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The Ubyssey Mar 12, 1963

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Array What we
need
THE U8 YSSEY
is some
common
cents
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 1963
No. 64
THURSDAY IS ACTION DAY
WE'RE BOYCOTTING!
Vic I/, joins
UBC's boycott
VICTORIA — Students at
Victoria University will join
UBC students in their protest
Thursday, it was learned late
Monday  night.
They will boycott lectures,
Thursday afternoon' to canvass Victoria in a blitz for
signatures on a petition io
back demands for increased
government financial support.
Student president Alf Pei-
ierson announced the move
Monday  nighl.
Bennett
meetings
admitted
(      By  RICHARD   SIMEON
Two members of the Board of
Governors have confirmed that
the board is negotiating directly
with Premier Bennett.
But they have refused to explain why.
Kenneth Caple, one of the
Senate appointees, said Monday. "The policy of the boird
is to talk only through a spokesman, either the president or the
Chancellor."
THE ANSWER
But when asked why the
board- was going directly to the
Premier, he said, "Who do you
think is the Minister of Finance?" '*']
W. A. C. Bennett is the Minister of Finance.
"There's your answer," he
said.
Chancellor Mrs. Phyllis Ross,
who told The Ubyssey Sunday
that the board had approached
Bennett directly, refused to comment further.
"I talked to somebody on
The Ubyssey Sunday," she said,
•'and I have nothing more to
say."
(Continued on page  2)
See "MEETINGS"
Students plan
petition blitz
Thursday is action day at UBC.
A massive campaign will organize thousands of students
into a three-day boycott of the University and blanket the
province with a petition-signing blitz.
Student leaders will speak in«
classrooms on Wednesday and
Thursday and a legion of other
workers will be calling out-of-
town students urging them to
return home during the! boycott
and arouse interest in UBC's financial crisis.
A march to the courthouse,
led by a rented hearse, has been
organized for Thursday night.
Bands, posters and sound cars
will publicize the 'Back Mac'
campaign throughout the city
and campus.
High school students all over
the province have been alerted
to join the campaign.
Faculty and alumni are expected to throw their support
behind the student protest.
The campaign is planned to
protest the refusal of the provincial government to meet Dr.
Macdonald's request for increased funds.
The AMS has rented 10 buses
to transport out-of-town students
to their homes free of charge
immediately following Thursday's AMS general meeting.
Professors decide today
now three and a  half Fifi's long.
how much students want more
money, Ubyssey photographer Don Hume laid all the pages
of the telegram and all the Fifi's end to end.
UBC's TELEGRAM TREK is
To   graphically   illustrate
They will be asked to take
petitions around to people in
their areas, asking them to support UBC's request for more
money.
Students will be telephoned
and asked to volunteer to go on
the blitz.
The campaign plan was decided by a student action committee which met Monday.
If plans are successful, the
University will close Thursday
afternoon until Monday.
Professors have indicated they
are willing to go along with the
boycott but  have held off any
decision until the faculty association meets today.
Students will march downtown to the courthouse to demand justice for education. The
hearse will be labelled higher
education, organizer Mike Sharzer said.
AMS president Doug Stewart
has urged every student to attend the general meeting Thursday noon in the armory.
The whole campaign will be
explained at that time. Dr. Macdonald will be the keynote
speaker.
There will also be speakers
from the alumni and the faculty
association.
Like kickapoo joy juice
Bus fleet ready
for Mac backers
Student action on the Back Mac campaign will spread
across the province Thursday.
The student action committee has rented 10 buses to transport
&an expeeted 500 out-of-town stu.
dents to their homes following
Evidence flowed in student court
By MIKE HORSEY
The charges were disputed
and the verdict wasn't rendered Friday but the evidence
sore smeHed like kickapoo joy
juice.
The trial of Harold Charters,
Peter Bro\vn. and Robert Smith
bogged1 down in a mire of technicalities Over wording of the
charges.
The trio is charged with
drinking at a fraternity vs.
Law basketball game and act
ing in a manner unbecoming
a student.
