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Array MARCH 13,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLVII
NEVER TALKING ABOUT IT AGAIN SINCE 1918
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THE ERA OF GUPTA
Computer science prof and non-profit
CEO Arvind Gupta named 13th president
and vice-chancellor of UBC
THE CULT OF THE JAPADOG P6 COMPETITIVE CYCLING CLUB P8 ROB FORD ELECTI
BATTLE OFTHE BANDS PROFILES P5 HOMELESS FORTHE HOMELESS P9THE ANNACI
TOAUSP4
DEBACLE P4 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON J    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY   13
RE-TAKING
THE UNIVERSITY
12 P.M.-&30 P.M. @ VARIOUS LOCATIONS
A bunch of talks on student activism.
On the docket: rape culture, animal
governance, sustainability and more.
For a complete list, visit UBC Social
Justice Centre facebook page.
FRIDAY ' 14
RED BULL WINNING 5
2 P.M.-6 P.M. @ MACINNES FIELD
This soccer tournament features
teams of five facing off against each
other but there's a twist: each time a
team scores a goal, the team that is
scored against must eliminate one
of itsteamates. Free registration at
redbull.ca/winnings.
SATURDAY ' 15
STARTUP WEEKEND
ALL DAY® WAYNE ANDWILLIAM WHITE
ENGINEERING DESIGN CENTRE
This three-day entrepreneurship
competition has open-mic pitches on Friday, product development on Saturday and Sunday
and prototype demos on Sunday
evening. Visit ubc.startupweek-
end.org for more information.
$50
ON
THE
COVER
When you're shooting someone on a tight timeframe, a stand-in does
wonders. News editor Will McDonald here was a good sport and stood
in. Of course, we then moved to the other side ofthe room forthe final
photo, but this got us most ofthe way there. Photo by Geoff Lister.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^|THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 13, 2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLVI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
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Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
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Culture Editor
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eulture@ubyssey.es
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
=HOTO OLIVIALAWJTHE UBYSSEY
Jacqueline Firkins usually works in theatre, but wanted to collaborate with someone from a different field for this project.
Firkins dresses up
cancer for a good cause
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
Most wouldn't put costume
design and medicine together in
the same thought, but theatre
professor Jacqueline Firkins'
latest project is an example of
exactly that.
As someone who has worked
in theatre costume design for
a while, her latest project is an
example of collaboration across
disciplines. She designed a series
of ball gowns inspired by cancer
cells; she hopes in turn the
dresses will inspire those who
are battling cancer.
"Fashioning Cancer: The
Correlation Between Destruction and Beauty" is a project that
aims to open up dialogue about
the disease, including its effects
on body image. Firkins said
there is the "need for beauty
when we're faced with mortality."
"It's my first time doing something like this. Most of my work
is in the theatre where we have a
script, we all work together, we
put on a show, and that's it," said
Firkins, who received her BA
from Drew University in New
Jersey, MFA from Yale School of
Drama and is in her first year of
teaching at UBC.
Firkins searched for a way
to convey her artistic work in a
research capacity. She had been
looking for a grant opportunity,
and she came across the Peter
Wall Institute for Advanced
Studies' research mentoring
program, which aims to provide
faculty associates with the
chance to work with veteran
UBC scholars on collaborative
interdisciplinary studies.
She wanted to collaborate
with someone from a completely different field. She chose to
work with Christian Naus, a
professor in the Faculty of Medicine. On his website, she found
imagery of cancer cells under a
microscope.
"I immediately thought that
[these pictures] would translate
instantly into fashion. I had such
a sense of artistry about it."
She incorporated the images into her designs for the 10
dresses that form the core of her
project. Each one varies uniquely in style, colour and pattern
in order to match each different
type of cell. "It's art; it's not just
science!"
A large influence on Firkins'
choice to use cancer cell imagery
was her personal connection to
the illness. "I have a few friends
who've gone through cancer,"
she said. "Fortunately, most of
them are still in my life, but not
all of them.
"What I really do well is
design and create clothes, so I
thought this might be a really
interesting way to do something
that's very much across disciplines, uses my skill set, but also
just creates something that can
generate conversation about
cancer."
The project has received a
great deal of positive feedback.
"Already, people have started
telling me their stories, and it's
been phenomenal," said Firkins.
Many have also shared with her
their opinions on self image, and
their changed outlooks on life
and organizations such as Pink
Ribbon, which supports breast
cancer patients.
I have a few friends
who've gone through
cancer. Fortunately,
most of them are still
in my life, but not all of
them.
