UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 23, 2001

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128870.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128870.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128870-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128870-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128870-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128870-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128870-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128870-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128870-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128870.ris

Full Text

Array BASEBALL!
THE THUNDERBIRDS TAKE TO THE FIELD TONIGHT—SEE PAGE THREE
MARCH 23. 2001
VOLUME 82 ISSUE 44
LOST SINCE 1918
1 Page Fridav-the Ubvssey Magazine
Mtm
Friday. March 23.20011
11
Respect the Cyclists! Head in the clouds...
 by Sharon Lis
Wake up, driversl The roads are not just for vehicles.'
Remember us, the cyclists. We too have a place on the
streets of metropolitan Vancouver. At least this was
my understanding when I took driver education. So
what is happening? Why must I fear for my life each
time I take my bike onto public roads? Does my terror
come from the fact that motorists ignore my very presence as I timidly advance along the roadside, or could
my inhibitions stem from the countless near misses?
Perhaps I would not be so scared if roads and traffic
lights were more accommodating to cyclists.
It doesn't seem to matter that I wear reflective
clothing and a helmet, or that my bicycle's brakes an<i,
tires are maintained. Nor does it%att|r,thatj usel
appropriate hand signals and slay to the side of the
road except when turning. I am on a bike, not in a
tank, and if a vehicle hitmeor cut meoff;! cotddbe ™
killed while the vehicle might sustain a merjlMc|ti "*
I have been using my bicycle for many years as
environmentally friendly mode of transportation.
Unfortunately, most of the busier roads in the city are
bike-savage. Aside from a couple of bike routes along
side streets, bikers have no space to ride safely. This
was a problem when I commuted to Simon Fraser
University (SFU) along Gaglardi Way and continues to
be a problem now that ride regularly to UBC.
Gaglardi Way is the main access route to SFU and
the top of Burnaby mountain. .Cyclists are limited to a
foot-wide bike lane for most of the ascent Cars, trucks,
and buses race up and down Gaglardi, qften exceeding ■
100 km/h. Bikers are completely exposed and susceptible to being hit as they grind up the steeper sections
of the road. I once experienced a close call riding up
Gaglardi A car passing another lost control next to
me, slid across the lane, hit another car and stopped
only metres from me.-1 had no avenue of escape
because the narrow bike lane was and still is bordered
by a high curb. Unfortunately, a few years ago millions
of dollars were spent to improve the roadways around
Burnaby Mountain but nothing was done to improve
the bike lane up Gaglardi Way.
Now, I cycle to UBC. The fastest, most direct route
for me to take to UBC is along 16th Avenue. Sixteenth
Avenue is hazardous along the stretch of road between
Arbutus and Cambie Street At rush hour the cars line
up, pumping out fumes and hugging the curb. To
avoid asphyxiation and being squashed, I am forced to
ride on the sidewalk. On the rare occasion that I can
remain on the road, vehicles skim within inches of my
bike, feeling like giant vacuum cleaners suctioning the
road. A passing bus or truck resembles a twister sucking me into its midst I fear what would happen if I hit
a bump or lost my balance while being passed.
Each day that I ride my apprehension grows. Two
weeks ago I was riding downhill on 12th Avenue near
Macdonald Street when a minivan turned directly in
: front of me. I instantly braked, lurching my bike into
the air. The van continued like it had not seem me. I
proceeded, heart pounding, limbs still intact
Last week, I was offered the opportunity to bounce
off two car doors oh route to downtown. Drivers generally check for other vehicles before stepping out of
their car. What about cyclists? WE DO NOT have
emergency ^raking systems or a set of armour I
I Yes] I too knoy* what it feels to be driving behind a
bike* weaving sid& to side, blocking passage. The frustration builds. The impatience grows. The foot goes to
'■ the pedal/ No doubt some people should not be on a
3|lS| pSn on a deserted road. But then there is the
mma rider attempting to get from point A to B. Are
they safer hugging the curve or hogging the whole
lane? I vote for hogging the lane. At least they will
have somewhere to go when a car passes too close or
cuts them off.
Drivers 'simply. do not respect the rights of
cyclists! .They pass too close. They turn without looking. Motorists-'speedy up when they see a cyclist sig-
' naliflg to turn left and pull over to the right without
checking that blind spot FrequentlyY vehicles back
up of pull out of a driveway or onto a road having
seen § bike approaching. Let's not forget the number'
of times people get out of their cars by throwing the
door open and then looking, or motorists that cut
directfyin front of cyclists, in their ever-frantic rush.
Cycjists^an only ride so fast. We cannot stop
instantly. It takes much more energy for a cyclist to
stop than1 for'- a motorist to put their foot on the
brakes. We do not have the ability to manoeuvre
through obstacles. And we do not wear earplugs.
I enjoy cycling. It is great exercise and is definitely an environmentally-friendly mode of travel.
Unfortunately, I am forced more and more to ride
defensively and aggressively. I have not been hit
yet..Given the way people drive in the Lower
Mainland, my luck may run out It is time for
motorists to pay attention to cyclists! We also need a
spot on the streets. Slow down. Look before you act
And please, do not blast that horn! ♦
-Sharon Lis is a first-year Education student
|»' ;J'4'?. ;J::: 1.1 ■ al":'.'"':" ■'"'' fy Chrfs' OingwaIi.
,^fi!Ri|||ni! time to close the 2(Jth cert-
Ct§!y>i' Ip^Mlioyhd;; $.6 ■* world:;.; were
;;:;iy||J^hc»J>vas the most influential indi-
Jlgulil; ?f thja|:century. The editors of
; |i^emagaz|h| chose Albert Einstein. A
Jjlrfejsuaii Jpicl .a decent publication* but
(hl|py the collective voice of the human
; S]|irJ|. 4, jut; J: tell:;" that , to. Patrick
:jB^sk|e^ichj and: you're liable to" be
J|a|fe<|'.h|§*h and nasty, or, dare: I say it
:J|^f|;j|js,h9uld knowjjl have suffered
.^|^:::j|is,||s^b's.'biting wit firsthand'
Jh|:f^|j|^|f|ti;rebuttai to my rebuttal of
;j|u|.5jrjej|||||j;|f.^pn;e other, rebuttal in
s|^f§|jfe^(^YY7lY':' . fVflN
7 J ffcm^Jmean and nasty f can htrjbfinf |
[tE^opgpstl title of my Ief£er; .Jr question
IJIJI; jujif* juljuiitfy^ ■.. before
Fii^i^^^^^^l^^'j|i^?j^s- fc ^^^'Ji^S.-^^ .-.* ■■
f^gr^JsWcleni prYhayl*. IS yearsJpf pri- ■.
J^|fe^qt^|J. da^^eaHiing^ under my .
SIM!*MM< yzg^^y ^cjuainted with dead
Jplpplg ^uijimpfessive titles who knew :
J|9i|^|^::m()fe; famous, than, they, or
I hl^eh&lb postage to send a dignified
:JetJer)#!>ur prime minister, or even be
published outside this campus, but,
then again, I'm 18 years old. I offer no
appjogy. for being: "goofy,* or 'mean and
s nasty* or criticising a man who thinks
pne inferior simply because of the',fac- ■
idly one chbse to enter. 7
' To say that the orthodox, view on this
I clmpvis—that Science is the only worth-
JMiile; faults? and that Arts: is a glorified
; Hamburger U—somehow goes against
■ Wtr. Bruskiewich's argument is baffling.
; Indeed^ his argument goes to fanciful
shallow lengths to validate this view.. In
raising Einstein to the level of a messiah
hei^fdihgap-ew age of science and peace
Jand &th?rhpod he' cheapens the man.
J Einstein the scientist is inseparable from
[iiiHolM..^ilistein $&.. roan is iiisepara-;
ble /from; pacifism. Einstein never
believed that science alone could cure
the ills of humanity wheii he himself was
appalled by the uses of his science to
level Japan; to say otherwise is to simplify an exceedingly complex and rare individual (and a man goofy in his own right).
Indeed, a scientist cannot live without art just as an artist cannot live without science. Imagine Sophocles without
the logic and order of the Greeks, Da
Vinci without the humanism of the renaissance, or modern art without the relativism of Einstein (and vice versa). Art
and science throughout history have
worked and conflicted in tandem to
;s r^l^pi|ttei| jiocamon origin; society.
YS|ienc| ii tfcrgbst artistic thing we do
Ssfi^^lwllsil&a I art is the most set
l^tifi© thing we do.
if||lpfink this is the point Mr.
Bruskiewich is trying to make—that art
arid science are two sides to a coin—but
he severely muddles ittyith such bragging and posturing that any authority he
has'is lost;, he forgets the other side of
the coin.. He rests his point not on any
facts, but on a flimsy assumption that
Science students have a manifest right
to idealism over all others. He should
note, however, that of my many friends
in Science, most are not so much interested in using science to 'carry the
brunt of human knowledge' as they are
in trying not to fail Math 104 and
English 112.
Having your head in. the clouds and
hope in your heart is an admirable
thing, something valued in the sciences
arid arts; to be sure, an essential part of
being. human. However, Mr.
Bruskiewich, it's good to come down
every now and then to remember your
own place in the madding crowd, or
else.you risk crossing the fine line
between having your head in the clouds
and having your head up your ass. ♦
-Chris Dingwall is a first-year
Arts student.
fi& FILMSOC
All films $3.00
ill Ihe NORM (SUB Ihcatie)
Film Hotline: 822-3697  OR check out
www.ams.ubc.ca'clubs/SOCIAL/Filmsoc
Fri Mar 23 - Sun Mar 25
7:00 Family Man
9:30 Dude, Where's My Car?
Wed MAR 28 - Thurs MAR 29
7:00 Breathless
9:30 Belle de jour
We have Double Passes to give away for a screening Of:
• Momento" on Wed, March 28th at 7pm @ 5th Ave Cinemas.