Student judges will bring
down a decision Tuesday noon.
Prosecutor Peter Brown
{Law III) produced evidence
including a capped glass of
alcohol, a corked bottle of
beer, a crumpled score sheet
and a chart showing the alco-
lic content of the glass and the
beer bottle..
A chemist-testified that the
capped glass" had 10 per cent
alcoholic content and the bottle about four per cent.
The defence pointed to the
14 points Brown had scored
during the game. He said it
was impossible for Brown to
score that many points if he
was drinking.
The prosecutor said the score
sheet showed evidence that
Brown only scored eight points.
But, he added, it is possible
there  was   a  mistake  because
one of the accused,  Charters,
was keeping score.
Other witnesses testified they
had seen the defendants drinking or smelled alcohol on the
breath of the accused.
One witness, when asked
how he knew Smith had been
drinking, said Smith breathed
on  him under the  basket.
Another was asked if he saw
anyone else drinking.
"Yes," he replied, "the referee."
the AMS general meeting.
Students will meet with high
school leaders from their home
towns as well as press, community officials and alumni whose
support they hope to enlist.
They will also conduct a door-
to-door campaign to collect1
names for a petition requesting
more financial aid to UBC from
the provincial government.
Bryan Belfont, organizer of'
the bus trek, said the 500 stu-i
dents will act as section leaders
for you, the students," said'
Caple.
(Continued on page  2)
See "BUSES" Page.2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  12,  1963
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy, 1961 and 1962
Winner of the Bracken Trophy, 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star irophy, 1962
Authorized as second class mail by the Pest Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published three times weelcly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Kditorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Uhyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3241,
Locals:  Editor—25;   News—23;   Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief:  Keiih Bradbury
Managing Editor   Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor   Mike Hunter
City Editor    Mike Valpy
Picture Editor    Don Hume
Layout  Editor    Bob  McDonald
Sports Editor          Ron Kydd
Layout:  Dave  Ableti
REPORTERS: Ron. Riter, Ann Burge, Lorraine Shore, Dick
Simeon, Graeme Matheson, Greydon Moore, Heather
Virtue, Mike Horsey.
TECHNICAL: Mike Atchison.
SPORTS: Donna Morris, Danny Stoffman, Mike'Sone, Glenn
Schultz, Janet Currie.
Letters to the editor
Open  letter to  the Alumni
Dear Alumnus:
Every alumnus of UBC is proud of
the tradition of responsible student
contributions to the development of
our University—from the great trek of
1922 to now—and again in 1963> the
present generation of students is carrying on.
The Executive of the Alumni Association have unanimously approved
the following resolution;
The Alumni Association of UBG
strongly supports the Board of Governors and thePresident intheir budget
request for operating grants for T963-
64.
Your executive now urges that you,
asan alumnus of UBC, take the following immediate action;
l.Sigra the petition, which the student campaigners are bringing to your
community;
2. Telephone,, wnite or teJegraph
you r^/vYLA to-express your opinion;
3. Provide any reasonable assistance
needed by the student campaigners in
bringing!this material forward in your
community or neighborhood in a responsible manner.
Remember the urgency of the present situation since the Legislative Assembly will shortly be prorogued.
Tuum Est!
Your Alumni Executive.
Telegram trek mushrooms
Nearly 4,000 more names have
been added to the telegram trek.
But this time they won't be
sent by telegram, AMS president
Doug Stewart said Monday.
"It has not yet been decided
how the new lists of names will
. be sent   to   Victoria,"   he   said.
"But  we   won't  telegram  them
this time."
More   than   10,000   students,
Heres your
committee
for action
This is your student action
committee.
It is asking for your help. If
you are interested see the committee members in the Action
Room at the top of the stairs in
South Brock Hall.
