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The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1983

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Array AMS firings 'unjustified'
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Alma Mater Society general
manager Charles Redden fired six
students from the SUB games room
without giving them adequate
notice or explanation, five, of the
former employees charged Monday.
"We were not given any warning
of any sort," said Dale Jackson,
who had worked in the games room
for about a year.
Jackson and others were notified
of their dismissal in a Feb. 3 memo
Redden sent to games room super
visor Alex Sawicki. "Employment
for the following part time staff is
to be terminated, effective Sunday
Feb. 6," one of the interdepartmental memos obtained by The Ubyssey
reads.
"There has been a very
noticeable decrease in the effort being expended by many of your part-
time staff," Redden said in the
memo. "Staff attitude towards
customers, and attention to some of
the job requirements such as keeping the litter off the floor and wiping down the screens of the video
games, have become a serious problem."
In addition, there had been "considerable abuse of the refund
system by your staff," Redden
claimed in an earlier memo dated
Feb. 1. "Each week there are
numerous examples of AMS games
room staff changing the refund (to
customers)!."
There have been reports of such
abuses, said games room sources
who did not want to be identified.
But they agreed the six employees
fired  should  have been given a
™E   l IDVCCEV
^C     "-^li^MlBlHifc'Smm'-r^ml^mmL^i^m\mWm\mWt:.-   ^M     >
Vol. LXV, No. 36
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 8,1983
— craig brooks photo
UBYSSEY STAFF MEMBERS commemorate Student Newspaper Week by placing Volkswagen on B.C. Place
stadium roof. Unidentified Ubyssey spokesperson said "not only are Ubyssey staff members good writers,
editors, photographers and reviewers, but we're good drivers too." Person was unwilling to say how prank was
done, saying only "That's The Ubyssey spirit."
Anofher one bites the rust
By CRAIG BROOKS
Another senior UBC administrator has joined the
rush to resign before George Pedersen becomes president July 1.
Vice-president academic Michael Shaw resigned effective June 30, administrative president Douglas Kenny announced Monday.
Vice-president and bursar William White announced
in November that he would be "retiring" as of June
30, the day before SFU president Pedersen takes office
as UBC president.
UBC's other vice-president, James Kennedy, has
not yet indicated if he will resign.
Pedersen will chair a university senate committee to
find a replacement for Shaw, student senator Lisa
Hebert said Monday. She said the committee, which
has one student representative, will start meeting
almost immediately since the new academic vice-
president will take office July 1.
Shaw, an agriculture science professor, said Monday, "I study (plant) rust, you could say I was getting a
bit rusty. That's all I have to say on that matter."
Shaw declined to comment on whether his resignation was due to the new president or impending budget
cutbacks.
The board of governors decided Thursday to confer
the rank of university professor on Shaw. The title,
given only two other times in UBC history, was in
"recognition of distinguished contributions to science
and the university."
Shaw first came to UBC in 1967, when he became
agriculture sciences dean. He was appointed to the
vice-presidency in 1975, just after Kenny became president.
Shaw, who maintains a low profile in non academic
areas, came under fire last year, when at an Alma
Mater Society sponsored forum on cutbacks, he claimed cutbacks were "not an issue."
He chaired a retrenchment committee that in
January 1981 cut more than $7 million from the
university's budget. UBC subsequently ran a $6.2
million surplus for the fiscal year.
chance to respond to any complaints lodged against them.
"We were never told about the
nature of the complaints," said Pip
White, who started working in the
games room 15 months ago. "I
don't expect to be told the source of
the complaints, but I'd like to have
some information."
White, Jackson and Monty Mitchell said their individual meetings
with Redden after the Feb. 3 memo
was issued proved fruitless. He did
not give them specific reasons for
their firings, they said.
Alice Daskowski, one of the
seven employees originally mentioned in the memo, was reinstated
afer requesting a second chance to
work in the games rooms.
"There is no validity to any of
these things," White said. "The
dismissal of the staff has been badly
handled. It doesn't follow any kind
of management style."
"I don't even know what the problem is," said Helen Lee, one of the
six former employees. "The memo
was just posted on the wall and no
one talked to me . . . that's what
bothered me," she said with tears in
her eyes.
"Redden doesn't have any
justification. He has never talked to
me (about complaints)," said
former employee Ralph Jonson.
"The order came from the top,"
said AMS games room supervisor
Alex Sawicki when reached for
comment. "(Redden's) the boss. It
See page 2: REDDEN
UVic, SFU get
gear schools
By CHRIS WONG
UBC no longer holds the sole
distinction of producing engineers
in B.C.
Simon Fraser University will be
offering first and second year
engineering courses in September,
while a four year program for the
University of Victoria is being planned.
SFU decided to go ahead with the
engineering program after the provincial government promised
$500,000 in funding. But UVic has
yet to receive a committment on
funding.
UBC applied science dean Martin
Wedepohl said Monday he is skeptical there will be sufficient funds to
support two full-time programs at
UBC and UVic.
"The government may be
spreading the icing too thin. There
simply won't be enough money to
support two faculties," he said.
But Wedepohl is supportive of
the SFU program. It will give wider
access to students from the eastern
part of the Lower Mainland, he
said.
"As fas as SFU is concerned,
we've been cooperating. We're
designing for a close interface."
The SFU program will initially
admit only 25 students, said SFU
engineering sciences dean Donald
George. But when the program
eventually expands to four years,
enrolment will go up to about 75
students a year, he said.
George said the program will be
geared toward high technology and
the theoretical side of engineering.
"Our program has been designed
to be significantly different (from
UBC). Its orientation will be
towards engineering science."
The UVic program will be a
cooperative program extending
more than five years, said UVic
academic vice-president Fred
Fischer.
The program will be delayed until
1984 because of budgeting problems but the necessary funding will
most likely come through, he said.
"We have already had some
funds and we anticipate we're going
to be receiving funds at the level we
will be needing."
"The UVic program will not
create funding problems for the
three universities Fischer added.
"In terms of the proposal we
developed, it was at least as cost-
effective as adding the same
number of students at UBC," he
said.
The three universities all see a
need for more engineering
graduates. Only about half the
engineers employed in B.C. are
educated in B.C. said Fischer.
Unemployed rally
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Singing Solidarity Forever, Vancouver's unemployed and union
members sympathetic to the laid-
off crowded into Robson Square
Monday.
Carrying placards which read
Save Me Not Whistler and Open the
Mills, Give Us Jobs, they clapped
and sang along with songs about the
unemployed. Guitarist Phil Vernon
of the carpenter's union led variations of Sweet Bye and Bye and I
Can't Get No (Satisfaction).
Rally organizer Kim Zander, also
coordinator of the Vancouver
Unemployment Action, listed the
rally's demands: that unemployment insurance benefits be extended
to the full period of unemployment;
that there be no further layoffs of
UI staff; and an end to delays in
getting benefits.
"We're here to demand dignity
for the people who collect UI. They
are making us come to our knees to
collect payment. The service is really inadequate," Zander told the 400
demonstrators.
The protestors then marched
along Hornby and Georgia streets
to the Canada employment and im
migrant commission offices at 1055
Georgia. Speakers there encouraged
further political action and
cooperation with the labor movement be taken by the unemployed.
A subcommittee was sent to the
employment and UI office to present the demands while the
demonstrators sang and listened to
speeches. A copy of the demands
will be sent to the federal government in Ottawa, said George
Hewison, rally chair and president
of the United Fishermen and Allied
Workers' Union.
