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The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1972

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Array Call for CAUT follows
new anthrosoc rebuff
Vol. UH, No. 42
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 27, 1972
4S 228-2301
By TOM STAFFORD
The anthropology-sociology
department, at a meeting
Tuesday, voted almost
unanimously to call in the
Canadian Association of
University Teachers to investigate
the handling of the disputed
tenure cases of junior profs
Matthew Speier and Ron Silvers.
The meeting was opened by
department head Cyril Belshaw's
reading of a lengthy, legalistic
letter from arts dean Doug Kenny.
In his letter, Kenny announced his
refusal to return the Speier-Silvers
cases to the department for
reconsideration. The department
had voted 30-8 three weeks ago in
Old American
new president
BURNABY (Staff) - Simon
Fraser University students elected
a 53-year-old American as their
new student society president.
In a low voter turnout Tuesday
of 1,100 of 5,000 students,
geography TA Ace Hollibaugh
defeated history student Norman
Wickstrom and Young Socialist
candidate Ron Cameron in the
byelection caused by the
impeachment of the student
executive in November.
Hollibaugh's slate, the
Alternative Government, landed
six persons on the 13-person
executive who will serve until
Aug. 31.
favor of having the cases returned.
Kenny decided that the
department had no right to pass
such a motion.
The motion to call in the
CAUT was made by professor
Howard Boughey and passed,
after some quibbling on the
wording, without a single
dissenting vote, although there
were a few abstentions. This is the
first time that a department at
UBC has taken such action, and
represents a further public
questioning, by students and
faculty, of the way in which
Belshaw runs his department.
Kenny's decision not to return
the cases came as no surprise to
department members who learned
of the move through informal
channels the day before. It is
expected that the decision to
ignore the department's wishes
will aggravate the situation of
crumbling trust that now exists in
anthrosoc, although it is unlikely
that any further action will be
forthcoming.
Department members have
succumbed to weariness, a desire
to be left alone and, perhaps, a
touch of fear. With their lack of
power having been openly
demonstrated, several department
members believe that the CAUT
motion is as far as they can go,
particularly in the face of such
things as Socred hints about
tenure   investigations   and   the
ICE COATS stonework around library fountain, snapped in cold January air by photographer Garry
Gruenke. "Is this our warm, fluid university?" students silently'asked.
pressure of the current economic
squeeze on the university.
As for the Speier-Silvers cases
themselves, the issue is not yet
closed. Kenny's promotions and
tenure committee has two options
open to it. It is still possible for
committee members to return the
cases to anthrosoc if they are not
satisfied with the evidence, or
they can go ahead, on the basis of
available materials, and vote for or
against tenure for the two profs.
Their recommendations go the
president. They are expected to
make a decision within the next
two weeks.
Under the welter of formal
political moves, several allegations
emerged about the murky
decision-making process in both
the department and the faculty of
arts.
It was learned from a member
of Kenny's P & T committee
(who, in UBC's great Year of
Anonymity, will go unnamed)
that Kenny's committee was
willing to return the cases to the
department in December.
At that time the anthrosoc P &
T committee was heatedly arguing
about whether or not to ask for
the cases back. It is further
claimed that Belshaw knew that
the arts faculty committee was
willing to return the cases.
However, members of the
anthrosoc committee were
operating under the impression
that Kenny didn't want the cases
returned, and Belshaw did nothing
to dispell that notion.
Committee members were led
to believe that the extent of
Kenny's statement of policy was
contained in a letter he'd written
a month before in which he'd said
that the political climate in the
department was too hot to permit
return of the cases. The anthrosoc
committee was not informed of
Kenny's change of mind on the
matter.
Nonetheless, the issue came to
a department committee vote.
Several persons present at the
meeting (who will also go
unnamed) reported that there was
a one-vote majority in favor of
asking for reconsideration of the
cases, at which point Belshaw cast
a negative vote, thus creating a tie.
Though several members of the
committee believe that it was
irregular for Belshaw to vote on
the matter, there was no protest.
Belshaw announced the next day
that the anthrosoc P & T
committee had decided, by a
"split vote", not to reconsider the
cases.
It is further reported that
Belshaw told the arts faculty
committee that the anthrosoc P &
T group had, by a one-vote
majority, decided not to
reconsider the cases. Apparently,
there is a discrepancy between
what Belshaw told the faculty of
arts committee (of which he is a
member) and what actually
occurred.
One of the many oddities of
the situation is that although the
department has repudiated
Belshaw's policies several times
in the last weeks, there is an
evident unwillingness too take the
usual final step of passing a
no-confidence motion that in
effect asks the heatf to resign. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  January  27,   1972
Daycare people unionize
By SANDI SHREVE
The majority of daycare centre employees are
underpaid, many earning less than the minimum
wage of $1.50 per hour.
"The average daycare worker earns $308 per
month and some less than that, while the directors
of the centres are making more than $400 per
month," daycare worker Larissa Tarwick said
Wednesday.
In an attempt to rectify this situation, more
than 50 daycare workers voted unanimously
Saturday to join the Social Service Employees
Union, established in Victoria one year ago.
They will apply to the Labor Relations Board
for certification as local 2 of the union in
mid-February.
Tarwich, who was elected local executive
president at the Saturday meeting, said the workers
will have bargaining rights with their employers
when they become certified.
"A lot of people tried discussing wage increases
and improved working conditions with their
employers on their own, but it didn't work," she
said.
She said other bones of contention between
employees and employers include long working
hours and inadequate working conditions.
The SSEU requires its members to work a
minimum of 40 hours per month thus allowing part
time workers to join.
"A lot of centres use part time help because it
is cheaper. We wanted a union that would include
them so we chose the SSEU rather than CUPE
(Canadian Union of Public Employees)," she said.
She said they hope to have the support of 16
centres by the time they apply for certification in
February and to "eventually include all Greater
Vancouver area centres."
WhatIs up, doc?
Vasectomy
Unless you've been living under a rock for the
past few years, you must have heard of the male
sterilization procedure called vasectomy. Here are
some answers to commonly asked questions:
Is it an operation? Yes, in much the same sense
as removing a wart is an operation. A little incision
less than an inch long is made in the skin of the
scrotum, usually under local anaesthetic, and the
patient takes, at most, one afternoon off work.
What exactly is done? There is a tube about the
thickness of a pencil lead, called the spermatic cord,
which travels from the testicle, under the skin, up
over the pubic bone, through the abdominal
muscles, down the front of the abdominal wall and
into two sacs near the bladder. The sacs connect
with the urethra and thence with the outside world.
