, one could
easily not realize its significance in his
more obvious discussions of "sexual
freedom". But Reich was not writing a
manifesto for women's liberation but
for human liberation. The point,
however, and he makes it well, is that
we cannot go much farther in our
vague and endless discussions about
human liberation until we realize that
the first step to any possible
restructuring of society is the real
inclusion of women in any blueprints
for revolution.
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971 " Simone de Beanvoir'
in The Prime of Life
By BARBARA COWARD
This is difficult to get down to. We are
looking for a house. We are powerless,
hoping for crumbs from landlords. Germaine
Greer mentions isolationist living in Female
Eunuch and I think, no, that's not how
Beauvoir lived in Europe. I long for a house,
quiet, fireplace, regular dinners, stability -
beginning to resemble the dreaded nucle*
that knows its boundaries to be the fence of
its private property. North American
residential syndrome, it grows in spite of the
street people.
I remember large flats in Montreal,
double stairway to each floor, milk chute
beside the first apartment. Wood. Not the
steel and concrete high rises of the North
Shore. The flat is one of the imagined
components of Beauvoir, for me an
indication of her physical location; in Paris,
Marseille, with friends, sharing money, ideas,
journeys, the street life. Which is a life of
cafes, terraces, walking, visiting, a
continuous conversation. I first read her in
French, not the autobiography, but
LTnvitee, her first published novel. It was in
a course given by a woman who would have
us believe that Simone was a jealous bitch
who longed to marry Sartre and, in jaded
failure, wrote a rancorous novel against him.
Fat chance. Years later I read A Very Easy
Death and Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter,
and now Prime of Life, and it is not the case.
Prime of Life, (Force de L'Age,) is about
that middle part of her situation, where she
found her centre of energy as a writer, and
politically. It is mostly about politics and
people. A personal account by a woman of a
country (France), continent (Europe), world
and time (approx. 1929-45), run
predominantly by men. She is one of the
principal writers of the twentieth century.
Strangely enough some prudery lurks
under the vivaciousness. In Memoirs of A
Dutiful Daughter Beauvoir says, in spite of
sexual desires (all those evenings with
unknown men in dance halls!) that sexual
exploration inhabited no part of her real
experience of people. Until Sartre, and even
then the affair is mentioned with utmost
discretion. This adolescent celibacy I find a
bit exaggerated, in fact the only aspect of
the books that disconcerted me. I kept
conjuring up the moist-thighed convent girl
described to Marat by Sade. And yet how
could that be the same twenty year old
roaming the cluttered streets of the wrong
side of town? Sexual modesty reappears in
Force of Circumstance when, practically
resigning herself to a sexuality circumscribed
by the years of childbearing, she is surprised
to have a lover at forty. And in Second Sex
when she refers to the vaginal orgasm as the
only 'normal satisfaction'. The nuances and
politics of sexual jealousy are discussed at
greater length in her fiction, LTnvitee, and
the novella collection, The Woman
Destroyed, rather than in the autobiography,
which serves better to outline an historical
context and literary development.
The main impetus of Prime of Life comes
from an incredible fidelity to detail, of what
European living was like during those years,
the struggle of intellectuals with their own
evolving sense of 'engagement' and political
involvement. Also the chronology of
Resistance movements during the war and
Beauvoir's personal response to the facts of
the crisis: "The individual's concept of
himself will depend on whether his society is
aiming at the achievement of freedom, or
content to merely endure passive bondage;
yet each one of us has the power to
challenge that collective decision. Every day
I had to experience this ambiguous
solidarity."
She   admits   to   a   late   maturing  with
respect to that decision for political
responsibility, following at times the
initiative of Sartre. Once the intial step was
taken, however, all of her energy became
devoted to pursuing 'authenticite' in writing
and in making socialism a political reality.
(It must be noted that previous to this Sartre
and Beauvoir had kept their distance from
the Communists, since they believed in
individual freedom and didn't want theirs
jeopardized at any cost.)
What I find most important in Prime of
Life is Beauvoir's intensity in acknowledging
life, how she will speak of it. Not many
women (or for that matter men) allow
themselves that degree of exhilaration.
That's why the French title Force de L'Age,
appeals to me more, declares the kind of
enthusiasm with which she approaches all
experience. There are exciting accounts of
relationships, travelling, the impact of
literature and art at the time. It is full of
people — Camus, the surrealists, Jean-Louis
Barrault, Picasso — figures of creative energy
in the France of the thirties and forties. As
an intellectual, her struggle includes
transcendance   of  the   stereotypic   role  of
woman, and is also a decision for moral
responsibility, the necessary roads of action.
So the energy and seriousness of her war
journal. Once she started writing, she found
that she couldn't stop, there was always
something to say. Her dozen volumes, in a
kind of prose that has been rarely emulated,
are proof that she has not been caught
speechless in the flood of an androcentric
world.
She likes women. And has never simply
pursued success in male terms in a male
society, although certainly she has publicly
attained that reknown. Her gaiety fights
against academic asceticism, seeking instead
to love everything that will give mind and
body pleasure. Demanding the right to
discover the world for herself, and politically
for others in the form of socialism. This is
something all women could learn, to find
their own lives. Prime of Life begins to refer
to all periods of time, what you must make
of it:
'Thus each book impelled me toward
its successor, for the more I saw of the
world, the more I realized that it was
brimming over with all I could ever
hope to experience, understand and
put into words.'
An important book to read for its politics
and people, and then, Force of
Circumstance.
I don't feel satisfied with this, leaving it
off. Why? I think it's not good enough, in
some objective terms, feel anxious about
how others will see it. I've been taught well,
to experience worry in competition. Here I
discover a discontentment with the writing
and want to look at it more closely.