Committee members are: Hugh
Schools, Gordon Gaibraith; Victoria College, Doug Stewart;
Labor Unions, Ron Pollard; Fraternities, Ken Dobell; Demonstrations, Mike Sharzer; Information Officer, Bob MacKay;
Petition, Peter Leask; Finance,
Chris Hansen; Bus. Groups,
Brian Marsen; Residences, Dave
ROwett; Print Shop, Denis Stanley; Construction, Ken Leitch;
and transportation, Brian Belfont.
In addition there are three
ex-officio members of the committee: Keith Bradbury, Jim
Ward, and Malcolm Scott. Coordinator is Ed Lavalle, and
Secretary  Sharon  MacKinnon.
The action committee was appointed Monday noon.
First step in the program was
a petition sent to the Legislature Friday.
faculty and alumni have now
signed the petition.
Friday, about 75 students canvassed classrooms, study halls
and club rooms to gather 6,000
signatures on a petition urging
more financial aid for the university.
Since Friday nearly 4,000
names have been added to t h e
petition.
"And I hope we get 100,000,"
Stewart said.
The petitions say: "We the
undersigned taxpayers of B.C.
congratulate the minister of education on his promise of legislation enacting a program of
ligher education throughout the
province.
MEETINGS
(Continued from  page   1)
Asked to comment on the
story, Percy R. Bengough, a
government - appointed governor, said, 'You'll have to ask
Mrs. Ross."
But when questioned further,
he said, "Lay off asking about
the negotiations,  will you?"
Bengough and Caple both denied rumors that the Board is
a  government tool.
"That's foolish," said Bengough. "The Board is as much
concerned as anybody about the
situation."
"We are trying to get money
for you, the students," said
Caple.
"I think the board is working
for the good of UBC and no,
one else," he said angrily.
The two governors backed up
student action now being taken
to get more money from the
government. But they didn't
feel it would be much use.
"The action won't hurt anything, and the students have the
right to do it," said Bengough.
"We ask that a supplementary
estimate be introduced to bring
the operating grant of the university of B.C. to the amount
requested by the president, Dr.
John B. Macdonald and tho
Board of Governors.
"We are sincerely concerned
over the gravity of the situation."
No secrets,
just privacy
The Board oif Governors
-isn't holding secret' meetings
—just private ones.
So says R. R. Jeffels,
former aide to Dr. John Macdonald and now the new registrar for Victoria College.
He said the Board's affairs
were private as in all private
enterprise  companies.
"Their negotiations with
the provincial government for
more money have certainly
not been secret as the downtown newspapers and The
Ubyssey have charged.
He said students should
neither trek nor strike until
negotiations with the provincial government are completed.
BUSES
(Continued from  page   1)
for other students the committee
hopes will return home during
the three-day boycott of the University.
Transportation both ways will
be paid by the Alma Mater Society.
He said anyone who wants to
canvass in their home areas is
requested to phone CA 4-3242
local 46-7, or call at the committee   rooms   in   South   Brock
Why trek?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am 39 and therefore old
enough to have fathered any
three average students here
and it is hard enough for me
to finance my way myself so
what must it be like for all
the parents of the students
here who are only making
around $4,000-$7,500.
Now, rather than concentrate on a trek to the government, and you know that is
simply advertising to all the
parents in the province that
you are leading a bunch of
"gimme a handout" and golden
youths and maidens fair . . .
(corny, I know), but anyway
golden youths and maidens fair
are the last people on earth to
be asking for support from the
rest of the population . . . not
with everything before them
and a good education to crack
off with and good, clean-cut
handsome youths and fresh
maidens . . . tain't fitting.
•    •    •
Now any ordinary degree
could be handled by the individual student for about $1,000
a year and going out, in Canada or the U.S., to earn a good
salary of not less than $5,000
or $6,000 after six month's or
a year at least ... it wouldn't
take., any time to pay off the
loan on easy payments and the
satisfaction of having carried
Oneself would mean great satisfaction.
Why load down the old folks
when one year's costs would
mean a new Hammond organ
or a trip to Hawaii or nail
down the mortgage for good or
whatever. How come it is so
important that the kids should
be a burden for these important years to the parents . . .?