The spermatic cord can be easily felt near the
pubic bone. It contains blood vessels and nerves and
the vas deferens, or "carrying tube" which carries
sperm. Vasectomy refers to cutting and tying off,
and usually removing, a piece of the vas.
Where is it done? In a specialist's office,
usually, though some like to do it in the hospital.
Is it safe? Yes. No deaths have been reported.
The usual side effects are a little pain and some
itching during the next three or four days.
What happens to the sperm that can't get
through the vas? They are reabsorbed into the body.
Will I become impotent? No. There is no
change in sexual function. The ejaculated fluid is
mostly secretions from the prostate gland anyway,
and its volume will not be affected.
Is it effective right away? No. Live sperms may
TAIZLTAIZtTAIZETAIZETAI "~~*	
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remain in the seminal tract for six weeks or more.
Your doctor will do repeated sperm counts after the
procedure and when you are sterile he will tell you.
Do the tubes ever join themselves up again? It
can happen, although this is rare — say, less than
one in a thousand cases.
Can it be reversed? Don't count on it. Some
surgeons say they can reverse up to 50 per cent of
vasectomies, but even when sperm reappear in the
ejaculate, fertility may not be regained.
Will the doctor refuse to do it if I have no
children? He might, because theoretically
sterilization is not legal in B.C. and you could sue
him if you changed your mind. You will be asked to
sign legal forms waiving your right to sue.
Is it a good idea? For a stable monogamous
couple who want no more children, it is the best
method of contraception now available — cheap,
safe, final and not as dangerous as female
sterilization.
By the way, doctors'are working on various
schemes for making temporary blockages in the vas
deferens, such as implanting plastic or metal valves,
or threads. Then when you want children, you
simply have another little snip in the skin and turn
on the tap.
Feeling rotten? Got problems with your body?
This column, written by someone who knows,
attempts to provide information about aches and
pains common among students and dispel some
common myths. It is strictly informational and
doesn't attempt to prescribe or advise, except to say
when a doctor should be consulted.
Send questions and letters to What's Up, Doc?,
Room 241-K, SUB, UBC.
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SUNDAY
January 30th
10:30 a.m.
Lutheran Campus
Centre
8:00 p.m.
Vancouver School
of Theology
Brother Thomas
Taize, France.
Sponsored by U.R.C.
ICONTACCI
12
HOUR RELIEF
10
CAPMRIS
1972
CHARTER
FLIGHTS
RETURN FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON - VANCOUVER
May 1 - Aug. 25 $250.00
May 2 - June 26 250.00
May 10 -Sept. 3 250.00
May 15-Aug. 25 250.00
May 28-July 14 250.00
EDMONTON - LONDON - EDMONTON
May 5 - Aug. 25 240.00
CALGARY - LONDON - CALGARY
May 10 -Sept. 3 240.00
VANCOUVER - MONTREAL - VANCOUVER
July 29 - Aug. 28 139.00
ONE-WAY FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON
May 15
145.00
Sept. 7
145.00
Sept. 11
145.00
EDMONTON - LONDON
May 15
140.00
CALGARY - LONDON
Sept. 30
140.00
AMS Travel Office Room 226 SUB
OPEN - 1:00 - 4 P.M. Mon. - Thurs. - 1:00 - 3 P.M. Fri.
PHONE: 228-2980
One capsule relieves the symptoms
of a cold for 12 hours.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
The following referendums will be voted on in conjunction with
the FIRST SLATE of AMS elections, on Wednesday, FEBRUARY 2,1972:
(1) S.U.B. EXPANSION REFERENDUM:
Whereas Student Council has recommended the development of the
following areas of S.U.B.:
(1) Area 18-D; and (2) Area 18-F;
and    whereas    Student    Council    has    recommended    the
redevelopment of the following areas of S.U.B.:
(1)  Room 30; (2) the present Lounge and Music areas and (31
Room 130;
ARE you in favor of extending the term of financing for the Student
Union Building to allow a $350,000 expansion program in these areas, it
being understood that such extension of term will result in no increase in
the amount of the current $15.00 Building Fee portion of the AMS Fee?
(2) FOOD SERVICES REFERENDUM:
In  principle,  are you   in  favor  of  the  AMS  acquiring  control  of the
University's Food Services operations in S.U.B.?
•     •     •
The following referendum will  be voted on  in conjunction with the
SECOND SLATE of AMS elections, on Wednesday, FEBRUARY 9, 1972.
FEE REFERENDUM:
Whereas the AMS fee is currently divided into a non-discretionary $15.00
Building Fee and a $9.00 Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
and whereas the Student Council of the AMS recommends an increase of
the Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
ARE you in favor of increasing the operating Fund levy from $9.00 to
$14.00?
READ AND CONSIDER
THE ABOVE REFERENDUMS!
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL
J Thursday, January 27, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—garry gruenke photo
CURRY COMES to campus as Curry House's Helen Wiseman dishes up kheema curry and rice in SUB 207-209. Curry House is one of five
restaurants serving organic and ethnic food weekdays in Alma Mater Society plot to subvert administration food services.
Partridge's
severance
$73,000
VICTORIA (Staff) - Outgoing
president Bruce Partridge of the
University of Victoria will take
$73,000 with him when he leaves.
The university agreed to pay
Partridge this amount because his
seven-year contract was cut short,
board of governors president
Lloyd MacKenzie said Tuesday.
The amount consists of Yh
years' salary at $42,000 per year
and "other benefits" which come
to about 10 per cent of this
salary.
"Some people in Victoria think
the amount excessive, but others
think that's what we must expect
from a man working at the salary
he was," UVic public relations
officer Maurice Cownden said
Wednesday.
Partridge came to UVic in
1968 from an administrative vice
presidency at Johns Hopkins
University. At that time the board
of governors agreed to match the
$42,000 salary paid to him by
Johns Hopkins.
On Nov. 15, 1971, Partridge
was forced to resign after a
prolonged struggle about tenure
during which his academic
qualifications were called into
question.
At that time it was agreed
Partridge's resignation would
become effective June 30, 1972,
and he would then receive his
salary until June 30, 1973.
Later it was decided "in the
interests of the university" that
his resignation would take effect
Jan. 31 of this year. Because of
this he was entitled to another
half-year's salary for the "loss of
office settlement" for the period
Feb. 1-June 30, 1972.     '
Cowndon said "to the best of
his knowledge" Partridge had not
taken another job as yet.
Partridge was labelled
"authoritarian and aristocratic"
by some faculty members last
year in his handling of tenure
disputes at UVic. Opponents also
condemned him for his so-called
"mail-order degrees" from the
discredited Blackstone College.
