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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1968

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Array "YO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF BEER" say Carey Linde, Jill Cameron and
Peter Brock, the originator of the pub-in. Ubyssey reporter James Conchie
uses the best notepad possible for recording the tippling trio's tynes. An-
<**— |ohn fruoH photo
other pub-in will be/held to coincide with the opening of SUB and Clubs'
day. Participants are urged to bring their own beer, wine, doublejack or
even colored water, but bring your own.
Vol. L, No. 7
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1968
224-3916
SUB opening
features
clubs, pubs
Clubs arid pubs — that's the
scene scheduled for Thursday
noon in the student union
building.
More than 60 campus organizations will be advertising
themselves and grovelling for
membership dues as part of
UBC's annual clubs' day.
But this year it's going to be
"different.
Students are urged by Bob
Sewell, clubs' day organizer, to
bring beer to make the day
more festive.
While   doing  their  part  in
the UBC struggle for a liquor
^licence, students can invesigate
what this year's  groups have
to offer.
Varsity outdoor club mem-
" bers will scale SUB walls while
New Democratic Party MLA's
haggle    and   debating    union
members  harangue.
Film society free shows, rod
and gun club and judo club
demonstrations will teach how
how to do things, while the
sports car club and dance club
do theirs.
The student Christian movement will build a Tower of
Babel, the Vietnam committee
will mobilize and the students'
international meditation society
will contemplate the confusion,
unamazed.
Students will drink.
What's inside
p.2
p.3
p.3
Student news from around
the world  - - - p. 7,10
SUB pub-in    - - ■
SFU election  - - ■
Savings accounts
shafted  - - - ■
Sports
p. 11
Council in accord with
student reps on senate
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Elections for student senators will be held as planned on
Oct. 9.
But do we really want student senators ?
Course boycott
got improvement
Last year's boycott by first year architecture students has
paid off.
This was the opinion expressed by a number of architecture
students polled Monday by The Ubyssey.
"The boycott definitely paid off," said Terry Kelly, arch. 2.
"Now we have what we asked for: individual projects substituted
for final exams."
Students in first-year architecture began a boycott of classes
March 1 to force changes in the school.
Main grievances centred around a lack of integration, relevance and opportunity for choice in courses.
"What the students want to do is to get away from marks,"
said Bob McKay, arch. 2. "Examinations are useless because you
learn nothing new.
"I feel that we are moving towards the right direction, but
we will go through the same thing again this year if the courses
are irrelevant."
Architecture head Henry Elder said changes in the school
were coming along but that the students' action did speed up
things.
"We will eventually get rid of examinations," he said.
"Lectures which tend to regurgitate facts have been eliminated. We are interested only in inspirational lectures."
A freedom clause in architecture's new 1968-69 manifesto
reads: "that the learning process in the school is both precious
and personal insofar as students are allowed freedom to pursue
lines and areas of study according to their own choice within the
field of architecture.
"Experimentation in the studio and the laboratory is part
of the process."
That was the question
brought up by Alma Mater
Society Vice-president Carey
Linde at Monday's council
meeting.
"The four student senators
we have are meaningless," said
Linde. "What purpose can they
really serve ?"
He said it is generally agreed
four students on senate is merely a token gesture, and that the
student body doesn' really need
them in order to communicate
with senate.
"We managed to talk with
the senators about the same
issue last year without representation, and we can do it
now."
Linde said the Universities of
Manitoba and Ryerson are refusing to put students on the
board of governors and unless
students get meaningful representation, we should take off
those we do have on.
When asked what percentage
he thought would be meaningful, Linde answered "Senate
should consist of faculty and
students only, elected on an
equal basis."
The engineering representative Fraser Hodge said if our
four voices on senate were removed, all discussion on the
AMS brief for academic reform
would be wiped out.
"We have waffled about with
this for too long," said Hodge.
"This must be hammered out
now. If we keep bumbling
along, the engineers will have
nothing more to do with the
AMS."
Linde claimed that student
council was making a mistake
in aiming toward senate.
"Senate will soon become irrelevant," he said. "We should
get to the faculty. "We don't
want to deal with senate at
all."
He also questioned the manner in which council was trying
to get reforms.
. "We should be asking for a
democracy and then try to get
reforms, not ask for reforms
from an undemocratic society,"
said Linde.
External Affairs officer Tobin Robbins disagreed with
Linde saying even if the student senators don't get what
they want, at least they, are
there, continually hammering
away at various issues.
Student senator Don Munton agreed the four weren't as
effective as they wished they
were, but they all felt they
were serving a useful function.
"Each student senator was
immediately put on at least
one major committee," he said.
"Four students may not mean
much in the plenary sessions,
but individually in the smaller committees, we have man-
. aged to do a good job."
Munton didn't feel the equal
representation wanted by some
council members was the primary concern.
Munton felt that one of the
important functions the student senators were fulfilling,
was bringing student opinion
to senate. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
— John frizell photo
THE SUB PUB-IN featured the Paisley Universe adding song to the wine. They played their
hit "It's time for change." Observers were left to decide whether it applied to B.C.'s archaic
liquor laws.
Police ignore campus pub-in,
300 enjoy SUB beer and music
It may have been raining over the office of
Liquor Control Board head Col. Donald Mc-
Gugan on Monday, but the clouds parted and
the sun shone over the student union building
pub-in.
More than 300 persons attended an open-air
party on the steps of SUB at noon.
And the pub-in was so successful that AMS
executives are planning another to coincide
with clubs' day Thursday.
"If we can get this many people drinking
openly with no advance publicity, we should
have a huge crowd on Thursday," Linde said.
Both faculty and students had favorable
comments to make at Monday's pub-in.
Said commerce lecturer Melbourne Foster:
"I think it's an excellent idea—I'm quite enjoying it. I hope it sets a trend."
Anatomy grad students Dave Gayton and
Mark Holtby spent the lunch hour sipping Gay-
ton Red, vintage '67 from fine crystal goblets.
"This is a wonderful thing, Gayton said.
"We'd like to drown the taste of Blairburgers
with fine wine everyday."
Howie Faulkner, ed. 5, who said he was a
member of the UBC young Conservative club
said: pub-ins should happen more often.
"I intend to make meetings like this a regular thing for our group," he said.
Grad student Pete Brock, whose comments
at an open air meeting on Friday sparked Mon
day's pub-in, said he was pleased at the large
turn-out.
"This is very good," said Brock, raising his
bottle to his lips, "I hope even more people
turn up on Thursday."
A Ubyssey count turned up over 120 empty
bottles, with more being drained at a tremendous pace.
There was no interference by police or campus officials.
A campus patrol man who refused to identify himself said that no action had been taken
because of an official policy to ignore such
events.
"It's just like the boat races. I can make an
arrest but until I get word from higher up, I
do nothing. That word never comes," he said.
UBC RCMP said they were aware of plans
for the pub-in. "Our men drove past a number
of times, they did not see any illegal drinking,"
a spokesman said.
Student reaction to possible police action
was varied.
John Lester, arts 2, said: "What can they
do? Arrest 150 people?"
Said Alex Lang, arts 1: "If 18 is old enough
to pay taxes and to fight for this country, it is
old enough to drink here. I don't mind being
arrested if it will give bad publicity to our
archaic liquor laws."
Administration officials could not be reached for comment.
— John friz-til photo
ANATOMY GRAD STUDENTS Dave Gayton (right) and Mark Holtby sample their fine homebrew on the SUB steps during Monday's pub-in.
TOMORROW'S EYES
are going to get
HIGH
Come to see if they get
BUSTED
WEDNESDAY NOON ON THE LIBRARY LAWN
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Locations
Sept. 23 to Oct. 4 Oct. 7 to 22
Parking Lot near Behind Brock
Education Bldg. (South)
Arts  Students  Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointnrjent Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL  STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
TOMORROW'S EYES
are going to get
HICH
Come to see if they get
BUSTED
WEDNESDAY NOON ON THE LIBRARY LAWN
HELD OVER
Three Days Only
Monday, September 30
Tuesday, October 1
Wednesday, October 2
The tfctneccftt/hg
by Harold Pinter
ROOM   207 — FRERERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
Charlie Browns
in
BIRD CALLS
Along with nearly 20,000 other students
BUY YOUR 1968 PRE SALE TICKET
75c TODAY 75c
DIRECTORIES AVAILABLE OCT. 7
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK Tuesday, September 24, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
-w^r*-
■/-fc^-ns
— ian lindsay photo
PATCHES OF SUNNY WEATHER always bring out 'splendor in the grass' eh,  Hanson? Sorry,
Jill, that reads 'grass' not 'class'.
Student savings switched
for  efficient service'
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
More than 3,000 student patrons of the campus Bank of Montreal branch returned this fall
to find the bank had switched their savings
accounts to chequing accounts—without notifying depositors.
The accounts were changed from savings
accounts with chequing privileges, on which
three per cent interest is paid, to straight
chequing accounts, on which no interest is paid.