Ted Miller, an NDP-MP currently attending a fisheries convention
in Vancouver, urged the
unemployed to demonstrate against
the federal job creation program's
failure to create a substantial
number of jobs.
"There is a need to generate jobs
that aren't government subsidies to
big business," he said.
A participant in the rally, which
was sponsored by the Vancouver
and District Labor Council, said he
came to express his support for the
extension of UI benefits to the full
period of unemployment and those
unemployed like himself. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,1983
Redden mum on firings
From page 1
doesn't matter what I personally
think."
Redden said Monday he could
not comment on the matter because
he had been legally advised not to
comment on all cases involving
AMS employee-management relations.
The dismissals have brought to
light problems in relations between
student employees and AMS
management personnel. According
to the five former employees, all
students who work for their society
are required to sign termination
notices before they even begin
working.
It is not clear whether the practise
is legal under the labor relations
act. White said he and others are
considering taking their case before
the labor relations board if student
council fails to reverse Redden's
decision at its next meeting Feb. 23.
White said other concerns will be
brought up if council does not
reinstate the six employees. These
include:
• legality of termination notices;
• length of employment termination notices, which amounted
in these cases to only three days;
• possibility of severance pay;
and,
• proper overtime pay.
A labor relations board
spokesperson declined to comment
on the validity of the students'
charges, including the pre-signing
of termination notices.
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THE    U BYSSEY
Page 3
Police
MONTREAL (CUP) — About
200 students attempted to close
down the University of Quebec at
Montreal Feb. 1 to demonstrate
their support for striking Common
Front workers.
Picket lines were set up in front
of building entrances, but other
students disregarded them and tried
to enter the university. There was
'Homosexuality
not illogical,
but homophobia
needs cure'
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Homosexuality is not a choice
and psycho-analytical and
sociological theories on its development have no data-based support, a
former Kinsey Institute research
sociologist said Friday.
"The belief that gays and lesbians can be 'cured' or changed is
confusing to me," Martin Weinberg, co-author of Homosexualities
and Sexual Preferences, told 100
people in the SUB auditorium. "I
don't understand why heterosex-
uality is seen as so deeply ingrained
and unchangeable yet homosexuality is viewed as something superficial, something that can be changed."
This notion of homosexuality is
illogical, he said.
Weinberg spoke mainly about
gay men rather than lesbians
because of the absence of lesbian
development theory and the difficulty in obtaining a sample
population. He cited several
theories on homosexuality which he
tested and found no conclusive
evidence for.
He gave the labelling theory as an
example. According to the theory
individuals are labelled homosexuals and consequently begin to
identify themselves as such.
Weinberg said he found no data
to support the theory, and that the
opposite is true. An individual
tends to label him or herself first
and then begins to identify with the
self-applied label, he said.
Many theories assume homosexual behavior precedes homosexual
feelings, Weinberg said. But this
assumption is incorrect because a
child develops sexual feelings
toward a member of the same sex
long before he or she engages in
homosexual behavior, he added.
Another example Weinberg cited
is the "wastebasket" or opportunity theory. Applied mostly to
women, the theory says individuals
are forced to seek homosexual relations because they are unattractive
to members of the opposite sex. The
implicit assumption is lesbians have
been discarded by men and form a
wastebasket category of women, he
said.
But lesbians tend to be popular in
their peer groups and usually have
dated men in high school as much
as other women, Weinberg
discovered through research. They
simply found heterosexual dates to
be unsatisfying, he added.
Weinberg did find data to support the theory that says effeminate
men have negative relationships
with their fathers. But the father's
rejection of an effeminate son does
not cause homosexuality as the
theory suggests, he said.
The father is merely reacting to
the son's lack of masculinity — thus
the data is correlational, not causal,
Weinberg concluded.
•    I
student picket line
some pushing and shoving between
students and police in riot gear were
called to clear an entrance to allow
students to attend classes.
On Jan. 31 800-1,000 students attending a UQAM student association general assembly voted 80 per
cent in favor of a two-day walkout
in sympathy with the Common
Front.
No one at UQAM is part of the
Common Front strike, which currently consists mostly of 88,000
school and college teachers. About
1.4 million primary and secondary
students are without classes.
The university administration
doesn't recognize the general student association and was preparing
to  obtain   an  injunction   against
picketing. The management, accounting and urban studies student
associations, which are not affiliated with the general student
association, were also seeking injunctions.
"It's students depriving other
students of the right to attend
classes. That's the fundamental
principle,"    said   departmental
associations representative Jacques
Lemay.
The UQAM student association
is protesting the Quebec government's decreed contracts which arbitrarily set working conditions and
roll back salaries for three months.
The association says the decrees are
"authoritarian arid antidemocratic."
Police oust U of T
pro-life display
-cary rodin photo
DANGERS OF GETTING stoned are exemplified by unknown deity and
child undergoing metamorphosis arising from unlimited participation in
numerous UBC undergraduate society weeks. "There is another one this
week, I hear," woman uttered before advocating ways of attaining higher
planes of consciousness with strange spices. "I didn't know cinammon
buns would do this to us — or we'd have done it sooner."
TORONTO (CUP) — University
of Toronto police asked a local pro-
life group to remove a graphic
display of anti-abortionist literature
and pictures from a campus
building Feb. 1.
Featuring pictures of dead fetuses
and a surgery table complete with
medical instruments, the display
immediately began attracting attention from students in the building.
Some students approached the
two display attendants, while others
openly questioned the tactics of the
group calling itself Students for
Life.
"The display is disgusting, sensationalist and backward," commented third year student Kathleen
Martin. "It is saying that people
who advocate abortions are
murderers."
Fourth year student Don Eady
expressed concern over the nature
UBC students get into the ACT
By SARAH COX
The Canadian Federation of
Students (CFS) is organizing cross-
Canada activities in March to
pressure the federal and provincial
governments.
The protests will focus on the
declining quality of education and
the prospect of record unemployment this summer. A national day
of protest is planned for March 23.
"UBC is going to start an anti-
cutbacks team to inform students of
the extent of cutbacks," CFS-
Pacific deputy chair Stephen Learey
said Monday. CFS-Pacific is planning to distribute fact sheets in Vancouver about educational cutbacks
and unemployment, he said.
The   literature   will   compare
government spending on education
to areas such as national defence.
"We want to show the public
that education is important to the
community," he said.
CFS plans to use the upcoming
B.C. provincial elections to force
politicians to take stands on education and unemployment, said
Learey.
"Politicians want to get votes.
They will be forced to act when we
go to the public with our information," he said.
"We'll also be distributing
literature on every campus in which
we list the policies of each political
party as well as their past performances."
Learey    said    the    provincial
SFU limits enrolment
Canadian University Press
Enrolment limitations may soon
be a fact of life at Simon Fraser
university.
The SFU board of governors approved a policy Jan. 25 limiting the
number of on-campus undergraduate students to 11,000. This is
800 above the current enrolment
level.
The new ceiling will be achieved
by tightening admission standards
for transfer students, high school
graduates, mature students, and
those performing below standard
academically.
Once implemented, the policy
will stand until more space and
resources become available.
Academic vice-president Jock
Munro considers the measure
"unavoidable, given the current
funding situation." He called the
measures "significant departures
from previous practice in the
university."
While student representatives
agree there is a problem with
shrinking budgets and soaring
enrolment, they criticized the policy
and the way it was approved.