Something about how I imagine my daily
activity and what it involves; how men do
the same. This reflection not to be taken as
entire, but a single insight, a possible flash of
recognition of my personal and perhaps
common condition of life. Who gets the
carrot and what is that carrot.
That is; my way of seeing, through images
as metaphor, meaning pushed through that
vision, rather than bare cold idea. Emotional
tones or nuances I respond to. Brian says
that he always wants to understand, through
explanatory sentence, the meaning of the
emotion — not to take it just like that but
make it mental — hear it in concepts. I put a
premium on ideas, knowing that as a kid I
was told that girls are good at memorizing,
describing things, but not THINKING (i.e.
synthesizing ideas) - man's realm. Like
knowing when Ed Dorn uses the word
'description' it is a depraved thing — if
you're described ('a plain white unassorted
citizen') you're as good as dead. Similarly if
that's what you do, describe, then you limit
by your action, it is a defilement of the
richness around us. So I got to college and
had to learn how to think. My brother could
think, naturally. I had to work at it, easier
for me to be carried off by image, emotion. I
write in my journal:
Vision. I am stuck with vision. 'Show
me what that looks like.' Wanting the
visible and not seeing the invisible,
spaces in between. 7 see what that
means.' I want to see what that means
or it stays impossibly mysterious and
impenetrable. Void. Gap. The terror of
having space invisible around you, like
the middle of the stage when the
music starts and how to imagine filling
that space. And the fear of emotion,
motion out of body scream and shout,
anger, the blackness that gapes in front
when you see anger.
My brother got his M.A. in political
science, a university-bonafide document that
is to be taken as no great issue of truth, but
rather an example here. I don't understand
it; when I read it, it is a maze of
hypothetical concepts, not one image to see.
And somehow I feel with all this, I should be
thinking, not feeling. Learning logical and
rational argument (your thoughts never
follow, they stop in midstream) that the
OTHER way (what books did I read when I
was young, how many ideas, how many
pictures imprinted) is like an undeveloped
nation, immature and inferior. And have
always had difficulty with pure idea, but in
spite of that revulsion, and knowing when 1
hear POETRY the tone carries across to me,
texture of language and what I can see
carries me off, there I am at the feet of
RATIONAL THOUGHT, grappling for a
way to know it. (I have been taught well).
It is too easy (but experience bears me
out) to contend that many men, maybe
most, have more trouble with love than
IDEA , struggle against it with
rationalization and unbiased fervour. And so
I don't want this to reinforce an incomplete
and possibly fallacious dichotomy for
male/female; it changes as social atmosphere
changes, as sex roles break down. The first
part of this writing comes from what Prime
of Life offered me, mostly ideas and the
occasional empathy with certain
experiences. And I didn't like writing it;
apart from me, it was a creature of my mind
with hard edges and no warmth. I prefer The
Woman Destroyed to the autobiography, for
its detail and precision, and in the same way
prefer Prime of Life to what I said about it.
It is not my word. About time 1 let emotion
claim its rite of passage and be reunited with
mind on equal footing. Just to say I wrote
this   and   didn't  even  stop  to  think.
* Nucle, contemporary description of a
nuclear family residence.
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Friday, September 24, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
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5 Geolers Mews 687-4047
The Answer To
Silly-Ass Arguments
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Masculine/Feminine... readings    in
sexual  mythology  and  the  liberation of
womenn'..  Editor  by   Betty Roszak   and
. Theodore    Roszak.    Harper   - Colophon
Books. $2.95, paperback.
Sisterhood is- Powerful, an anthology of
writings from the Women's Liberation
Movement. Edited by' Robin Morgan.
Random House, New York. $8.95 in
hardback, available in paperback.
•   Liberation   Now!   Writings   from   thet
Women's Liberation Movement. Edited by
women who decline to detract attention
from the many authors by listing their own
names. Dell, New York. $1.25, paperback.
Now that thousands of women's
liberation groups are bubbling with activity
all over the continent, publishers, have -
begun to notice the money to be made in
supplying" women's hunger to know about
themselves. -
Hence these three anthologies, ,^.
representative of a rash of above-ground A
literature.' about women,, our movement/J"
and our past.
Masculine-Feminine     is    in    part yj
sourcebook, a collection of articles byy
woman-haters and male woman-defjlkiers
i.i.d p^yclioli-iii ' , as well asof^'amlfstoes
In \anous wings i'f Hii' m<-vcuiciil.
Iii 'he main. ili'.'Ujili, all the contents ol
. tnewrbookf weie luM circulated insineaily
mimeojrai'hed pamphlets in IniK-
newspapfets put out In hille group; ul
hard-workinu women, in nongbooks arid
poetry supplements ulled wilh an odd
mixture of I'.iieiness <tnd |oy. One ailicle
-was   a   'spi.ci.li   (o   A<-huiii>ii   foi   the.
Advanceme'ii    ■>!   I''\ Ji.'ilierapy    b\   a
woman doc i"i   I   »iiu»i haie eleclnlied the
association.
Now, gaili- ■ ini together, 'his tiuierr.il
forms  an ewliem  cioyt-*-cuoii of wh.ir
movement w--u ■ n   i. savinji.
, It is diffiv nit i" K.-'iiimeiid which book
you should   ■ i- ■ w i'Ii  ■! ■ on want io know
about   the    iimwih. m     >nd   can'l   I mil
anything   in    ill--    irn.il    uiedi.i   exccpi
hysterical,    d inn . i.hikh       .iihI    giggliu-
sensationalism.
' Masculine/Feminine is more fJPjpeople
who have had the situation clearly defined
and want some in-depth understanding on
the   mythologies,,kjp#e||,\Women   who.