Students   interested   in   saving   are   being
Troops  kill  two
in Uruguay riot
MONTIVIDEO (CUP) — The Uruguay government closed down all universities and
secondary schools in this city Sunday while calling out the army to quell days of bloody street
fighting against students and workers.
Students and militant labor groups here
are demanding an end to president Jorge
^Pacheco Areco's austerity program, under
which prices and wages have been frozen. But
as fighting grew more intense the economic
issue are largely supplanted by grievances
against police.
A man and a woman, identified as student
leaders, were killed and about 100 other students and workers were wounded in last week's
fighting alone.
Troops joined policemen at centres of tension throughout the city and took over the
various faculties of the national university. A
government communique said that university
facilities and secondary school would remain
closed until October 15 for "reasons of public
order".
Student disorders have been frequent since
August when police raided the University of
Uruguay to rid the campus of communism.
Students claim the police violated the Latin
American tradition of university autonomy.
urged to place their money in five per cent
savings accounts, which have no chequing
privileges.
The campus branch is the only local branch
to take such action, said manager G. F. Peirson,
Friday.
From now on, he said, the bank will not
allow students to open three per cent chequing-
savings accounts.
Peirson said the changes were made to provide more efficient service to students.
He said lineups for service would be reduced under the new system, since all accounts
could be posted by computers rather than by
hand.
Students would save by having two accounts, he said.
Cheques written on the three per cent accounts used to cost 20 cents each, he said.
"Our true chequing accounts (non-interest)
costs only ten cents per cheque," Peirson said.
Accountant Serge Pouiot said the bank had
some complaints.
Only two students had closed their accounts,
Peirson said. One re-opened his account when
the situation was explained.
"The response has been good," he said.
As students come in, they are urged to open
true savings accounts, paying five per cent
interest.
To date, 254 students of the 3,000 affected
by the changeover have done so.
"Opening two accounts saves the students
money," Peirson said.
When asked if the bank stood to gain by
the transaction, Peirson said it was a hard
question to answer.
"We could stand to lose if everyone opened
the five per cent savings accounts right away,"
he said.
He said the changeover would be more efficient and convenient for the bank.
He said the rule was not discriminatory,
since it applied to all despositors — students,
faculty, and staff.
Transfers between the two types of accounts
are free.
Radicals go down
in SFU elections
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
BURNABY (Staff) — Radical proponents of student power
were shackled Friday at Simon Fraser University as students
elected three moderates to council positions.
Radicals and moderates now have three seats each on student
council. The student power slate had taken three positions by
acclamation earlier in the week.
The second round of the battle between radicals and moderates takes place this Friday. But last Friday's results were telling.
Radical student presidential candidate John Conway was
defeated 1,842 - 859 by Robb Walsh. Walsh is a liberal who would
have sounded fairly radical on most Canadian campuses.
At SFU he took what seemed a middle of the line poistion.
And most students, after a summer of continuing radical
manoeuvres employed by the student power slate controlled
council, seemed anxious to have a president who would not
persist in confrontation tactics.
However, radicals have three seats on council, may take
others, have a militant following and will likely provide the
moderates with a sharply critical, well-organized opposition
force on campus.
Eight positions will be decided Friday. Other results last
Friday: new public relations officer Greg Rahn defeated Guy
Pockington 1,668 - 861; and Rob McAnnish lost 1,815 - 833 to
Judi Bell, the new secretary.
CUS denies violence
'in struggle for peace'
OTTAWA (CUP)—The Canadian Union of Students issued
a statement Thursday charging the mass media with falsely portraying the organization as a "conspiration elite, dedicated to
chaos and violence".
CUS finds it "ironic" that the "present press labels —
'violent', 'anarchist', 'saboteur'—should be applied to a movement which has its roots deep in the struggle for peace."
The student organization says charges of violence began as
soon as protest moved beyond the levels of "academic debate"
and began to "threaten established interests and attempt real
change".
Radical tactics are not be confused with violence, says the
statement. The movement still depends on pacifist (sit-in) and
union (strike) techniques.
"Violence in the student movement has been initiated by
the state and the police. Brutal repression of student protest by
the police -or army has been matched only by the skill with
which the media has blamed the violence on the students themselves," said the document.
Talking about the coming year, CUS said: "We need see no
violence, unless administrators decide to use police against
student action and student demands."
And in an admonition to student leaders, the organization
said: "Student leaders cannot abandon their commitment to
criticism, confrontation and change. They can and should condemn all acts of violence. The existence of violence will be
decided by administrators and not students."
, Purdy to read from
Wild Grape Wine
Canadian poet Al Purdy will read tonight at 8 p.m. ?
in Bu. 106. |
Purdy, the author of eight poetry volumes and editor >
of The New Romans, Canadian opinions of the U.S., will J*
;   read from his latest book, Wild Grape Wine,  and other J
-*   volumes. i
A discussion will follow the reading. ^
*-.*,-..' ,«.'V*» "*-■*» Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
> >&%*   .>* *s
THt WSSCY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23;  advertising,  local  26.  Telex   04-5224.
SEPTEMBER 24,  1968
Boycott
Why should students participate in the upcoming
election for student senators?
Students last year showed they were at least partially in agreement with the analysis of 'radical' students at
the time who said that to allow four students into this
body of 80-plus members was mere tokenism designed to
co-opt demands of students for democratization of the
university.
Two of the four senators elected at the time made
it quite clear in their campaigns that a vote for them was
recognition of this tokenism and rejection of it.
Since that time four things have become clear:
(1) that senators will refuse to pay serious attention
to proposals (i.e. Fair Weather or Foul) from a student
body which is powerless to effect changes they wish to
see made;
(2) action is developing among students on a departmental level designed to press for a revamping of the
whole teaching, examination, and appointments system;
(3) the student body is powerless to effect the
changes it comes up with so long as the ultimate financial authority rests with a body of governors over which
they have no control;
(4) conditions at the university (alienation, overcrowding, and course irrelevancy) continue to deteriorate
rapidly.
The senate is only the middleman in this affair, in a
position to water down and change proposals of the mass
level into what will be acceptable to the corporate and
government officials sitting on the board.
The senate is responsible only to the majority conservative element among the faculty against whom much
of the student criticism is aimed, and the same alumni-
corporate and government interests which compose, the
board of governors.
Students are encouraged by Dr. Hare and by their
politically naive and elitist student leaders to concentrate on the senate as the vehicle by which their grievances may best be righted.
But at the same time, the government's Universities
Act makes it impossible for students ever to have a
majority on this body by decreeing that it must be composed of A majority o.f faculty members.
This leaves students in the position that if they are
ever to achieve their ends of the total reorganization and
humanization of the university they must first do the
basic work on the departmental level to propose the
necessary alternative methods, and secondly and simultaneously be in control of the ultimate financial authority of the board of governors.
Meanwhile, the means of assuming control of the
board must be concentrated on and worked out, which
will only happen if the students understand fully the
nature of the structures involved in the conflict and are
sincere in their desire to take control of their lives at the
university.
The students who put themselves forward as senatorial candidates can only be regarded as consciously
selling out the desires of the students* for, meaningful
change and control, or politically naive individuals on an
ego trip of personal aggrandizement.
At this stage, a boycott of the senate elections or a
Campaign to spoil ballots in protest is the only means
students have to show their dissatisfaction with the non-
gains they have achieved to now and to show they are
ready to seriously embrace the concept of student power.
"KT" ' -    -        r4<'**•*-"*     *<      >i *<•*!**•«*■*■-- ' *'        .   ,,
Alas, alack, it's all In vain, cried the
not-so-stalwart mentors of the following: Ulf Ottho, Kirsten Emmott, Alexandra Volkoff, Karen Loder, John
Gibbs, Irene Wasilewski, Frank Flynn,
James Conchie, Nader Mirhady, Dale
Wik, Elaine Tarzwell, Hanson Lau, Bob
Dickson, Irving Fetish, Alice Dee, Mary
Warner, Leo Tolstoy and probably several others of whom a dreary-minded
city editor cannot apprise himself at
this writing. Hik Nyland and Frank
Scherubl were game for sports. Dick
Button, Ian Lindsay, and someone named Frizzell took pix.
For stose staffers, including Stan
Persky, who believe in participatory democracy, there be a meetin' here in t'
01" North Brock office today 'bout the
time the sun creep hover over the
yardarm. Air your beefs, and help print-
frazzled   editors   solve   their  problems.
EDITOR: Al  Birnie
City Desk   Paul Knox, Mike Finlay
News   John Twigg
Managing    Mike Jessen
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
South Viet students
oppose government
By THAN VAN DINH
College Press Service
WASHINGTON — (CPS) — On July 24,
two co-eds representing the executive committee of the Saigon Student Union (SSU) called
a press conference at the Union's headquarters
to protest the "kidnapping" of Nguyen Truong
Con, 23-year-old editor of the Sinn Vien, the
SSU's official magazine. Con had been picked
up that day by the police without warrant
while he was on his way home.