Grape still using
i Straight office
The Grape will continue to
publish out of the Georgia
Straight offices at least until
Monday.
Straight owner Dan McLeod
made an application before the
B.C. Supreme Court Wednesday
morning for an injunction to
expel the Grape collective from
the Straight offices. An
adjournment of the motion was
granted until 10:30 a.m. Monday
to allow Grape lawyer Leo
McGrady to prepare his case.
The court granted the
adjournment, providing that no
sale of Straight assets or use of the
Straight distribution system occur
during the interim.
The Grape collective took over
the Straight offices Jan. 19, and
Friday published the first issue of
the Grape.
The second issue was published
Wednesday morning, "though the
collective is using the alternate
-distribution system, as directed by
the court," McGrady said. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,   January   27,   1972
mums ft
JANUARY 27,1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial   departments,   228-2301,   228-2307;
Friday. Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Page
It was hide and seek day as Berton Woodward
peeked frantically through John's Sydor, but only
Garry Gruenke greeted him and quickly frittered away
to the deep regions of the impregnable Vaughn
Palmer, who galloped gracefully into the incredible
juxtaposition of Kinl MacDonald and Sandy Kass.
Safely hidden he listlessly surveyed the lonely
Laurence Leader wandering aimlessly with two strikes
against him through the Jan O'Briens. John
Andersen crept out from between Paul Knox and
Ingmar Bergman and ran to a nearby Randy Frith
while our hero hippied through the valleys of Leslie
Plommer who uncouthly pushed him into the
white-footed troubador Mike Sasges, from whence he
rebounded into the gangling land of Ginny Gait,
Gordon Gibson and Mike Gidora. Kent Spencer
harrumphed uncomfortably, while Lesley Krueger
revealed that it was Sandi Shreve who was hiding the
moral indignation up her pant leg, all along.
Bad show
Events in the anthrosoc tenure dispute are
finally grinding towards some kind of resolution.
The game is already up for Cyril Belshaw,
who has now lost his last shreds of credibility
both within his department and in the university
in general.
As for arts dean Doug Kenny, a man with
aspirations in the university hierarchy, he too is
gradually being exposed as the power figure who's
keeping the lid on the arts faculty by backing
department heads all the way.
It Seems amazing to us that Kenny refused to
return the Speier-Silvers cases to the anthrosoc
P&T committee after the department voted 30 to
eight in favor of the move. This university is
really in great shape when the dean of arts decides
that such a clear-cut department vote is
illegitimate.
But now the CAUT will likely be arriving on
the scene.
It doesn't have much power, but it brings
with it some rather nasty publicity for the
university, and at a time when the government is
talking about looking in to tenure.
Lousy, lousy timing. Why is it that
administration moves keep back-firing?
Could it be that the truth always emerges in
the end?
Arrghhh
Vast public outcry has brought it to our
attention that we have totally ignored a subject of
such importance, such magnitude, that no
right-thinking student newspaper with space to
fill could possibly overlook its consequences.
We speak, of course, of the proliferation of
the avocado, without a doubt the most vile and
obscene creation of nature.
All around us we see these egregious, nay
pusillanimous fruits, with their tasteless
putrescent filling, working their way into the
hearts and stomachs of unsuspecting Canadians.
And still the avocado marches onward,
contaminating our precious bodily fluids with its
syphlitic pus.
Where it will all end is another matter. But
at least our conscience is clear. We've taken a firm
stand against this creeping fungus.
Never let it be said that The Ubyssey shirked
its duty. The End.
SoC   $Ta*y   C»a*t
"I'm glad you young people have seen fit to protest non-violently. It shows you're civilized. Now get out."
Letters
Crossing
I have recently become
interested in the proposed third
crossing of Burrard Inlet, and am
convinced that this is one of the
most important issues now facing
the people of the Vancouver
region.
Unfortunately, information
about the proposal and intelligent
public debate have been in short
supply to date. The present
majority on Vancouver city
council and most of the elected
officials of the North Shore
municipalities are doing their
utmost to ensure that this remains
the case.
On the other hand, I have been
delighted to find that there is a
great deal of public concern over
the issue. Three hours of soliciting
signatures for the petition
demanding a plebiscite which is
being circulated by the Citizens
Co-ordinating Committee for
Public Transit has convinced me
of this.
Of the people I approached in
front of a supermarket on West
Broadway on Saturday, I would
estimate that about 75 per cent
signed the petition. Of these,
almost all were opposed to the
crossing proposal. About 20 per
cent were not interested in the
petition, while only about 5 per
cent actively supported the third
crossing.
I am enclosing a copy of a
letter which I have sent to Donald
Jamieson, federal minister of
transport. A similar letter has
been sent to W.A.C. Bennett. I
request that you reprint it as an
open letter, since it outlines some
of the important issues involved in
the third crossing controversy.
I   urge   all   members   of  the
university to inform themselves as
best they can about this issue, and
to express their opinions in
writing to the federal, provincial,
and municipal governments. Most
of the hundreds of millions of
dollars involved would come from
the federal and provincial
governments.
The Citizens Co-ordinating
Committee for Public Transport
has requested anyone who is
interested to help in circulating its
petition calling for a plebiscite in
the Greater Vancouver Regional
District on the third crossing
proposal. They will again be
collecting signatures in public
places on Saturday, and invite
everyone to help out. They can be
reached at 733-4953, or at P.O.
Box 4007, Station D, Vancouver
9, B.C.
Tom Perry,
biology 3
Dear Don
Dear Mr. Minister,
I am writing to you with
reference to the proposed third
crossing of Burrard Inlet,
Vancouver. I have recently
become aware of some of the
basic facts and issues involved in
the present controversy over the
crossing, and it appears to me
obvious that the current proposal
for a freeway-tunnel crossing of
the inlet is entirely inappropriate
to the present and future needs of
the city and region of Vancouver.
There are several very good
reasons why I believe that the
proposed crossing would be a
foolish and dangerous venture:
1. Lands available to
accomodate the future growth of
the Vancouver metropolis are
located predominantly to the east
and south of the city. Suitable
areas on the North Shore of
Burrard Inlet are severely limited.
Consequently, improvements in
transportation to the east and
south of Vancouver already are
and will remain more important
than those directed primarily to
the North Shore.
2. Construction of the
proposed crossing will inevitably
lead to the further extension of a
freeway network in Vancouver.
Pressures will become irresistable
to connect the crossing with the
401 freeway. This may lead to the
eventual strangulation of the city
in the type of freeway web which
has become the bane of Los
Angeles, Seattle, and many other
North American cities.