, h'pe^,4£^Jv%*j£?^3in 'Amount;', of
c^icieiisttess-rai^ing and reading will find it
The other two books are very similar to
each other: personal testimony of working
women and housewives, articles on
abortion, contraception, orgasm:
arguments, about the family;, about
children, about day care, about
housework: scholarly stuff, about class,
economics, Marxism, psychology,
sociology: some light on black and brown
and Chinese and. African and Cuban
women:-some Lesbian writing: some -..
poetry.   ~. ,>   . '
Both contain some of the same articles.
"The   Politics  of Housework"  has been -
much reprinted, and certainly it is one of
the funniest little polemics that ever made
a husband wince.
"Double Jeopardy: to be Black and
Female" is must reading for those
concerned about the birth control-race
genocide argument. And so on. I wish both
had "the Grand Coolie Damn",.the story
of what happens to women who think they
can.take a significant part in a male-run
.leftist group: I wish they both had "The
Myth of the Vaginal Orgarism", which
everybody should know about by nowi
] For me, "Sisterhood is Powerful" is the
better book. It has more humor; for one
thing. And it has a fat reading'list and tells
you what moview to order and what books
not to read. *
It has "historical documents", meaning
vaffipft^gosjtion papers from the past six
It hassrfJSF/photos, just to keep your
has articles of every degree of
corrng^xity. It has 601 pages. It answers all
^^bJerf!W5i|bj^ss.J>>arguments   that, male
Sfejag;- with.  It  will.
imgaftric^nfib*ages. And"
Mt:
the movement to date.
Liberation Now looks like a slick job,
with its cover picture of grinning women
raising the fist. Look, they're actually
\ I TRACTIVE! and so on. At 377 pages,
it's shorter than Sisterhood is Powerful and
H doesn't cover the movement quite so
well. But is has plenty of good thinking,;
.md for an introduction to the movement "
>"U can hardly do better than the first four
.ii I teles.
Sally Kempton's "Cutting Loose", for
uiitance, with Vivian Gornick's "The Next
fweat Moment in History- is.Ours", will
sci-rethe unsuspecting reader by the throat
:iiid shake him into a whole new way of
flunking about women/
'As     for     those     people     who
siniplemindedly keep asking "what do you-
want,  anyway?"  -   they  should
of the section of jobs: by a
wning in the. Steno Pool",'
dess, "Pie in the Sky",
mong other things, is
liberation   ''on^^^ degrading, shitwork
that no man woll|ottv$4lie spinelessness
to ertdure^and at wnragjppgj salaries!
All three books,- of
on    American    history
women:ijffijJblejrnsl„.__i^ ^„.^. ,-
A Canadian anthology is in progress in
Toronto: perhaps it will deal with special
Canadian problems. The sufferings of
native women, for instance, would mean
more to B.C. readers than those of
American black women. As for women in
Quebec, who didn't even get the vote until
1940, there's a unique set of problems left
untouched. ;. ...ii.
% All in all, these three books are; ail gold
mines of information about the women
movement and its controversies. The
uninformed will find them valuable: the
. woman struggling for liberation will find
them a priceless source of inspiration.
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LE CHATEAU
"Is Where It's Happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971 By HELENE ROSENTHAL
Phyllis Webb, Selected Poems 1954-1965, Edited with
an Introduction by John Hulcoop, Talonbooks,
Vancouver, 1971.
A book of selected poems offers to the
reader what a retrospective show of paintings
offers to the viewer; an opportunity to see in
perspective the development of the artist. The
pleasure of such an occasion is that the process is
telescoped, allowing us a share in the artist's
mastery of time. Yet to enter the world of
Phyllis Webb is to come up against time as a
"cruel, articulate/encompassing," a time-sense
both historical and subjective, but above all
oppressive. In spite of this, one comes out of the
book with a sense of exhilaration. The
breakthrough is Webb's. It is not only there in
the mastery — the "made-ness" of the form; it is
in the struggling vision itself, a kind of
counter-compassing that sweetens the pill of
existence and makes it endurable.
I suppose I am talking about tension, or
balance, or some such sweet thing. Anyway it is
there, at the beginning, in the coupling of such
poems as "Pain" and "Patience," and later in
"Making" and "Breaking." Now patience may be
The
Luminous
Webb
=0=
=0=
a form of passive resistance. It may serve to
endure. But we have to arrive, with the poet, at
the affirmation of "Making" to perceive that
there is a "certain order," the active product of
the artist's vision — call it the search for beauty
— which may well be the only remedy for pain
there is. "A grace is made." It is a fragile enough
counterpoise to the ache of negation but, "it
does," says the poet in a kind of litany, doing.
Which is infinitely more than just making do.
A moment's pause.
I had the foolish hope that I might have it in
me to say just enough about the poetry to whet
your appetite for more. But this already has all
the earmarks of a solemn review. So I had best
refer you to John Hulcoop's excellent
"Introduction" in the book itself. Besides
containing a biographical sketch of the poet, it is
the most thorough and meticulous critical
appreciation of her work you are likely to find.
If I were asked to say what really turns me
on about this book I guess I'd have to say simply,
that Phyllis speaks for me. As I believe she speaks
for us all, out of femininely felt responsibility for
the quality of life. The being a woman is not, in
my opinion, incidental, but gives a decisive cast
to experience. That seems undeniable. But who
shall dare to define what it is? Is it enough, in the
present instance, that Webb, the humanist,
despairs of the high cost of suffering:
This our inheritance
is our distress
and  aspires towards beauty, despairing of its
attainment:
What are sad about?
that all my desire goes
out to the impossibly
beautiful
Caught between a social concern and an
aesthetic need, Webb is far from unaware that
she has been accused of "complaining" in her
poems (or of the fact that no one has noticed
since    she   "stopped")'    One    might    remark,
offhandedly, that she is in good company; what
writer of the times does not reflect darkness? But
that doesn't quite answer. If her work favors the
theme of self destruction as against themes of joy
or affirmation, should that disturb the critic? It
is a problem which leads Hulcoop to regret "the
pessimism of her general outlook," though she
tracks a movement (often uncertain)
in her poetry away from the purple
rhetoric of a private past towards a
present   made   public   in    spare
poems... a movement away from a
self-pitying   obsession    with    the
despairing self and towards a much
more self-critical preoccupation with
language as a means of proclaiming
or presenting the nature of present
things.