Miss Hao said: "Since 1954, South Vietnam
has voluntarily joined the side of freedom, and
despite several successive government's pledge
to implement democracy, the; students have not
seen democracy anywhere." She warned that
"by court-martialing Nguyen Truong Con, the
government will collectively court-martial 25,-
000 students and 5,000 readers of the magazine
as well."
The next day, a field military court sentenced Nguyen Truong Con to five years at
hard labor. The verdict could not be appealed.
He was accused of "having disseminated false
peace and pro-communist printed material
harmful to the anti-communist struggle of the
Vietnamese people and armed forces."
The condemnation of Nguyen Truong Con
was but one case in the long list of repressions
by Thieu-Ky military regime against Vietnamese who fight for peace and civil rights. (Truong
Dinh Dzu, the runner up peace candidate in the
1967 presidential elections, was also condemned
to five years at hard labor July 26.)
Suffering from arbitrary measures by their
government is not new to Vietnamese students.
But in recent weeks, the arrests of students
have reached a regularity unmatched even by
the 1963 crackdown on the Buddhists and students by the late President Ngo Dinh Diem.
Two years ago, during the Buddhist uprisings
in the summer of 1966, many students (especially those at the University of Hue in Central
Vietnam) were imprisoned. Quite a few joined
the National Liberation Front (NLF) just to
surface again in the Tet offensive. The Tet
offensive in early February, which brought the
war into the heart of the cities where most
students live, the brutality of the U.S. military
operations conducted to "save" Saigon and
Hue, have left a trail of shock and despair for
many who in the past could afford to go to
school and forget that a few miles away, in
the rice fields, their countrymen were dying
by the thousands.
The demands for peace which have been
the basis of the student movement grew
louder. At the end of May, Tran Van Huong,
previously respected for his honesty and known
for his desire for the end of the war, was named
Prime Minister. The presence in his cabinet
of some liberal intellectuals such as Ton That
Thien (Minister of Information, former editor
of the Vietnam Guardian) and Au Ngoc Ho
(Minister of Economy) gave some hope to the
students and encouraged them to step up their
struggle. On June 12, the Saigon Student
Union, representing 25,000 students (87% of
the college student population in the country),
made public a statement on the situation of
the nation. The statement reads:
"As the TET offensive occurred, most of the
Vietnamese people feel that the country is
undertaking a historical change. After many
years of slaughter, the war cannot be ended
by the armed forces. On the other hand, ammunitions have more and more destroyed and
exhausted the energy of the people and the nation. Up to now, that kind of bankruptcy is
still going on because of the dominating ambition from the outside, so the present situation
of the country is more and more miserable.
Understanding the danger of extinction and
seeing the slaughter of people, the destruction
of buildings, the Saigon Students Union solemnly declares before history, people and students:
"I. It is time for the war in Vietnam to
be ended through the negotiations, so the
people will not be extinguished. Vietnam must
have peace, independence, freedom, so that
everybody can have a chance to begin the
building of the country.
"2. We ask for an essential peace solution
in the South and particularly demand the Tran
Van Huong government to carry on his promise as he assured the Premiership in Saigon." Tuesday, September 24, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
^>pm®$K<i? -t-A**r
Your tan/:'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I being only a humble student, at least financially, must
appear to represent little
threat to the branch office of
"Canada's   Illustrious   First
- Bank', firmly ensconced in a
virtual monopoly position on
UBC's campus, by withdrawing my account and transferring it to the Canadian Bank of
Commerce in the village.
But this step was taken because of the reasons listed below and to which I urge my fellow students to pay particular
heed in view of the fact that
they apply directly to all students who have accounts at the
campus branch of the Bank of
Montreal.
The first reason is the manner in which student accounts
were peremptorily changed to
chequing    accounts    with    no
- prior consultation with students about their views on the
matter. I am sure the move was
legal, but the morality involved
is subject to question particu-
.. larly in view of the fact that
savings accounts bear interest
and cheqing accounts do not.
Secondly, this step was taken by the bank because it is to
the bank's advantage — i.e.
profit. Let us suppose that each
student on campus maintains
an average balance of $300, a
conservative estimate — for a
period of three months. The
bank by transferring your account from a savings to a
chequing   account   is  now re-
- quired to hold an "8 per cent
higher (4 vs. 12 per cent) reserve ratio against your $300
deposit   and   thus   forgoes   in-
•""■ come of approximately 36
cents. But also by this transfer-
ral it gains (saves) $2.63 in interest which it no longer pays
on your deposit.
Further let us suppose that
each student makes three withdrawals per month. In three
• months 90 cents more is added
to your service charges, bringing tbe total gain per hypothetical student to $3.17 for a
three-month period.
- All this may seem trivial,
but when each of, say, 8,00*0
student customers of this bank
is clipped for $3.17, the bank is
making — you are paying to its
greater glory — $25,000 in
three months, based on the
•   above conservative estimate.
Faculty members have the
privilege of personal savings
accounts at this branch as does
the general public at other
branches of this same bank.
One could ask the question,
"Why did the Bank of Montreal in testimony before the
Royal Commission on Money
and Banking never mention
such arbitrary imposition of its
will on its customers ? This is
blatant discrimination which
should be resisted."
To all who deal with 'The
Bank' I would suggest the removal of all accounts. In this
list I include the student government, the university admin-
" istration, and all student activities maintaining accounts at
the campus branch of the Bank
of Montreal.
That is,  I  am suggesting a
.*?>-
student boycott with possible
picketing on this 'benevolent
institution.'
Perhaps with this show of
consumer sovereignty 'The
Bank' may prove amenable to
providing the services that
students demand and have a
right to expect. Students above
any group, can ill-afford to be
treated financially as second-
class  citizens.
GLEN PERKINS,
economics 4.
Doggone it
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It has come to my attention
that a considerable effort is
being put forward by many
who would espouse my candidacy for the senate.
While I appreciate the support of the many on this campus who appreciate my principles, and given the fact that
since present senators see fit to
treat the general student population like dogs and therefore
would presumably like to see
a student representative which
as closely as possible fits their
image of the typical student,
I personally feel that running
for the senate is barking up the
wrong tree.
I am not, nor have I ever
been, a candidate for the senate. I disagree with its policies,
and as for the students who
seek office among the privileged elite, well, I wouldn't
lift my leg on them.
In conclusion, I reiterate that
I appreciate the support shown
for me, but am not open to
any doggone  draft.
FRIAR HOUND,
law 8.
Bleed baby
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: your article Thursday re:
James Cluff who bled for 40
minutes while waiting for an
ambulance. It is hard to believe
that   a   university  which  sup-
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ports a student population of
20,000 can claim impracticality
as an excuse for not providing
an ambulance service.
We have RCMP, a patrol
service and a fire department
and a hospital (no mention was
made of help from that source
in your article).
Why no ambulance service ?
The total population of UBC
and the endowment lands far
exceeds 20,000; smaller towns
and villages have ambulance
service, even if it is run as a
branch of a volunteer fire department.
If the administration is unable to provide this much-
needed service, then I suggest
the AMS or some other interested body donate a vehicle
which is usable; even a used
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science 2.
Nobility
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As I reflect on my initiation
into a fraternity which took
place a few years ago, I vividly recall the 'procedure'. At
one point each pledge was compelled to strip, place a marsh-
mallow in his anus, and then
crawl across the room and deposit   this   marshmallow   in   a
bowl. Yet in the advertisement
for fall rush sponsored by the
fraternities, it was stated:
"Most fraternities are steeped in tradition and ritual. The
formal pledging and initiation
ceremonies are patterns of
acceptance that have evolved
from the middle nineteenth
century when many fraternities
were formed. These procedures
are as demanding as they are
impressive, but they reflect a
nobility and beauty that is not
easily forgotten."
MICHAEL CHESSLY,
law 1.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Blorg police chief J. Peirpoint
FrothingslOsh today refused to
act on reports of wild drinking
on the U of P.P. campus. "We
don't look for trouble," said he.
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OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
PAUL BOUTELLE . . . "no elections"
Residence
plans to be
released
Preliminary drawings for the
wireless site residence project
should be released next week,
says housing director Les Rohringer.
In an interview Monday, Rohringer said the clients committee, a sub-committee of the
UBC housing advisory committee, will meet on Sept. 27.
"The committee will study
the drawings we have just received from the architect,"
said Rohringer.
The clients committee consists of board of governors
member Arthur Fouks, grad
studies dean Ian Cowan; dean
of women Helen Macrae; physical plant director J. T. Turner;
and three students Don Munton, Peter Wardle, and another
to be named by the AMS.
"Copies of the drawings will
be released for publication after the clients committee has
studied them," Rohringer said.
Boutelle predicts unrest,
"7976 vote will not be held
Unrest in the U.S. will have grown to such
proportions by 1976 that it will be impossible
to hold an election, a black militant said here
Friday.