3. The expenditure of
hundreds of millions of dollars in
capital investment and repayment
of the federal government loan for
the proposed third crossing would
render the construction of a
comprehensive rapid public transit
system virtually impossible in the
foreseeable future. Thursday, January 27, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
4. Even if the proposed
crossing were constructed, the
collection of high tolls for its use
might result in continued heavy
pressure on the two existing
crossings, which would be free,
and in under-utilization of the
new facility.
5. Alternative proposals for
transportation systems not based
on the wasteful single-occupant
automobile are abundant. These
include a rapid and efficient cable
ferry crossing, improved bus
services, and incentives for
car-pooling to improve efficiency
of transport within the existing
system. An experiment with the
latter proposal has recently
commenced in San Francisco. All
of these proposals would cost
only a fraction of the cost of the
current proposal.
6. In general, transportation
systems based primarily on the
automobile will become more and
more disagreeable each year.
Vancouver's geographic situation
makes it susceptible to
atmospheric inversions which may
eventually produce severe air
pollution problems. Increased
driving speeds on freeways
produce greater pollutant
emissions and higher noise levels.
The dumping of large numbers of
automobiles into a city core
dehumanizes the area and leads to
its eventual decay. Freeway
construction produces great social
disruption in the areas through
which they must pass. Freeways
encourage the waste of
non-renewable fossil fuel
resources by single-occupant
vehicles.
The present majority on the
Vancouver city council has done
its best to conceal these problems
from the attention of the general
public. It is only through the
concerted efforts of citizens'
groups that the issues are being
raised, and the vast majority of
the public remains unaware or
uninformed about the entire
controversy. Vancouver city
council has recently voted by a
margin of only 6 to 5 to allocate
$3.4 million for construction of
the approaches to the proposed
tunnel. By this mechanism it has
circumvented the need for public
discussion and a plebiscite.
I therefore urge you, Mr.
Minister, to appoint a special
commission of inquiry into the
need for the proposed third
crossing of Burrard Inlet, the
transportation priorities of the
Lower   Mainland   region,    and
possible alternatives to the current
freeway-tunnel project, BEFORE
ANY FEDERAL MONIES ARE
COMMITTEE TO THE
PROPOSED SCHEME.
Alternatively, I urge you to
direct this matter to the attention
of the House of Commons
committee on transportation and
to schedule public hearings of the
committee in Vancouver in the
near future. I remind you that
there have never been any public
hearings in Vancouver on this
question and that the public of
Greater Vancouver and British
Columbia has never been
consulted as to its wishes.
I for one do not wish my
federal taxes to be used in
construction of such an ill-advised
and dangerous project as this.
I would appreciate a reply at
your earliest convenience. 	
i '
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Blorgian stuffer Gimley Gumshoe
repeated to this small island
eater's paradise today that a
Gastown Restaurant Guide will be
included in the Friday edition of
The Foodyssey-
Tongue-tied before an audience
of three mauve blorgs, Gumshoe
repeated that he is not sleazy, but
rather greazy.
Nixon's permanent war
The following article is by Barry Weisberg,
author of Ecocide in Indochina, who will speak on
Ecocide and Nixon's Permanent War at the spring
'72 Anti-War Action Conference.
The conference will be held Feb. 5 and 6 in
Vancouver at Chown Memorial United Church,
3519 Cambie Street.
By BARRY WEISBERG
Although individual members of the scientific
community have been concerned with chemical
and biological warfare for some time, only recently
has public attention been focused on U.S. chemical
warfare in Southeast Asia, crop destruction, and
defoliation.
Herbicides, together with the "application of
massive fire power" and forced urbanization, have
evolved into ecological warfare in which the
military's old strategy of "search and destroy" has
given way to the incentive to simply destroy.
This could not have been accomplished with
ground combat- troops — that is, "fighting the
enemy on his own terrain." The U.S. had to
eliminate the terrain. One gets the awful feeling now
that the concern of America in Indochina is no
longer deterence, or even counter-insurgency — but
rather total destruction. There seems no other way
to describe the complexity and sheer volume of
havoc ... the destruction of the "living landscape"
by war as well as the effects of such a war upon the
people and culture of Southeast Asia, most
specifically South Vietnam.
Peter Farb in The Living Earth understood well
the interdependence when he wrote: 'The
wholeness of what we call life is like a delicate
fabric with many simple strands. The wonder is not
that so many threads are necessary in the fabric, but
rather that the fabric manages to exist at all."
In Asia the unravelling of this fabric is a
strategy geared not only to the destruction of the
enemy with his present settlements and culture but
also to the breakdown of the biological fabric
required to sustain any possible adversary in the
future. What the U.S. has now accomplished in
Indochina is to make vast areas of rural society
uninhabitable for decades to come, pushing refugees
into a consumer economy in the urban slums.
Perhaps after 10 years of the growing awareness
that there is no longer a means by which to
distinguish friend from foe in Indochina, there has
evolved a strategy to combat "people's wars of
national liberation" - the elimination of the people.
But Southeast Asia merely provides a telescopic
preview of conditions on a planetary scale. The
destruction of the life support system of Indochina
parallels U.S. destruction of the air, water, and land
of the entire world through chemical
contamination. Such a manipulation of nature is
unique.
Within the last few years the human race has
achieved a totally unprecedented influence on the
course of all life on this planet. For several billions
of years the processes of life and death - the cycle
of regeneration — remained woven in the
unpredictable, unmanageable legend of evolution.
No single animal, or species of animal, could at will
bid the journey or termination of other forms of
life.
This has changed. Our relationship to nature is
no longer determined by nature but is subject to the
rule of political management on a scale beyond
normal comprehension. This awesome realization
forms the foundation for understanding not only
the willful destruction of Indochina but also- the
ecological peril that faces the earth from America's
pre-eminent role in the chemical poisoning of life
support systems. No other event of our time has
more clearly marked this unprecedented power than
the dawn of the atomic age, more than twenty-five
years ago. But perhaps in Indochina, during these
last five years, we have taken another qualitative
step along the terminal path of aborting the
multi-billion years of evolutionary process. The
threat of atomic warfare is self-evident.
But with ecocide, more consciously in
Indochina, less consciously elsewhere, we are
slowly, though steadily, altering the organic
chemistry of the life process, and we are
approaching a point beyond which regeneration is
impossible. During these past few years the threat of
atomic holocaust has been held in check, but the
threat of ecological oblivion proceeds almost
without reservation.
Ecocide may be less dramatic, less immediately
apparent than atomic war - but it is every bit as
conclusive.
Again, Southeast Asia only mirrors a larger,
more pervasive, but related issue. The forces at work
now in Indochina are at work around the world, in
the towns of America as well as the jungles of Asia.