As a joy-booster myself, only too prone to
despair, I can feel for this castigation of
subjectivism. But I cannot find the poems
•themselves guilty. They' are, by virtue of the
hardheaded care, the skill, that has gone into
their shaping, freed of the charge of "self-pitiful
obsession." As things in themselves, they
transcend their causation; they are self
-redeemed. Here, for example, is an early poem —
"And in Our Time" (1954) - which, despite the
public reference in its title, may seem to take
some of its color from the "purple rhetoric"
John deplores. The allusion, as he notes, is to
Neville Chamberlain's 1938 Munich betrayal of
his promise of "peace in our time," and so sets
the subjective concern of the poet within the
context of the historical.
\A world flew into my mouth
with that first kiss
and its wings were dipped
in all the flavours of grief.
Oh, my darling, tell me,
what can love mean in such a world,
and what can we or any lovers hold of this
immensity of hate and broken things?
Now it is down, down,
that's where your kiss travels me,
and, as a world tumbling
shocks the theories of spheres,
so this love is like falling glass
shaking with stars the'air which
tomorrow, or even today,
will be a slow, terrible
movement of scars.
The startling imagery of that first line as it
moves into the sensory language of the second is,
to me, nothing less than a mind-blower. The
artlessly pathetic question that follows, so direct,
so intimate, is upheld by the strength of that
opener and, in such a way, that the lovers' kiss
takes us "down, down" to the very heart of
darkness before we are even aware of the fall.
Then it hits home. At the moment of expected
ecstacy, the poet transmits her pang of
premonition and we taste its bitter awareness. We
intuit the death of love at its very source.
Webb takes something of the experience
further in an admittedly more sophisticated
poem entitled "A Pang Cantata." Hulcoop calls
this "an analogue in poetry for the self-contained
abstract painting." In form truly a
"sound-sight-scent synthesis," it represents the
kind of success in achieving immediacy and
concreteness that is the goal of articulation in the
arts today; and indeed demonstrates a formal
triumph of language over the raw material of
feeling and emotions. Hear, in the silence of
allusions, how the music of the pang strikes:
A Pang Cantata
A pang cantata
serin of Villa-Lobos
=o=
=0
13=
=d=
a tinkle canticle
a rose is arose is roses
Logos poetica Logos
Logos poetica
crin erotic!
O roaring spice
0 lion of Rousseau
all exotica!
O wild canary
like a mad Chagall
hanging upon
a basil-scented wall!
Pain which has undergone such a process is no
longer pain. Wit has metamorphosed it. And in
Continued on page 8
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Friday, September 24, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 From page 7
the expression of the earlier poems wit of a
special kind — perhaps metaphysical best
describes it — exerts a similar control over the
poem, informing them with a great range of
allusions. Phyllis has privately confessed to me
her present abjurance of this web of references,
and while I cannot agree, the reason for it is
plain. One has to move forward to the Naked
Poems, from which the final section of the book
is drawn, to see why. Here the voice of Phyllis
Webb has come into its own true clarity, stripped
even of the echoes, lovely as they were.
The clarity, I would say, arises from the fact
that in these poems the poet has at last defined
her position in relation to time, to people and to
things. She has narrowed her formerly vast realm
of space down to personal proportions. We see
this already in the poem called "Sitting," which
is taken from the book that precedes Naked
Poems, "Sitting" gives us an image of hermit-like
withdrawal. "The way/ to mend/ and
extraordinary world," says the poet, wickedly on
the edge of non-involvement, is to sit "perfectly
still/ and only/ remotely human." And she gives
us an image, of a Buddha-like figure "receiving
fire" from the sun.
But to absorb the sun's energy is to grow, to
grow is to expand, and to expand is to recreate
space in one's own substantial image. 1 don't
think she invokes the vegetable or mineral
kingdoms. She is talking as a human being; of
responding to life in a way that consciously
assents to, even draws inspiration from, the
process and its source. Then what is behind her
ironic advocacy of a do nothing removal? We
have to come upon the poet in the same pose
again, to find out. This is in the last part of the
book entitled "Some Final Questions." The
questions are put in the form of a dialogue
between a presumptive reader and the poet
herself.
Now you are sitting doubled up in pain.
What's that for?
doubled up I feel
small like these poems
the area of attack
is diminished
So  there  it  is,  naked of pretension. What  it
reveals   is   no   elevated   image,   but   an   only
too-human vulnerability. Which she has said all
along but never so exactly.
Hulcoop, tracing the chronology of the
poems, finds it "fundamentally existentialist in
direction," moving towards a solitude in which
Webb survives by "imagin(ing) her own
Olympus." While I am not too satisfied with the
accuracy of that latter description, there is no
easy resolving the paradox of an artist who both
makes a place for herself in the pantheon of
poets, and yet refuses the elevation. She puts
herself where we are, the non-elite. For me, this
is an endearing aspect of the person in the poet:
a complete lack of that egotistical pride we find
over and over again in the works of celebrated
male poets; in the very Yeats that Webb admires,
for example (though it is not to be found in
Rilke, to whom, in a moving poem, she pays
tribute).
I know I haven't touched upon her humor.
Pardon, pardon . .. there isn't TIME.