"The election of 1976 will not take place,"
Paul Boutelle told an overflow audience in Bu.
104.
Boutelle, U.S. vice-presidential candidate of
the Socialist Workers' Party, spoke at noon,
then moved outdoors and talked informally to
a smaller group for several hours.
On the subject of the current presidential
race, Boutelle said the SWP has no illusions of
getting elected. "The chances of us winning
this election are nil," he said.
State election procedures in the U.S. require
that third parties must obtain thousands of
signatures on a petition or hold conventions of
a certain size just to get on the ballot, he said.
Despite these obstacles, SWP candidates are
on the ballot in 21 states. Said Boutelle: "This
is as good if not better than all of our previous
campaigns combined."
Boutelle is a black militant from Harlem
who makes his living as a New York cab driver.
For the last several years he has been involved
in the Black Power movement and in mobilizing Afro-Americans against the war in Vietnam.
He was the key speaker at the nominating convention of the Black Panther Party
in Seattle. The SWP calls for total black control of black communities and for the immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops from Vietnam.
Boutelle and Fred Halstead, the SWP presidential candidate have been travelling throughout the U.S. as spokesmen for the SWP.
Boutelle has just returned from a tour of
Scotland, England and France where he spoke
to students, revolutionaries and Black Power
militants.
Linde to advise undergraduates
on political tactics, negotiations
By FRANK FLYNN
Student council will spend years passing
minutes while the real action goes on at the
undergraduate level.
And Alma Mater Society vice-president
Carey Linde wants to get in on the action.
Linde outlined these and other views in a
memo to undergraduate societies- oa Sept.  17.
By offering his services to the various Undergraduate societies, Linde hopes to "ask
questions that people would rather went unasked, and unanswered."
"As an outside politician I might be able
to offer a new approach to your problems,"
states the memo. "I would like specifically to
meet with your executive and then sometime
address a general meeting of your faculty."
The memo expands Linde's thoughts of
the student council, and charges it to be impotent.
In an interview Monday Linde claimed that
students on campus want action and the AMS
is not giving it to them.
But things are happening anyway, he said.
"The undergraduate societies are doing a lot
on their own and I want to help them."
Linde explained that he wants to advise the
students on political tactics, methods of negotiations and what other faculties are doing.
Students are wasting thsir time on worthless
demands he said. "Forget about the senate and
these higher positions, because they only rubber stamp the decisions made on the faculty
and department levels."
"We must get in on department levels because this is where the real decisions are made".
Education president Gerry Olund agreed
Monday with Linde's charge that undergraduate
societies come to the council meetings solely
to further their own goals.
"Undergraduate societies always want their
share," he said.
But as for Linde's offer to aid the various
society, Olund expressed doubt that the vice-
president would be able to become deeply involved.
"I am sure that this faculty would be really
interested in what he has to say," said Olund.
"But for him to become deeply involved in faculty of education problems would be impossible".
Science council representative Mike McPhee
welcomed Linde's brief.
"He wants to give undergraduate societies
insights and methods, McPhee said. "Some societies are politically very narrow."
"Students in science want to see matters
fully discussed and we would be happy to have
Linde address both the executive and a general
meeting".
McPhee also agreed with Linde on where
and what to reform.
"The capacity for change is better amongst
the faculty than in the senate," he said. "There
is a lot that the undergraduate societies can do,"
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her first year or equivalent and is a fully registered
student for the 1968-69 academic year. Candidates must
have attained in the previous sessional examinations an
average of no less than 60% for 15 units or more, and
65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 aJn. Wed., Sept. 25, 1968
and will close at 12 noon Thursday, Oct. 3, 1968. Voting
will take place Wed., Oct. 9, 1968.
Elections for the positions of
Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office of
Student Senator:
Three students from the student body at large (including
The Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected by the
student body at large. To be eligible for election to one
of these positions, a student in the academic year most
recently taken prior to the election shall have taken a
full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second class standing; he
shall also be registered as a full time student at this
University.
Terms of Office: Of the students elected by the student
body at large, the candidates receiving the highest and
second highest number of votes shall hold office for 2
years, the candidate receiving the third highest number
of votes shall hold office for one year.
Nominations are open immediately. Nominations will
close on Oct. 3, 1968. Voting will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1968.
Nomination forms are available at the AMS office in
Brock Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 55. For further information contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS mailbox number 55.
Elections Committee
Applications are now being accepted for the Elections
Committee. Four members-at-large will be appointed by
the Student Council. The Elections Committee helps
govern the running of the Alma Mater Society elections
including drawing up rules and checking eligibility.
Applications and questions should be sent to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Student Library Committee
Applications are now open for four positions on the
Library Committee. This committee is advisory to the
head of the service and may make suggestions or
recommendations concerning developments or changes
in the library which may affect students. Anyone interested please contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS box 55.
Wireless Site Residence Committee
Applications are being received for a position on the
above committee. For information, please contact office
of Housing Administration. Send application to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS box 55.
AMS External Affairs Commission
The above will be holding its first meeting on Wed.,
Sept. 25 in Buch. 219 at 12:30 p.m.
The Commission will be composed of two sub-commissions, each being fully responsible for programming and
implementation in its own sphere.
1. Political Education Sub-Commission
—work to better inform public about what UBC is
all about
—anti-Socred campaign, emphasizing the need for
more university financing and the passage of a
new Universities Act which takes into account the
aspirations of students and the needs of the university community in general
—high school organizing and orientation
2. CUS Sub-Commission
—make CUS relate to UBC
—implement CUS resolutions and directives on campus.
The External Affairs Commission is geared for action
and if you want to get involved be at Buch. 210 at 12:30
p.m. Wednesday. Tuesday, September 24, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Columbia denies SDS
use of campus buildings
NEW WORK (CUPI)—Columbia University
has suspended the Students for a Democratic
Society's right to use campus facilities and referred to the Committee on Student Affairs a
request for revocation of the organization's
campus charter.
The move followed SDS's disruption of
registration Wednesday that erupted briefly in
violence.
Revocation of the charter would make illegal every SDS campus activity and subject
participants to administration discipline. The
revocation would not prevent the group from
engaging in unauthorized activities, but would
deprive it of its status as an approved body and
would place all its adherents in jeopardy of
suspension or expulsion from the university.
The Student Affairs Committee, comprised
of two students,. faculty and administrators,
met Thursday night but there was no immediate word of the decision.
The disciplining action came after about 150
members of SDS forced an early close of registration Wednesday as they clashed briefly
with campus police outside registration hall.
SDS was trying to register some 30 students who remain suspended from last spring's
revolt. Led by Mark Rudd, the crowd jammed
the doors of the campus gym where registration was going on and demanded entrance.
Their demand was rejected and limited
violence erupted between the students and
campus police armed with billy clubs. No one
was arrested or injured.
As a result of the afternoon's action, the
university cancelled meeting privileges for an
"International Assembly of Revolutionary Students" that was to have taken place that evening on the campus.
The cancellation led about 200 people to
seize a lecture hall at 8 p.m.
The next night acting president Dr. Andrew
W. Cordier surprised a student rally of 700
when he mounted the podium to "meet with the
students". Cordier promised the problems of
the university would be dealt with in a "purposeful and candid fashion" and told students
"repression is not a word in my vocabulary."
One of the major problems faced by students last year was the utter inaccessibility of
then president Grayson Kirk.
Four killed in Mexican riots,
1000 demonstrators busted
MEXICO CITY (CUPI) — Rector Javier
Barros Sierra of the University of Mexico resigned amidst violent weekend battles between
students and police. Sierra and the students are
protesting the army occupation of the national
university campus.
Violence erupted here again Sunday and
resulted in the death of one policeman and hundreds of arrests.
Saturday-evening, two youths and a policeman were killed in another demonstration.
Saturday's three deaths were a result of
sniper fire and police retaliation in a battle
ending with the arrests of more than 1,000
demonstrators.
Sierra announced his resignation Sunday
after repeated public attacks against him by
congressmen and rulers of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party.
Sierra called the occupation an "excessive
act of force which our house of study does not
deserve."
The Mexican army invaded the University
of Mexico Wednesday for the first time in 40
years in response to a student threat to disrupt
the Olympic Games next month.
Several thousand troops in full battle array
swept the strike-bound campus with assault
cars and  apparently plan  a  prolonged  stay.
Pop music
dulls youth
IIYA (NEW YORK) — A
group of young Ukrainians
wrote Pravda Ukrainy to ask
why in Poland, Czechoslovakia
and other non-western countries "no one reproaches young
people for singing modern
songs and dancing to pop music."
Pravda Ukrainy didn't answer the question, but it did
warn the young people that
popular music in the West was
an imperialist weapon designed
to dull the senses of young
people.
If Soviet young people wanted popular music, it continued,
there was plenty of the homemade brand to choose from,
such as "Our Locomotives Run
Fast, Our Stop is in the Commune."
Soup kitchens rolled in after the military.