"It's the same problem," said
student society resource person Jeff
Berg. "They're making academic
decisions on the basis of financial
and physical restraints."
Berg said the student society has
been fighting this proposal for over
a year.
SFU students had different opinion on the new policy. "I understand their reasoning," said one,
"But it's extremely unfortunate
that it has to happen."
government has not yet announced
whether there will be summer
employment programs this year.
"We haven't heard anything
about them yet. I have the feeling
they want to cancel them
altogether," he said.
"Unemployment is going to be
worse than last summer and last
summer was the worst it's ever
been."
CFS-Pacific fieldworker Mike
McNeil said the strategy for this
year's protests is a unique and promising tactic for student organizations.
"Hopefully we can adjust public
opinion to the point where the
government will realize it will be
politically unwise to continue in its
present course," he said.
McNeil said post secondary
education has always been less accessible for people from lower
socio-economic backgrounds and
the situation has worsened over the
past three years.
"We've got to turn that around.
It's something to be very worried
about," he said.
CFS has also called on federal
and provincial governments to increase taxation of Canada's largest
corporations instead of cutting funding to education and other social
services.
of the Students for Life, saying the
group "was not being forthright in
saying who they are."
"It looks like they're a part of the
Maranathas and are using the abortion issue to increase their membership," Eady said. Maranatha is a
right-wing Christian organization
the Council on Mind Abuse
(COMA) has deemed a cult.
Group member Mary Marrocco
denied allegations the group is affiliated with Maranatha. "Students
for Life is an independent group advocating issues like abortion that
deal with life." Marrocco said the
group is a resurrection of a previous
campus organization called U of T
Pro-Life.
The display "was to let people
know we are here and to gain
members," Marracco said. She
responded to criticisms by saying
"You can't be controversial with
controversial issues. Most people
don't have the facts, we're just trying to present the facts."
- Debate over the display came to a
head when student administrative
council women's commissioner
Gillaine Funnell and student governor Susan Prentice questioned the
group's status as a recognized campus organization and its right to set
up the display. "Technically, the
Students for Life group has no right
to be here at the U of T," Prentice
said. She referred to the display as
"classic propaganda techniques."
Marrocco maintained that when
the group phoned the dean of arts
and science "we were not told you
had to be a U of T student. As far
as I can see we have every right to
be here."
After receiving complaints from
students about the display Arts and
Sciences Student Union president
Sudhashree Rajagopal checked the
group's status with the university
and was told Students for Life was
not a recognized campus group and
had no right to set up its display at
the U of T.
Students for Life claimed it
phoned the dean's office to request
permission but the dean's office
denied the claim.
On the advice of the university,
Rajagopal contacted the police,who
ordered the group to remove the
display. The group left the premises
without protest but Marracco said
that as soon as Students for Life
confirms its status as a recognized
campus group it will set up another
campus display.
MoiiMMali.ft.hlii rAnlacAs aav nuitAN
If they don't like gay and lesbian dances, why
don't they just stay at homo?
Posters advertising Gay and Lesbian week activities were torn down last week and replaced with
fakes. It is not known who was responsible.
The fake posters claimed to be produced by the
gays and lesbians of UBC and annouced the Up the
Butt Dance, featuring "the unique music of Twot
Wad and the AIDS Cases." AIDS refers to Acquired
Immuno Deficiency Syndrome, erroneously thought
of as a disease affecting only gays.
The poster's graphic depicted a male couple engag
ed in intercourse, with the prone partner sniffing a
flower. The date And time given for those who
wanted to "be there or be straight," were those of
the actual gays and lesbians of UBC dance.
Bob Summerbell, gays and lesbians of UBC president, said he was reluctant to accuse anyone of making and putting up the fake posters.
"It was definitely the act of insecure males. There
is no mention of lesbians. Their hang-up is male
genital sex," he said.
The perpetrators should not get the attention they
are obviously seeking, added Summerbell. Page 4
THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, February 8,1963
iPK.iv/<a- cLef\pJiNo  inline
©
Lett ers
Frat pledges should learn
It is quite apparent, from the recent correspondence regarding the
Pit incident, that the controversy
has not yet been satisfactorily
resolved. By this we mean that opinions have been loudly and indignantly proclaimed but there has
been a complete failure to achieve
dialogue between opposing groups.
If an act is perceived as offensive,
then the perpetrators have a responsibility to carefully examine their
behavior as well as the viewpoints
of those who have been offended.
For example, ever since U.S. blacks
have made it clear that the term
"nigger" is unacceptable, caring
people have refrained from its use,
regardless of how they personally
view the word.
Similarly, if this "prank" has
caused such outrage, surely the least
the pledges can do is to listen to the
arguments of the ones who are
outraged. To dismiss them as
"prudes", "radical feminists" or
attempt (not too subtly) to link any
criticism with Marxist philosophies
(shades of commie plots?) is too
easy; you don't have to hear the
arguments.
If the fraternity members can
learn something about their responsibility for the feelings of other
members of the larger community
as a result of this episode, then
something of value may yet emerge.
However, we consider that the
key issue here is how women are
perceived. Today, no one can be
unaware of the central focus of concern to women's groups, namely,
the depersonalization which
underlies the Playboy philosophy.
It is evident that for many of those
who have been offended (both on
Ghost after Brougham
A spectre is haunting UBC — the
spectre of feminism. It has arrived
in its latest guise, that of "militant
feminism", to again persecute the
brotherhood of man and A. D.
Brougham (Letters, Poor
Pranksters Victims of Pointless
Agitation, Feb. 1) in particular.
But Brougham's rhetoric exceeds
even this frightful appellation: not
only is he threatened by militant
feminists, but also by carrion
vultures, trendy fanatics, and
urinating dogs. Beware the
ravenous maw of "wild-eyed
pseudo-feminists", etc., etc. . . .
Reactionary rhetoric aside,
however, Brougham's letter has
managed to totally avoid the issue
at hand while saying practically
nothing at great length. Luckily for
us, he has supplied a seven point
summary of his argument which effectively demonstrates just how
much control he has over his rational processes.
Note in particular his third point,
"Yellow journalism of The
Ubyssey", or his forceful conclusion, "(7) feminism". And as for
his statement, " 'Ku Klux Klan',
'racism,' and 'sexism' (5) cannot be
taken seriously here (6) Unless we
have succumbed to militant (7)
Feminism", it is difficult to know
what he means, let alone take him
seriously.
The central point to arise out of
the Pit incident (one not included in
Brougham's enumerated list) is not
that it was the pledges' overt intention "to symbolically abuse women
and racial groups" — clearly it was
not — but that the prevailing attitudes (in the fraternity, in the Pit,
in society at large) condone exactly
that: abuse, symbolic and otherwise.
The explicit intention of a single
agent is not at issue here; what is at
issue is the whole "boys will be
boys" attitude which dismisses
racist, sexist or violent actions as
being innocuous. "Let them have
their fun," cries the old guard,
chuckling at the fact that they too
were young once.
Brougham claims that it is the
"moral climate" that has created
the present feminist outrage (or that
it itself is feminist, or that it is simply activist — it is not exacely clear).
But he fails to look behind the actions of feminists to see them as a
reaction to a moral climate which
has been systematically oppressing
women for far longer than
feminism has been "trendy".