I suggest that if you want to
do any trekking- . . . and it is
a good idea, O.K., may I suggest that you trek down to the
head office of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce at Hastings
and Granville and back the
manager up into a corner and
ask him what his requirements
are for extending a line of
credit to students . . . all the
usual safeguards . . . good
academic records . . . good
character, etc. . . . but not impossible academic records like
just a steady pass student
would be O.K. . . . then if you
get a snow job you could line
up 50 or 100 students at each
teller's -wicket and just change
a buck each, slowly, and then
change the change back into
a buck and tie up the bank
long enough to have the TV
cameras grinding and the news
media hysterical and N. J. Mc-
Kinnon in Toronto on the
phone pleading and pledging
full support ... in which case
you could call off the reverse
strike . . . consumers' ... or
borrowers' strike . . . and give
him a deadline to get cracking
with the good Dr. Macdonald
and Mr. Peterson to get together and work out a unified
scheme whereby students
would be able to borrow up to
$1,000 a year . . . say ... no
interest till after graduation
or completion of post graduate
work . . . and then only 3%
and easy payments.
Yours truly,
PETER BAXTER.
Well, what do you want now? uesday, March 12, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Birds win
loop crown
By MIKE SONE
- Peter Mullins' UBC Thunderbirds dropped the first game,
en came back with two consecutive victories to win the
anook Invitational Basketball Jamboree Sunday at College,
aska.
Birds, missing Ken McDonald, Keith Hartley, Gordie' Betcher and John Cook, but bolstered by Jayvees' Lance Fletcher, Rick Williamson and Bob
Barazzuol, lost 53-49 to St. Martin's College Rangers Friday.
Saturday, switching to a zone
defence, UBC came back to
edge the military all-stars from
Fort Wainwright 58-57, and
then clinched the tourney title
with a thrilling come-from-be-
himd 69-67 win over the host
University of Alaska.
PREDINCHUK   DRIVES
That gave UBC a 2-1 won-
lost record, identical to Wain-
wright's, but T-Birds' Saturday
victory over the all-stars gave
them the unofficial title.
In Sunday's finale, Birds
were behind most of the way.
They tied the score 67-67 with
just seconds remaining, then
won the game when guard
i Laurie Predinchuk scored "a
driving lay-up with one second
left.
Predinchuk finished with 19
points, while six-foot-seven low
post man Ron Erickson had 20.
HISTORIC   GAME
I "It was a good weekend all
C Thunderbirds to a team i ar«und." said Mullins. "I was
tory    in    the     B.C.     Open i Phased  with   the   play   of   the
Williamson    in
f""
LAURIE PREDINCHUK
.  .   .  winning  basket
SPORTS
SHORTS
WEIGHTLIFTIMG: Bob Mc-
vin smashed four Canadian
lior records and one provin-
1  Senior record  to  lead the
Here Wednesday
High school meet
to jam UBC gym
By DANNY STOFFMAN
The annual B.C. high school'basketball tourney hits UBC
Wednesday, as schoolboy teams and their screaming supporters from all over the province descend on Memorial Gym.
All but one spot in the tour
Jayvees,    Rick
particular.
"Friday's   game  was   historic
because it was the first played
by two college teams in Alaska,
-ndrew Hinds won the 148 Il ihou^ht il was historic because
ind   class,   George   Tsoi-a-su !U must have been the  lousiest
ightlifting championships.
/TcGavin pressed 260 pounds,
itched 245 and cleaned and
ked 320 for a total of 825
inds.
ced third in the 123, Wayne
mon second in tfce 165, and
us Hallschmidt in the 181
• •    •
N HOCKEY: The UBC Thun-
birds will compete in the
iter Olympics at Innisbruck
itria next year after all.
he decision came after an
jrnational Ice Hockey Fed-
lion meeting in Stockholm,
arlier, president John
!arne said that there was a
ability World Ice Hockey
)s would pull out of the
mpics because of the con-
rersy over distribution of
ley from T.V.  rights.
• •    •
* CYCLING: Norm Kendall
UBC placed second in the
B. Allen Trophy race held
Stanley Park this weekend.