The campus was fortunately fairly free of
students because classes have not been held
there for over two months. 88,000 Mexican students have been on strike for two months protesting government repression of a student
demonstration July 26 in support of Fidel
Castro's Cuban regime.
Following the army invasion, hundreds of
students and professors were arrested for alleged "anti-social and possibly criminal activities."
Olympic Village, where all the athletes will
live during the games, is just two miles from
the campus.
The government said it had waited two
months for a return to normality on the campus and troops were sent in because university
authorities had no means to re-establish order.
At a mass demonstration in the Mexican
capitol August 27, about 200,000 people called
for the resignation of President Diaz Ordaz
and shouted their opposition to the Olympic
games.
Banners borne by marchers called Ordaz
a murderer and a dictator because he had
ordered police to use violence to break up student protests. Student leaders claim about 20
students were killed during police action in
July.
LEGEND READING CENTER
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The Technique of Thinking
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SEPTEMBER 24-29 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
'ACADEMICS CAN CRITICIZE' - SFU BOARD
By KAREN LODER
Academics should have the right to criticize
their universities freely, says a Simon Fraser University policy statement released Friday.
The long-awaited statement, adopted by the SFU
board of governors, defines academic freedom as
"the right to teach, investigate and speculate without deference to prescribed doctrine".
The document is prefaced by the statement that
academic freedom and tenure procedure give society
"the benefit of honest judgment and the independent
criticism which might otherwise be withheld because of fear of offending a dominant social group
or transient social attitude."
The essential functions of the university are defined as the dissemination of knowledge and under
standing through research and teaching.
Academic freedom is recognized as essential to
the carrying out of these functions.
"Academic freedom includes the right within the
university to decide who shall teach, who shall be
taught and what shall be taught and published,";
states the document.
"Because a university's essential concerns are
intellectual, academic freedom involves the right of
appointment of staff or admission of students regardless of race, sex, religion or politics."
The faculty member's responsibility to the non-
academic community as outlined in the statement
incudes a duty to avoid giving the impression he is
speaking for the university when such is not the
case.
Faculty protection is given against arbitrary dismissal. Tenure is defined as "permanency of appointment, the right of a faculty member not to be dismissed except for cause."
Associate professors and full professors may be
awarded tenure upon appointment.
If tenure is not awarded at that time they must
be considered for tenure within two years.
The faculty member must be given notice in writing at least one year before expiration of his contract when tenure is not granted, the document
states.
Dismissal procedure is also outlined in the policy
document. Faculty members can be dismissed only
for cause and have a right to a formal hearing to
determine whether there is cause for dismissal.
Dworkin
organizes
females
By DALE WIK
The Feminine Action League
is not just another group of
squabbling women.
The league, organized on
Sept. 16, is a group dedicated
to bettering the lives of people
on campus — all people, hot
just women, says organizer
Ruth Dworkin.
"Integrated washrooms are
what we advocate," Alma Mater Society external affairs
officer Dworkin said Monday.
"We also want to do away
with segregated quiet rooms in
the student union building and
through these measures promote liberation of both sexes."
Although the group is dedicated to fighting the "myth"
of male superiority, men are
invited to the meetings, she
said.
"We're going to make things
happen," said Miss Dworkin.
"If we feel that anything needs
to be changed, we'll take direct action against it."
The group, patterned after
FAL at Simon Fraser University, has no formalized structure. Its aims will be decided
by each person in the group.
Tentative major issues will
be day nurseries, wage parity
and education in birth control.
The University of Toronto has
a birth control centre endorsed
by the Student Administration
Council, and FAL will be fighting for one for UBC.
As to the struggle for feminine equality, FAL feels that
women must consider themselves on an equal level with
men. Political involvement is
being considered.
The first meeting of the FAL
will be held in the TV room of
Brock Hall at noon Wednesday.
Education
applicants
called
Education undergrad president Gerry Olund issued Monday a call for applicants for a
student-faculty committee that
will decide which decisions affect students within the faculty.
He said the EdUS was in the
process of achieving student involvement but that it was not
compatible with nor could it
be achieved by student apathy.
Applications will be received
until Sept. 30 in room 1 of the
education building.
ROTP
REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN
INTHF
CANADIAN A R: aiD FORCES
EDUCATION FOR LEADERSHIP:
The Department of National Defence, through the
Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP)., sponsors a
programme of university education and leadership
training for selected numbers of young men who
have the potential to become officers in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Candidates with senior matriculation, junior matriculation, or who are university undergraduates
taking suitable courses, are eligible to apply for
enrolment as officer cadets in the Canadian Armed
Forces. The admission standards are high, but for
those who qualify, the way is open to a challenging
and rewarding career.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
They are either high school graduates or university
students in any undergraduate year. Undergraduates enrolled in the Armed Forces while they are
attending university continue at their university
until graduation.
Applications for general or honours courses in
Arts, Science, Engineering and several other courses
are considered. Applicants for university training,
and undergraduates, may obtain a complete list of
acceptable courses for ROTP subsidization from
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centres. You may apply
during the academic term but not later than 1st April.
While attending university, cadets wear civilian
clothes and receive monthly pay at ROTP rates.
Uniforms are supplied by the Canadian Armed
Forces for summer training.
PAY AND ALLOWANCES—
REGULAR OFFICER CADETS:
Tuition and other essential fees are paid by the
Department of National Defence. Officer cadets
entering the Canadian Military Colleges are provided with necessary books and instruments; those
attending university receive an allowance each year
of $125.00 to purchase books and instruments.
Pay rates are as outlined in the attached Pay Rate
card. In addition, full medical and dental care, clothing and other benefits are provided without charge.
Annual leave (30 days plus travelling time) with pay,
maybe granted each year, usually after the summer
training period. Christmas leave is also granted.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDIES:
ROTP does not apply to students entering the medical and dental faculties for whom separate subsidization plans are available. Details may be obtained at
a Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre or through the
Director of Recruiting, Canadian Forces Headquarters, Ottawa 4, Ontario.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
MEDICAL: be physically fit for enrolment.
AGE: have reached his 16th birthday, but not his 21st
birthday on the first of January of the year of entrance
if applying with senior matriculation, or his 20th
birthday if applying with junior matriculation. Consent of a parent or guardian is required if he is under
18 years of age.
The maximum age is increased by one year for
each academic year completed beyond senior matriculation.
HOW AND WHERE TO APPLY:
Applications and further information can be obtained at
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341 Tuesday, September 24, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Builder's faux-pas' delay SUB,
UBC-AMS lease not signed yet
The new student union building will not
open until Thursday.
The building was to have been opened
yesterday, Sept. 23, but because of more delays this was impossible.
SUB was to be sealed during the weekend
so that the bowling lanes in the basement could
be lacquered, instead the lanes flooded on Friday, the third time during construction.
The lacquering has been put off until the
wood dries, meaning that SUB will have to be
sealed for at least 48 hours within the next
month.
Other problems include the cleaning of the
building to remoyte the debris caused by construction.
The responsibility for completing this mop-
up job by Thursday has been undertaken by
Buildings and Grounds.
"Also, before the building can be opened to
the students a formal lease must be signed by
the university," said Al Wait, a member of the
SUB building committee.
"The negotiations have been completed but
documents have to be signed before we can
move in," he said.
When the building opens on Thursday the
main floor will be occupied by the Club day
booths.
However, the basement games areas, the
ballroom, the auditorium, and the special clubs
facilities will not be open.
Dave Cooper, the building manager said that
most of these areas will be opened on October
15 when the air conditioning and ventilation
systems for that part of the building are completed.
"Clubs such as Radsoc will not be able to
move into their rooms until the new year because their extensive facilities will not be completed until Christmas."
Peter Braund the Student Building committee chairman was not available for comment.
Wallace dubiously supported
at Kentucy speaking engagement
By GUY MENDES
College Press Service
(Guy Mendes is associate editor of the
Kentucky Kernel in Lexington)
LEXINGTON, Ky. (CPS)—George Wallace,
a man who has contributed greatly to the
political polarization of this country, visited
" the University of Kentucky last Saturday and
was greeted by a complete reversal of the polar
stereotypes.
While eight "straight-looking" anti-Wallace
'pickets paraded and a number of neatly-
attired members of a campus action group
passed out anti-Wallace leaflets, some 35
scroungy, bearded, beaded, sandaled, long-
- haired "hippies" (as they called themselves)
demonstrated for nearly two hours in support
of the former Alabama governor.
WE'RE FOR PO-LEECE POWER
Carrying placards reading "Turn on with
Wallace", "Keep America beautiful, get a haircut", "Sock it to us, George", "America — love
it or leave it", "Hippies for Wallace", and
shouting slogans like "Law and Order Now"
and "We're for Po-leece Power", the group was
curiously received.
Many of the crowd of 10,000 who turned
out to hear Wallace were supporters from
across the state. Some of them were able to
perceive the tongues in the hippies' cheeks,
but many were unable to cope with the reversal of stereotypes.