Just because the pledges were
drunk, or "meant no harm", does
not mean that we can dismiss their
actions as a "mere prank". Their
actions have incurred outrage
precisely because they reflect the
prevailing misogynic attitudes of
not only the Bowery, nor Archie
Bunker's living-room, nor even
UBC, but our entire society.
Craig •oyes
arts 4
and off campus) the link between
the use of a doll for sexual abuse
and the depersonalization is all too
clear.
A repeated justification of the
behavior has been that the students
were drunk. As we see it, one has to
accept responsibility for one's actions whether drunk or sober.
Besides, this was not a spur of the
moment escapade. Particularly
where there is offence or harm to
others, one simply can't hide
behind the excuse of drunkenness.
The truth is people usually get
"tanked up" to enable them to do
what they would be incapable of
doing sober.
The university should be exemplary in the area of human relations. As members of this community we are ashamed that this
episode has been so casually accepted.
Anthony Glass
J. Leach
botany
Pit incident
'disgusting9
I wish to express dissatisfaction
regarding the mock rape staged by
some Psi Upsilon fraternity membrs
in the Pit on Saturday Jan. 22.
Not only are we disgusted by the
sexist and racist acts but appalled at
the lack of action shown by the Pit
staff in their failure to eject the
members of Psi Upsilon from the
Pit immediately.
It is also dissatisfying to read in
The Ubyssey that Alma Mater
Society president Dave Frank feels
that these actions and their
perpetrators have been dealt with.
He sees no need for a complaint to
be assessed by student court, which
is UBC's judicial body. These acts
are more than just "pranks." They
should, and we understand they
will, be taken to an official court of
law, however unnecessary Frank
seems to think that is.
Miriam Sobrino
AUS student council rep
Photog antics distract from Mose
In response to the Mose Allison
review of Feb. 1 (Mose Sings
Cynical Blues), I am surprised that
your reviewer Chris Wong mentioned only the drunken couple lurching
near the stage. In the opinion of
everyone around me this distraction
was nothing compared to the antics
of the Ubyssey photographer accompanying him.
He spent seemingly endless
moments preparing every shot,
focussing and refocussing, practically using the piano as an elbow
support, all the while blocking the
view of everyone who had waited
hours for the few good seats the
Landmark offers.
By the time he had finished a
whole roll of film, shouts of "Sit
Down!" were rolling in from
behind. By comparison the drunken
couple later on provoked only a
bemused reaction.
The fact that all this disturbance
resulted in the small smudgy picture
that appeared in The Ubyssey is absolutely incredible.
Patricia Lust
■ unclassified 5
(Im)posters
Ripping posters from campus walls is an unconstructive way to express
a dislike for something. Replacing these posters with crude and
misrepresentative fakes is even more childish.
Last week, the gays and lesbians of UBC posted notices about a dance
during gay and lesbian week at UBC. The posters were subsequently torn
from the walls and bulletin boards and substituted by false notices.
The second set of posters showed a crude drawing of two men having
anal intercourse while the man in front was sniffing a flower. They promoted an "Up the Butt" dance and gave the date and time of the dance
planned by gays and lesbians of UBC.
No one has claimed responsibility for this homophobic action.
We can assume that the people who printed the fake posters thought
they were funny. It is not surprising that those responsible have not identified themselves. Few people would laugh with them at their intolerant
message.
Last Tuesday a plane dropped thousands of corks on crowds in UBC's
Main mall. On the corks was inscribed the message: GET CORKEDI! It's
Gay Week.
This event was not sponsored by gays and lesbians of UBC. The people
who decided to rent a plane and take the trouble to engineer the typing and
wrapping of the messages are the people who deserve to be corked.
In light of these prejudiced actions during gay and lesbian week, one can
only hope the people responsible will realize the implications of their
misguided actions and focus on something more constructive. Preventing
and discrediting sexist events on our university campus, for instance.
The Lady Godiva ride is a good place to start.
,^fr
7
Vfd-'ffs-flj
As one man with his mind in the
toilet to another, I admire David
Chamberlain's letter of Feb. 1
(Patron Pissed Off), explaining his
mission to boldly go where no man
has gone before in seeking out new
facets of urine production in
Buchanan. Here at last is one Arts
student who seems to be concerned
with affairs of the bladder, and not
just those of the soul, the mind, and
any of that other artsy-fartsy stuff.
Unlike him, however, I immediately detected the reason why
those choice loos he cites may be so
empty. He describes their use, or
lack of it, on a recent Thursday,
when as everyone in Arts knows (including me, a B.A. '81 oldtimer)
that Thursday is the dead day in
that faculty; profs don't show,
students don't show, seats appear
on otherwise crowded buses (not to
mention in otherwise crowded piss
places), etc.
Now if he were to comment on
vacant totos as a by-product of bad
course scheduling I'd instantly
agree. I remember in Arts being
overloaded with courses on every
day of the week but Thursdays, and
besides in those ancient days we had
the dreaded Thursday 2:30 p.m. lectures nobody would register for or
go to if they did.
Fortunately that hour no longer
exists in Arts, from what I've seen
lately. I suggest that Chamberlain
take a look at the relevant cans on a
Monday or a Wednesday before
making any final calculation of the
cubic foot volume of urine flow. As
for dismantling said pissoirs, we
sure could use them in the law
building, where there aren't really
enough fine and private places to go
around. But this would create a bad
'admired'
turn of events. What does
Chamberlain, who seems to have an
overwhelming desire to urinate in
the presence of his fellow man and
to force this poor, common soul to
do the same, suggest that the fine-
boned, high-minded men of Arts do
instead — go piss up a stick?
He should look at the situation
another way. Perhaps all this really
means is that Arts students are less
full of shit than the university had
once reasonably anticipated. By the
same token, law students may have
at one time been presumed to be
severely lacking in this commodity,
but are in fact in it up to their
necks.
As for Robert Beynon's review
(Mussoc 'Amusing' But Dated) on
the opposite page, I have sympathy
for his position as a reviewer of
Mussoc, because back in the stone
age I used to review Mussoc in these
esteemed pages, too. Not only
because I was the only staffer who
said he'd go but because I was the
only one who seemed to want to.
Some idiot once even had the gall to
write in and complain about what I
wrote.
That scarring memory behind
me, I'd like to complain about what
Beynon wrote, namely Guys and
Dolls was filmed by MGM in 19SS,
when in fact it was a Samuel
Goldwyn production. It even
boasted the Goldwyn girls.
He should have asked Shaffin
Shariff as resident movie hack for
help on that one, but then again,
Shaffin's the one who thought Barbara Streisand won the Oscar for
Hello, Dolly! Some people think
they know everything after they've
become quotable in movie ads.
Larry Green
law 2
THE UBYSSEY
February 8.1963
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press.
February arrived with as little warning as a Cruise missile, and the staff was taken unawares.
Aside from Muriel Draaisma, no one knew what love was, or even thought it existed. But as
Feb. 14 drew nearer, Chris Wong, Alison Hoens and everyone else felt a change in atmosphere. Love. It was in the air, and spewed forth from dying Underwoods as Shaffin
Shariff and Craig Brooks typed out notes to persons unknown. Brian Jones and Peter Berlin
looked on in wonder as Doug Boyd, Harry Kertscheg and Monte Stewart found Nirvana
reading Sports Illustrated. As Robert Beynon introduced Cary Rodin to Cupid, Victor Wong
went wild drawing hearts. "Make sure they're good and red," chipped in a delirious comrade
Cathy McGann as Sarah Cox gazed lovingly at a picture of the CN Tower. Kelley Jo Burke
just sat in a daze, while Emma spoke to the youngsters about the merits of free love. Tuesday, February 8,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 5
Beynon's review: like Rex Reed
The Mussoc society, Grace Macdonald, and scores of other
volunteers deserve a big pat on the
back for the wonderful job they did
in realistically reproducing the
famous Damon Runyon story of
Guys and Dolls. It is a production
refreshingly free of complicated
plot, character or theme.