Come to SUB245 for details!
Women at
tkFrontier
of'Ej^eCCence
MicKaet Smiti's Legacy
to Cana/ian \Vomtn in
Science andTecfinoCc-gy
Speakers:
G'jbi'k'lle Bcu'Jiirif. Ho-pita! (or Sick fcdft. Tcruutc
Un H<irrii'«vm, Oi-Uiu CiuHxr [rwjtul*
Ca-jMri-ie K.i!ljt! UcMasler Un.vtrsl-y .
Clsraldine Keiwy-WalW. Birti.h Aere-pao"
Julia U-\y, QLT lac
Freda MJ!«r. Mon'jc»l-N'ctrolo«ica1 tdilute
Jwu-t Rossiuit. Samuel Luuorjeld lusdaite
Shirioy Ti'shnmn Princeton lo:.v>-.'r*j'.y
C!a:ieTi.-uijn, Stalibrd Unlwrsn-y
April 7, 2001 at
WVutaxJr 1D0 Lcaun- Tlicjuf
L'nivL-7-ii-y uf Brit-jH (Xvuibo
K.-«^t--r JtiJ uifurmi'i^tv
www.exxcellence.org
- . 1 &y akbrttwa itflSx
CctuSian idviusti. Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
Sports
Friday. March 23.20011
Base-Birds getting noticed
The UBC baseball team.
now in its second season
in the NAIA, is starting to
attract a lot of attention
from players, scouts, and
people with big bundles
of money to throw
around . . .
INCOMING: Left-hander Reid Wildeman sends one homeward during practice at Nat Baitey Stadium, tom peacock photo
by Tom Peacock
Wednesday afternoon, UBC Thunderbirds
baseball coach Terry McKaig and his team
were at Nat Bailey Stadium doing some
heavy-duty cleaning up for this weekend's
homestand against the Northwest Nazarene
University Crusaders from Nampa, Idaho.
At around 6pm, there was still a bunch of
leaves blowing around in the entrance of the
men's washroom, but otherwise everything
looked ship-shape. McKaig said that he's convinced the 6000-capacity stadium is more
than ready to welcome local baseball fans.
As for this weekend's games, McKaig says
he isn't one to make predictions, and baseball
is a funny game, but he's pretty sure the Birds
will do well.
"We have a huge home advantage,' McKaig
asserts during a brief interview in his office
deep beneath the stands at Nat Bailey. "For a
lot of the visiting players it will be the first
time that they've ever been to Canada. And
with the large stadium, it's a completely different environment than they're used to. It
should put them back on their heels a bit'
And as for the UBC players:
'Everyone knows pitching wins baseball
games,' McKaig says. 'And we have 11 pitchers on the team. We're really deep off the
bench. Last weekend [at Lewis and Clark State
University in Idaho] we played four games,
and we used ten pitchers.'
Among the 11 pitchers on the team is 21-
year-old phenom Jeff Francis from North
Delta. Francis is 4-2 so far this season, with an
earned run average (ERA) of 1.95, The lefthander has struck out 48 batters, while walking just eight, in 3 7 innings pitched. McKaig
says he'll play Francis in the Erst game, and
leave it up to the Nazarene coach to make the
difficult decision about how to deal with him.
"They have to decide—do they burn out
their best pitcher during the first game, or do
they save him? It's a nice feeling to have such
a dominant guy. It takes the pressure off our
guys,' the coach explains.
In June 2002, Francis will enter the major
league draft, and McKaig expects him to go
very high. If he does, it will be great news for
the program at UBC. But how does McKaig
hold onto a guy like Francis in the first place,
a guy who had his pick of at least four NCAA
Division I schools?
"I sold him on three things: staying at
home, the academics at UBC, and the fact that
he'll get exposure here, more than he would
playing at Division I schools in the States
where he wouldn't throw much during his
firstyear,' McKaig said.
It doesn't hurt McKaig's recruitment
efforts that UBC is the only collegiate team in
Canada that plays in a US national organisation. In baseball, the coach says, playing in the
States is the only way for a Canadian team to
get any credibility.
Another thing that's working in McKaig's
favour is the symbiotic relationship between
his team's talent and his fundraising efforts.
While the Thunderbirds program is starting to
attract more better players, it is also starting to
attract lucrative support from local corporations, alumni and UBC athletics. Being able to
promise the players scholarship money is a
key element of McKaig's recruiting strategy.
McKaig has been involved in the UBC baseball program since its inception four years
ago. Ever since taking over the coaching job in
the winter of '97, he has worked non-stop at
fundraising and recruiting in order to turn the
team into a top-level competitor.
During the spring '97 season, when Jim
Murphy was the coach, the UBC team was little more than a school club. The Birds played
about four or five exhibition games, and the
level of play was hardly exceptional.
Then McKaig graduated from UBC Human
Kinetics, got the head coaching job, and immediately focused on strengthening the program
and getting the team playing a real schedule.
In the spring of '98, the team played 20 games
against junior college teams in the Northwest
Soon a windfall came McKaig's way in the
form of Texas Ranger and BC native Jeff
Zimmerman! Zimmerman, a former teammate
of McKaig's on the Canadian national team,
offered to help support the team financially.
Before embarking on his pro career,
Zimmerman earned his MBA from SFU. He
has been calling Vancouver his off-season
home since '95. Though
his motives for helping
the team were certainly
not entirely selfish, he
knew that working with
a   strong   UBC   team
would help him keep in
shape during the off-season.
'Jeff i$ a real role
model for the guys on
the team,' McKaig says.
"Here's a guy who got
his Master's—who took
care of his academic
goals—before pursuing
his goals of a pro
career.'
Zimmerman might
soon sign a contract with
the Rangers for $1.5
million a season, in
which case things will
only improve for the
Birds. 'If he gets that, we're going to be in a
good position. We talked about it, and he
wants to make sure we're looked after,'
McKaig says with a smile.
When McKaig took over as coach, the UBC
baseball program was almost entirely self-
funded-McKaig knew he couldn't just rely on
the money he was getting from Zimmerman.
Going on the enthusiastic support he'd
received from his former teammate, the coach
wrote a letter to Maple Ridge native Larry
Walker, Canada's most famous baseball pro.
Walker, who plays with the Colorado Rockies,
was also keen to help get the program on its
feet, even though he'd never met McKaig
before.
With the financial help of the two pros,
McKaig was soon able to bring together a competitive team, and last year the Thunderbirds
joined the NAIA league. UBC baseball began
attracting the attention of top-level players
from across Canada.
"Now, I'm getting all kinds of calls, especially from Ontario," McKaig says. "Next year,
I predict less than half the guys on the team
will be from BC."
This year, the Birds have five players from
Ontario—traditionally the strongest province
in Canada for baseball—and one hot-shot
pitcher from New Brunswick by the name of
Jeff Brewer.
Brewer, number two behind Francis on the
Bird's pitching rotation, was ready to wind
down his baseball career and enroll at UNB,
until he got a call from McKaig asking him to
play for the Thunderbirds. The 20-year-old
right hander is now eligible, along with UBC
catcher Chad Tuck and centre-fielder Darren
Watts, for this year's major league draft
'Since coming here, I've developed the
dream of getting drafted, which I never had
before,' Brewer said during an interview with
the Vancouver Sun. "There's a chance it might
not happen, but if I didn't come out and take
this opportunity I never would have had the
chance.'
McKaig says the attention the players on
the team have received from major league
scouts is no big surprise to him, since the program is fast becoming a focal point for the top
talent in the countiy.
"There's a lot of scouts in the Northwest
and in Canada. They love our program. From
a scout's point of view, you can come here and
see five or six players who are professional
prospects,' he explains.
Although last season was mediocre for the
Birds—they finished with a 22-29 record—
this year things are looking good. The Birds
are 13-11 heading into their first conference
games, and last weekend they managed
to get one win in four games against the
defending national champion Lewis-Clark
University Warriors.
Brewer, who has a 6.00 ERA in his five
exhibition and tournament starts this year,
will start Saturday for the Birds, while Francis
is scheduled to start for the Bird's first home
game at 4pm Friday.
Nat Bailey Stadium, on 29th Ave. between
Cambie and Main, might not fill up for this
weekend's games—for one thing, it's a long
haul from campus. Still, McKaig is expecting a
good turn-out, since, as he says, "It's a lot of
fun to see Canadian teams beat American
schools.' And at their own game too. ♦
SLUG, SLUG, SLUG: Thunderbird heavy hitters warm up for this weekend's homestand at Nat Bailey
Stadium. Games start at 4pm and 7pm Friday, and 12pm and 3pm Saturday, tom peacock photo Friday. March 23.2001
Culture
Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
Dance of the Millennium: Gold, Maple & Dreams
first Chinese Canadian dance
creation with contemporary dance
and five music accompaniment
portraying the Past, Present and
Future trials and trfcutations of the
Chinese corn-unity in Canada
■ji v' y Anabei Ho, Werv
lCSj^AlipojOd by Jin Zhang,
flpjitdPui-MingLee
Va-33
z*m
(20%
seniors &
AtCCCBox
658-8850/658-887
■iii'ii,t   if '•  ■ \?   vB9
^B^± Pratotaiby ClmocCultunlCcolre ^"iVi.    Utt '• !P    Q8S9    C " CIS        S~
* ▼▼▼▼ ufGrcaai Vancouver «■•«». -   -    __-^ca     ^    —^r-3-   _w        w
TAKE THE CREDIT
If you have a university degree in ANY field you may
be able to obtain a BCIT Diploma in one year.