"I thought hippies were for McCarthy,"
said a Wallace supporter who appeared dismayed by the prospect of association with
freaks.
Some Wallaceites were convinced the hippies were serious. "Hippies have SOME sense,"
said one.
Another said, "If someone like that is for
Wallace, I don't know if I'm supporting the
right man or not."
* Other Wallace supporters could not overcome the stereotype and were sure the hippies
were goofing on them. "You can look at them
and tell they're not Wallace people," said one.
• "They're either doped up or ignorant."
SOME FREE SPEECH FOLK
Even Wallace was somewhat bewildered by
the group when they gained his attention dur-
, ing his oratory. It was a typical Wallace
speech, complete with catch-phrases, Wallace
witticisms and emotional appeals to the working man.
". . . who can't park their bicycles straight
. . . they looked down their noses at the people
of . . . will be the last car they lay down in
front of . . . never made a speech in my life
that reflected on . . . got some free speech
" folk in this country . .  ."
As the atmosphere grew tense, as the fervor spread in the crowd, the hippies came
through to lighten the mood. They started
_r chanting, "Sock it to 'em George, sock it to
'em George."
Wallace, thinking the shouts came from
one of the usual groups of adversaries who attend his speeches, pulled out several patented
retorts from his repertoire: "All right, you're
not goin' to get promoted to the second grade
. . . you people don't know how many votes
you get me each time you . . ."
Then, pointing toward the group which was
sitting high in the balcony, he said, "You need
a haircut," though he was too far away to see
how correct he was. The hippie group began
chanting even louder — "We want Wallace."
SLICKED-BACK HAIR
Wallace hesitated, took a step backwards,
approached the mike again and said, "Oh, I
think they're for us up there," which brought
wild applause from the group. The little man
with the slicked-back hair had been goofed
on and didn't know.
Later at the airport, when asked about the
hippies he said, "If they're really for me I'd
be glad to have them."
To the hippies, it was a romp at a high level
of satire. They converted the new left victory
signal into a three-fingered "W" for Wallace
and they also amended the "Hell no, we won't
go" chant to "Heck yes, we want George" —
a somewhat morally re-armed version of the
anti-draft original.
The dialogue between the large pro-Wallace
group, the small anti-Wallace group and members of the crowd added to the delight of the
2,000-plus crowd who watched from the sidewalks during the demonstration.
Members of the anti- and pro-Wallace
groups knew each other and engaged in mock
debate when the picket lines passed one
another.
The prp-Wallace hippies would shake their
fists and call the neatly dressed anti-Wallace
pickets "Communists . . . hippies . . . anarchists . . . you ought to be shot . . . boo, boo,
hisss . . . lay down and I'll roll over you,"
were a few of the hippies' remarks.
The pro-Wallace hippies drew such comments as "Dirty love fascists . . . filthy patriots
... go club some kids."
PATRIOTIC LOVE-IN
After nearly two hours of pacing back and
forth, the hippie group moved to grassy area
for a "patriotic love-in". There they sang
"America the Beautiful" and "Dixie". They
passed around cans of water which attracted
a policeman checking for alcoholic contents.
As the policeman checked the cans, the hippies
applauded and got to their feet shouting "Law
and order, law and order". They smiled and
offered water to the policeman, who managed
to slip away after a few pats on the back.
The policeman was no doubt confused — as
were many others. The actions of this band of
unkempt youths were certainly not of the same
cloth as that of the usual hippie.
But as one of the pro-Wallace hippies said
later, "This may be conservative Lexington in
super-conservative Kentucky, but come on,
man  .   .  ."
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—
The Pango Pango Asses and
Mules Society dragged their
weekly meeting decibals beyond deadline for the second
week in a row.
The Busy Body newspaper
threatened suicide.
Available at
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In The Village - Wz blocks
from Memorial Gym
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FOUNDER (R) Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
— dick burton photo
"I COULD HAVE spread my wings and done a thousand things" at the dance at Place Vanier
Saturday.
Campus councils question
CUS student radical role
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Universities of Windsor and Alberta have joined the growing
list of campuses holding referendums on membership in the
Canadian Union of Students.
Alberta, out of the union
since fall 1966, decided Sunday
to tentatively set a membership referendum for November.
The 13,000-student campus is
the largest university outside of
Quebec not in CUS.
U. of A. has been a longtime opponent of the political
stands and actions of CUS,
charging student councils have
no right to make decisions for
individual students and should
concentrate on providing student services.
Student president Marilyn
Pilkington said it was important to keep in touch with the
moderate campus unions on a
national level. She said there
was no way this could be
achieved within CUS.
She added that a "smear
campaign" at the CUS congress had branded the Alberta
student council "fascist reactionaries".
At the University of Wind-
Senate meetings
opened at McGill
MONTREAL (CUP) — More chips fell off the rapidly
crumbling wall of Canadian university senate secrecy Wednesday
at the McGill University senate voted to open its meetings.
After a year and a half of bitter debate, the senate voted
to open its sessions "to observation by any member of the
university community and the accredited press subject to limitation of space, good conduct, and special considerations".
Student president Robert Hajaly was encourage, saying: "It's
an important step towards the democratization of university
government."
Student council is still calling for opening of the still-
closed board of governors and senate committees.
Meanwhile, at the University of Lethbridge, the general
faculty council voted to open its meetings to "all members of
the university community", with the provision that majority
vote of the council would be sufficient to send it back into
secrecy   anytime.
In other moves by the McGill senate to accept controversial
reform proposals with which it had grappled for months, it also:
• Agreed to student council demands that plans for rewriting the student discipline code be scrapped in favor of a code
applicable to all sectors of the university. The code would be
drawn up by a student-faculty-administration committee.
• Agreed to add three students to its key committee on
academic policy, reversing a previous decision.
• Included junior professors as members of all faculties
of the University. (A faculty is a decision-making body previously
consisting only of senior staff.)
In the session, perhaps its last behind closed doors, the
senate also produced a final version of proposals for overall
changes in university government. These proposals went to the
board  of  governors  for  approval  on  Monday.
Although the senate is withholding its university legislation
pending board approval, it is expected eight students will be
added to senate and the number of elected faculty members (now
eight) almost tripled.
Elected faculty and students would then have a numerical
majority on the senate over more than twenty-five administrators
and governors.
sor, a petition from over 250
people led by anti-CUS student councillors forced a membership referendum two days
after the student council had
defeated a simliar motion 11-5.
The referendum will be held
Sept. 27.
Windsor last year voted 576
to 552 for staying in the union.
The present council maintains
the referendum was poorly
handled and another vote
would clear the issue.
A number of other universities also plan to hold referendums. Carleton now in CUS,
plans to vote on whether to
continue its membership in late
November. Memorial, Mount
Saint Vincent and Lethbridge
universities, all of whom are
not now in CUS, will vote at
undetermined dates. More universities are still considering
referendums.
Students stage sit-in
for faculty council seat
CALGARY (CUP) — The University of Calgary general
faculty council cancelled a meeting Thursday when 35 students
demanding open meetings refused to leave the meeting chamber.
The 35 students, including three representatives of the
graduate students association, attended the meeting in response
to an editorial in the U. of C. student newspaper, The Gauntlet,
which urged them to take action for open meetings of GFC.
The general faculty council is U. of C.'s highest academic
decision-making body (equivalent to the senate in most univer- _
sities), and seats three students.
GFC meetings have always been closed to non-members
except by special invitation.
About 45 members of the GFC arrived to find the students
already seated along the walls of the room. Acting president,.
Dr. W. R. Trost, chairman of the GFC, asked the students why
they were there.
After  some  discussion,   Trost  asked  three   times  that  the
students leave the chamber. He said he would be unable to
convene  the  meeting with  visitors  present.  When  only three ,
moved, he asked all members of GFC  to withdraw,  although
several were trying to gain the floor.
Hunting     Fishing    Shooting
JOIN THE VARSITY
ROD & GUN CLUB
See Our Booth On Clubs Day
CIO VRNNI'S
COIFFURES
Specializing in
All phases of
modern hairstyling . . .
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from the sophisticated
3543 W. 4th Ave.
733-8646
Tony Barbta-i
Winner of
1968 Gala
Hairstyling  Award
TOMORROW'S EYES
are going to get
HIGH
Come to see if they get
BUSTED
WEDNESDAY NOON ON THE LIBRARY LAWN
FILMSOC PRESENTS
FREE SHOW
THURS. SEPT. 26
BURT LANCASTER
"ELMER GANTRY"
Shows at 12:30 and 8:00
IN THE OLD AUD. Tuesday, September 24, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Up the Creek University today
announced plans for awarding
athletic scholarships to champion tiddley-winks players.
The move coincided with the
official death of the University
of Bongo Congo's sports program. Officials say the main
reason was a lack of athletes.
— dick button photo
ANOTHER UBC JV hits the turf beneath Wenatchee tacklers in Saturday's 40-0 loss in Thunderbird Stadium.