The chemical poisoning of Indochina by the
military parallels the poisoning of America by the
chemical industry. To believe for an instant that
one will stop without the other would be a grave
miscalculation.
It is tragic that many of America's enviromental
crusaders have not fully realized the connection
between the destruction of Indochina and the
destruction of our total environment. The power of
the military, the power of excess production, as well
as imperial consumption, must be broken at the
source.
Put in most simple terms, we can never hope to
stop the destruction of the environment in America
unless we can stop America's destruction of
Indochina.
GRADS!
FREE
4X5 Color Portrait
Make your appointment now
and avoid the big rush
CANDID STUDIOS
3343 West Broadway — 732-7446
tuood/t^ck
with
JOAN BAEZ •    JOE COCKER
• CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
• TEN YEARS AFTER  • SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE • JOHN SEBASTIAN
• COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH
• SANTANA     • JIMI HENDRIX
• RICHIE HAVENS
•      •      •   » I  •  • 7 oi  .
a CINEMAWEST presentation
TODAY -
12:30 Noon & 7:30 p.m.
FRI & SAT at 7:30 only
$1.25
OLD
AUDITORIUM
iiiniiiiiumi
SUB THEATRE
Thursday 27th — 7:00
Friday & Saturday — 7:00 & 9:30
Sunday — 7:00
50
SUB FILM SOC presents:
MICHELANGELO
ANTONIONI's
tOBf OB. CKfe KB* fl £mW3k D47D QQD
,iuiurao;iMiumi;;
f*j% ^*f/v n EoJ3CZD
rwM ii Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,   January   27,   1972
Hot flashes
Boost boded
for B bleeders
The Red Cross requests that
any students with type "B" blood
present themselves today before
4:30 p.m. at Room 361 in the
Brock extension to receive a
Ubyssey-certified painless
injection to boost their natural
anti-A serum.
As the injection will need
about three weeks to take effect,
students participating will receive
a notice in 3-4 weeks telling where
and when they may donate their
boosted blood. Ubyssey staffer
Berton Woodward, who got the
injection, says there are no side
effects.
For other types of students the
Red Cross blood clinic continues
from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each
weekday until Feb. 5.
Bergman
Bergmaniacs will be able to
indulge in their fantasies on a
regular basis beginning next
month.
And all it costs is the fare on
the cross-town bus.
Films by the Swedish
film-maker (Ingmar Bergman, if)
you haven't caught on yet), will
be shown free every Thursday
noon during February and March
in the Simon Fraser University
Theatre.
The first film will be The
Silence, to be shown Feb. 10.
Films to follow woll be The
Seventh Seal on Feb. 17, Wild
Strawberries on Feb. 24, The
Virgin Spring on March 2,
Through A Glass Darkly on March
9 and Winter Light on March 16.
Belch
The Alma Mater Society
alternate restaurant service started
operations this week.
Each day a different local
restaurant will provide food at
minimal prices in SUB 207-209.
Today Chinese food will be served
and Friday God's Kitchen will
provide natural food.
Turnout this week has so far
fallen below the 100 persons
needed for the restaurants to
make a profit. About 60 persons
went on Monday and 80 on
Tuesday.
"While they're not losing any
money, they're not making any
either," Adrian Belshaw, AMS
external affairs officer said
Wednesday.
Bos
The North Shore-UBC direct
bus route has been extended.
The bus now serves the Grand
Boulevard and Upper Levels areas
in North Vancouver and Fifteenth
Street in West Vancouver for the
same fares as before.
Persons boarding the bus at
Park Royal in West Vancouver
pay 45 cents per one-way ride,
and those boarding at other stops
pay 50 cents. Consistent riders
and those paying in advance are
charged 35 cents from Park Royal
and 40 cents from other points.
All full time riders whose
payments are received before
January 31 will be eligible for a
draw for a free seat on the bus
during February.
For further information call
985-5824 or 985-1053.
Birds o\ bees
The Environmental Crisis
Operation will be presenting a
film dealing with conservation
efforts in Canada.
The film, called "Atonement",
is a National Film Board
Production. It will be shown at no
charge in Geography Building
room 100 at noon today.
>«TfV, '-v ;w* *&* * *4&^^w&y*%s&f&ms>jt - &
'Tween classes
TODAY
CCF
Prayer-Fellowship     meeting.     SUB
215; noon.
IH
Free   films:  A   is for  Architecture,
The   Medium   is  the  Massage,  You
Know, Upper Lounge in IH at noon.
BICYCLE CLUB
Organizational   party, all  welcome.
SUB 213, noon.
ALPHA-OMEGA
L.    Toelorutz    and     D.    Luchych:
Ukranian-Canadian   Festival   of the
Arts, SUB 105B at noon.
BAHA'I CLUB
Buch 230 at noon.
PHOTOSOC
Meeting     of    members    exhibiting
prints,  photo studio, room 245 at
noon.
ECO *
Film on Canadian Wildlife Service.
Geog 100 at noon.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Dancing. SUB 207-9, 12:30-2:30.
VCF
Drama:,   the    in   group.   SUB   art
gallery at noon.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE
Al Soroka: U.S. Domination of the
Canadian Publishing Industry. SUB
Clubs lounge, noon.
FRIDAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
P. Berton: Constitutional Reform In
Canada. SUB 111, noon.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTE
General    meeting,    new    members
welcome. SUB 210, noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Speaker:    Gordon    Gibson.    Clubs
Lounge, SUB, at noon.
BISCI
Film:    Cataclysm    From   Space   —
2800 B.C. SUB Auditorium.
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE
OF CANADA
Mr.  Christian De Laet: engineering
and   the   conservation   movement.
Civil 201 at 12:30.
ANTHROSOC
Important   meeting   for   all   majors
and honors, Buch 107, 12:30.
MONARCHIST LEAGUE
Organizational   Meeting.   SUB  119,
noon.
PRE-SOC WORK CLUB
Special     speaker     discussing
Community     Social     Work.     All
welcome. SUB 115 at noon.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMEN1
On National Petition for a People's
Canada. SUB Main Foyer, 12:30.
VOC
Ski-touring   trip   and   party   with
Aquasoc and Phrateres.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Coffee House at LCC. 9 p.m.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General   Meeting  in  SUB  105B at
noon.
AQUASOC
For  Aquasoc,  VOC  and Phrateres
members.  SUB Party  Room. 8:30
p.m. 50 cents.
SATURDAY
HILLEL
Film:   San   Francisco.   8:30   p.m.,
Hillel House.