BCIT's direct entry and post diploma business
programs can fast-track you into a career in:
•S Business Administration
S Finance/Financial Planning
•S Human Resource Management
•/ International Trade and Transportation
S Operations Management
S Professional Accounting
APPLY NOW FOR FALL 2001
For More Info on
Accounting/Finance:
Allan Cobbett
Associate Dean
Financial Management
(604)432-8898
acobbett@bcit.ca
For More Info on
Other Programs:
Chris Clark
Associate Dean
Business and Operations
(604)451-6714
cclark@bcit.ca
www.bcit.ca
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
at UBC
\
T
BPGGA
OPERA ,
JOHISTGAY J
<*l
S**,
j>    \
A
n photo Meghan Gardiiw
..f'
MAR 2
, MON-SAT 7:30PM j
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
lTrCKETS:REG$l6
, FREDERIC WOOD
822-2
Plot-driven murder
THE CRIMSON RIVERS
now playing
' With Hannibal still making a killing at the box office,
there is no denying that serial killers, who simultaneously manage to repulse and fascinate us, draw moviegoers. But for every Silence of the Lambs and In Cold
Blood, we are faced with pretenders to the throne like
The Bone Collector and The Watcher, which are poorly
written, badly acted, and lack panache.
Unlike Baise Moi, the other French 'serial killer' film
currently playing (and gaining notoriety for its Natural
Born Killers-style killing and hardcore sex scenes), The
Crimson River is actually plot-driven. The script—with its
clearly European flair—is well written, the alpine
scenery is breathtaking, and the characters are well
developed. The small town of Guernon, in the French
Alps, is home to one of the smallest and most exclusive
universities in the world, one where students and faculty are from the village and the local environs. When the
university librarian's mutilated body is discovered
trussed up like a suckling pig, Paris dispatches
Commissioner Pierre Niemans (Jean Reno) to solve the
bij Qreg Ursic
crime. Soon after his arrival, more bodies are discovered
and Niemans crosses paths with Max Kerkerian (Vincent
Cassel), a lieutenant from a nearby town who is investigating the desecration of a young girl's grave by neo-
Nazis. The duo is soon drawn into the depths of
Guernon's dark past and dirty secrets.
Reno brings the same gritty no-nonsense manner that
he displayed in Le Professional to Commissioner
Niemans, who is as much of an enigma as the mystery he
is solving—we only know of his reputation in law enforcement circles as a supersleuth, and that he appears to be
unbalanced. His partner, Kerkerian, doesn't bring any
more stability to the pairing. Kerkerian openly flouts
'minor laws" in pursuit of criminals and possesses a dry
wit similar to Harry Callahan (aka Dirty Harry) with an
explosive rage that culminates in a well-choreographed
fight scene. The characters gel well and complement one
another, ever if they choose not to admit it
In spite of the tight script and good acting, the film
ultimately comes down with a case of Hollywood it is—
the ending is contrived and does not make a whole lot
of sense within the context of the rest of the film. Pity.
Still, a good Tuesday nighter, though. ♦
PUNK AS POPPA: Aging Canadian punk rockers NoMeansNo took to the stage Wednesday
night at the Commodore looking like a bunch of your friends' dads. But they sure didn't
sound like anyone's parents! as they laid into tracks from their new album, No Means No One.
Midway through the show,, fans were getting rowdy and were stage diving when one fan
knocked over frontman ftob Wright's microphone stand. The burty Wright (pictured above)
was having none of it, and tossed the poor sod into the crowd. "Don't fuck with me," he
warned the crowd, as the poor fan's friends showered the singer with beer swiff. Apparently,
back in 1996, when NoMeansNo played the Commodore with Pigment Vehicle, the same
thing happened and Wright freaked. Anyway, the show went on and the mosh-pit got crazier
and I left early because \ am old. But when NoMeansNo was formed I was only five. Think
about that for a minute, tom peacock photo Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
Culture
Friday. March 23.20Q11
Refusing the myths of femininity
BY MICHELLE BASTIAN
UNRULY BODIES
at the Dynamo Gallery
until Mar. 31
When I was young, I read a fairy-tale about a little orphan girl
who loved red shoes. This girl loved them so much that when she
was given a pair, she wore them every day. She even used to
wear them to church. But as we all should know, red is an evil
colour and so the little girl had done something very naughty. An
old beggar saw what she had done and he cursed the shoes. They
started to make the little girl dance and dance. She couldn't take
them off and she danced day and night Her feet bled and blistered and she became so exhausted that finally she begged a
woodcutter to cut her feet off. When he did, they went dancing off
into the woods. But every time she went to church, the red shoes
would dance in front of the doorway. Only when she had truly
repented did the shoes cease to haunt her.
Needless to say, I found this story horrifying. I even used to
have nightmares about it. Having been brought up in the good
old-fashioned Catholic way, I was very susceptible to morality
tales. However, if merely liking the colour red gotyou in so much
trouble, what hope did I have? So after reading this tale, I promised I wouldn't be bad like that-I wouldn't be vain, or disobedient, or want to dance or ask for red shoes or, or, anything!
Unfortunately, at that age, I didn't have the critical ability to
realise that these morals were bullshit. Nor did I realise that this
story was written in a time when there was an extraordinary fear
of women and their bodies. We were thought to be connected to
the untamed natural world. We were therefore unruly and dangerous and required constant vigilance.
Ilze Bebris' installation explores the issues central to this
fairy tale—using text, images, drawings, and 30 ceramic red
shoes. At first sight the installation seems unassuming.
However, this impression belies the remarkable effect that it has
on the viewer. The different perspectives, or 'voices', that the
work presents are all very appropriate, from the onerous commands to be virtuous, to the frightened pleas for forgiveness,
and the defiant voice that will not be controlled. Bebris gives
space to all of them, but most importantly, previously silenced
voices are given the opportunity to speak out In this way, the
issues of obedience, control, and socialisation are explored,
along with the possibilities for freedom from them.
When viewing this installation, I was amazed that I still felt
the shock, guilt and fear that I had when I first read the tale. I
was saddened by the poor little girl who was punished so
harshly, and I wondered how many other women had read
this story at bed time and taken its message too much to heart.
For even though I have rejected many other myths of femininity, I have found that stories can have a lingering effect.
However, this installation, with its critical look at 'goodness,'
has helped me to be more aware of society's commands to be
a 'good girl,' and it has also inspired me to reclaim my right
to wear red shoes. ♦
Salvation for Soacjal
&
EXIT WOUNDS
now playing
The martial arts genre is typified by bad acting, (anything with Chuck Norris), and nonexistent plots {Black Mask), but recently popup characters have made Crouching Tiger,
Hidden Dragon and Rush Hour anomalies.
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon boasted an
itt-deptrt story line, strong characters
(women no less), stunning cinematography,
and amazing fight sequences, while Rush
Hour was intentionally comedic and turned
out to be a blockbuster. Could this trend lead
to respect from the studios and the film-
going public? Well, let's not get carried away.
Orin Boyd is part Dirty Harry, part
Serpico—a rogue cop with a bad attitude, taking bis oath to serve and protect, but thinking nothing of bending the rules, and particularly despising dirty cops. After one too
many "gut reactions," Orin gets reassigned
to the worst precinct in the city and soon discovers that a major drug dealer is working
with several of the city's finest The question
becomes "who are the real crooks?"
Steven Seagal is acknowledged as an
Aikido expert. He also happens to be arrogant, temperamental, a bad actor, and
known for taking himself far too seriously.
bygreguksk:
While his earlier films were not what anyone would consider "cinematic watersheds/ they did have excellent action
sequences. His most recent works have
been forgettable at best. Maybe that
explains the 'new' Seagal.
Exit Wounds has a bonafide plot, several
of the characters think before they strike, the
fight sequences are stylishly choreographed,
the pulse-quickening action sequences are
tightly edited, and there is an overall unique
sense of humour. Seagal has even learned to
poke fun at himself, and his character's bad
attitude is the focus of a running gag, DMX,
meanwhile, is more than adequate as an
actor, but I wouldn't suggest he abandon his
music career anytime soon. Both actors,
however, are overshadowed by the duo of
Tom Arnold and Anthony Anderson who provide constant comic relief throughout the
film, especially during the credits—do not
leave until the screen goes black and the
credits run, trust me on this one.
While there are several particularly
ridiculous moments—Seagal's pistol transforming into a machine gun comes to mind,
and enough beefcake to supply Black Angus
for a month—action movie fans will be able
to overlook them, and get a good dose of
humour in the process. ♦
flTld^l 1   Contest Winners:
WINNERS   Andrea McPherson
Please com to SUB Room 245 during      (hriStillQ Wrifjflt
business hows to collect your prizes. **
Please have your student ID ready.       StUQTt RotnQlSSS6r
WHEUBYSSEY
Contest Winners:
John Sheehy, Aaron Hyndes,
Alfred Dong, Julie Phillips,
DIDO
WINNERS
please com to sub Rom us durhg   Madonagh Clarke, Wendy Harvey,
business hours to coikd your prizes.   Amanda Kosonen, James Tansey,
Please have your student ID ready.     _       ....      _ .    ..    .. ..
Terry Holden, Bnce MacNeil
«THE UBYSSEY
STORAGE
FREE MOVE TO STORAGE
FREE boxes
RESERVE NOW
ANNACIS LOCK-UP
5 2 7-03 88
^^WiW)^1
Y.W- KS LEY;. ■■ W,_Q.. R K M, AN
JSTHEUBYSSEY
^pss*?^* $<P*
p^<J>'
Come to SI Ii Room 245 with
the answer to.the question
below, and you may Hit lof 5
copies of HAWKSLEY
WOHKtLWWCD!
Question: How old is the Lbyssey?