• •    •
I SKIING: French ski films
i Total" and "Christiana
sr" will be shown Tuesday,
ch 12 at 8:30 p.m. in the
l Oliver High  School.
game ever played by two college
teams."
There was still another bit of
history that Mullins didn't mention. For the first time this year,
he introduced a double post offence, and declared it a success.
CHAMPIONSHIPS
"The double post worked
very well," Mullins said. "I
plan to use it this week in the
east, with Keith Hartley at low,
and Ron Erickson at high post."
And he'll probably need it
when T-Birds meet Stu Aberdeen's defence-minded Acadia
University Axemen in the first
round of the Canadian collegiate
championships Friday at Windsor, Ont.
JIM BECK
.  .  .  broken jaw
Ex-Brits find
dirty rugby
doesnt pay
By   GLENN   SCHULT7.
A bloodthirsty Ex-Britannia
XV went down to defeat at the
hands of the Birds 11-0 Saturday
in one of the roughest rugby
games of the year.
The game proved to be one
of the costliest for the Birds this
season as three UBC players
were sidelined with injuries.
Prop Jim Beck suffered a
broken jaw while Bob May had
to be helped off the field with
a concussion. Ray Wickland got
a badly cut lip.
Beck will be out for the rest
of the season.
He was hit during a scramble
with about five minutes to go in
the contest and the referee
promptly ended the game.
He said the roughness by the
Ex-Brits was completely unnecessary  in  an  exhibition match.
Coach Albert Laithwaite added: "The Ex-Brits were late
tackling, which is dirty play."
Laithwaite hopes to have his
team in top shape, with the exception of Beck, for the McKechnie Cup final this Saturday
against the Vancouver Reps
The Heps qualified by scraping by Norwests 6-3 last Saturday.
nament was filled over the
weekend, as the separate
| leagues completed their finals.
Delbrook and Queen Elizabeth
met Monday to decide the last
spot.
MEI HERE  AGAIN
Perennially powerful Vancouver College leads the Vancouver   City   contingent.     College,
Soccer team
takes a loss
UBC's soccer Thunderbirds"
advanced to the third round of
Province competition Sunday,
defeating- Williams 6-0 at Hill-
crest Park.
John Haar led the Birds' attack with two goals. Singles
came   from  Joe   Johnson,   Noel
with  high   scoring  Neil  Willis- j Gumming,   Dewiss   Brown,   and
croft leading the way, dropped j Ed Wasylik.
Winston   Churchill   to   win  the j     Saturday,   UBC  lost  its  first
Pennsylvania Trophy Friday.
Lord Byng, Killarney, and Lester Pearson complete the city
group.
|     Another   regular   tournament
contestant,   highly-ranked   Men-
j nonite     Educational     Institute,
i took  the Fraser  Valley's  nunt-
j ber one spot. Other entries from w
that   area   are   Abbotsford   and
North Surrey.
OLIVER   DISQUALIFIED
West Vancouver will represent the Howe Sound league.
Prince Rupert will dribble the
ball for northweest B.C., with
Prince George representing the
north-central  zone.
Penticton will attend from
the Okanagan, replacing an
Oliver team disqualified for
low marks.
Alberni, Nanaimo, and Court-
enay will attend for Vancouver
Island.
game in 19 starts this season
They dropped a 3-1 decision
to St. Andrews in a regular
Mainland League game. UBC
has already clinched the league
championship.
Summer Classes
Typing - Shorthand
8:15 a.m. -1:15 p.m., May 1
Advance Business College
AL 5-3227 or CY 8-3822
There is no charge for our services
modern travel limited
345 Dunbar Street Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone 224-3110
Special   Events
presents
The Vancouver
Symphony
Orchestra
in the
Canada Council
Concert
under the direction of
IRWIN HOFFMAN
Tchaiskovski 4th Symphony
NOON TUESDAY, MAR. 12
AUDITORIUM — .25
UP
1*16   ,
I ■   ^_^   Complete!
includes Frame of Tour Choice f
and Single Vision, Prescription |
lenses.