Jacqueline Firkins
UBC costume design professor
Apart from the primary goal
of opening dialogue, Firkins
hopes her project can also raise
money toward battling the disease. In the upcoming months,
she hopes to find a sponsor and
venue to hold an auction for the
dresses. The money may then be
donated to such causes as cancer
research, counselling services,
or even to individuals with
unique cases.
Creating a website to serve as
a space for public commentary
on her project and for people to
share their own stories may be
in the works too.
Whether she carries on work
in raising awareness for the
correlation between cancer
and body image, or moves on to
create more costumes inspired
by disease research, Firkins is
hoping her project will "have a
life beyond this semester." XI
w 3,924 people have done it
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ITHE
UBYSSEY // News
/ILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
UBC PRESIDENT »
Arvind Gupta named next president
PHOTOS GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Arvind Gupta, right, will succeed Stephen Toope, left, as UBC president. Board chair John Montalbano (centre) hosted the announcement.
Will McDonald
News Editor
Arvind Gupta, director of
Mitacs and a UBC computer
science professor, will be UBC's
next president.
Gupta will replace current
president Stephen Toope on July
1, at which point he will begin his
five-year term in office.
"There's nothing more humbling than following in the footsteps of president Stephen Toope,"
Gupta said at the announcement
this morning. "He's a role model
not just for us, but for any university president."
Animal research protestors
interrupted the announcement,
standing up as Gupta was introduced and chanting, "Stop the
torture! Stop the pain! UBC is to
blame!" They chanted again during Gupta's speech.
Gupta has a bachelor's degree in
science from McMaster University, as well as a master's degree
and a PhD from the University of
Toronto. He's been at UBC since
2009 and specializes in algorithmic issues in bioinformatics. He
has three daughters, two of whom
are UBC students.
The search committee tasked
with finding the new president
unanimously approved Gupta as
their choice.
"He is profoundly committed
to the mission of the university
and I know that he will help us
all together drive UBC to even
greater achievements," said Toope.
"I think we should be thrilled with
this appointment. I am, person-
ally."
In addition to his role at Mitacs
— the Mathematics of Information Technology and Complex,
a national research organization — Gupta is a member ofthe
Government of Canada's Science,
Technology and Innovation
Council and serves on the Canadian Mining Innovation Council,
among other bodies.
"This is a world where the very
nature of interaction and learning,
research and work is morphing
before our very eyes. It's a world
where networks, knowledge and
ideas are supplanting traditional
currencies as measure of empowerment, wealth and well-being," said Gupta. "Our universities
are at the vanguard of this change
and none is better positioned to
handle that change than UBC."
Gupta is optimistic about the
university's government relations
and potential to influence public
policy.
"I never see it as lobbying....
I think our relationships with
governments have to be partnerships," Gupta said in an interview
after the announcement. "I've
always believed that governments
are there to try and build the best
society they can, so the question is,
how do we contribute to that?"
Gupta said his background
in computer science will help
him understand new flexible
learning technologies.
"Technology is really changing
the world around us ... and I think
that we should really embrace
technological change in the higher
education system," said Gupta.
"When the printing press came
out, I'm sure there were monks
thinking, 'Boy, I'm about to lose
my job.' Really what it did was
open up knowledge ... just like
technology is opening up the
world."
Gupta was supportive of
Toope's strategic plan, Place and
Promise, particularly the flexible
learning component of it.
"There's very good long-term
outcomes and when I see Place
and Promise, there's a lot of
initiatives going on at UBC to try
and boost experiential learning
for students," said Gupta. "That's
something I really see eye to eye
on."
Although Toope has adopted a
staunch stance, Gupta has his own
Twitter account.
"If I read an interesting article
and I want to share that with
people, I use Twitter to say, hey,
here's something really interesting
that you might want to read. It's a
way of getting timely information
like that out," said Gupta.
Gupta said his immediate goals
include meeting with as many
people as possible to get up to
speed on the issues the president
deals with.