"(lost night we were) the Delicious Ulolvei - the latest album from HftUIKSlCV IVOftKMAN, the 84-yeor old Vow<levilliofl
linger, songwriter, poet, with the panache of Avfui Woinwright, the vocal talent of Jeff Buckley, the songwriting skills of
a musical Oscar Wild ond a charisma that is entirely his own." Website: www.howkslevwArhmon.com
COUPON
iriTiiiMiriTTiTiTiiiiiiiiiiir Ha
$2
i
Off
any haircut
|     Ext*w 4/M/tl •UlDBBSfeDiSClBBtt
II
II
II
II
II
cIhi(SMastcrs
formerly Toppy's
COUPON
$5 on
perm or color
Ixilres V3H/J1 • He Doable Disowns
c//a/'c?Wasfc/s
formerly Toppy's
COUPON
I I
I I
I I
II
I I
II
20
0/
,/0nff
on
any product
Eulres 4/30/tt • Hi Ooihft) msceaMs
cHait5\1astcr$
formerly Toppy's
LOCATIONS: 2389 W.4UI Ave, 482-3274
3701W. Broadway, 222-3331
Concord Pacific Place, 646-4648
cHait£Master&
(formerfy-Toppy's) [Friday. March 23.2001
Feature
Page Friday-trie Ubyssey Magazine
Friday. March 23.20011
CHAIRMAN
by Michelle
Mossop
Toronto designer Bruce Mau
thinks that^^^f\^mfm ^
sign
Designer Bruce Mau bears an uncanny
resemblance to Chairman Mao. Besides
the pronunciation common to their names,
both men are large, have short dark hair and wear
mandarin-collared jackets.
But while the former Chinese leader certainly
has fewer followers than he once did, Toronto's
Mau is widely considered the guru of design. His
recent visit to Vancouver, part of a tour to promote his new book, Life Style, drew over 500 people to a Downtown Eastside warehouse on a rajny
Thursday night.
At 626 pages, the book, published in the fall,
chronicles Mau's creative projects over the last
decade. His studio, Bruce Mau Designs, boasts an
impressive roster of clients, including the Andy
Warhol Museum, the Art Gallery of Ontario,
Hortensia Volchers in Vienna, Roots and, notably,
Zone Books in New York, with which Mau has
been affiliated for the past 16 years.
The book has been widely acclaimed and has
sold out in bookstores across North America and
Europe, despite its hefty price tag of $98. But
when Mau stood in front of a room full of
Vancouver's top designers, architects and artists,
he was very unassuming indeed.      -       .«■--.   -
He cracked a joke about the book. "We had
some book cloth left over. So I decided to make
myself a book jacket"
According to Mau, Life Style is not about
lifestyle—it's about the choices people make in
their lives. "For me, the book is really about this
intersection of life and the stylistic choices we
make." Mau includes in his book his famous 43-
point manifesto, which provides his advice for
creative growth, and from which many designers
have taken their guiding principles.
Principles such as
18. Stay up late.. Strange
things happen when you've
gone too far, been up too
long, worked too hard and
you're separated from the
rest of the world.
"*    37. Break it,
stretch    it,
bend it, crush it,
crack it, fold it.
Born in Sudbury, Ontario, Mau studied science
in high school, but wanted to experiment with art
as well. His guidance counsellor told him that it
was too late to switch careers. But Mau decided to
spend a year in an art program for students with
no previous experience, and then immersed him-
* self in various aspects of art—drawing, ceramics,
photography and prints.
Mau then enrolled at the Ontario College of Art
in Toronto. But he found the courses too elementary, and soon dropped out He went to work at
Fifty Fingers—a design studio in Toronto. A year
later, he moved to London, where he worked at
Pentagram Design, an internationally-renowned
design firm, but one in which he felt constrained
by bureaucracy.
By 1983,hewasbackinTorontotohelpstarta
; studio called Public Good. Here he was able to create a creative office environment that allowed
each designer to be more independent. The studio
created ad campaigns and informational materials for unions, government agencies and cultural
institutions.
In 1985, Mau was asked to design a series of
titles for Zone Books, and Bruce Mau Designs was
born. The first book, Zone 1/2, was a collaboration
between the studio, cultural theorists, philosophers, writers and photographers, and was
intended as a discussion of
urbanism in contemporary
society. The book was Mau's
claim to fame—its radical
design was the starting point
for a new design philosophy
that linked content to presentation. Zone 1/2 is not an illustration of urban contexts so much
as it is is model of urban space.
McDonald's, Bruce Mau had a moment of clarity.
"I realised that the split between the tractor
and the trailer was, in fact, a model of our culture.
And in particular, of design culture," Mau said.
Mau believed that the separation of delivery
and content made the driver unaware of what he
was delivering.
"Any political or ethical implication that might
derive from its contents were in no way attached
to him," Mau said. "He was a driver, driving the
tractor. The. trailor and its substance was the
responsibility of someone else." And Mau could
not imagine a clearer definition of conventional
design.
Over the past 16 years, Mau and his studio
have tackled a number of complex, cross-disciplinary creative projects, one of which was an interpretation of the Chris Marker film Lajetie. The
film is a 28-minute long science-fiction work
made up almost exclusively of stills. "When I was
asked to take the project I thought 'this is going to
be the easiest job of my life," Mau recalled.
But what Mau found was a difference in
rhythm and dramatic structure between film and
the page. The entire studio watched the film over
200 times until they got the timing right.
"In the space of a book you actually have to produce dramatic effect using the time of the book
which is a very different temporal construct than
the time of cinema, which is always working in
one direction," he explained.
Mau's studio also finished an exhibition last
summer in Vienna called Stress, an installation
that explores how stress is used for economic and
cultural production.
"We would establish a boundary," he
explained. "Push toward that boundary as
hard as we could, collapse the boundary,
reestablish equilibrium at this new condition
and then from there establish a new boundary"
metropolitan life."
"From the outset, we declared it impossible to
be able to see the future of this for the kind of
accuracy that the competition was calling for,"
Mau explained. 'So we created a formula that
would produce that kind of envelope of identity,
but would also' allow for any number of possible
parts to evolve within that envelope with response
to changing conditions/
Mau stressed the uniqueness of the park—the
site is an ecological disaster. After doing some soil
testing, the team discovered that the land was one
gram per cubic centimetre a\yay from concrete.
"You could basically fire a gun to the ground and
the bullet would bounce," Mau joked.
As a result, the park must be turned into a natural site, an ambitious task that Mau describes as
exhilarating.
But Mau has his critics, too. In last week's
National Post, media critic Robert Fulfold asked
"Why does everyone think so highly of Toronto
designer Bruce Mau's recent forays into philosophy and social criticism? It's not that the emperor
has no clothes, he has no right to the throne."
Fulford skewered Mau for failing to put forward any truly new ideas. Fulford complained that
Life Style was merely "an elaborate exercise in
self-congratulation, a designer's promotion
piece." He also condemned what he deemed the
brain-numbing banality of such Mau catchphrases
as 'Go Deep' and "You have be willing to grow."
Fulford pointed out that Mau's manifesto paraphrases Sigmund Freud.
For example:
taking information and breaking it down into creative forms.
M
"Wi
L
ate one night in London,
while watching a truck
deliver   its   load   to   a
'e didn't expect to win;" Mau
laughs. "But now we gotta figure
out how to build a park."
Mau's studio recently won an international competition to develop Tree City, Canada's
first urban national park. The site is a 320-
acre, decommissioned military base north of
Highway 401 in Toronto. Mau's team submitted a
six-point formula of concise phrases about how
the team would attempt to create a "low density of
19.  Work  the   metaphor..
Every object has the capacity
to stand for something other
than what is apparent. Work
on what it stands for.
Mau acknowledges that he is not a philosopher. "I am merely reporting," he said, claiming
that he is merely doing his job as a designer by
au believes that technology allows people
to define design as a horizontal practice
in a world of random, vertical slices.
"We evolved from a model of resource extraction to an investment model," he said, noting
that efficiency should be replaced by depth,
speed by growth and professional classification
by integration.
"I'm not sure that this new way of working
means the end of design, or whether it means that
designers have become authors, or authors
become designers, or all of the above," he said.
Mau is convinced that this approach is capable
of producing results not otherwise possible—
though there are obstacles.
'One of the dilemmas of the coming era is that
there is no erasing anymore. We've lost the ability to subtract, we can only add," he said.
As the digital replaces the analog, there is no
impetus to lose things, he said. In the past, it was
cumbersome to store information; now the capacity to record and store material electronically is
basically unlimited. "We are orJyjiqv^e&tering the
era of real acceleration in the movement to capture information."
But Mau warned that sheer quantity is overpowering. He said that in order to remain in control, designers and artists, cinematographers and
architects—the authors who shape culture—must
become critical players.
"As the mass of volume of information
increases, people search for a
clear signal," Mau explained.
"More powerful than ever, the role
of the navigator—one who gives
pattern, shape and direction to the
noise—becomes indispensable."
This  is,  for  Mau,  what the
designer should strive for.
"We're suggesting the designer
as a difficult, frictional figure, one
who cannot afford to be stable or
to acknowledge boundaries as
impassible," Mau said. "To try to
turn our work into a constant
process of growth—a living thing
that responds to its environment
"And as the environment itself evolves, [it]
propagates new opportunities." ♦
(Mau
-isms:
9. Begin anywhere. John C
Selections from
Bruce Mau's
Incomplete
Manifesto for Gfowth
ige tells us that n ot knowing where
to begin is a common form :>f paralysis. His j dvice: begp anywhere.
f!
16. Collaborate. The space
filled with conflict, friction, Strife, exhilaratior
creative potential.
Detween people working together is
, delight ahd vast
22. Make your own tools. I ybridise your too s in order
unique things. Even simpler tools that are your own cz
entirely new avenues of exploration. Rememper, tools
our capacities, so even a small tool can make
25. Don't clean your desk
morning that you can't see
34. Make mistake faster..
. You might find
onight.