SUNDAY
L'ESCRIME
Regular practice cancelled.
UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL
Brother Thomas of Talze,  France.
Lutheran    Campus   Centre,    10:30
a.m.
VST AND SCM
Brother Thomas. Fireside Room,
Trinity House, 6050 Lona Drive.
8-9:30 p.m.
MONDAY
ELCIRCULO
Soundtrack of El Hombre de la
Mancha. IH 402-404 at noon.
WEDNESDAY ,
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Jinks on pedodontics. SUB 211
at 12:30.
THURSDAY varsity demolay
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting. Kingston Hotel, 8
p.m.
STRENGTHENING
RELATIONSHIPS
A 'GROUP DYNAMICS'
WEEKEND WORKSHOP
WITH FDM Group consultants,
from Friday, 7:30 p.m. Feb.
4th $ 6th at Hotel Plaza 500
(corner 12th & Cambie) Fee:
$18.50, Write to 1249 Nanton
Ave., or call: 266:6656.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
A   Paris Boutique
HANDICRAFTS CROCHETS
Leather Goods
We take orders for clothes
2105 W. 16th Tues. - Sat.
FLY to RENO
3 DAY All-inclusive
WEEK-END For
99.00
DEPARTURES:
Feb. 18-Feb. 25 - Mar. 24-Mar. 31
For Information
With No Obligation
688-0266
CANADIAN TOUR PAK
Spring Rush
at
PHI KAPPA SIGMA
FRATERNITY
Get Acquainted Party
Beginning of Feb.
For Information
GIVE US A CALL
AT 224-9684
Ask For A Member
Pre-New Year's Special
Chinese Food Comb. Plate
REDUCED TO 75?
TODAY & TOMORROW -     11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Auditorium Snack Bar
Free Chinese Tea to All Chinese Food Customers
CLASSIFIED
Mo* Compos - 3 Ihm,  1   day $1.00; 3 day. $3.30
CmmmkM - 3 linn,   1  day $1.25;
Rims 30c; 4 days prfco of 3.
GfnsstfJee? ade ate not meeeptmd by telephone ana*
in advance. Deadline w 11:90 am., Urn day baton ,
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dane**
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST: LAST FRI., GLASSES,
light square frames in flowered
case. Either UBC or hitching.
from 10th & Alma. 228-8334.	
I LEFT A RED TOQUE IN YOUR
car Mon. morning. Help! 224-0314.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
BIO BLOCK SUDS NITE MON.
Jan. 31st 8 p.m., in SUB. Varsity
& Big Block.  Members welcome.
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a. plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box 4002 Vancouver.  B.C.
DISCOUNT — STEREO AM-FM
FM - Stereo Tuner - Amplifier,
Turntable, base, cartridge, plexi-
glas cover, two speakers, 2-year
guarantee. List $200.00, your cost
$125.00 Call 732-6769 for savings.
Also carry Sony, Dual. Akai and
Sansui.
AN EXPERIENCE IN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate. 922-4481.
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished  condominium   opposite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
Travel Opportunities
18
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment servicese etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St., Ventnor
I.W., England.
SPRING QUARTER, SUMMER
Session, or Junior Year in Mexico?
Write Dr. H. B. Benedict PNW
Rep University of the Americas
3253 Robertson, Bellingham, Wash.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: TWO GOOD USED
sleeping bags. Call Jim, room 163,
224-9962.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'62 FORD ECONOLINE WINDOW
van. Has rebuilt motor, new
brakes, good rubber. Phone Ron,
522-5527.	
•60 RAMBLER AMER. STAND. 6,
4 dr. Good cond. 1 owner, reg.
gas gives good mil. Good rubber,
snows, city tested. '73, Conv. to
bed, extras $400. 266-2446.	
'62 FORD FAIRLANE 4-DR.
standard shift, 6 cyl. good condi-
tion, $325. 224-1768.	
1962 RILEY 1.5 4-DR. SEDAN. EX.
cond.  $275, 736-0652.	
Auto Repairs
24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
Photography
35
r
,ti)e &en* anU gutter
&i,j      Cameras!.
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alio at Denman Place
"At last we are able
to recommend a moderately priced zoom leas
in this range which has passed
our optical test with flying corrected colors . . . Certainly
among the medium priced zoom
lenses the LBNTAR must be
classed as a best, buy."
—February Modern Photography
LENTAR    ZOOM     LENS   J1CQ.9S
80-200 mm  f3.S IDS
Scandals
37
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
LOIS MALYSH EDUC.3 WHY DO
you have to go when I love you.
Life  is  cold   without you.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.
TYPING. 40c a page. Petra, days
685-9388; nights 327-1037. Pro-
fessional.	
EXPERT D3M SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable Rates — 321-3838,
Mrs.   Ellis.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Sharl
at 738-8745—Reasonable Rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work. Reason-
able Rates. Phone 263-5317.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick service on  short essays.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
FULL ROOM AND BOARD PLUS
remuneration for 2 or 3 days
weekly assistance incl. driving
paraplegic working woman. Dunbar.   733-2819   (Eves.)
SUMMER   1972
CAREER    -    ORIENTED
SUMMER    EMPLOYMENT
PROGRAM
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Biological, Chemical, Life
and Physical Sciences, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Economics, Social Sciences.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time uni-
niversity students in the above
fields who intend to return to
university in 1972-73. Canadian
citizens have statutory preference
for   appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UPCA application form (available from
your University Placement Office
and a list of courses taken., to
the Public Service Commission of
Canada Regional Office, 203-535
Thurlow St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Apply  before   January   31,   1972.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MUST SELL — 190 CM OLYMPIC
skiis — brand new, $30. Call 596-
0680.  .        	
ROSIGNOL STRATO 190 CM MAR-
ker rotomat bindings $75. Hes-
chung boots ($185 new, used twice)
size 6 narrow $145. Joan 926-4789.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
COMFORTABLE ROOM SEFAR-
ate entrance and bathroom; hotplate, linen provided. Dunbar area.
Phone 733-5772.
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE DKE
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.,
224-9691.
PRIVATE     BED-SITTING     ROOM
BATHROOM, TV
bathroom,   TV  plus  board   in   exchange  for   evening   housekeeping
duties  on campus,  224-6296.
Furnished Apis.
83
BASEMENT SUITE, ONE PERSON,
private entrance, bath, cooking.
Near gates, $100 p.m. available
Feb   1.   224-3882	
COMFORTABLE BASEMENT
suite, 2 bedrooms, newly constructed. Near university. Very reasonable.  263-8441
Unfurnished Apts.