"I was just talking with Stephen
[Toope] about this. His advice was
to decompress a bit, step away
from all this and relax, because
when July comes there'll be lots to
do," said Gupta. XI
Presidents of yore: a look back at the twelve that came before
UBC's presidents have a long and storied history that goes beyond the streets and buildings named after them. Here are the highlights
mI
FRANK WESBROOK
(1913-1918)
• UBC's first
president
• Annual salary
$10,000
ARVIND GUPTA
(2014-)
LEONARD KLINCK
(1919-1944)
• Lived in a tent first year
in office conducting
research
• Oncesuspended
a Ubyssey editor for
publishing unflattering
(but true) information
about him
STEPHEN TOOPE
(2006-2014)
• Initiated Place and
Promise, UBC's current
strategic plan
NORMAN MACKENZIE
(1944-1962)
• Enrolment
increased from
2,500to 18,000
students during
his term
MARTHA PIPER
(1997-2006)
• Oversaw
increased market housing
• Had an imaginary friend
named Bort
JOHN MACDONALD
(1962-1967)
• Removed
the bowling
alley from
WarMemoria
Gym
DAVID STRANGWAY
(1985-1997)
KENNETH HARE
(1968-1969)
• resigned after eight
months
GEORGEPEDERSEN
(1983-1985)
WALTER GAGE
(1969-1975)
• Known as
r.UBC
DOUGLAS KENNY
(1975-1983)
• Sold land for
• Resigned in protest of
• Dealtwith
market housing
provincial government
cutbacks in
to deal with
cutbacks
provincia
funding short
WW
funding
ages NEWS    I   THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014
MONEY»
UBC negotiating payments for
cash-strapped wastewater centre
Maura Forrest
StaffWriter
UBC and Metro Vancouver will
sign a formal contract detailing
UBC's payments for the Annacis
Wastewater Centre by this summer.
A board of Metro directors
voted on Feb. 28 to approve six
payments of $90,000, which
the university had committed
to the research and teaching
centre back in 2011. However,
the schedule of those payments
remains uncertain.
UBC researchers have been
using the facility free of charge
since it was completed in 2011 on
Annacis Island, next to the waste
water treatment plant. Minutes
from the recent board meeting
indicate that Metro is hoping "to
negotiate retroactive payment for
the use ofthe centre prior to 2014."
But UBC's associate director of
strategic partnerships, Iain Evans,
believes UBC should not have to
pay the full $90,000 per year dating back to 2011, as there was little
research activity at that time.
"There will be retroactive payment that will take place. I think it's
fair that UBC researchers pay for
what they used," said Evans. "But
the reality is there wasn't $90,000
worth of research going on in 2011.
It would be odd to backdate it all the
way back to 2011 and pay for things
that UBC didn't actually use."
Evans said the six-year contract
will expire in 2017 if it is retroactive to 2011, which would cut
the remaining time the university
has to make use ofthe facility. He
said UBC's proposal is to begin the
payments for 2013.
The Annacis Wastewater Centre
was conceived in 2006 as one
of five sustainability academies
The wastewater centre is located on Annacis Island, between Richmond and Delta.
that would train students to find
innovative solutions to regional problems like waste water
management. The facility cost
$9 million to build, two thirds of
which was paid for by federal and
provincial grants.
UBC initially considered a
contribution of $1 million to the
project, but according to Michael
Isaacson, dean ofthe Faculty of
Applied Science at the time, no
formal agreement was made.
In 2011, UBC committed to half
of their original proposal in a new
agreement, but Metro only realized UBC would not be pledging
$1 million in late 2013. Soon after,
plans for the four other academies
were shelved.
The Annacis centre is now operating at a $390,000 annual deficit.
White Rock mayor Wayne Baldwin said the deficit has occurred
because the facility is underused.
"They have staff there who supposedly operate and promote it as
a place for conferences or meeting
spaces and they're not bringing
in very much," he said. "It's not
an attractive place to be, next to a
treatment plant."
Evans said the centre could still
become profitable if it were rented
GRAPHIC MING WONG3THE UBYSSEY
out to private enterprises doing
waste water research.
"UBC isn't the only institution
in town that does research," he
said. "I think there's a real opportunity to turn the centre into quite
an entrepreneurial little hub that
would generate revenue based on
renting out the pretty impressive
research infrastructure that they
have."
Baldwin disagrees, saying the
institution will never make back
what it cost to build.
"I'm not thinking that there's
much chance for it to be profitable." XI
NEWS BRIEFS
Professors oppose Fair
Elections Act
160 professors from Canadian universities signed a letter published in the
National Post on Tuesday criticizing
the proposed Fair Elections Act on
several fronts. Fourteen UBC professors were among them.
The lettersaid the bill would disenfranchise certain groups of citizens
and favour larger and incumbent
parties. The letter also expressed
concerns aboutthe lackof consultation in drafting the bill.