Let me conclude: in Phyllis Webb's
ambivalences, moral and linguistic; in her duality,
we face her most enduring quality, and her most
haunting charm. That is her tensile strength. For
in her self-mocking irony, we cannot avoid a
confrontation with-ourselves As a case in point,
"A Suite of Lies" precedes the book's
questioning finale, itself raising the question of
the nature of truth. There are no conclusive
answers and we know it. In the luminous framing
of the enquiry, however, the human form is
discerned, and we are all guests on Olympus who
find ourselves at home in the company. But
don't believe me. Check it out for yourself— go
right to the top.
CONTRIBUTORS' NOTES
Annette Kolodny teaches in the English Dept. at UBC, previously taught at Yale, and has a
Ph.D. from UC Berkeley for a thesis in American literature.
Gladys Hindmarch was raised in Ladysmith, Vancouver Island, has an M.A. in Creative Writing
from UBC and is the author of Sketches (published by Beaver Kosmos Folios).
Barbara Coward was born at a Canadian military base in Whitehorse, Yukon, and is currently an
M.A. student in UBC's English Dept.
Anne Petrie, co-ordinator of the Women's Studies program at UBC, is currently writing a thesis
on George Sand for an M.A. in the English Dept. at UBC.
Kirsten Emmott is a third-year student in Medicine at UBC and a former member of the
Academic Senate.
Helene Rosenthal is a Vancouver poet, author of Peace Is An Unknown Continent and A Shape
of Fire (both published by Talonbooks).
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Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971 Friday, September 24, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
Letters
(Continued from Page 4)
Critique
One of the first official acts of
a new totalitarian regime is
generally the engagement of
unequivocal support from the
press.
This may be achieved by
bribery in the form of material
goods or titles, by coercion in the
form of threats to health or
welfare, and by fools in the form
of editors or reports. The effect is
invariably the same ... stifling of
all criticisms.
On the other hand, a truly
democratic and well-meaning
government realizes that to stifle
all criticism is to invite apathy and
court political disaster.
What has brought all this on is
a very vague, yet very persistent
worry... an uneasy feeling that
all is not as it should be. Our
all-too-human government has yet
to make a blunder in its political
career. Can it really be true that
we have been blessed with a
super-human government?
Or has The Ubyssey become
the house organ of the AMS?
For it seems to me that the
only tangible difference between
the present regime and its
predecessors has been the
emphatic sloganeering. In fact, the
constant bombardment of catchy
slogans seems to be a ploy to
mask a very mediocre
performance, a rather poor
substitute for bombast.
What, indeed, has the human
government done?
A    noon-hour    rock    concert
series, circuses to keep the
peasants occupied and happy;
A poster -campaign to
encourage Mamooks' extortionist
prices and to remind the peasants
that there is a government in
power;
A student-run co-op bookstore
that is a totally inadequate
solution to the basic injustice of
the university bookstore;
A group of poetry readings as
an alternative to any concrete
action on Canadian content, or
the lack of it, in courses;
A request for cessation of
"further mindless construction"
of new libraries and other such
unnecessary facilities;
A move out of the executive
suite to reaffirm that the AMS is
as much a village of peasants as
the rest of us;
An orientation program that is
too little too late;
A repeat of the border closure
brouhaha that was excellent
publicity when it was first done
two years ago;
And, or course, radical
cliche number one - demands for
legalization of marijuana... the
only worthwhile cause left for the
budding anti-bureaucrat.
The real issues are still there,
after having been dealt with by
the human government as adroitly
as an ox executing a pas de deux.
Deus ex machina, and with the
full support of The Ubyssey.
Meanwhile, you mention that
Dr. Schwarz's marijuana study
"has been halted while the
presidential committees
investigate the matter." Whereas
that piece of muckraking garbage
in the previous issue (along with
the editorial cartoon, for which I
accept full blame and for which
my conscience was caused much
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grief) was totally responsible for
the termination.
Had the study deserved such
treatment, it would have been
understandable. But the fact that
only a token attempt was made to
establish the other side of the
argument brands the article and
the cartoon as reprehensible and
totally irresponsible.
You have made much play of
those with prejudices against
marijuana, yet show no
compunction to promulgating
your own brand of prejudice.
I agree with Karl Burau
inasmuch as the legalization of
marijuana is not the be-all and the
end-all; it is not the panacea for
every problem of mankind. It is
merely de rigueur for the sub-set,
as are long hair and wierd
clothes.
But that is all beside the
immediate point.
What is really wrong with
asking about one's sex life? It is
flaunted openly in public when it
is not asked for (which is much
more of an invasion of privacy)
and the whole concept of privacy
itself is a non-radical attribute.
I am not so sexually inhibited
that I wouldn't divulge the
information to someone who is
seriously interested (although I
stress the word "seriously"). And
if 1 thought the whole idea were
an invasion of privacy, I would
say so.
Nevertheless, of the
approximately 50 people who
were approached with Schwarz's
questionnaire, the only ones who
refused to answer were the
stereotyped hippies.
The whole opposition to the
survey reeks suspiciously of fear
that perhaps there are some sort
of adverse effects of marijuana on
the mind, and that publication of
these could very well jeopardize
marijuana's legalization. For if no
such effect were noticed,
marijuana why not say so and
influence the results of the study?
Silence is a tacit admission of
guilt, and to paraphrase a moral
dictum, all that is required for the
forces of evil to conquer the
world is enough good men and
women remaining silent.
And it is standard procedure,
backed by as much precedent as
to convince the supreme court,
that the questions constituting a
questionnaire refer directly to the
area of concern.
If someone wishes to
investigate the degree of
correlation between mental lapses
and marijuana use, he or she does
not ask questions about the
frequency of bowel movement.
Which brings me to my last
point. The human government
proposed "a moratorium on drug
arrests while marijuana research is
being conducted on Canadian
campuses."
Very ironic, and very very
sharp.