84
DUPLEX FURNISHED 10th &
Alma. 2 bedrooms, living room,
kitchen. Fridge, stove, heat included. 2-3 students or couple. Tel.
732-6449   evenings.   $170/month.
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
GIRL   TO   SHARE   HOUSE.    OWN
room.   Use   of   all  facilities  $70.00
per month. Phone 733 3276.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Thursday, January 27, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
WHA may recruit 'Birds
By KENT SPENCER
Ken Dry den of Montreal, Bobby Hull of
Chicago, Dale Tallon of Vancouver — hockey
players under WHA spotlight?
These players and others throughout the
National Hockey League could skip their current
NHL contracts and jump to the World Hockey
Association planned for next year.
However, at 20 players per team, and 16 new
teams, the 320 jobs will for the most part be filled
by minor pro league players, college and Junior A
amateurs, and grandfathers coming out of
retirement.
This certainly means that the top UBC
Thunderbird players will be offered jobs in one of
the pro leagues. Several of the 'Birds have already
had pro tryouts and others are being watched by the
scouts.
Two years ago, 'Bird centre and current
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Association scoring leader Bob McAneeley tried out
with the NHL Oakland club. He stayed three days.
"It wasn't really worth it for the money they
Ruggers clobber Caps
Yuletide socializing and the occasional beer
have put little fat on UBC's rugby men.
The well-conditioned Birds and Braves
swamped North Shore Capilanos teams by 84-6 last
Saturday.
The Thunderbirds humiliated the Caps 42-6
with tries by John Mitchell, Bob Gallagher, and
Spence McTavish. Kicker Ray Banks added 18
points on conversions and penalty kicks.
Saturday's preliminary match saw the Braves
overrun the Caps by 42-0. The frosh lost to the Kats
16-0.
Weather permitting, UBC hosts Oregon State
this weekend. Kickoff 2:30 Saturday, at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Thunderette tournament a success
After being upset by
Vancouver City College
Falconettes 32-22 in the opening
round of the tournament, the
UBC Senior B team went on to
defeat Cowichan 38-34 and
Vancouver Rovers 27-25, to win
the Consolation round of the
Thunderette Basketball
tournament on Saturday.
High Scorer for the Sr. B's was
Debbie Taylor, who averaged 7
points per game.
The defending champion
Western Washington State College
team had no trouble winning the
title again, defeating SFU 45-40;
Intramurals
CYCLING: Anyone interested
in a 15-mile cross-country cycling
event to be held early in March
should contact the intramural
office as soon as possible.
SNOOKER times and tables
for the A and B events are now
posted.
SOCCER games will be played
on Friday. Check with the office
for times and fields.
WRESTLING: New weigh-in
will be held on Friday and
Monday. Competition goes on
Tuesday and Wednesday.
BASKETBALL RESULTS:
Division 1: recreation 46-Totem
Park 37; A.D. 46-science 43;
forestry 23-Sammies 16; Beta
35-gears 25; Fort Camp 69-Phi
Kappa Sigma 19.
Division 2: Vanier 29-Beta
27; dentristry 40-commerce 21;
Beta 32-MBA 31; Hillel
27-education 21.
Division 3: Place Vanier
48-Gears 19.
BCIT 59-18; and in the final VCC
58-43.
In the Junior division final of
the two day tournament, the UBC
JV's, coached by Bill Ruby, lost
out in the final seconds of the
game to a strong Prince of Wales
team 42-39.
The JV's, behind 27-10 at half
time, outscored Prince of Wales
29-15 in the final 20 minutes but
lost the game at the free throw
line where Prince of Wales scored
their last 7 points.
Kathy Burdett, a former New
Westminster player, was high
scorer for the JV's in the three
games with a total of 41 points.
Women's
Intramurals
UNIT MANAGERS
meeting this Friday at noon
in room 211 War Memorial
Gym.
In other games, the JV's had
beaten Douglas College 38-21 and
New Westminster Hyacks 51-37.
JV hockey
lead league
The UBC JV hockey team
continues to dominate the Pacific
Intercollegiate Hockey League
standings.
The team leads the league with
a perfect record of 10 wins and no
losses. They have scored 91 goals
and let in 31 for a 9.1 for and 3.1
against average per game.
SFU is currently holding down
second place with a 6-2-1 record,
followed by Alaska, Gonzaga,
Selkirk and Cariboo.
The lowly BCIT Cougars brings
up the rear with no wins and
seven losses after seven games.
The next JV home game is
Feb. 12 against Richmond at 3:30
p.m. in the Winter Sports Centre.
Summer Employment Opportunities
FIELD SUPERVISORS
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Several vacancies exist from May 1st, 1972 to August 31st, 1972.
The Field Supervisor has broad experience in aquatics, holds the Red
Cross/Royal Life Saving Society Instructor certificate and has proven
leadership abilities. This individual is a self-starter able to work without
supervision, works well with volunteers and has a flair for public speaking.
Apply detailing qualifications and experience to:
Director of Water Safety Services,
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY,
4750 Oak Street. Vancouver 9. B.C.
Applications should be received by January 31st, 1972.
were offering," said McAneeley. "I wanted to get
my degree first."
'Bird goalie Ian Wilkie has had a tryout with the
Montreal Canadiens, and left-winger Laurie
Yaworski played 12 games with Portland of the
Western Hockey League last season. Reserve goalie
John Fischer and right-winger Richard Longpre have
also had pro tryouts.
Left-winger Doug Buhr stayed in the Los
Angeles King's training camp for a week, and was
offered a contract. He decided to complete his last
year of engineering and will probably turn pro this
year.
"Hockey to me is only a sport," he said. Buhr
said that he would like to try pro hockey out for a
year, and possibly stick with it for awhile if he liked
it.
"I might find that it's too much of a hacker's
league. I wouldn't play if they just wanted me to go
out and get other guys," he said.
At a recent 'Bird game, hockey coach Bob
Hindmarch counted 14 pro scouts, most from the
NHL. There are three or four at every game, taking
notes.
"I think one of the best sources of players for
the pros could be college," Hindmarch said.
"However, I don't think the players are going to
jump unless it is a very substantial offer. It pays to
have a college degree."
Hindmarch said the constant living in hotels,
travel and hard work combined to make the pro life
tougher than most people thought.
"But if you like hockey, it's okay," he said.
Barry Wilcox and Norm Park of last year's
'Birds are now playing minor pro hockey at
Rochester and Springfield.
After 35 games, Wilcox has seven goals and
three assists. According to friend Rick Noonan, the
6'1", 190 pound left-winger really enjoys playing in
the American Hockey League.