"While we agree that our electoral
system needs some reforms, this
bill contains proposals that would
seriously damage the fairness and
transparency of federal elections and
diminish Canadians' political participation," the lettersaid.
Three UBC employees in top 20
public sector earners
Three UBC employees were among
the20 public sector employees with
the highest salaries in B.C. in the
2012-2013 fiscal year.
According to the Vancouver
Sun's database, which includes
bonuses and vacation pay, UBC
President Stephen Toope is the
llth-highest paid public sector
employee in the province.
Dean of Medicine Stuart Gavin
and radiology professor Frangois
Benard placed 13th and 16th,
respectively.
Forty-six ofthe top 50 highest
paid workers in the university sector work at UBC. Most of these are
in medicine, business and the office
of the president, xi
ARTS»
'Rob Ford' elected AUS representative
Andrew Liang
Contributor
Joke candidate Rob Ford won a
position in the Arts Undergraduate
Society (AUS) elections.
After winning a spot as AMS
representative for the 2014-2015
year, Ford announced on his
Facebook page that he would be
delegating his duties to Harsev
Oshan, who ran the joke candidate's campaign. Oshan ran for
AMS president in January and lost
by 29 votes.
Courtney Lee, AUS elections coordinator, expressed deep concern
over the precedent Ford's candidacy has set for future elections.
Lee said the AUS election committee was "not pleased" that Ford beat
out seven other serious candidates.
"It's not fair that he pushed out
more serious candidates and if he
continues to be Rob Ford on the
council, that's something we're not
happy about either," said Lee.
Oshan thought differently.
"Rob Ford won, and if anything,
I think that this proves that stu-
Rob Ford conceded his position to Harsev Oshan.
=HOTO STEVEN RICHARDSJTHE UBYSSEY
dents are very disconnected from
the whole process. It shows how
much name recognition matters
when it comes to these elections."
As Ford's platform included
abolishing tuition and providing
free alcohol to all students, Oshan
said he did not expect to win and
was shocked when he discovered
he came in fourth out ofthe five
elected AMS representatives.
He conceded that his candidacy
may have negatively affected the
election.
"It definitely hurts students who
were serious about it. They ran as
serious candidates. It hurt them,
but at the end ofthe day... it's a
democracy," said Oshan.
Oshan made it clear he would
not be working as Rob Ford
while representing the AUS on
AMS Council.
"I was going to do [so] initially
but I don't think it's goingto add
any value to the votes that students
cast," said Oshan.
Both Lee and Oshan expressed
interest in making it more difficult for joke candidates to win in
the future. Oshan said one of his
priorities as an AMS rep would be
to rework election bylaws.
"I think that the purpose ofthe
joke candidate should be to create
that buzz and then the responsibility ofthe students is to say, 'I've
heard about the joke candidate running in this election, but let me see
what this election is all about." H
ACTIVISM »
UBC students
host I Am a
Feminist Day
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Passers-by were invited to write down
their own definitions of feminism.
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
UBC students gathered on
Monday to celebrate women's
rights and gender equality with
an interactive engagement fair in
the SUB.
Participants at the fair were
asked to reflect on the question,
"How do we enact feminism?"
People could write out their
thoughts on this matter on
posters at the I Am a Feminist
booth or talk to organizers to
learn about how to get involved
with clubs on campus that
promote feminism.
"Feminism gets a pretty bad
rap," said I Am a Feminist campaign member Alex Mierke-Za-
twarnicki. "Most people would
agree with feminism if it was
really described to them. So, this
event is about trying to show that
being a feminist can mean a lot of
different things to a lot of different people, and that there's a lot
of ways to be a feminist."
Passers-by could purchase
I Am a Feminist Day T-shirts
and buttons imprinted with the
campaign's logo, as well as "Got
Consent?" merchandise from the
Sexual Assault Support Centre
(SASC).
"It's supposed to get people
who don't normally go out and
look for information on feminism
[to do so] now that they see that
their teachers, peers and friends
are wearing these buttons [and
merchandise]," said organizer
Cheneil Hale.
At their booth, members of the
Equity Ambassadors displayed
profiles of different women on
campus and handed out flowers
to passers-by.
"In lots of different countries,
on International Women's Day,
they give out flowers. We wanted
to celebrate in the same way,"
said Cicely Blain, a representative for the Equity Ambassadors.
I Am a Feminist Day was led
by the same student group who
ran the Campaign to Reclaim
Consent, which started last
term. The group teamed up with
the Women's Centre, SASC, the
Equity Ambassadors and other
campus clubs to organize the
event in celebration of International Women's Day, which
was on Saturday.