John Kula,
Architecture III
We look forward to printing
your proposals.
GENERAL PANTS CO. The largest volume pants
store in Canada is now offering an additional
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APPLY NOW AT
GENERAL PANTS CO.— 339 Water St. Gastown
for your GENERAL PANTS STUDENT CARD Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971
'Tween classes
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General   meeting,   12:30   p.m.,   IH
upstairs lounge.
MONDAY
LEGAL AID
Friendly    help,    12:30   p.m.,   SUB
228.
TUESDAY
HELLENIC SOCIETY
Greek     culture,     7:30     p.m.,     IH
downstairs lounge.
ANARCHIST GROUP
Program discussion,  8 p.m., Buch.
230.
SAILING CLUB FRIDAY
instruction   program.    12:30   p.m.,      ^"CAN-UNITED
Buch   104 CAMPUS MINISTRY
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Dances
11
CAMPIS DANCE FEATURING
Sunshyne and Shylock Friday.
Sept. 24 8 to 1. $1.25 per person.
Refreshments available SUB Ball-
room and cafe.	
POLKA PARTY. FRIDAY. SEPT.
24, at International House. 8:30 -
1:00 a.m. Food and great refresh-
ments. $1.25 per person.	
WOOD IS GOOD, BUT GIRLS ARE
better: have both at Undercut '71
Sat., Oct. 2. SUB cafe.
Greetings
12
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Losi & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM RICHMOND
(Vicinity Steveston Hwy. & No. 1-
3 Road preferably). Can use own
car part of time. Staff; can leave
at 4:30. 274-3303 or 228-4983.	
RIDERS WANTED FROM SOUTH
Brighouse, Richmond. Morning
classes. Non-smokers please.
Phone Sheila 274-1519.	
GIRL DESIRES 1-WAY RIDE, 7:30,
a.m., Monday-Friday from Como
Lake, Blue Mountain to Vancouver.   Phone  WE   9-3680.
Special Notices
15
LORD BYNG SCHOOL RUMMAGE
Sale, 16th & Crown. Sept. 30 and
Oct. 1. 7 until 9:30 p.m.	
UBC BOWLING CLUB NEEDS
more members especially girls to
bowl in our Monday Night League.
New and low average bowlers welcome. For further information call
Walter at 228-8225.	
THE BIG GREEN MACHINE AP-
pears at Undercut '71. Sat., Oct.
2. SUB cafe.	
HOMEMADE WINE. 6 BOTTLES 6
weeks. All equipment included.
Complete kit guaranteed $6.75
postpaid. Send money order today.
Wineco, Dept. 1P9, 670 King East,
Hamilton,   Ontario.
Travel Opportunities
IS
STUDENTS: UNIVERSITY CHAR-
ter Calgary to London Sept. 30
$125 or best offer. Call 731-8349
anytime.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1965 VW, excellent condition, $650.
Contact Paul at 733-5741.	
1963 FORD COUNTRY SQUIRE
$400, and 1957 Pontiac S.W. $100
o.n.o.   Phone  321-1483  after 6 p.m.
'55 VW EXCELLENT CONDITION!
Just overhauled. Very reliable.
Ready  to  drive.   Ph.   738-6003.
1964 ANGLIA DELUXE. VERY
good shape $400.00 or best offer.
Phone 224-9684 ask for room 11.
~65 MINI COUNTRYMAN REBUILT
engine, real good condition $350.
255-5613.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Auto Repairs
24
WILLING TO SAND AND MASK
your car? If so, I'll paint it for
$15, or $35 — paint supplied. Bruce
687-4013, 738-5056.
Motorcycles
25
HONDA SL100. EXCELLENT CON-
dition. Must sell. Any reasonable
offer. 731-8898.	
'69 SUZUKI 250 HUSTLER (COST
$825 new) low mi. excel, cond.
Only $475.  263-8472.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
STEAMBUBBLE GRAPHICS FOR
posters at student (not mamooks
ripoff), prices; and photography
services. John or Nick at the
Steambubble. third floor Lassere,
almost anytime.
Dance Bands
33
Scandals
37
GASTOWN'S A RIOT BUT THE
Gastown Saloon's pretty cool. Tally Honks playing there next two
weeks. No entry fee, just $1.00
worth of garbage. 137 Water Street
Ph.  683-9469.	
PEDAL YOUR ASS FOR $89.95?
See the Wheeler Dealer at the
Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th. 731-5531.
HOMOSEXUAL? WOULD YOU
like to meet other gav UBC student? Write Box 6572, Station "G"
Vancouver. 8.
Photography
35
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Yu,t      Cameras!
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Contest For
Photogs
Under 25 . . .
Full details at —
3010 W.Broadway
736-7833
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices-
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, manuscripts, essays,
etc.  Mrs. Troche. 437-1355.	
EXPERIENCED TYPING THESES
papers,   etc.   Electric.   731-8898.
ERPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typ-
' ist. Reasonable rates. Mrs. Ellis,
321-3838.
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL ED-
it essays, theses, mss for grammar, punctuation, syntax, spelling,
clarity,  etc.   263-65B5.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SINE NOMINE SINGERS RE-
quire bass soloist for Britten's —
Rejoice in the Lamb — and Bach's
— Christ Lay in the Bonds of
Death — for October 17 concert.
Others (tenors or basses), good
readers, also appreciated. Contact
Len Lythgoe, director at 224-1602
before Monday.	
TOPLESS DANCERS REQUIRED
for private student party. Ph. 733-
6314 Gary.	
PERSON FOR OCCASIONAL
babysitting weekdays, vicinity of
39th and Trafalgar, Kerrisdale,
261-4956.
Work Wanted
52
LOVING DAY CARE, OTHER
children. $3 half day, $4 full day.