This isn't my idee
think it belongs to Andy Grove.
r
40. Avoid Fields. Jump Fences. Disciplinary bound
regulatory and regulatory r
wilding of creative life. They
order what are manifold, co n
job is to jump fences and cross the fields.
o build
n yield
amplify
a big difference.
something in the
—I borrowed it. I
ies are
:gimes are attempts to control the
are often unders andable ei forts to
plex, evolutiona y processes. Our 8
Friday. March 23.2001
Culture
Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
Dancers Storm the Norm
Tow Peacock
Soul Expressions
at the Norm Theatre
Feb. 20
Dance Dance Revolution! Now that that's out of the
way, I can get on with this article, a very serious, Jiigh-
ly-informed critical rundown of the UBC Dance
Horizons show at the Norm Theatre Tuesday night
The show, called Soul Expressions, was billed as an
eclectic repertoire of dance. Jazz, tap, modern, hip-hop,
and ballet were all showcased during the two-hour
show. At the end, there was even an impromptu break-
dancing contest with guys doing backflips, windmills,
headspins, and various other bodily contortions all up
in each other's faces.
The show got off to a shaky start as the first group of
hip-hop dancers found their legs and dealt with performance jitters. Stacey Grubb followed the hip-hop
group with a solo traditional dance from somewhere
with the Roma, and the show was just jiggy from there
on in.
Of course, Dance Horizons is a student dance club,
not a professional organisation. A large chunk of the
members are pretty new to dancing, so there was going
to be some glitches, some ill-timed steps. Having said
that, the quality of the dancing and the choreography
was surprisingly high. It's obvious the club doesn't
skimp when it comes to finding teachers.
One of the more interesting aspects of the show was
w
the fact that a lot of the dancers appeared in more than
one different style of dance, sometimes consecutively.
It was fun to look for the different dancers as you followed along on the program. Gita Harris, for one, did a
little hip-hop number with her friend Sheila Lee,
dressed in the necessary baggy cargoes and wind-
breakers. Harris then returned to the stage minutes
later costumed as a ballerina. After the ballet dance,
she once again took the stage in street wear for another hip-hop number. It was hilarious to watch her hop
around, trying to get into the right headspace before
the music started.
The solo dances added necessary pause and pace to
having my senses bombarded by a stream of figures
taking the stage. Trina Isackson, Krista Savage, Rona
'showing the love with one sparkling glove" Kertesz,
Sheana Lehigh, Elissa Clifford, Stacey Grubb, and Sarah
Kennedy all added their own unique flavour to the program.
But the highlight of the show for my highly-trained
eye were the ballet pieces, "Moments' and "Beyond the
Bliss.' It's probably because (okay, I'll admit it) I haven't
seen that much ballet but these two pieces were the
most beautiful to watch. All in all, a good show, a fun
time, and that's about all I have to say about thatl ♦
TOM PEACOCK PHOTO
French Baroque and First Nations dance show
UBC First Nations Longhouse
Mar. 17
Anyone looking for a little cultural contrast should have
checked out last Saturday's French baroque and First Nations
dance show at UBC's First Nations Longhouse. Yup, you read
that right French baroque music and dance (powdered wigs,
short pants, knee-high stockings, leaping, prancing, arid vigorous orchestral music) interspersed with First Nations music
and dance (stories of animal spirits, powerful drumming,
chanting, and scary masks). A perfectly Canadian idea
As Tom Durrie, president of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra,
commented, there are similarities between these traditions
that made for smooth transitions between pieces. Both dance
styles are based on storytelling and mythology, create an elegant and simple tone, and reveal a fascination with the natural
world. Still, it took a while to get over the performance's inherent bizarreness. And I'm not entirely sure that I got over it
The music and dance itself, however, was top-quality. The
17 members of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra, led by its artis
tic director and acclaimed violinist. Marc DestrubeY played
pieces byJean-Baptiste Lully, Martin Marais, and Jean-Philippe
Rameau with a breathtaking mix of passion and sensitivity.
Destrube, in particular, brought extraordinary energy and
imagination to the performance. The baroque dancers,
Thomas Baird and Paige Whitley-Bauguess, aptly demonstrated
the tradition's lively, mannered style with a piece they
arranged themselves, "Une Fete Marine,' and a selection from
Rameau's "Les Indes Galantes.' Both are highly accomplished
dancers who tour internationally.
"Une Fete Marine' tells the story of a tragic love triangle-
one lover, however, is an evil Cyclops. "Les Indes Galantes" is
also a love triangle, but presents the feather-wearing
'sauvages' as a people superior to the French and Spanish
colonisers in the ways of love and peaceful living. The baroque
era was definitely intrigued by the myth of the noble savage,
which was a bit strange to witness in the Longhouse. Still, the
SCARY SASQUATCH: First Nations singers and members of the orchestra look on as a Smililh (a female sasquatch) entertains the audience
during the French Baroque and First Nations dance show, anna king photo
program's intent was simply to present two different traditions
from approximately the same historical period, without passing judgment, and in this it was successful.
The Squamish First Nations S'pak'wus Slulum (Eagle Song
Dancers) also kept the audience riveted with vibrant singing,
traditional clothing, and masks—engaging stories and an sense
of humour. 'Kakul'Uta' (Wild Women of the Forest) tells the
story of a 'Smililh" or sasquatch who paddles across the
Georgia Strait and cannot return to her village. Other dances
included tributes to the Eagle and Mountain Lion, an opening
prayer song, and the final piece of the performance,
'Celebration of Life." Bob Baker, leader of S'pak'wus Slulum,
prefaced each dance with some gentle and/or hilarious statement Before one dance he made the audience repeat a
Squamish-sounding word a number of times then said, "Man,
you guys'll say anything.' The S'pak'wus Slulum are also
accomplished performers; many of them work as part of
Hiwus, a nationally acclaimed
First Nations dance and culture
performance that takes place
atop Grouse Mountain.
Both elements of the program were excellent, but I still
can't avoid the obvious question: Did it work? I'll give you
the obvious answer: sort of.
Both the Native and baroque
musicians looked and sounded
at home in the expansive cedar
Longhouse, and while the
baroque dancers looked a bit
out of place, it wasn't too jarring because they used the
majesty of the room to their
advantage. And since Destrube,
who conceived of and directed
the project, didn't attempt anything silly like trying put the
dancers on stage together, the
performance felt like a simple
presentation of differing art.
Still, after the show ended, I
was left wondering what to
make of it all. Maybe it was the
discovery (hardly a true discovery, it's just that I'd never
thought of it before) that I am
way more familiar and comfortable with coastal First
Nations traditions than goofy
French baroque ones. And this
is from a white girl who actually
liked French immersion. ♦ Page Friday-trie Ubyssey Magazine
Culture
Friday. March 23.2001 |Q
(Dis) unity
BY ALICIA MILLER
UNITY (1918)
at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
until Mar. 24th
The promotions material for the first-ever
production of Unity (1918) depicts a staid,
pensive World War I soldier above the
image of "a railway snaking around a
Saskatchewan wheat pooL This juxtaposition of images, combined with the title of
the play, seems to foreshadow a production about life in a small Canadian prairie
town during World War I. The program,
however, refers to the play's topic as a
'forgotten chapter of Canadian history.'
Forget the first World War? How could we?
But it is not the war itself that playwright Kevin Kerr proposes has been left
out of our cultural memory. It's the
Spanish Flu epidemic. If, like me, yoii
indeed know nothing of this epidemic,
then your next question is: "What's that?*
The Spanish Flu epidemic was the most
deadly infectious virus outbreak in history. From September to November of
1918, this deadly and unusual strain of
influenza spread throughout the world,
aided by the return of soldiers
after the end of the war. It overcame mainly young, strong
adults and resulted in an estimated 20 to 80 million deaths
worldwide. In Canada, more
people died during four weeks
of the epidemic than during
four years of World War I.
Kerr uses Unity (1918) to
explore the Spanish Flu epidemic and its impact on Canada during and after the final days of
the war. The play begins in
Unity, Saskatchewan—a small
prairie town with not much
more than a railway platform to
mark its existence—oh October
15, 1918. This date marks just
less than a month until the end
of the war, as well as the 21st
birthday of Beatrice, the narra
tor of the play.
Beatrice, a slightly awkward young
woman with an insightful eye and a helpful heart, is played by Michelle Porter to
intense, wide-eyed excess. Too innocent,
too cutesy and too over-the-top, the character deserves a bit more grounding than
is allotted in Porter's portrayal.
Nevertheless, Beatrice's bursts of narrative, which she reads or recites from her
personal journal, provide the backbone
of the play. In addition to introducing
Beatrice, the first scene of the play also
introduces Beatrice's best friend Maiy,
who is engaged to a soldier overseas, and
Beatrice's younger sister Sissy, who is
interested only in boys and the imminent
end of the world.
Rounding out the cast of characters
are Sunna Thorson, the town's 15-year-
old female undertaker, and Stan, a poor
local farmer whose wife dies in childbirth. The nosy telegraph and telephone
operators, who enter and exit the action
by way of an innovative switchboard
office/trolley, and Michael, a life-loving
young man not yet old enough to fight in
the war, are also introduced. The next few
scenes reveal the contrasting personalities of the two sisters: while Beatrice
yearns for a boy named Glen, now a soldier overseas with no inkling of her
desire for him, her sister Sissy capably
and eagerly seduces the young Michael.
After the two busybody operators
learn that a soldier is on a train bound
for Unity, word spreads quickly through
town. Beatrice, excited at the prospect
that it might be Glen, Mary, excited at the
prospect that it might be her fiance, and
Sissy, excited at the prospect that it might
be male and breathing, all hasten to the
railway station to greet the soldier. But
only Sissy's hope comes true. It is Hart, a
soldier blinded during the war. After
passing through Halifax, where everyone
is dying or dead from the flu—including
his own mother—he has continued onto
Unity in hope of finding his father.
After Harf s arrival, news of the flu
and its continued progress towards Unity
infiltrates the town, causing widespread
hysteria and fear. Although no one in the
town has been infected by the virus, the
people of Unity nevertheless don masks
and close themselves off to visitors. But
despite their efforts, the flu arrives all the
same, and one by one, the townspeople
are afflicted.