The major goals ofthe I Am
a Feminist Day campaign are
centred around education about
feminist issues through dialogue.
"We tend to be confined in this
little box because we think only
about our own experiences, but
there are so many other problems
that we may not be aware of,"
said Hale. "By talking to other
people ... we can hopefully spread
awareness and learning, and then
more initiatives can pop up and
take on specific problems." XI II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
URSDAY, MARCH 13,20
MUSIC »
Jaguar prowls in style
Last August, a group of musicians
came together for a show put on
by TheCalendar.ca at the Fortune Sound Club. They had never
played with each other before.
"We rehearsed as a band for the
first time at sound check at this
show and it was one ofthe best
shows I had played to that point.
We had a really good time, we just
jammed. And that's how it started," said second-year UBC student
Robert Gorwa, the lead guitarist
of Jaguar and self-proclaimed
medical doctor.
"We basically have UBC to
credit," added trombonist Dexter
Joric.
The eight-month-old seven-man
funk R&B band has seen a successful start since their first event at
Fortune Sound Club. Self-described
as "a bunch of jazz players playing
R&B," Jaguar expect to put on a
fun and lively show this Thursday.
"As long as it's groovy, man, we don't judge," said tenor saxophonist and "spiritual chieftain" John Awrey.
Eccentricity lies at the heart of the Jaguar cohort. "Every show that we do, we try to think
of a different theme or something that's trending," said Joric.
"We're trying not to be just a couple dudes just rolling in T-shirts; it's something to make
us stand out," added Gorwa.
With Last Band Standing just around the corner, the members of Jaguar appear confident
and up to the challenge. For them, their Thursday night wouldn't be complete without a
hair-infested White Spot burger, jungle music and a pre-gig "f lowjob" — Awrey's
ritual haircut before every major show.
Indeed, Jaguar seems to revolve around homegrown superstitions,
claiming their performance is also dependent on Awrey putting on
his left sock before his right sock first thing in the morning. But
otherwise, their routine is simple. "We all show up, drink beer,
then there is always one person that is really late and then we
all get anxious waiting for them," said Gorwa.
Then, after a huddle, they're ready to perform — not just
for the show, it seems, but in their style.
"Just getting bigger and better from here — that's where
it's going," affirmed Awrey.
—Tom Spano
Jaguar can be found on their Facebook page.
=HOTOCOURTESYJAGUAR
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEJTHE UBYSSEY
FINAL
SHOWDOWN
The New Atlas
charts a course
for the wild
Did you ever hear of an album recorded in a barnyard, complete with
chickens and cats?
UBC's very own folk band, the New Atlas, has done just that. The
band was founded over a year ago when Cam Reed, Jodi Bagge and Luc
Gloanec met at Trinity Western University. Even though the band is relatively
new, they have performed at many events and are about to release their second EP.
Their music is rich, yet simplistic. "Even though the music is written by different writers coming from different places, there is a common theme of trying to make sense of relationships in the
world," said Gloanec, the guitarist, vocalist and banjoist for the New Atlas. "Our values, things
we hold important to us, and where we stand in the world and its conflicts."
The Barnyard Session, the band's first EP, conjures the illusion of a Utopian world. It makes
the listener feel like a hobbit living in the Shire, where dancing and drinking wine are the only
tasks in the schedule. But the EP evokes a sense of emptiness — much like how one would feel
after a rewarding backpacking trip.
Through musical collaborations, members ofthe New Atlas have established a special bond
with each other. "To me, music is the last bash of spirituality in our society. We can achieve a
connection that can be transformative," Gloanec said. "[Music has] changed me by giving me an
outlet to create art and share
what I believe to be true and
beautiful."
The band is becoming more
and more active; their list of
to-dos includes releasing a
new EP, touring B.C., making
music videos, and recording
more music.
The New Atlas is not nervous about their performance
in the upcoming finale of the
2014 AMS Last Band Standing competition. Instead of
being concerned about their
performance, they are more
intrigued by the "relational
aspect of live performances, in
terms ofthe music, audiences,
band members and how everything works out beautifully,"
said Gloanec.
—JolinLu
The New Atlas can be found on
PHOTO COURTESYTHE NEW ATLAS       FaCebOOk.