No phone yet.  3161 W.   6th.  Vicki.
Music Instruction
61
PIANO AND THEORY INSTRUC-
tion available at U.B.C. from ex-
perienced teacher (A.R.C.T.,
B.Mus.)   Phone Linda  327-8677.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ROSIGNOL STRATOS SKIS 207
c.m. plus bindings $75. Herschung
boots size 7%. $40. Jim 224-0942.
FOUR-PIECE RAVEN DRUM SET
22-inch ride, high hat, folding
stool,  $200. 732-6965.	
USED AMPEX 1260 TAPE DECK
with speakers $250 (about $700
new) excel, shape. 732-8920 or 291
3667.
Centals & real estate
Rooms
81
FREE RENT IN PRIVATE HOME
for experienced carpentry work.
Call 263-5020 or 263-4227.	
MALE WANTED TO SHARE BED-
room with same in large apart-
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LOTS OF ROOM AT UNDERCUT
'71,  SUB cafe,  Sat.. Oct. 2.
Room & Board
82
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE OFFERS
you: largest rooms, comfortable
lounge areas, colour TV. Newest
house on campus. Excellent food.
5725 Agronomy Rd. Phone 224-9620.
ROOM, BOARD & SALARY FOR
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Phone 224-6963.
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83
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87 Friday, September 24, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Gnup plans surprise
By KENT SPENCER
There is a lot at stake this
weekend for the troubled UBC
Thunderbird football team. The
stakes, of course, may not exactly
be high, but they could easily
improve what appears to be a
dismal season for football at UBC.
At stake is last place, and the
Birds want out.
On Saturday, the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies will
visit Thunderbird Stadium. Their
record this season is 0-1, resulting
from a 27-7 loss to the Manitoba
Bisons.
The Bird's record is 0-2, and a
win here would raise them from
the cellar even though the Huskies
would have a game in hand. And
that should be enough to get even
the most complacent fan excited.
Jim    Tarves    will    start
quarterback for the 'Birds.
at
Coach Frank Gnup plans no
changes in the lineup other than
the replacement of two injured
WATCH FOR TUESDAY'S ISSUE OF UBYSSEY
FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF
GRAND OPENING SKI SALE
AT
IVOR WILLIAMS SKI DEN
SEPT. 30-OCT. 1 st & 2nd
HOURS   9-6 THURS.   FRI. TILL 9 p.m.
2120 W. 41st AVE KERRISDALE
<■
players,    Rick   Peck   and    Joe
Gluska.
"The same squad will handle
the offense, but we have a few
surprises up our sleeve for the
game. I'm hoping these will get
our team rolling."
Saskatchewan has to be rated
as a favorite for the game
although the scouting report puts
them about equal with UBC.
Saskatchewan may use either
Bill Preston or Barry Pollawick at
quarterback.
The scouting report on the
Huskies describes Preston as "a
roll-out passer... good runner
with previous college experience."
'Pollawick - "Mainly a
drop-back passer, more accurate
than Preston. He will throw the
flag, post, square out, and
square-in to his outside receivers."
Also in the lineup for the
Huskies will be Larry Demmen,
the Saskatoon 60 yard sprint
champ. He plays left offensive
halfback.
Game time tomorrow is 2:00
p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium. As
usual, all UBC students are
admitted free with their AMS
cards.
Intramurals
MEN'S
At bat: Beta came from
behind yesterday to take a 7-5
victory over education. "Keep
practicing," referee Tom Stiles
said after the game.
Same pitch: Sid Feldstein
belted the ball off the field to
lead commerce I in a close
decision over Alpha Oelts II,
10-0.
Football Preliminary rounds
are on for today. Check the
intramural office 308, Memorial
Gym for the schedule.
WOMEN'S
With volleyball and
badminton well underway,
home ec. and rehab, medicine
are once again fighting for the
Spencer Cup.
Everyone's progress will be
marked on the master
thermometer outside the
intramural office.
All team managers are
reminded of the meeting today
in SUB, room 213 at noon.
Flag football and 100-mile
cycling entrees are due today.
FOOTBALL
UBC Thunderbirds
vs.
Saskatchewan Huskies
Sat. • Sept. 25 • 2 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM~|
Free admission to UBC students on presentation of A.M.S. card
-Keith Dunbar (1970) photo
COACH FRANK GNUP of the UBC Thunderbird football team stated
that the Birds would have a few surprises up their sleeves for Saturday's
game against the University of Saskatchewan Huskies at Thunderbird
Stadium. Rummaging through the files, the sports department came up
with this photo from last year of Dave Corcoran (35). It sure would be
nice, Frank, if this was one of your surprises. Game time is 2 p.m.
UBC tennis star
without a team
By SUE NICOLLS and LYNN POLLOCK
"Susan Eager Stone is at UBC on a $1,000 tennis scholarship and
we have no team to offer her," said Tony Bardsley, coach of the men's
tennis team.
Stone is currently practicing with the men and if it weren't for
her sex, would be good enough to play in the men's singles.
"A haircut and a baggy sweatshirt might rectify the situation,"
said Bardsley.
Women's athletic director Nancy Wells said that women's tennis is
not an intercollegiate sport this year since no other Canadian
universities have teams.
As a result, tennis was dropped from the program because of an
insufficient budget.
UBC put up an excellent showing against California last year,
splitting their matches, two wins, two loses, but the trip down there
proved too costly.
"However there is fine competition here in Vancouver," said
Bardsley, and he offered to coach the women for free.
But Bardley's offer has not changed the situation.
"The only solution," said Wells, "is to encourage campus league
tennis until someone sees fit to provide adequate funds for the
sponsorship of a UBC team."
4=f=&
*-
•- »   1. -       .»