Bifocali  Additional.
ALL EYE SOCTOB5
I OPTOMETRISTS & OCTTUSTSl
I EYEGLASS   PKESOKZPTIONSl
FILL.S
GRANVILLE
OPTICAI,   I.TD.
WTT  3-8921
861 Granville, Vancouver
"Repairs While Tou Wait"
EYE EXAMINATIONS
eachers!
Mr P.G
• says
"This is our salary schedule—effective September, 1963
to June, 1964—unique in that it is based on the school
year, not the calendar year."
Yr.
EC
EB
EA
PC
PB
PA
0
3060
3650
4100
4550
5000
5450
1
3285
3875
4325
4780
5240
5700
2
3510
4100
4550
5010
5480
5950
3
3735
4325
4775
5240
5720
6200
4
3960
4550
5000
5470
5960
6450
5
4775
5225
5700
6200
6700
6
5000
5450
5930
6440
6950
7
5225
5675
6160
6680
7200
8
5450
5900
6390
6920
7450
9
6125
6620
7160
7700
10
6850
7400
7950
11
7080
7640
8200
12
7880
8450
13
8700 Page  4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  12,  1963
Federal
finances
required
By RON RITER
Dr. John Macdonald says the
federal and provincial governments should share the responsibility for higher education in
Canada.
He said Sunday in a radio
address that the provincial governments should assume primary responsibility for the cost
of undergraduate education.
The federal government
should then bear the financing
of education at the graduate and
professional levels, he added.
The cost of higher education,
he said,  is a national problem
and   requires   a   national   solu-
- tion.
COLLEGES ENDANGERED
"The federal government will
need to participate more effectively than it has been required to in the past.
•Thus I suggest the federal
government assume the responsibility far graduate and
pro fessional education," Dr.
Macdonald said.
Earlier in the weekend, Dr.
Macdonald warned a Kelowna
conference on B.C.'s crisis in
higher education that bickering
could kill the junior college proposed for the Okanagan Valley.
He urged valley residents to
overcome their differences and
plan a two-year college on a
regional basis.
The Macdonald Report calls
for-a junior college serving the
Okanagan to be established in
the Kelowna area.
There are reports of friction
among the major valley communities over the site of the
college.
HIDDEN FRICTION
This friction lay just beneath
the surface of the conference
which Dr. Macdonald addressed
Saturday.
The conference approved a
resolution empowering a steering committee of the Okanagan-
Mainline  university   association
to:
"Plan with the provincial
government in the establishment of higher education facilities for this region."
A high official of the association was later asked why the
resolution did not specifically
mention backing the Macdonald
Report.
"The report calls for the college in Kelowna," he said, "We
would have had a dog-fight at
the conference over it."
Message ai thanks
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Find-
lay and son Allan G. wish to
thank the members of the
faculty and students of the
University of British Columbia who sent kind expressions of sympathy following
the accident which took the
life of their daughter and
sister, , the late Lorraine
Carol Findlay. Thank you
most sincerely.
Chem Students
L«a,rn the elements of the Periodic Table in their proper order
(and remember them) this fast,
simple way. Send $1.00 to
MURRAY, P.O. BOX 234, OUT-
HEMONT,   P.   QUEBEC.
'tween classes
Canada's taxes
adapted to JFK
DIETRICH  LUTH
. . . backs Mac
Luth joins
Back Mac
campaign
UBC's perennial soapboxer
has joined the Back Mac campaign.
Friday noon, Dietrich Luth
stood on his box in front of the
library and called on students
to shpw their support for President Macdonald's campaign for
more money.
"We have to show the president we're with him," he told
about 1,000 students.
"We have to show people
everywhere that we're willing
to fight for our University."
Luth was interrupted once
when a large dog wandered out
in front of him, sat down and
started scratching.
"This is the kind of apathy
we have to get away from,"
Luth said.
"We could tie up the whole
city of Victoria in a few hours,"
he said, "as long as there are
enough of us.