"The pay is good, the hours are short — it's the
type of life Barry enjoys," Noonan said.
Five years ago there were six major league
teams. In a few more months, there will be 30. This
is what's known as inflation.
SUB GRUB
— Why are alternate
food services
in S.U.B.
successful?
— THINK ABOUT IT!
WESTERN PROMOTIONS PROUDLY PRESENTS
IN CONCERT
B. B. KING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27
Q.E. THEATRE
8:30 P.M.
$4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Tickets: Concert Box Office, 680 Robson —
687-2801
Outlets: Rohan's, Thunderbird Shop, Grennan's,
Totem Music (Lougheed Mall)
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
ENGLISH AND FRENCH
LANGUAGE
SUMMER SCHOOLS 1972
Government-sponsored bursaries
will be offered in connection
with these programmes
Enquiries:
Continuing Education Programme
Division of University Extension
Toronto 181, Ontario
(416) 928-2400
uieed/tQ<k
with
JOAN BAEZ •    JOE COCKER
• CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
• TEN YEARS AFTER  • SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE* JOHN SEBASTIAN
• COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH
• SANTANA     • JIMI HENDRIX
• RICHIE HAVENS
a CINEMAWEST presentation
TODAY -
12:30 Noon & 7:30 p.m.
FRI & SAT at 7:30 only
$1.25
OLD
AUDITORIUM Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  January  27,   1972
\
School pursues charge
against Straight handout
—kini mcdonald photo
ACCLAIMED POET George Bowering read from his Governor
General's award-winning books in SUB art gallery Wednesday as part
of Human Government Canadian poets series.
Frontier beckons
Frontier College is offering UBC students some challenging
summer jobs.
But if you weren't at the sign-up meeting in Buchanan 104
Wednesday noon, you may not have the chance to take advantage of
the offer.
Frontier College is seeking 100 Canadian university students to
work as laborer-teachers in lumber, mining, railway and power camps
in outlying areas this summer.
Final interviews will be held with Toronto organizer Scott
Baron today in Hut M4.
College workers, guaranteed at least $1,200 for a summer, are
expected to work up to 24 hours a day in the camps, program
organizer Ron Rothwell told about 200 students Wednesday.
The program's $120,000 budget is funded one-third by federal
and provincial government grants and two-thirds by student unions,
private industry and individual contributions.
Organizer Denise Davies said the 1972 program for women has
been expanded to offer 10 jobs in Newfoundland fish canneries.
Previously, there were only two jobs available for women.
Beleaguered Buzas quits
MOOSOMIN, Sask. (CUP) -
The school board here has picked
up where the provincial education
minister left off in pursuing
charges against a local teacher for
distributing the Georgia Straight.
Margi Gordon was dismissed in
early October under a
seldom-used section of the
Education Act which makes
provision for the firing of a
teacher for gross misconduct.
The board's appeal against
education minister Gordon
MacMurchy's decision to
withdraw the charge began
Tuesday in Regina.
The reason given for Gordon's
dismissal was parental objection
over an article in a Straight which
was described as "pornographic".
Gordon was teaching on a
probationary certificate which
restricted her to teaching home
economics to grades eight to 12.
The local school board and the
Moosomin High School
administration assigned her duties
beyond the terms of her
certificate with the approval of
the department of education. Her
outside duties included teaching
social studies and supervising
home room discussion periods.
These periods were to be used
by the students for purposes of
discussion on topics of current
interest. Periodicals such as Time,
Newsweek and the Regina
Leader-Post were distributed.
Gordon was reading the
Georgia Straight in a home room
period when a student asked her if
she could read the paper.
Due to the interest shown by
the students, Gordon decided to
make copies available to be used
as discussion material by the class.
Later, she was called before a
meeting of the principal,
superintendent and the chairman
of the local school board. They
Alma Mater Society executive assistant Carol
Buzas announced her resignation at the student
council meeting Wednesday night.
In a letter of resignation Buzas said, "I am
satisfied that the difficulties which arose in the
change of executive have been reconciled; however I
was not pleased with the way the situation was
handled.
"In fact I was hurt."
About two weeks ago AMS general manager
Brian Robinson told council he intended to fire
Buzas. However, council asked him to reconsider,
and Buzas was retained.
In  other  business,  council passed a motion
directing AMS treasurer David Dick to give an
$1,800 cheque to alternative food service manager
Lyle Osmundson as a loan for the repair of his food
bus, subject to confirmation of Osmundson's vehicle
insurance.
This came after a lengthy debate in which
Osmundson claimed the executive had delayed
payment of the loan, which had previously been
unanimously approved in council^
Approved in principle at the meeting was a
report which would guarantee the undergraduate
societies AMS funds. Each society will receive a
minimum $200 grant, and will also be given 40
cents per person in its faculty.
DO SOMETHING
FOR SOMEONE
UBC BLOOD DRIVE - BROCK HALL
TODAY - to FRI., FEB. 4
9:30 - 4:30 p.m. Continuous
informed her that parents were
objecting to the use of the paper
in the class. When asked not to
use the paper again in class,
Gordon agreed.
After a meeting with parents
from the district and discussion
by the school board she was fired
from her job.
Gordon's    firing    was    the
culmination   of a  campaign   of
insinuations and rumor that had
M
been in progress since the
summer.
She was said to be addicted to
heroin, which was given by the
locals as the reason that she was
thin and wore long-sleeve
sweaters. She was also rumored to
be pushing drugs and birth control
pills to students.
To top it all off she was also
suspected of advocating women's
liberation in the classroom.
W
Slight alteration made to Slavonic studies meeting room.
Slavonics students
want re-evaluation
Graduate students in the Slavonic studies department are calling
for a re-evaluation of tenured and non-tenured faculty in then-
department.
The action follows the dismissal of two instructors, Vera Reck
and Catherine Leach, who has since resigned, and the demotion of
assistant professor Frank Beardow to instructor for alleged
"budgetary necessities".
"Just what is going on in the departmental committees and in
the executive committee appointed by arts dean Doug Kenny to
oversee the administration of the department," asked the eight
students, who wish to remain anonymous, in a statement to The
Ubyssey Wednesday.
"It looks like a re-evaluation of competency of assistant
professors in our department.
"Dean Kenny is also considering a recommendation of the
executive committee that one professor be demoted to instructor
level," they said.
"If one, why not others?
"In fact, why not a complete re-evaluation of the qualifications
and publications of language and literature specialists at all levels of
the department?" said the students.
IF YOU NEED YOUR HAIR STYLED
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AND
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SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
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famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
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HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 a.ra to 4 am - SUNDAY 4 p.m to 2 a.m.i

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