55&IK** -"■■'.''* i»C
—gary gruenke photo
BARB   COX,    home   economics,   limbers   up   her   kicking   toe   in
preparation for the Teacup game against the nurses.
SKI
Instructors'
Training Course
at
GARIBALDI'S WHISTLER MTN.
Sats. and/or Sundays   Oct. 9th & 10th - Nov. 13th &14th
Any parallel skier can join - Instructors jobs available
for information phone:
JIM McCONKEY, General Del., Alta Lake B.C.
932-5422 or 926-1034 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24,  1971
VANCOUVER STREET THEATRE performed interpretive plays in front of SUB at
noon Thursday. Personal impressions of university life provided the basis for their two
_ **.-?-"»~-:\Tr,.. ,-v.
creations which captivated the attention of an audience, despite the day's dreary
atmosphere. • -greg deacon photo
Clubs compete for meeting space in SUB
By VAUGHN PALMER
UBC's clubs are fighting over
inadequate space in SUB.
AMS     ombudswoman
Campana said Thursday:
Joan
"I've been getting complaints
from people who have no club
meeting or office space.
"The clubs committee is doing
its best with available space, but
there just isn't enough of it," she
said.
Clayton   Vogler,  of the  UBC
clubs committee, said he has
received about 20 applications for
nine small rooms which are left
after specialized groups, such as
Radsoc, have been assigned space.
There are 120 clubs at UBC.
"Most groups go to Buchanan,
Angus, or some other campus
meeting place," Vogler said.
"There are 5,500 students in
clubs — that's more than any
other AMS activity - and most of
them are cramped."
Among those complaining are
Filmsoc, which, spokesman Kirk
Tougas said, has had to stop its
film-making activities.
"We lost our film editing room
in last summer's shuffle," Tougas
said. "Now our expensive
equipment and film projects lie
idle."
Campana said that many
groups are indignant because the
planned expansion by the AMS —
a pub-restaurant facility in SUB
basement — does not take in the
space needs of the clubs.
"Several more small rooms
would be a great help," she said.
Campana       said      another
Kitchener follows Vancouver,
removes young from welfare
KITCHENER (CUP) - Social service officials
here are following the rationale of their Vancouver
counterparts for removing young people from
welfare rolls.
". .. There are too many needy persons
requiring welfare assistance for money to be given
out to people who really don't want a job and are
spending the taxpayers' money on drugs," said city
welfare administrator J. A. Bernstihl, about the
"hippie types on welfare rolls".
Seventy-three unemployed youths have been
chopped from the welfare lists and reviews are being
made in the cases of 100 others.
"In the last few months we have been averaging
about five cases a month who require payment of
hospital bills resulting from treatment for bad trips.
We are compelled to pay hospital costs but we are
certainly going to look into the taxpayers' money
being used to purchase drugs," said Bernstihl.
He went on to say that the reason for the
removal of the 73 from the welfare rolls was that
the young men were obviously not actively looking
for work as welfare regulations demand.
"After all," he said, "to get a job a person has
to make himself a bit presentable."
(On Thursday, Vancouver welfare administrator.
Walter Boyd reinstated payments to residents under
19 whb are eligible for welfare.)
complaint was that food services
has taken valuable former club
space, room 208, as an office.
Graeme Vance, SUB manager,
said clubs already take up a larger
portion of the building than other
AMS allotments.
He said that food services has
paid for all its space.
Vance said the AMS pub in the
basement will take up about
5,000 square feet, which leaves an
additional 3,500 square feet near
the bowling alley unused.
Clubs back to one day
The annual Clubs Day animal show will be staged in SUB Oct.
14.
UBC clubs committee member Clayton Vogler said Wednesday
this year's extravaganza will be cut to one day from two.
"Last year our membership was 5,500 — an increase of only 500
over the previous year," Vogler said.
"We don't feel this warrants the $400 cost of an extra day."
He said specific events for the day would be planned next week.
About 70 of UBC's 120 clubs are expected to make their annual
pitches to students.
Athletic fees policy 'wrong'
AMS president Steve Garrod favors an end to
student support of the extramural athletic program.
Garrod described the program, which includes
the UBC hockey and football teams as "a public
relations device for the university".
"The administration and not the students
should pay for this," said Garrod.
The issue of athletic fees was raised during
Wednesday's student council meeting. Garrod
warned that the 1971-72 AMS budget does not
include enough money to continue the AMS
support of the intramural sports prpgram. This
year's grant will be limited to about half the $7,000
the intramural program requires.
"The AMS doesn't want to see the intramural
program discontinued," said Garrod. "We feel the
money paid in athletic fees should be used to
support the program."
Garrod wants the intramural committees to ask
the administration or the athletic fund to make up
the deficit for this year.
Law representative Grant Burnett moved that
the AMS hold a referendum to abolish the present
$5 athletic fee and replace it with a $1 fee to be
used exclusively for the intramural program.
Garrod hopes to see the $5 level of taxation left
with a transfer of the funds to a $ 1 intramural levy,
a $2 grant to the special events committee and $2 to
the AMS general fund.
The human government also criticized the
present distribution of funds between the men's and
women's extramural programs. About $4.20 of the
fee goes to the men and 80 cents to the women's
activities. Garrod said "the distribution is
inequitable, particularly since the women have been
bringing home the medals."
Garrod plans to discuss the athletic fees issue
with members of athletic office .and and intramural
program representatives at a meeting next Monday.
JERRY   WEINTRAUB   PRESENTS
meesYBLaEs
•*••*•***•••
PACIFIC COLISEUM
•*•••*••••••
WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 29, 1971
8:00 P.M.
Tickets Available at
Following Concert
Box Offices
Opus 69 - 680 Robson at Granville
Totem Music — Lougheed Mall
Grennan's Records— Richmond Square
$4.00 $5.00 $6.00

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