The remainder of the play deals with
the impact that the flu has on its victims.
Thankfully, the play's moribund subject
matter is offset by many moments of
hilarity. While the jokes provide an
appreciated levity to the situation, they
also serve to add to a growing feeling of
discomfiture and unease.
The play's second act fails to live up to
expectation. The characters and ideas of
the first half establish a solid foundation
for some interesting plot developments,
but little resolution to the issues is provided. A scene during the second act
which features two new characters—both
old-time prairie farmers—chatting about
local events, seems frivolous and unnecessary. When Glen, Beatrice's crush,
returns from the war, we learn that he
has gotten married, but then that plotline
also falls by the wayside. A series of
ridiculous lines, such as when Hart imitates Sunna's voice and responds to
her questions in a conversation with
himself, pervade the script, as do
over-dramatic ensemble processions, songs and recitations, which
do little to enhance the plot or
enforce the themes.
According to the play's program,-
Unity (1918) "looks at life through
the lens of death." Although this is
true and as such is not, in itself,
problematic, the play also attempts
to look at life through many other
lenses—including those of Canadian
identity, immigration, heroism, war,
love, media distortion, the railway,
the apocalypse, poverty, family,
women's sexuality and, of course,
unity. While Kerr admirably tackled
a number of large themes and topics, in the end the plot of Unity
(1918) is nothing if not disunified. ♦
Want to know more about
government services for you?
• Looking for a new job
• Starting your own business
• Getting access to the Internet
• Taking parental leave
• Planning your retirement
• Making your home
energy efficient
Learn more about the hundreds of services available. Call us and
talk to an agent in person. Visit our Web site. Or drop by the
Service Canada Access Centre nearest you.
1800 O-Canada
(1800 622-6232)
TTY/TDD 1800 465-7735      www.canada.gc.ca
Canada Friday. March 23. 2001
1Q
THE UBYSSEY
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2001
VOLUME 82 ISSUE 44
Op/Ed
Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
EDITORIAL BOARD
COORDINATING EDITOR
Daliah Merzaban
NEWS EDITORS
Alex Dimson
Sarah Morrison
CULTURE EDITOR
Michelle Mossop
SPpRTS EDITOR
Tom Peacock
FEATURES EDITOR
Nicholas Bradley
i *        * *
COPY/VOLUNTEERS EDITOR
Trjsfan Wihcrt
PHOTO EDITOR
Tara Westover
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Holland Gidney
COORDINATORS
RESEARCH COORDINATOR
Graeme Worthy
LETTERS COORDINATOR
Laura Blue
WEB COORDINATOR
Ernie Beaudin
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper at the
University of British Columbia, tt is published every
Tuesday and Friday by The Ubyssey Publications Society,
We are an autonomous, democratically run student organisation, and al student! are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications
Society or the University of British Columbia.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University
Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP'S guiding principles.
Al editorial content appearing in 77ie Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written permission
of The Ubyssey Publications Society,
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
{not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with al
submissions. ID wl be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey, otherwise verification wl be done by phone.
"Perspectives' are opinion pieces over 300 words but
under 750 words and are run according to space.
"Freestyles' are opinion pieces written by Ubyssey staff
members. Priority wiH be given to letters and perspectives
over freestyles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces wil not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified.
It is agreed by al persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to
publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the
liability of the UPS wil not bd greater than the price paid
for the ad The UPS shal not be responsible for slight
changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the
value or the impact of the ad
EDITORIAL OFFICE
Room 241K, Student Union Building,
6138 Student Union Boulevard,
Vancouver, BC.V6T1Z1
teb (604) 822-2301
fax: (604) 822-9279
e-mail: feedbock@ubyssey.bc.ca
BUSINESS OFFICE
Room 245, Student Union Building
advertising: (604) 822-1654
business office: (604) 822-6681
fax:(604)822-1658
e-mail: ubyssey_ads@yahoo.com
BUSINESS MANAGER
Fernie Pereira
AD SALES
Jennifer Copp
AD DESIGN
Shalene Takara
There waa a riot going on in the Ubyssey candy store. Chris
Shepherd was throwing wine gum* at Sarah Morrison while
Jastine Chen was lying up Michelle Mossop with licorice
ropes. Even Nic Fensom was getting out of hand, devouring
marshmaUow bananas by the handful and encouraging Alex
Dimson to steal Pez dispensers. Tom Peacock was cruising
around the store on his skateboard knocking chocolate bars
to the floor, which Tristan Winch was picking up and stuffing
in his jacket to take home to Tara Westover. With the encouragement of Hywel Tuscano, Regina Yung was frying to see
how many lollipops she could stick in her mouth and had so
far managed to squeeze in 13. Hiding behind the counter
were Holland Gidney and Daliah Merzaban. both sucking on
jawbreaker* and watching Laura Blue shower Graeme
Worthy with midget mix and Swedish Gsh. In another part of
the store. Anna King, Greg Ursic. and Michelle Bastian were
getting bubblegum stuck in their hair. Even Nicholas Bradley
and Duncan McHugh were raising hell having pinned Ron
Nurwisah against the wall with theii barrage of jelly beans.
Unfortunately, because they were allergic to sugar, Helen
Eady and Alicia Miller couldn't join in the fun.
V
Canadian
-   University
Press
« Port Sab. AflTMOMnt Numbw 0732141
It's Vietnam all over again
It would appear that the US is in the midst of losing another war. But this time, not even bombing the hell out of Cambodia is going to do anything to stop the inevitable.
The battle being waged is the US government's 'War on Drugs/ and the all-out, no-holds-
barred, black-and-white attack on narcotics is not
going quite as planned. Drugs are still pouring
in, people are still getting fucked up, the jails are
bursting, and there's not a whole heck of a lot the
government can do to rectify the situation
The US' approach to the drug problem is
something akin to an alcoholic blaming the bartender for his or her affliction Never mind that
the reason narcotics became such a lucrative
market for 'producing' countries—as the US'
Drug Enforcement Agency dubbed them—is
because demand is so high. Even so, the government proceeds to lock up every pusher in sight,
only to have another dozen pop up to take his
place.
When American President George W. Bush
went to Mexico as his first foreign visit, it
appeared that Mexican President Vicente Fox
was shaping up to be the new Republican
leader's lapdog. Not so.
Last week. Fox showed a surprising amount
of independence—and guts—when, agreeing
with Mexican police officials, he advocated the
legalisation of drugs as the only effective way to
combat narcotics trafficking.
The philosophy of legalisation is becoming
more and more accepted everywhere. Here in
Vancouver, Mayor Phillip Owen announced a new
drug policy last November that includes safe
injection sites and the medicinal administration
of heroin to recovering users. The policy changes
come as part of a new Tiarm-reduction' approach
to the drug problem in the Downtown Eastside.
As well, there have been challenges in the
Supreme Court of Canada recently over the legitimacy of laws criminalising marijuana.
Prompting changes in public sentiment are
the obviously futile efforts of governments
spending huge sums of money trying to crack
down on the international drug trade. The
money would be much more effectively used
supporting social awareness and education pro
grams designed to tackle drug dependency at a
community level.
The Free Trade Agreement of the Americas'
conference is happening in Quebec City next
month. Uruguayan President Jorge Batlle said in
an interview last week that he will attempt to
open the question of legalisation to debate at the
conference.
The benefits of decriminalising drugs may
not be enough to compel leaders auch as Fox or
Batlle to actually pursue legalisation—fear of economic reprisals from the US could effectively
quash these sentiments, no matter how
entrenched in reason they might be.
Still, while no one should expect a global
legalisation any time soon, it's encouraging to
see the grasp of America's moral crusade
against drugs loosening. The 'War on Drugs' has
been, and continues to be, a horrible and misguided endeavour. It is time for the US and its
partners to admit that they lost the war, and for
them to find a new approach.
As President Batlle said recently, 'Have you
watched Traffic?? Go tomorrow.' ♦
letters
wy#^
jS^'.-tf^*'' «•!'"«*''
Lifeline sees no joke
in GAP protest
It is veiy nice for Mr. Dimson that
he found Wednesday's display "circus-like' ('GAP returns twice in
seven days' [Mar. 20]). I will admit
it was ridiculous.
But there was no humour in it
for Lifeline members, who are
aware that Students for Choice
members have been violent (and
unrepentant of that violence) in the
past At least one of the students
who had previously attacked a
Lifeline display and shown an
inability to control her emotions
was there on Wednesday. Far from
finding the situation amusing.
Lifeline members were afraid for
their safety.
Students for Choice's actions
constitute a blatant intimidation
tactic. Their proximity was a threat
to our personal security. And while
Mr. Dimson reported that we hung
our signs where they could not be
blocked, he did not report on the
religious slurs that the counter-protesters hurled in their anger at
being thwarted. While I take
offense at Students for Choice's
assumptions of the demographics
of our club, my true complaint is
that any students feel they have the
right to persecute others for their
religious beliefs.
We may have looked "bizarre'
out there on Wednesday, but there
was a sinister overtone to the
actions of Students for Choice that
Mr. Dimson failed to reveal. Please
be aware that lifeline will not succumb to tha intimidation and
harassment of Students for Choice.
Until, of course, there is an end to
the genocide of the most vulnerable
members of our society.
-Gillian Long
Lifeline member
Abortions do not
constitute genocide
In "Abortion breaks Lifeliners'
hearts/ (Letters [Mar. 13]) J.
VanderHorst uses the following definition of genocide to argue that
abortions constitute genocide: 'the
deliberate and systematic destruction of a national, racial, religious,
political, cultural, ethnic or other
group denned by the exterminators
as undesirable." Such a definition
renders the term genocide meaningless. Any law can then be inter-
pretated as constituting genocide
against the group of people who
practice (d) what the law prohibits.