Jayvee offense falls flat,
Knights take season opener
By FRANK SCHERUBL
The UBC Jayvee football
team showed a definite lack of
experience as it bowed 40-0
to Wenatchee Junior College at
the UBC Thunderbird Stadium
last Saturday afternoon.
The Jayvees have played together for only one week and
the lack of experience was very
obvious as they were outscored
37-0 in the first half.
During that half the Jayvees
made 2 first downs and managed only 43 yards on offence
to the 220 yards ground out by
the Wenatchee Knights.
The Knights did not have to
kick once in that half and were
throwing passes that rendered
the Jayvees defensive secondary useless.
In the second half however
the Jayvees gained confidence
and they held the Knights to
only three points. The defensive front line showed exceptional progress this half and
held the Knights ground gain
to practically nothing.
The   Jayvees   spent   three1*
Weekend of wins
for rugby teams
UBC rugby teams enjoyed a very successful weekend as
they played their way to two wins, a tie and one loss.
The Thunderbirds had a creditable game Sunday as they
came from behind to tie the Vancouver Kats 6-6. The Kats led
6-0 at one point in the game, but a penalty kick, and a try
by Doug Schick tied the score.
The Birds then had a chance to win it on the convert, but
the attempt was missed.
The UBC second squad played the Kats' second squad on
the same bill and came away with a very impressive 12-0 win.
Brave's scoring was by Bob Chataway with two, and Brian Mc-
Daniel and Jeff Taylor with one try each.
The third UBC team, the Totems, played Britannia and lost
11-8. The team played quite well generally, but made several
mistakes which proved to be costly.
The freshman rugby team played Britannia's 4th squad, and
scored an impressive 24-0 victory. The backfield was especially
" notable in this game and the forwards also made a fine showing.
The season opens this weekend when the Birds will play
West Vancouver and the freshmen play BCIT.
Cross country success
heaalded by first win
After the initial outdoor meet of the season the UBC crosscountry team appears to be ready for a very successful season
despite rugged competition from all sides.
On the weekend the UBC team was the host for the inaugural
meet of the newly-formed B.C. League and they made a very
impressive showing.
The league was instituted for the development of crosscountry running in the province and is unique in that every team
has an equal chance of winning based on a time handicap system.
The weekend meet attracted twelve teams, with the strongest
two—UBC and the Vancouver Olympic Club—supplying three
teams each.
In the final standings the UBC "A" team narrowly defeated
the Varsity Outdoor Club's "A" team by 11.2 seconds.
By the handicap system this amounted to only four points
for VOC. UBC is now in the lead with seven points and is looking
very impressive with Ken Elmer (third in the weekend meet),
Jack Burnett (fourth), Tom Howard (fifth), Laurie Bridges
(seventh) and Pat Laver (ninth).
In the meantime there is talk of an all-woman UBC crosscountry team. UBC presently has three very competent female
runners in Pat Mills, Ann Covell, and Jo-Anne Heatherington. If
any other girls are interested they should contact Lionel Pugh
at the Memorial Gym and UBC may get its first all-woman crosscountry team.
fourths of the time on defence
as their offence could not muster any sort of dangerous
attack.
Most of the time the Jayvees
played an experimental game,
trying all sorts of new plays
and new formations. Nothing
resulted in any kind of success, however, and the final
score of 40-0 for the Knights
proves this beyond a doubt.
Life saving
instruction
Anyone interested in the Red
Cross Royal Lifesaving instructor school is invited to contact
Dave Goodman or Mike Brown
at the Memorial Gym at noon
weekdays.
Ask at the Gym or phone
738-0288 for more information.
•.-" I*-   ,*• /> - i *v> >     *** , ■.***    «""t*:.   .
4 Underground
FILMS (>*>*»»»
COLORFILM (1965) Ben Van Meter 9 minutes. Col.
A rich colorful excursion of a group of zany characters into the dense undergrowth of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.
THE MATTRESS (1964) Robert Bresson 9 minutes. B&W.
Second Prize, Fourth Independent Filmmakers Festival, Los Altos, California.
Shown at Melbourne and San Francisco Film Festivals.
"An old discarded mattress in a vacant lot, inanimate and alone. We explore
its potential," — Robert Feldman.
SAN FRANCISCO TRIPS FESTIVAL (1966) Ben Van Meter 9 minutes. Col.
This film is a color assault on the senses. One gets the impression that this
is some sort of cellullar -excursion. The rock band sets the tempo and the
screen explodes from start to finish. A trip.
THE CONNECTION (1961) Shirley Clarke
100 minutes. B & W.
THE CONNECTION is the award winning adaptation of the Jack Gelber play
that ran for over two years on Broadway as a play, in 1960, it led the
"Obie Awards", taking three first prizes.
THE CONNECTION, under the brilliant direction of Shirley Clarke, became the
underground's first feature-length success.
"Fascinating  as an  exhibit of bravura filmmaking.  As -in Antonioni's films,
the camera insists that we look." — Arthur Knight, NEW YORK TIMES.
"What she has done is to treat her material with such visual point and power
that one grasps  and feels it all  through  the eyes first of all, cinematically.
This is real filmmaking, not the adaptation of the play." — SPECTATOR.
(RESTRICTED aWP I
No out under IS admitted I
t. -., r*       .--  •
WED., THURS. — SEPT. 25 - 26
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BARRIE.  ONTARIO Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES . . .
Annual Clubs day
slated for Thursday
PHOTOSOC
Offices located in Brock Extension 163 until SUB facilities are open. Visit us any
noon or clubs day in SUB.
GERMAN CLUB
Come to a meeting today
noon in I.H. 402 and 404 to
sign up for construction of
clubs' day booth Wednesday
night.
SPECIAL EVENTS
SPEAKERS
"The American Revolution
'68"—Aaron Dixon, captain
of Seattle Black Panther
party; Thursday noon in
Hebb Theatre.
VOLUNTEER SWIM
PROGRAM
Red Cross-Royal Life Saving
instructor school starts Friday, 6:30 p.m., in Empire
pool. Prerequisite — Bronze
medallion, Red Cross leaders, or Award of Merit.
CURLING CLUB
Sign up for curling, today
noon, Bu. 106.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Everyone welcome to meeting, Wednesday, noon, Angus
104. Need volunteers and
slides of club activities. Details and news of weekend
trips at meeting.
CHORSOC
(Everyone welcome to practice Wed. 6 p.m., Bu. 106.
OMBUDSMAN
Students willing to help run
the Ombudsman's office,
leave names in AMS office
or in AiMS Box 76, Brock.
ENGLISH LITERARY UNION
General meeting for all English students, election of officers, student-faculty committee, symposia, bull sessions,
Wednesday noon, Bu. 106.
Faculty welcome.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
"Black and Blue Review" on
sale daily, Common Room.
Ma. Annex, 1119.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Science jackets and sweaters
on sale daily Hennings Lobby at noon.
SUB FORMAL OPENING
COMMITTEE
Meeting today, noon, Bu. 225
for all those interested in
working on the formal opening of SUB in January.
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
First membership meeting
Wednesday noon, Bu. 221 to
discuss future activities.
Everyone welcome.
CREATIVE WRITING
DEPARTMENT
Canadian poet, Alfred Purdy
will read from his works including the latest Wild
Grape Wine, Tuesday, Bu.
106, 8 p.m. All welcome, admission free.
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
General meeting in Brock
council chambers today noon.
FEMININE ACTION LEAGUE
Kathleen Aberle, Anthropology prof, at Louis Riel U.
will speak tonight at 8 p.m.,
room 3003, L.R.U. on "Women in the 20th Century:
Emancipated ?"
UNIVERSITY CLUBS
COMMITTEE
Annual Clubs day, noon to
2:30 p.m. Thursday in SUB.
SQUASH CLUB
Sign up for membership at
Clubs day or on bulletin
board in men's common room
of Law Library. This week
only.
SAILING CLUB
Membership   meeting   Wednesday noon in Bu. 102.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl     Burau:     "Capitalism,
socialism and the parties'' today noon, Bu. 100.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Meeting Wednesday, 9:30
p.m. in Union College 202.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Speaker Friday noon in Angus 110.
ED. U.S.
Open forum between Dave
Zirnhelt and Carey Linde in
Education lounge today noon.
CHINESE OVERSEAS
STUDENTS ASSOC.
Annual general meeting tonight at 8 p.m., I.H.
HILLEL HOUSE
Guest speaker Roy Jacques
will speak on his trip to the
Middle East today noon in
Hillel House behind Brock.
IL CAFFE
Meeting in I.H. 402 Wednesday noon.
PRE MED
Opening meeting and pathological display Wednesday
noon, Wesbrook 201.
Policy-making voice
given French students
PARIS (UNS) — The French cabinet has approved a bill
giving students a policy-making voice in France's universities.
Approved last week, the bill is to be submitted within the next
few days and the large Guallist majority is expected to ratify
it swiftly.