Although Ubyssey critic Robert
Beynon was busily searching for
justification of the musical's
"Broadway glitter and glamour"
(Mussoc 'Amusing' But Dated,
Feb. 1), scores of smiling individuals were transported (via the
frivolous plot and characters) back
to the days of gambling and
romance. The musical is intended to
be taken lightly. It is pure escapist
fun.   Beynon's   declaration   that
"Broadway musicals often lack a
sound plot and theme" is hardly a
revelation.
Musicals are not literary works of
art, nor are they asking to be
reviewed on the basis of a sound
plot or theme. What musicals intend to do is to take you away from
reality with great singing and dancing.
Most of all, a musical is an alternative form of entertainment. Judging from the reaction of the sellout
crowds this past weekend this year's
seventieth Mussoc production can
be considered a crowning success.
Beynon's retort, "Mark Hopkins
and Tina Kaya upstage Chris Elis
and Pam Danglemaier," and "they
lack charm and stage presence" is a
gigantic   mis-hit.    Ellis'   and
Bicycles: Where to park?
Dangelmaier's duets are wonderfully performed, and their
characterizations, meant to contrast
the brassiness of the other leads,
lend the down to earth quality that
Beynon seems to be looking for.
These comments aside, his crack
about, "the tacky auditorium ornamentation and faded red velvet
drapes" shows an inept lack of purpose as a critic. To add to his
obscure observation about the dear
old aud, Beynon tells us that falling
in love and marrying in two days is
preposterous.
So what? Beynon's use of
generalizations and obscure observations illustrate an inner desire to
enter the Rex Reed school of
criticism. Creating controversy is an
easy crime!
Dean Giustini
education 2
NOTICE TO ALL
ARTS STUDENTS
Nominations for the Arts Undergraduate
Society Council of 1983-1984
OPEN: February 8,1983   Close: March 21,1983
Positions Available:
1. President
2. Vice President
3. Treasurer
4. Secretary
5. Social Coordinator
6. Intermural Representative
7. Four Student Council Representatives
of AMS
Elections:
Will be held Wednesday, March 2nd, 1983
In Buchanan Building
9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
All Nomination Forms and Election Details are available
at the Arts Undergraduate Society Office: Buch 107
With regard to the new "No
Bicycle Parking" signs on campus
— where can we park? The existing
bicycle racks are out; they damage
wheel rims and I can't lock my bicycle onto them with my kryptonite
lock, not to mention the fact that
many stands are exposed to the
rain. I always lock my bike onto a
pole or rail, but so do an increasing number of other cyclists.
It is now getting so crowded that
there is often nowhere left to lock a
Precision Haircutting
bike except in the 'restricted' areas,
or the racks. This puts the cyclist in
a bad position: either use the bike
stands (and risk having it damaged
or stolen — like mine was last year),
or lock it in a spot where it might
impede a handicapped student.
Rather than just posting signs
telling us where we can't park, the
university should be providing proper bicycle racks in sheltered areas.
Marlyn Chisholm
economics 2
CORRECTION
NOTICE
ARTHUR ANDERSEN
Please note that deadline
for submission of resumes
for positions in management consulting should
be:
FEBRUARY 11, 1983
15%
OFF
Any Service
<EN     HIPPERT    HAIF
CO.
UBC Village -
Phone: 228-1471
with presentation of ad
to Terry, Karin, Debbie
Expires Feb. 28 83
StvtxcK j}<xr
,2)tkcvO\o {SVa*'4**'^^ oerv«3 " -i
The
University of
Lethbridge
School
of
Management
JAPANESE MANAGEMENT
TECHNIQUES
March 16, 17, 18, 1983
Lethbridge, Alberta
THEME
For Canadians, understanding the Japanese business world is important, not only
because Japan is Canada's second largest trading partner, but also because she offers
another perspective on management that is being closely followed by Canadian
Organizations.
The conference explores the nature of Japanese management and examples of its
transferability to North America. Academic and business specialists on Japanese
management will assess recent trends both in Japan and North America.
PARTIAL LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
Prakosh Sethi: University of Texas. Dallas
Founder and President, Onizuka Tiger Sport Shoe Company, Japan
Charles McMillan: Faculty of Administrative Studies, York University
Gregor Guthrie: President, Canada-Japan Trade Council
Sei Hayakawa: Retired, Japan Export Promotion Agency and General
Manager, Japan Petroleum Exploration Corporation of
Canada
Stanley Stark: Department of Management, Michigan State University
Shinichiro Tomihari: Consul-General of Japan, in Edmonton
For a brochure including information on registration and fees (reduced fees for faculty and students), contact Diane Bennett, Conference Coordinator, The University of
Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4, or call (4031 329-2244.
See The
EULYMPICS
Boat Racing, Keg Racing, Bellyflop Competition, E-Ball
Thursday, Feb. 10-SUB Plaza 12:30-2:30
DUNK A HACK
25c for 3 Shots at AMS and EUS Hacks
All Proceeds to Variety Club Telethon
*5J38J/
The
Price
is Right
hair design ltd.
• *p «/¥»>ntre\ent r$eccie*i
. 6r/r>? Wt ad. &rJr*t>
Shnyoo* t4i//ri 4>*SCat
me*
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1983 SPRING LECTURES
Brian Skinner
Dr. Brian Skinner is Professor of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University. He is known internationally for his work
in the areas of mineral resource economics and earth science. He has authored numerous scientific papers and
reports, as well as a book on the future of resource-based economics. His lectures should be of special interest to people in the disciplines of economics, geological sciences, physics, oceanography, chemical engineering, geophysics
and astronomy, mining and metallurgy.
SERIES TITLE:  The Origin and Future of Our Dwindling Mineral Resources
THE TERRESTRIAL HEARTH: Mineral deposits through time, from nature's factory
Tuesday, February 8 In Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 PM
THE WAVERING RESOURCE BALANCE:  Mineral deposits form slowly and are mined rapidly, with
long-term consequences for society
Thursday. February 10 In Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 PM
THE GEOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF SOUTH AFRICA, BUSHVELDT AND WITWATERSRAND:
Told in Words & Film
Friday, February 11
In Room 330-A, Geological Sciences Building, at 3:30 PM
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,1983
'fiom&&&?
TODAY
FAMILY HOUSING
Walt    Disney's   Dumbo,    6:30   p.m.,    SUB
auditorium. $1.50.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
The Polt. Sci. players present their annual Lack-
of-Talent show, 8 p.m., SUB 207/209. Usual
refreshments. Everyone welcome.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film: Americans in Transition — an introduction
to the history of Latin America and The United
States' involvement in the region, noon, Buch.
A204.
CIRCLE K CLUB
Meeting, 4:X p.m., SUB 213.
ENGINEERING WEEK
Ingenuity engineering, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,  SUB
concou'se. Displays on the latest in engineering
type stuff.
NEWMAN CLUB
Souper dooper soup lunch,  noon,  St.  Mark's
lunchroom.
ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Open general meeting to discuss policies and
goals for the new art gallery, 11:30 a.m., SUB
260.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General meeting  —  T-Shirt sales,  noon,  Biol.
Sci. 5458.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Celebration   of   eucharist   with   Rev.   George,
noon, Lutheran Campus centre.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Literature table — drop by for Marxist literature
and discussion, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., SUB concourse.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES
OF CANADA
Will the middle east explode? A lecture by Dr.
Conway, history professor, noon, Buch. A204.
BAHA'I CLUB
General  meeting,  everyone welcome  to  open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
207.
CUSO-UBC
Working in our backyard — labour at home, 7:30
p.m.. International House upper lounge. Part of
development education series.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt    Disney's    Dumbo,    6:30    p.m.,    SUB
auditorium. $1.50.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST CLUB
Recycling committee, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr.   Mavis   Teasdate,   associate   professor   of
paediatrics speaks, noon, IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
CANADA COUNCIL
Poetry reading: Anne Marriott, winner of Governor General's award (1941), noon, Buch. A204.
MED I
Multi-media presentation, 7 p.m., IRC 2.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Community dinner followed by Contemplation
and   Meditation   with   Roy   Wood,   6   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
General meeting and elections, noon, SUB 212.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
VALENTINES UBYSSEY
Deadline for valentines for Friday's paper, 4:30
p.m. SUB 266.
UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, 2:30 p.m., SUB 241k.
ENGINEERING WEEK
EUS film festival, noon, SUB auditorium. $1 admission to Variety club.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTURAL
DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214.
COOPERATIVE CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
MINISTRY
Dinner with George, the fighting young priest
who can talk to the young, 5:59 p.m., Lutheran
Campus centre.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATIC CLUB
General meeting, all members please attend,
noon, SUB 212.
THURSDAY
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Alam Brain, UBC educator for nuclear disarmament, will speak on nuclear disarmament and
socialism, noon, Comp. Sci. 200.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films: Gurdeep Singh Bains and Children of the
Tribe, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussin on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
212A,
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch evening, 7:30 p.m., International
house gate 4.
STUDENT PUGWASH ASSOCIATION
Panel discussion: The role of the public and of
experts in setting standards, noon, IRC 5.
UKRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting for people interested learning how to
skydive, noon, SUB 216G.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 206.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, voting members attend if at all
possible, all others welcome, noon, Buch. B224.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Is there only one god?, noon, Scarfe 206.
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Green door — an opportunity to find out about
Commerce related careers. Members of the
business community will be at hand. Everyone
welcome, orientation 1:15 p.m., Seminars
1:30-5:30 p.m., Wine and cheese 4-6 p.m., SUB
second floor.
ENGINEERING WEEK
EUlumpics, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB plaza. Dunk
EUS and AMS executive.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting discussing the World Council of
Churches, noon, St. Mark's music room. Phone
224-3311 for more info.
ST. JOHN AMBULANCE
CPR course, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., IRC mall.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, bring your lunch and practice
your French, 1:30 p.m.. International house main
lounge.
CYCLING CLUB
Slide presentation on touring in Northern B.C.,
noon, Buch. A102.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting information on upcoming speed
chess   championship,   noon-2:30   p.m.,   SUB
216F.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Social for all UBC team members, managers and
coaches.  Bzzr and chicken night, 6:30 p.m.,
SUB 207/209.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 224.
COMPUTING CENTRE
Open house, self-guided tour of the computer
room, noon-4 p.m., Comp. Sci. 100.
FRIDAY
CHINESE VARIETY CLUB
Chinese new year dinner and dance, 6:30-12:30
p.m., Kingsland.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Retreat on Clowning, at Camp Alexandra, meet
at 4:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre. Continues to Sunday.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Gym night, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CLUB
Workshop, 1:30-4:30 p.m., faculty of law moot
court room.
CITR BASKETBALL BROADCAST
Broadcast of T-Bird Canada West game against
the defending Canadian champs Victoria Vikings
on 102 FM, 8:15 p.m., game at War Memorial
gym.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE
The geological development of South Africa,
Bushveldt and Witwatersrand: told in words and
film, 3:30 p.m., Geo. Sci. 330A. B. Skinner, Yale
university.
NEWMAN CLUB
Fabulous feast, soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's
lunchroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Soiree de Patinage, Kitsilano community centre.
For more information come to the Thursday or
Friday rendez-vous.
Conversation hour, bring your lunch and practice
your French,  noon,  International house main
lounge.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Cruise missile display, all day, SUB foyer.
CHESS CLUB
Speed chess championship, free to members, $2
non-members, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Canada West basketball game against
Victoria Vikings, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
Preliminary games at 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Dumbo, 3 p.m., SUB auditorium.
$1.50.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
CSA Valentine dance, 8 p.m.-l a.m., Paradise
club, 1251 Howe St.
ENGINEERING WEEK
64th annual engineering ball, Thunderbird
Winter Sports centre. Public viewing of
engineering models 1-4 p.m.
?Show... 8:30p.m.. H--30P--
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Friday Feb. 18th
TICKETS
-CRO & VTC OUTLETS 687-4444
- All Eaton s & Woodward s Stores & at the door
I'ROVINC t        i"i siJuWi / i
M,„, I hi fh.m Hi. Mo
CHQM Vi In,,,,,•>»
RICHMOND REVIEW
i.-iin .COURIER       7Vri
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.tORCI A STRAIGHT
Mill SU-VMSMI,,//,,,,    Ml,
CISL Ih, I n. .Si,,.,.
I'rmluilum       I ik,    \   I r, s/i ( oul „l C.JI.ll     ■ K. ..II I   UBYSSEY        / h.V. ■ H if.   l,r,ut' ,\„ Qu
Iri.-vW.T, fumuM,,     .SI Hi    VANCOUVER SHOW     il'l»»„ ■ ,„ I „„ ,, Hrs it, -i
K./usI   I ontuslH      i 'i        (,< I /niisc.Si, Jw, s Oft Ih,  Air     .'
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women's Canada West basketball game against
the Victoria Vikings, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym. Preliminary games at 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game vs. South Slope YMCA, 10 a.m.. Aquatic
centre.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Winter Novice series slalom, 10 a.m., B-lot by
barn.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome, 9 a.m., meet between SUB and aquatic centre.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
The real ride to Trolls for Brunch (weather permitting), meet at 10:30 a.m., SUB north side.
MONDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening, 7:30 p.m., International house gate 4.
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
^^ Charge Phone Orders taken over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
INCREDIBLY INTERESTING 1 month
adventure to a town 7000 ft, in the
Himalayas of India. Departs May '83. Fantastic climbing areal Complete cost, including airfare, only $1989! Info: Joe Pilaar,
CC, Trent University, -feterboro, Ont.
705-743-4391.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
EDGAR CAYCE
type deep trance readings.
Any question in the world.
Booking now for DON
DAUGHTRY'S February visit to
Vancouver. Call Pat Wood,
228-9865.
20 — Housing
UNFURNISHED, single room available now
now in community house for mature male.
Vegetarian, non-smoker, reliable. Rent $260
plus utilities. Janet 286-6376.
ON CAMPUS. Full room and board. Available Feb. 1st. $310 per month. Contact
Dennis at 224-3606 or 224-9431.