(Pot smokers are just one example
of a group that is then threatened
through genocide). In fact, this definition would mean that Lifeline
members take part in a genocide of
pro-choice people. Not only do
Lifeline members promote hate
towards women by comparing
them to Nazis and the KKK and
thus hamper the ability of women
to freely and openly debate abortions, by aiming to illegalise abortion, they want to take away
women's ability to have an abortion Together with the people who
kill abortion doctors and the people
who threaten those of us who are
openly pro-choice (through death
threats, repeated phone calls, etc)
they are taking part in the deliberate and systematic destruction of
the group of pro-choice people.
Some of us are killed, others
silenced through intimidation and
eventually we might be 'assimilated* and an important women's
right (practised for centuries under
more or less favourable conditions)
will be lost.
-Katja Cronauer
PhD student
Interdisciplinary studies Page Fridav-the Ubvssey Magazine
Letters
Friday. March 23.20011
11
Respect the cyclists! ||||1^
 by Sharon Lis
Wake up, drivers! The roads are not just for vehicles.'
Remember us, the cyclists. We too have a place on the
streets of metropolitan Vancouver. At least this was
my understanding when I took driver education So
what is happening? Why must I fear for my life each
time I take my bike onto public roads? Does my terror
come from the fact that motorists ignore my very presence as I timidly advance along the roadside, or could
my inhibitions stem from the countless near misses?
Perhaps I would not be so scared if roads and traffic
lights were more accommodating to cyclists.
It doesn't seem to matter that I wear reflective
clothing and a helmet, or that my bicycle's brakes and
tires are maintained. Nor doe? ifc?matt|r.that I use!
appropriate hand signals and slay to the side- of the
road except when turning. I am on a bike, not in a
tank, and if a vehicle hit me: or cut me off, I could be
killed while the vehicle might sustain a mere scratch^ \
I have been using my bicycle for many) ear's* as In *
environmentally friendly mode of transportation
Unfortunately, most of the busier roads in the city are
bike-savage. Aside from a couple of bike routes along
side streets, bikers have no space to ride safely. This
was a problem when I commuted to Simon Fraser
University (SFU) along Gaglardi Way and continues to
be a problem now that ride regularly to UBC.
Gaglardi Way is the main access route to SFU and ;
the top of Burnaby mountain. Cyclists are limited to a '
foot-wide bike lane for most of the ascent Cars, trucks .,
and buses race up and down Gaglardi, ovften exceeding ••.
100 km/h. Bikers are completely exposed and susceptible to being hit as they grind up the steeper sections
of the road. I once experienced a close call riding up
Gaglardi A car passing another lost control next to
me, slid across the lane, hjt another car and stopped
only metres from me? I had no avenue of escape
because the narrow bike lane was and still is bordered
by a high curb. Unfortunately, a few years ago millions
of dollars were spent to improve the roadways around
Burnaby Mountain but nothing was done to improve
the bike lane up Gaglardi Way.
Now, I cycle to UBC. The fastest, most direct route
for me to take to UBC is along 16th Avenue. Sixteenth
Avenue is hazardous along the stretch of road between
Arbutus and Cambie Street At rush hour the cars line
up, pumping out fumes and hugging the curb. To
avoid asphyxiation and being squashed, I am forced to
ride on the sidewalk. On the rare occasion that I can
remain on the road, vehicles skim within inches of rm
hike, feeling like giant vacuum cleaners suctioning the
road. A passing bus or truck resembles a twister sucking me into its midst I fear what would happen if I hit
a bump or lost my balance while being passed.
Each day that I ride my apprehension grows. Two
weeks ago I was riding downhill on 12 th Avenue near
Macdonald Street when a minivan turned directly in
: front of me. I instantly braked, lurching my bike into
the air. The van continued like it had not seem me. I
proceeded, heart pounding, limbs still intact
Last week, I was offered the opportunity to bounce
off two car doors oh route to downtown. Drivers generally check for other vehicles before stepping out of
their car. What about cyclists? WE DO NOT have
emergency braking systems or a set of armourl
I Yes' I too k^loy* what it feels to be driving behind a
bike' weaving side to side, blocking passage. The frustration builds. The impatience grows. The foot goes to
the pedal No doubt some- people should not be on a
bik^ even on a deserted road. But then there is the
timid rider attempting to get from point A to B. Are
they safer; hugging the curve or hogging the whole
lane? I vote for fogging the lane. At least they will
have somewhere to go when a car passes too close or
cuts them off.
Drivers'simply do not respect the rights of
cyclists! They pass too close. They turn without looking. Motorists-' speed, up when they see a cyclist signaling to turn left and pull over to the right without
checking that blind spot'Frequently,' vehicles back
up of pull out of a driveway or onto a road having
seen $ bike approaching. Let's not forget the number'
of times people get out of their cars by throwing the
door open and then looking, or motorists that cut
directly.in front of cyclists, in their ever-frantic rush.
Cyclists^can only ride so fast. We cannot stop ;
instantly. It takes much more energy for 'a cyclist to '
stop than' for' a motorist to put their foot on the
brakes. We do not have the ability to manoeuvre
through obstacles. And we do not wear earplugs.
I enjoy cycling. It is great exercise and is definitely an environmentally-friendly mode of travel.
Unfortunately, I am forced more and more to ride
defensively and aggressively. I have not been hit
yet..Given the way people drive in the Lower
Mainland, my luck may run out It is time for
motorists to pay attention to cyclists! We also need a ;
spot on the streets. Slow down. Look before you act ■
And please, do not blast that horn! ♦
-Sharon Lis is a first-year Education student
|^en|||in|f tfm.e to close the 20th cen-'.
^|u|^:JJg|g^g:;4S|rpuhjdi1 the world...were
;||k|d wfei wi£ the most influential indi-
M^!!Yg|stMt. century,. The editors of
IIm|rli|gazme chose Albert Einstein. A
,&Xkgjnan.and a decent publication, but
hardly lfie collective voice of the human
llmf?':' ;Mf; tell..-..jhai: J to Patrick
BrusBewich . $&8 you're liable to be
|H|d. I#£aji and: rjas^Jp^. dare; I. say it
'g^^YIJshpulci .know; I have suffered
|^^J8|j|isJ^g|^||i'4jSiti^'wit firsthand -
jaj2s rec|ftf rjsouttal to my rebuttal of
Ks.^ewitMlM SOI4e other, rebuttal in
K''BKfes battle betv«een<f |pteqtioi
ItillYPixIS
jjdep;|:sti|den^' and
[IQejili Jper J' whose,.
*^X;pwYihean and nasty.I eah hi
JtB^jQHgpll title 6f my letter in question
|ff|lt plc^ptJ^J^Pjau^ck" Mistdewich
& JllL:^:;:-il^HPtS^--:' .Ct^s^3kfUUty. J'<dbvaiSi@B<J. .1>e fore
f||||ig||i^i:E^^!Q^ t may not be a
[|r|c|:j^$entY or h&yC 1.5. years of pri-
;jya^e-S|etpr' day-dreaming^ under ray
||>|j|*|>f ||;pguely acquainted with dead
[£|cip||: \y|tS impressive titles who knew
Y§3m£b||d;y/m6re' famous than they, or
J.Ea'vS enBugh postage to send a dignified
J?etterJ txj pur prime minister, or even be
Jp^bji^edTnitside this campus, but
i$^iiJpig|i|BiiJ I'm 18 years old, I offer no
' apbldgyjfof being."goofy,* or "mean and
Jnasty^; or criticising a man who thinks
JQfteJinferW simply because of thejfao-
Ypiybhe chose to enter.
1421 To say that the orthodox view on this
■ Campus—that Science is the only worth-
Jwfiile faculty and that Arts is a glorified
'Hamburger U—somehow goes against
Mr. Bruskiewich's argument is baffling.
Indeed, his argument goes to fanciful,,
shallow lengths to validate this view. In
raising Einstein to the level of a messiah
Jieraldihg a new age of science and peace
Jjinct bro&erhpod he cheapens the man
j|yi^j%i^ from
^wljlI.EiJsfehi.the man is insepara
ble -from' pacifism. Einstein never
believed that science alone could cure
the ills of humanity when he himself was
appalled by the uses of his science to
level japan; to say otherwise is to simplify ah exceedingly complex and rare individual (and a man goofy in his own right).
Indeed, a scientist cannot live without art just as an artist cannot live without science. Imagine Sophocles without
the logic and order of the Greeks, Da
Vinci without the humanism of the renaissance, or modern art without the relativism of Einstein (and vice versa}. Art
and science throughout history have
worked and conflicted in tandem to
:rejie|jt|thei| ||oimon origin society.
Sfienca iltiMigost artistic thing we do
inJllll.§Iail&at art is the most sci-
itifial|iihgJ we do,
; ■" "liink this is the point Mr.
Bruskiewich is tiying. to make—that art
arid science Sre two sides to a coin—but
he severely muddles it with such bragging and posturing that any authority he
Jhas is lost; he forgets the other side of
the coin He; rests his point not on any'
facts, but on a flimsy assumption that
Science students have a manifest right
to idealism over all others. He should
note, however, that of my many friends
in Science, most are not so much interested in using science to 'carry the
brunt of human knowledge' as they are
in trying not to fail Math 104 and
English 112.
Having your head in. the clouds and
hope in your heart is an admirable
thing, something valued in the sciences
and arts; to be sure, an essential part of
being human. However, Mr.
Bruskiewich, it's good to come down
every now and then to remember your
own place in the madding crowd, or
else you risk crossing the fine line
between having your head in the clouds
and having your head up your ass. ♦
-Chris Dingwall Is a first-year
Arts student.
^ FILMSOC
All films $3.00
is the NORM (SUB theatre)
Film Hotline: 822-3697  OR check out
www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/SOCIAL/Filmsoc
Fri Mar 23 - Sun Mar 25
7:00 Family Man
9:30 Dude, Where's My Car?