"We can do anything as long
as we do something."
Dean Neil Percy will speak
today in Bu. 106 on Kennedy's
be adapted to Canada.
* *  *
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN CLUB
World    Students'     Day    of
Prayer   Worship  Service,   noon
' today,   Bu.   104.  Everyone  welcome.
* *   *
AWS
General meeting, 12:30 Wednesday, Bu. 100. All women
please attend.
* *   *
UN CLUB
Second-slate elections, noon
today, Bu. 205. All positions
open. New membership for next
year   on   sale.   Join   now   and
vote.
* *   *
PRE MED SOC
Microscope display postponed
one week until Thursday, March
21.
* *   *
CUSO
Mr. Woodcock will speak on
Tibetan refugees today at noon
in BU. 100.
* *   *
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events presents the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of Irwin
Hoffman for the Canada Council concert. Noon today in the
auditorium.
* *   *
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
We dare you to see the revealing and shocking "World of
the Schizophrenia" film noon
today. Bu. 204. Fifteen cents for
non-members.
* *   *
SPECIAL EVENTS
Applications for positions on
next year's committee will be
accepted until Friday, March
15. Applicants should submit
name, phone number, year, academic standing and experience
—to special events box in AMS
offices.
to commerce undergrads at noon
tax reforms and how they might
Matr & Wozny
548 Howe St       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
Summer Employment
Register with the N.E.S.
Mr. W. L. Roberts of the N.E.S. will be attending
the U.B.C. Student Services Employment Registration
sessions the week of 11-15 March in the auditorium and
Arts "100."
"THE N.E.S. CAN HELP YOU"
Notional Employment-
Service
Socreds took
everybody
by suprise
The Social Credit government's pledge of concrete action
on the Macdonald Report took
the province by surprise.
Education Minister Les Peterson told the house Thursday the
government is proceeding immediately to implement the report.
Opposition members in the
house were clearly being taken
by surprise.
Earlier in the budget debate,
Peterson had given the impression the report's recommendations were too costly for the government.
Elsewhere in the province, his
announcement was termed a
complete surprise.
Several speakers at the Alumni Association conference on
higher education in Kelowna
said Saturday their speeches
had been invalidated by the announcement.
Two of the speakers admitted
having to rewrite their speeches
on the day of the conference.
Governors line
lands in Kelowna
KELOWNA—The Board of
Governors official line found
its way to the Okanagan Saturday.
"Why is the Board of Governors delaying on whether
it will accept the $1 million
increase in operating grant
for UBC or fight for $2.8 million," an Alumni Association
forum on higher education
was asked here.
Moderator Dave Brousson
described the question as a
"hot potato" and tossed it to
UBC president Dr. John Macdonald.
"The Board of Governors is
not delaying," said Dr. Macdonald.
Leadership leaders
Applications for the Leaders-
ship Conference Committee are
now being accepted.
All applications should be
deposited in box 80 in the AMS
offices. For information see
Douglas Hager..
GETTING ENGAGED?
10% Discount plus 3 years Insurance
on fine Quality Diamond ring's.
Also 35% Discount on Famous Brand
Name  Watches.
Phone   Mel   Battenshy,   Sc.   4
FA 7-2S89
TUXEDO
RENTAL  &  SALES
• Full Dress
m Morning Coats
• Directors'   Coats
m White 8b Blue  Coats
m Shirts & Accessories
A 10%   Discount
To UBC Students
L A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
•23 HOWE. MU 3-2457
BRIGHT
SPRING
FASHIONS
Glenayr
Sprightly new for Spring is
this Arnel/Cotton Swiss
Jacquard Cardigan ... in
many beautiful patterns and
colour combinations, with
narrow facing, to match
Arnel/Cotton fully-lined
double-knit skirt—in exciting
new colours for Spring!
Cardigan 34-42, $10.98, skirt
8-20, $13.98. At better shops
everywhere.
Without this label  f@ffn.f&  it is not a genuine KITTEN
W12/W14

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