25 — Instruction
GMAT,      LSAT,      MCAT     Prepara
tion. Call National Testing Centre 738-4618.
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners Course or
Basic Coastal cruising. 30 ft. cruiser/racer.
Hands on experience. Registering NOW
Feb. Mar. Apr., classes. Don't be left on
the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after
7. Sailcraft Ltd.
30 — Jobs
35 — Lost
LOST: Reward for ladies gold watch lost Jan.
20 near Soc/Anth bldg. Has great sentimental value: Call Bertha 321-0589.
LOST one tabby cat, blonde, blue eyes,
cuddly. Last seen heading to Paris. If found
please return to Dave & Steve.
40 — Messages
DO YOU KNOW the reason why: the evening STAR sheds beams of peace, and the
CRESCENT'S silver horns increase?
Schlong.
50 — Rentals
65 — Scandals
FRENCH   LIEUTENANT'S   WOMEN   is
showing is SUB this week. Showtimes are
Thurs. & Sun. at 7:00 and Fri. & Sat. at
7:00 & 9:45.
MILONI SOCCER CLUB
PRESENTS
DOUCETTE
& mystery guest
SAT., FEB. 12
Hellenic Hall, 4500 Arbutus
Tickets $5 — Charles Bogle Records
4430 W. 10th AVE.
MODE COLLEGE of Bartering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
NEED EXCELLENT DAYCARE. Phone
Cecelia 734-1013. Carnarvon Community
Daycare Society. 4V4 yr. olds and
kindergarden age — $220 per month. Out-
of-school care — $95 per month. 16th &
Balaclava, Vancouver. 7:30 a.m. to 6:00
p.m.
SELF HYPNOSIS TAPES. Many titles and
made to order by a clinical hypnotherapist.
For free brochure, contact Entrance Communications Ltd., Dept. B Box94567, Richmond, B.C. 273-7048.
80 — Tutoring
TUTORS WANTED: Economics 100,
Chemistry 103. $14 per hour. Contact:
Sheila 228-4685.
TUTORING SERVICE: Undergraduate and
graduate tutoring in geography, natural
resource management and community
planning. Tutor hold PhD in geography and
has seven years university teaching experience. 681-7936 or 669-1284.
85 — Typing
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 876-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
YEAR-ROUND expert typing essays, theses,
etc. Phone 738-6829 ten a.m. to nine p.m.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further, resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
TAPING: $1.00 per page 585-6024. Term
papers, thesis, letters, resumes, misc. Experienced typist. Near Guildford.
FRANCINES TYPING SERVICES: Theses,
papers, etc. —reasonable rates. Please inquire 732-3647.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes,
Bilingual, Word Processor, Clemy,
266-6641.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone in 224-6518. Tuesday, February 8,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
The OLD FORT BREWING CO. suggests you share the Old Fort experience with your Valentine by taking her/him to "Dee Lippingwell's"
Photography Showing.
o>bMs
<3
A.M.S.
GAMES ROOM
DOWNSTAIRS STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY OR BRITISH COLUMBIA
~~~~HEATURJNG:.
8 LANE 5 PIN BOWLING
RECENTLY RENOVATED
9 BILLIARD TABLES
AND OVER 45 VIDEO 5^£g, jWNMU^FOOSEMU.n
ANY GROUPS OR LEAGUES INTERESTED IN MAKING
ADVANCED BOOKINGS, PLEASE CALL
THE GAMES ROOM - 228-3692
THE A.M.S. GAMES ROOM INVITES YOU TO COME
AND VISIT THEIR NEWLY RENOVATED FACILITIES,
THIS COUPON ENTITLES YOU OR YOUR GROUP TO
hMs
HALF PRICE
BOWLING
FROM FEBRUARY 1 ■ FEBRUARY 23, 1983
OPEN: MONDAY to SATURDAY — 8:00 am - 12:45 pm
SUNDAY: 10 00 am - 11:30 pm
BOX OFFICE -
10:00 a. m. -5:00 p. m.
MON.-SAT.
AMS Ticket Office
& Concessions
NOW A VTC OUTLET
CLUB
Casual Wave - Feb. 18
Daniel Ellsberg — March 26
February Blues Dance — Feb. 11
Cupid's Night Out - Feb. 12
OTHER
Lorita Leung — Feb. 20
Keg Valentine Party — Feb. 11
Great Trek T-Shirts      $4.00
Great Trek Golf Shirts    $10.00
Cigarette Special, ctn    $10.59
selected brands
Black Twizzlers   3/10c
while supplies last
Student Directories      $1.00
Selection of Picture Frames
THE NEW WORLD OF
AMOUCA-S ftMMTTE UVI lODKf MCTKHI P10GUAI
A FtelNMN Cmcti *ik mt mmm STAR TUX   IAm^m Imi   TV Hm> a»«4 -mm* «f*Mi
mm fcr STAI fXIX    TW Cmj   *n«f H*tt Haam m*1 *kb! kuim| el *, NAM Urn
V***""*    NwhAbM liiAirtii'U *m tW fcftn m STAl TUX A* Cm li^^Hi)
mm •■« 4**t»« aAni STAI THE Mast mt ■*** mm mmmn
1mm AT'
SUN. MARCH 6th   1.30pm & 730pm
VWR MEMORIAL GYM,  UBC
ADVANCE TICKETS' $5 AMS STUDENTS
$6 GENERAL
AMLABLE AT VTC/CBO OUTLETS, WCCOWW*
-EATON'S. COMC SHOP. AMS BOX OFFICE _
FOrInFOWIATION PLEASE PH0HE 687 4444
PRODUCED BY A.H.S.  CONCERTS
BREAK THOSE
ACADEMIC CHAINS
Come to the PIT
Saturdays, Noon to 6
Feb. 12: "PINBALL MADNESS"
Black Hole, Sharpshooter, Buck Rogers
Feb. 19: "FOOSBALL FUN TOURNEY"
ALL MACHINES ON FREE PLAY
PRIZES, SURPRISES
FOR HIGH SCORES, LOW SCORES
& MYSTERY SCORES
FOR SINGLES, TEAMS, COUPLES.
SEE YOU THERE!!!
"PIT
UPDATE"
Feb. 10 & 11
9:30 p.m.
"INSTRUCTIONS"
Electronic Sound from
Winnipeg
Thursday — Free
Friday - $2.50
GALLERY
LOUNGE
"Keith Bennett
and the Blues"
Blues Music
Feb. 9 thru 12
9:00 p.m.
No Cover Charge
STUDENTS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO ATTEND OUR
PREMIER
SHOWING
THE GALLERY LOUNGE
presents
THE SWEETHEART OF PHOTOGRAPHY
in person
DEE LIPPINGWELL"
Rock and RoJI
Photography Show
Time: noon to 4 p.m.
Date: February 14, 1983
Place: Student Union Building
Main Concourse
University of B.C. Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 8,1983
First hoop win
in two years
By DOUG BOYD
For some reason, popular opinion on the campus seems to be that
the women's basketball team is a
pushover. A visit to the War
Memorial Gym last Friday or Saturday night would have silenced some
of the skeptics.
On Friday night the women
T'Birds hosted the ninth ranked
University of Saskatchewan.
Despite a valiant second half rally,
they were overpowered and were
handed their sixth consecutive conference loss, 64-56.
On Saturday night it appeared
that they were destined for a similar
fate, as the sixth ranked University
of Alberta Pandas had run up a
16-2 lead after nine minutes of play.