Wed MAR 28-Thurs MAR 29
7:00 Breathless
9:30 Belle de jour
UBYSSEY
GIVEAWAY
We have Double Passes to give away for a screening Of:
' Momento' on Wed, March 28th at 7pm @ 5th Ave Cinemas.
- Come to SUB245 for details!
'Women at
tdeTrontier
offcigeCCence
MicHaeC SmilS 's Ugtcy
to Canadian l^omtti in
Science andTecfimilcgy
Speakers:
GiiMk'lln Boil'Janc. Hc^ital for Sick K;ds, Tcnjute
U« Karrir.*--'"!. Oi'.Uiu Cam-wr Inrj'.ute
Ca-.hori.-ie K-ilLn. M'.Masler Ua.vcrsi-.y
(U-ra'.clins K.-mwy-WnIUu-. Birti.h Aeresp.w
JiJ'-a W. QLT lac
Freda M'.lior. Mun'.ral.N'ctrutasical IrKitute
Jani't Rosiiuit. SdinuJ Luuor.fc!d Iusu-.ute
Shirley Ti'fhman. PnnceUin Univor^'.y
t"aue Ti>uTin, 3(adurd Umvershy
i<^
April 7, 2001 at
'.VY-iiVcok 100 L.-cturt-Tlif.l'.ic-
R'-^^t.'T d!id infurDii'i'-tV
www exxcellence.org
- 4 }£xy cettSrjlic* oftfo
acSxMwnts uffiiruie
CamJidn scientist!.
"^5^
m. ■1 O[Friday. March 23.2001
News
Page Fridav-the Ubvssev Magazine
Health plan premiums could rise
 by Alex Dimson
UBC students are likely to be paying more for the Alma Mater
Society (AMS) Health and Dental Plan in September,
The AMS Council decided Wednesday night to inform the
university that premiums for the plan will increase from
$168 to $176.75 per student.
The current AMS Health and Dental Plan contract will
expire August 31 of this year.
When the health plan was first approved by a 1999 student
referendum, the question stipulated that the cost of the plan
would be indexed to inflation.
The proposed $8.75 increase matches the 5.2 per cent
rise in the Consumer Price fndex (CPI)-a standard measurement of inflation-isince the health plan was first implement
ed in January 2 OOO.
AMS Vice-President of Finance Yvette Lu said that negotiations with the insurance provider for the next contract are
still ongoing, but the AMS is expecting the premiums will
have to rise.
"It's probably going to be increased, but we're not positive
yet If it's going to go in the calendar we have to let [UBC's]
Board of Govenors know...so students don't have a surprise
when the calendar says $ 168 and it's actually $ 176," she said.
According to Lu, the health plan's insurance company experienced a greater-than-expected demand since the health plan's
inception and is insisting that the AMS pay a higher rate.
While the details of negotiations have not been made pub- .
lie, Lu acknowledged the possibility that the insurance com^i
pany may require a premium increase higher than the CPf.
In this  case,  Lu  said  that  tile  /VMS has  over  $200,000
saved in a reserve fund to cover the difference. If this fund is
depleted, however, the AMS would be compelled to take the
health plan back to a third referendum to get a fee increase
approved by students.
But Lev Bukhman, the executive director of StudentCare
Networks (SCN), the AMS' health plan service provider, said
that he doesn't expect the insurance provider to demand
more than what the AMS has set aside.
"We will definitely be able to come to an agreement with
the insurance company based on the available premiums
that they have," Bukhman said.
"We are doing lots of number crunching and going back
and forth to come up with wh*at is thl best possible deal i
in the AMS' resources, whicH are llrnited." ♦
I with-
Safety audit finds flaws
 by Chris Shepherd
An annual student-organised review
of campus safety has found that
many of UBC's relatively new blue
light phones aren't functioning.
Last Thursday evening, 30 volunteers—including students, staff,
and administrators—braved the
chilly temperatures to perform the
Alma Mater Society (AMS)'s annual safety audit, which surveys the
campus to determine trouble spots
and offer safety recommendations.
This year, volunteers focused on
the southern end of campus, and
found that many of the blue light
phones, which are designed to connect people in crisis with either the
RCMP or Campus Security, do not
work properly.
Problems with the phones
included broken strobe lights and
not hearing or being heard by the
person on the other end of the line.
Sue Brown, co-coordinator of
Safewalk, said that the failure of the
blue lights is a major concern. There
have been 27 active blue light
phones installed around campus
since 1996.
"If they're not working it breaks
down people's confidence in the system," she said.
David Grigg, associate director of
UBC's    Campus    Planning   who
helped with the audit, indicated that
the university will begin to repair
the phones immediately.
"If the light goes wrong it'll be
[fixed by] Plant Operations. If it's a
telephone issue we go back
to...ITServices," Grigg assured.
Auditors also noted that at many
locations lights were not working on
campus. Plant Operations has bejen
working to rectify this problem with
a failed light reporting program.
In previous years, the audit has
been criticised for failing to focus on
areas of campus which might pose
significant security risks, such as
peripheral areas where many students travel at night.
But AMS Safety Coordinator
Tommy Gerschman said that this
year's audit was an improvement
over previous years' because it
looked at routes rather than zones.
"Students don't travel in straight
square lines, so we felt that routes
that are heavily used would be something worthwhile to look at," he
explained.
One such route was the path
between Totem Park residence and
the SUB, which was identified in a
recent university study has having
many "areas of fear* along it
Brown said that she is working
with Grigg to possibly install blue
light phones at shortcuts that stu
dents often take along this route.
During the audit, each group of
volunteers was given a section of the
campus to au.dit, and the facilitator
for each group was responsible for
^ensuring that different safety
issues-such as traffic density, lighting quality, and functioning of the
blue lights—were monitored.
Due to a low volunteer turnout
two zones were not covered.
Gerchman said that he was surprised particularly by the low
turnout of female volunteersJEven
though he contacted women's
groups and several residences to
advertise the audit, he said that
only five women came forward to
assist. ^
"I think definitely having women
coming out would make a big difference, and maybe it should focus on
getting some more out, and at the
same time it would be really good to
get people who have problems with
accessibility to come out as well,"
Gerchman said.
Brown agrees that the issue
regarding the female attendance is
an important one because it
'becomes a male perspective of
judging safety. And I think its
important to find other ways that
women can contribute."
The final report on the audit is
expected to be announced soon. ♦
KAMIKAZE PANE: Thirty-some years of routine is enough to make anyone snap and this Tuesday,
rather than sliding shut as it atways had. Gage east tower resident Richard Rhee's window decided
it wasn't going to take it any more. Suffice iq say, the 16 floor resident was rather surprised by the .
window's sudden change of heart, though tragically the window's exploration of the outside world J
was but seconds long. No one was hurt by the kamikaze pane and Gage Residence Life Manager Val {
Holtrom said that an investigation into the incident was underway, chris shepherd photo !
blue BEACON Though many were found broken, UBC
says they should be fixed soon, chris shepherd photo
Coke ends exclusivity
by Sarah Morrison
Coca-Cola will no longer encourage
the adoption of exclusivity contracts
with US schools, the beverage giant
announced last week.
But these same changes will not
affect the company's Canadian contracts, according to a Coca-Cola
spokesperson.
Coca-Cola has been criticised for
encouraging exclusivity contracts at
elementary and high schools, as
well as at post-secondaiy institutions. These contracts give the company a monopoly over soft drink
sales at those institutions.
Now, the beverage giant is supporting 'an adoption of non-exclusive agreements with schools,"
according to a statement released
on Coca-Cola's website last week-
Coca-Cola also promised to honour schools' wishes to limit the sale
of beverages at certain places and
times of the day, use non-commercial graphics on school vending
machines and provide healthier
drink options in the machines.
Coca-Cola's Western Canada
spokesperson Scott Clark said that
many of the same policies are
already in place in Canada.
"Many if not all of our machines
already have that variety in them, so
we're very fortunate in that that's
another way that our market is different than the US at this point in
time," Clark said.
He added that Coca-Cola's
Canadian operations do not require
exclusivity in their contracts with
schools. He explained that when
Coca-Cola is invited to participate in
a contract with an educational insti-.
tution, it provides a proposal based
on whether the institution prefers
an exclusive or shared deal.
"Exclusivity in Canada is really
set by the educational institution,"
Clark said.
In 1995, UBC and the Alma
Mater Society (AMS) signed an
exclusive agreement with Coca-Cola.
Since that time, the university has
faced mounting criticism over the
secrecy of the deal, which is not
open to the public
Members of UBC's Social Justice
Centre (SJC) are concerned that this
announcement is simply a ploy to
. deflect criticism away from the corporation.
"I think that there's definitely a
higher degree of criticism about corporations and their aggressive marketing campaigns, especially in
places like schools, and this is just a
way of sugar-coating or diffusing
those debates," said Sima Zerehi, a
representative from the SJC.
SJC representative Jay McKinnon
added that he doesn't see Coca-
Cola's move away from exclusive
contracts as a big step.
"I think that it misses the entire
point because it says that the exclusive contracts are the real evil,
whereas the real evil is that you're
addicting little kids to caffeinated
beverages."
UBC's ten-year deal, the first
signed by a Canadian university, will
expire in 2005. Hubert Lai, the university's legal counsel said that it is
too early to predict whether Coca-
Cola's announcement will have any
effect on future negotiations.
"It's impossible to speculate
about what we would or wouldn't do
with Coca-Cola five years from now.
It's a long time and a lot of things
could change," he said.
"At that point in time, Coca-Cola
might not be interested in doing
any deals with the universities,
this university might not be interested in doing any deals with soft
drinks at that point, it's really
difficult to say." ♦

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128870/manifest

Comment

Related Items