The reform measure gives students a voice at all levels
of financial, educational and administrative policies. The government will surrender control over the educational program,
the examination system and internal security.
But it will retain some control since the government will
continue  to   dispense   money   appropriated  by   parliament.
The highly-centralized bureaucracy of the university system will be broken up into faculties or colleges and smaller
units.
Adminstrative councils for the colleges will be one-third
professors, one-third students and one-third outside personnel.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75-t, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6781.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
WOULD THE PERSON WHO FOUND
books in B-lot please phone AM 1-
6430 and leave message. Urgently
needed!
GOLDEN RING, DARK-BROWN
stone. Family's keepsake. Reward.
Please  cal]  681-2073.
DOST PAIR OF GLASSES, ANG.
building. Brown horn-rimmed ladies.
Call Val  733-8855.
FOUND ONE TIMEX LADIES'
watch on sidewalk by War Memorial Gym, Wed., Sept. 11. Phone
224-9875.
PIPE:  CURVED, MONDAY SEPT.  16
in Frosh Arts class. Ph. Pat 224-1508.
FOUND: MEN'S DARK WOOD
frame glasses. Monday, 8:30 In front
of Hebb. Claim at Publication's
office. Brock Hall.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDERS WANTED ALONG ROAD
from Marine at Victoria at 8:30 departs at 5:30. Phone 326-1036.
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO FROM
West Van. Phone 926-1208. Ambleside area.
RIDERS WANTED FROM THE
Broadway and Arbutua area. Phone
Jerry 738-2786.	
WANTED RIDERS OR ALTERNATE
drivers — 14th and Haywood, W.
Van.  Mike,  922-8836.	
GOT TO HAVE OTHER DRIVERS!
Richmond carpool. Vic. Blundell and
No.  3-4.  Phone Ralph 273-3289.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to Serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.	
FREE: CANADA CAREER DIREC-
tory for class of 1969 only. Packed
with career opportunities in industry and government. Also information on school boards and graduate
schools. Call at the Placement office
for your copy now.                '
JOSE FELICIANO, OCT. 24, 8 P.M.
First big concert in SUB. Limited
tickets available. Ticket sales begin
soon. Keep watching! In concert
Jose Feliciano, SUB, Thurs., Oct.
24, 8 p.m.	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
Travel Opportunities
16
SWIM STUDENT, 23, WISHES
company for car trip to Olympics.
Pref. female. Call 736-7846, leave
message.
Wanted Information
17
ANYONE SEEING FRONT CHROME
wheels being taken off red '57 Chev.
in D lot on Thursday, Sept. 12.
Phone  321-1662  after  6:00 p.m.
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at 1110 Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: USED CLASSICAL GUI-
tar in good condition, will pay about
$50.00.  Phone John 224-6643.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 MONZA, 4 SPEED, RADIO,
maroon with black interior, buckets,
mechanically perfect. Call Rod, 733-
8285.
'64 MG MIDGET EXC. COND. MECH.
sound and extras. See on campus.
Phone M.W.  at 224-9769.
'59 CHEV. BISCAYNE, 6 CYL., 4
door, radio, 2 new tires, completely
reconditioned engine, brakes and
clutch assembly. $500.00 or nearest
offer.   Guido,   922-7578.
'65  AUSTIN A60. EXCELLENT CON-
dition.   Call   738-8131.
1963 MERCURY COMET. EXCEL-
lent condition. Six cylinder, two door
sedan, standard .transmission, radio.
New tires, $850.00. Phone 224-1772
after six.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
IDEAL COMMUTERS CAR UBC
traffic—Mercedes 220S, good condition, semi automatic. 1959. Recently
overhauled. Well under $1000. Phone
733-6827   after   6   p.m.   daily.	
1965 PONTIAC WAGON, AM-FM
radio, power windows, 43,000 miles,
$1800.  Cash or best offer.  736-5147,
'67 V.W. DELUXE; RADIO, GAS
heater, great shape. Must sell! Don,
Rm.  27, 224-9880. 	
1964 V.W. DELUXE, PLUS SNOW
tires and extra heater. Good condition.  $800.  224-3052.       	
1965 DODGE DART, NEW CLUTCH,
V-8, radio, maroon, non-Canadians.
$1095 or best. 228-9166.	
'65 VALIANT V-200, 4-DR. SEDAN
deluxe auto. $1650. Dr. Arnold, Room
121,  Chemistry.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
HONDA 175, DIKE NEW, UNDER
3500 miles, $550, Phone 435-9958,
after 6. Ask for Bob.
1966 HONDA, MODEL 166, SPORTS.
Immaculate condition, cheap. Ken
Lee, 736-6631 or 874-3089.      	
1967 SUZUKI 250X6, HELMET, ROLL-
bar, sprockets. 731-3480. Offers!
Geoff.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6622
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS.
Children & adults. Reserve early for
Halloween. Also Scottish kilts. 5620
Dunbar. Ph. 263-9011.
Scandals
37
SCANDALS: ALL OVER THE PLACE
in SUB on Clubs Day, 12:30-2:30,
Sept.  26.	
WHY SUFFER WITH TEXTS ? TAKE
Legend Reading Centre's Speed
Reading Course. Mike, 254-4557 after
6:00 p.m.	
EVER WONDER HOW THE BIG
thinkers on campus tick? Read all
about it in "The Technique of
Thinking" — available in SUB and
Angus.
TOMORROWS EYES ARE GOING
to get high! Come and see if they
get busted. Wednesday noon on the
Library  lawn.
INSTRUCTION
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PHOTOGRAPHER REQUIRES GIRL
assistant one or two mornings per
week. 325-2433.
GIRLS REQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon  Enterprises,  736-6223.
YOUNG MOTHER TO BABYSIT —
weekdays, my home, outdoor walks.
732-7002.
Help Wanted—Male
52
ESTABLISHED GARDENING Business being surrendered by student
going east. Very lucrative, asking
only $20.00. 738-3252.
WE NEED AN ENERGETIC YOUNG
man with Managerial experience to
build and maintain a sales force.
Only those wh-o desire something
better,   need   apply.   Phone   321-2786.
Male or Female
53
SPANISH, HEBREW, LATIN,
Dutch, German and Italian tutors
required.  Phone 736-6923.
TUTORS REQUIRED, HIGH SCHOOL
mathematics and sciences. Minimum:
fourth year. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Phone
736-6923.	
STUDENTS — EARN WHILE YOU
learn. Part-time contact work, management opportunity. Promise good
money and invaluable experience to
those who qualify. For interview,
call Ralph 929-2454, 6-8 p.m.
Work Wanted     54
Instruction Wanted 61
Music 62
Special Classes 63
STUDENTS   AND    PARENTS   WHO
need to  improve  their  French  have
very   good   opportunity   by   calling '
Emmanuel Piarron at 683-6192.
Tutoring 64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR STUDENT TELEPHONE
directory. Buy pre-sale tickets for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publica-
tions Office, Brock Hall.	
VARSITY  SPECIALS
Students' desks    from 14.95
New bunk beds  pair 29.50
Book cases    _ from 8.95
New  252   coil  Hollywood  bed
complete    -    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drlve-ln at rear of store)
THE WORLD'S  LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R.  $40.  Others $34,  $25. Fac-
tory prices.  Ph.  SID  298-9110.
SPENCER  MICROSCOPE WITH OIL
immersion lens.  Phone 261-7345.
1965 AND 1966
TOTEMS
25c - To Clear - 25c
Publications, Office Brock
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
QUIET ROOM FOR QUIET MALE
student, non-smoker, non-drinker,
near  gates.   Phone   224-3096.	
FURNISHED ROOM(S) WITH KIT-
chen and other facilities. Male (a)
only. Phone 736-7128.
Room & Board
82
ROOM — BREAKFAST AND SUP-
per. $90 mo. 733-0984, 2466 W. 6th
Ave. 	
CLASS  82—NN  N  N  N N N  N  NNN
ROOM AT UBC GATES — REDUCED
rent   to   nursing   student   in   return
for   small  amount  of  help.   266-8642.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   ON   CAMPUS
at Phi Delta Theta House. 2120 Wesbrook,  224-9073.
Furn. Houses & ' Apts.
83
HAVE FURNISHED APARTMENT
to share with another girl. Prefer
grad   student,  732-8062  after  5.
3RAD STUDENT NEEDED TO
share furnished apartment. Call
738-2856.
FURNISHED SUITE, 1746 MAC-
donald. Room for six girls — group
or individual. Phone 733-4476 or
733-0584.
WANTED: SENIOR OR GRAD STU-
dent to share house with two others.
2086 W. 46th or see Al, Hut 0-15,
Tues.  afternoon.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
FEMALE—BSMT. PRIVATE SHOW-
er, separate entrance. Use, den,
fridge. Quiet. 228-8948. $45.
Halls For Rent
Houses For Sale
85
86   -
Other Cities
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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