"Our team is very young", said
coach Pomfret, "and we always
come out very tense in the few
minutes which leads to all sort of
problems."
However, led by Nadine
Fedorak's tenacious play and Cathy
r^f
AT LAST... a Canada West win
Herbert's shooting, the 'Birds had
closed the gap to 22-18 by halftime.
The second half featured exciting
end to end action. By the 14th
minute the 'Birds had taken the lead
by one point only to be down by
two, four minutes later. In the last
minute of play, the 'Birds again
took command and held on to post
en emotional 46-44 victory.
"I'm very proud of the team",
said Pomfret, "they never gave up.
We're in a tough division with four
of the six teams ranked in the top
ten nationally and we'll have to
continue to work hard to have a
successful season", he said.
On Saturday night at 8:30 the
women will take their 9-17 overall
record into WMG and face the
country's top ranked Victoria
Vikettes.
BLACK & LEE
TUX RENTALS
NOW 3  STORES
RICHMOND 273-5929
VANCOUVER 688-2481
SURREY 585-0733
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
SPORTS
'Birds beat Bears in 'bush'
By MONTE STEWART
The Birds split a pair of games
held at War Memorial Gym. Saturday, the Alberta Golden Bears
defeated UBC 79-78 in a game that
the Birds are probably kicking
themselves for losing.
Thursday, the Birds squandered a
10 point half-time lead, but still
managed to wrestle a 75-70 decision
from the University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
Some players are becoming
dispirited as a result of the lack of
fan support. They feel that some
changes should be made — soon.
"This place (War Memorial
Gym) is bush", said one player who
refused to be identified. "As far as
I'm concerned, the best improvement that they could make would
be to put some bleachers at court
level", said the player, referring to
renovations which are currently
underway. Also, the player felt that
the Athletic Department was using
budget restraints as a poor excuse
for not promoting WMG events.
"They say we (Athletics) don't have
any money, but how much does it
cost to stick up a sign saying FREE
ADMISSION?" asked the player
Saturday, the Birds could taste
victory but could not sink their
teeth into it. With nine seconds left
Mark Marter narrowed the margin
to 79-78 by sinking a couple of foul
shots. On an ensuing throw-in,
Alberta forward Fred Murrell was
charged with a pushing foul.
Therefore, UBC regained possession. However, three Thunderbirds
failed to tip in consecutive rebounds
before time ran out.
Marter led all scorers with 20
points while Jamie Boyle and Pat
West contributed 16 points each.
Although the Birds trailed by 12
points at half-time on Saturday and
still almost won, they led by 10
points at the half on Thursday and
almost lost. "We played just well
enough to win", said coach Bob
Molinski.
Husky guard Paul Humbert was
very successful from long range and
Hockey on the up
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
Coach Jack Moores is optimistic.
Not only does he have to be, he has
good reason to be.
Although his second year as
coach of UBC's Thunderbirds
men's hockey team may land him
another finish out of the play-offs
in the tough Canada West conference Moores and his assistant
Fred Masuch have made solid
strides toward building a winning
hockey team.
While winning only 6 of 24 league
games last year, the weekend split
with Calgary Dinosaurs gives the
Thunderbirds 6 wins in 18 games
this season. The Birds' overall
record of 14-15-2 is already a vast
improvement over last year's unimpressive 9-21-0 finish.
"We are growing. If you take a
look at the stats, we're ahead of last
year," Moores said. "We're getting
stronger and we're going to keep on
getting stronger. Add a few more
players and hopefully ..."
Coach Moores is looking to take
the Birds' to their first winning
season since 1977-78, which was the
last season of a 12 year stint without
a losing record. "It doesn't happen
overnight," Moores said. "It's one
to two years down the road at least.
Friday night in Calgary netminder Pierre Grenier (4.08 goals
against average) notched his third
win in three starts as the Birds
defeated the Dinosaurs 6-4.
On Saturday night, Harris' ninth
goal of the season was the Birds only score in a 4-1 losing cause.
ENGINEER'S BALL
Public Viewing of Decorations and Technical
Models. THEME: "Great Journeys"
SATURDAY, JANUARY 12
1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Donations to Variety Club Telethon accepted
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 10 at 12:30 p.m.
Angus Building, Room 104 (Commerce)
Sponsored by Baptist Student Union
subsequently led all scorers with 18
points. Bruce Holmes paced the
Birds' attack with 15 points while
Boyle added 14 points and 10 rebounds.
The Thunderbirds now have a
12-21-1 overall record and a 1-4
mark in league play. The Birds have
five league contests remaining.
Three of those are at WMG.
The Birds meet the University of
Victoria Vikings this Friday at 8:30
p.m. at War Memorial Gym.
Hopefully, the increased media
exposure will help increase attendance. "It's pretty sad when most
of the fans are the players'
parents", said the very dejected
unidentified player.
Athletes make mark
Eleven UBC athletes attained Canadian Intervarsity Athletic Union
qualifying times at the Northwest
and Pacific Northwest meet in
Moscow Idaho on the weekend.
This brings the UBC total to 20.
The outstanding performance in
the Cibbie Dome was by the men's
4x200 metre relay team which won
first place in a smoking 2 minutes
11.1 seconds.
In the rest of the events UBC
could only manage a second, by
Dave Parker in the pole vault and
three thirds, by Bob Dalton in the
400 metres and Carmen James and
Tami Linz who tied in the high
jump. All these athletes will be
travelling to Toronto next month
for the CIAU games. Those athletes
who haven't managed qualifying
times yet will have another chance
at Portland, Oregon in two weeks.
UBC, Clan split
The Thunderbird swimming and
diving team travelled to Burnaby
Mountain last Friday night for a
dual meet against the Simon Fraser
University Clansmen. The results
were mixed, the women won 87 to
62 and the men lost to the Clan 77
to 36.
This was the final dual meet of
the season for the 'Birds. The
women finished with a five-three
overall won loss record and the men
won two and lost six of their meets.
UBC's key swimmers continued
to excell. Val Whyte took the 100
and 200 metre backstroke and 200
butterfly, while Rhonda
Thomasson won the 50 and 100
metre freestyle events. In men's
competition Mike Blondal won the
100 metre butterfly.
Nancy Bonham continues to
dominate the university diving
scene. She led the women's team to
a clean sweep of the top three spots
in the one and three metre events.
Teammate Steve Church won the
three metre event in the men's competition.
Fourteen members of the
Thunderbird team will participate
in the B.C. Senior Provincial
Championships at the Vancouver
Aquatic Centre this weekend
SWAP
Make Your Holiday Work!
Cut travel costs and gain valuable work experience abroad with
the Student Work Abroad
Program (swap).
NAME
PHONE
SWAP 82/83
Mail completed coupon to:
GroilK   e^ TRAVEL
Ybi*W5y!iV*  CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344
THIS WEEK AT
HILLEL
Tues., Feb. 8
12:30-2:00 p.m.  Free Salami Lunch sponsored by
B'nai B'rith Women
Wed., Feb. 9
"Rap with the Rabbi" - 12:30 p.m.
Thurs., Feb. 10
Network Seminar — 12:30-2:30 p.m.
Israel Week Orientation
Fri., Feb. 11
Israeli Dancing in preparation for Israel Week
Notice of
AMS ANNUAL
GENERAL
MEETING
Wednesday, Feb. 16th
12 to 12:30 p.m.
Room 206, S.U.B.

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