On the evening of March 13th, four UBC-based bands — each
with their own style, attitude and sound — will compete in the
finale of the annual AMS Last Band Standing competition in the
Pit Pub. Over 8,000 students voted online during the first round
of the competition last week, in which six competitors, selected
:ens of submissions, streamed their music videos over
burveymonkey. The winner of tonight's battle royale, who will be
selected by a jury of industry specialists, will receive a variety
of prizes, including a live video recording session, airtime on
CiTR, and most coveted of all, a spot on the lineup forthe
AMS Block Party. We've profiled each ofthe competitors in order, in order to give discerning audiophonic
connoisseurs the full skinny on who to watch
forduring the night.
Room 202 keeps it real
From their high school
music program to the
upcoming Last Band
Standing finale, Room
202 has come a long way
over the years.
As the alternative
pop-rock group awaits
its performance at the Pit
Pub this Thursday night,
frontman Zishan Abdullah, a third-year chemical
engineering student,
reminisces of Room 202's
early years and the high
school classroom that
inspired their name.
"We spent most of our
time in that room, hanging out and playing music
together," Abdullah said.
Taking influence from bands like Green Day and Maroon 5, Room 202 — which consists
of lead vocalist Abdullah, Rosendo Flores on lead guitar, bassist Earl Moya and Joshua Lopez
on drums and percussion — has played at some remarkable venues, including the Biltmore
Cabaret and the Fairview Pub. However, there is one venue that particularly stands out in
Abdullah's mind.
"We played at Science World about a year ago," he said. "There was a huge event that Science World was putting on and a whole bunch of people [came to] it. That was really fun."
No matter where they are playing, Room 202 hopes to transfer the passion they put into
creating their music to their audience in an effort for the band and crowd to travel far together.
"We really like to display our passion on stage," Abdullah said. "We like to make sure that
we're having a good time and that our audience is having a good time. We really put effort into
that."
Indeed, passion seems to be incredibly important to Room 202, but becoming deeply embedded in their music does not come without its string
of challenges. For Abdullah, balancing a heavy course load with the
responsibilities of a band is sometimes a very difficult task.
"I'm in engineering," he said. "It takes a lot of time, but I also
have to put my time into music. It's a passion of mine, as well."
Regardless ofthe challenges that come with being both a
student and musician, Abdullah encourages other local bands
to keep their passion going.
"There's no such thing as perfect, but if you keep practicing, that's what really matters."
—Marlee Laval
Room202 can be found on Facebook or on Soundcloud.
Rebel on a
Mountain
ROAMs free
Vancouver-based indie folk band Rebel on a Mountain has
definitely gone through its share of changes since their formation
in 2012.
With a series of lineup changes and genre evolutions, the group, commonly known as ROAM, is excited to showcase these changes at the Last
Band Standing finale this Thursday.
"We're basically Rebel on a Mountain 2.0," said lead vocalist Kristian Wagner, a UBC
student studying political science.
"I feel like we've gone through a lot of different stages," Wagner said. "[Initially our
music] was very technically driven... [but] the new sound, which we're bringing to Last
Band Standing, is a bit more hard-hitting indie folk. It's goingto be exciting to see how
people receive it."
The chance to win Last Band Standing and earn a slot at this year's Block Party is a big
deal for ROAM, considering that they would be playing at the same show as one of their
biggest influences, Vancouver local and Block Party headliner Dan Mangan.
"A bunch of the guys in the band have had chance encounters with him because they work
in coffee shops," Wagner said, laughing. "He's randomly come into their coffee shops and
they get super nervous and fangirly."
Leading up to the release of their Kalendar EP last year and now their finalist spot at Last
Band Standing, ROAM has learned about the sense of vulnerability that is required to grow
both musically and personally.
"Everyone has to check their egos at the door as soon as they enter practice. It's a very
special and humbling experience," Wagner said. "It's a toiling process, but at the same time,
it's super exciting and one of the things that I personally enjoy the most. It's not just musical
development; it's also getting to know yourself as an individual."
Citing their friends, family and
the Blank Vinyl Project as their
biggest support systems, ROAM
hopes other local bands will be
able to find the support and confidence that will get them far.
"There is so much excess talent,
especially in Vancouver ... that
really just doesn't get showcased
or displayed the way that it
deserves to be," Wagner said. "I
hope that people can feel confident that they can do something
with their music." 'tJ
—Marlee Laval
ROAM can be found on Facebook
or on Bandcamp.
EBELONA
gUNTAIN
PHOTO STEPHANIEXIVTHE UBYSSEY CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014
The marvellous life and curious
death of the Japadog vendor at UBC
Japan Association raises funds for earthquake
JESSICA-CHRISTIN
i HAMETNER
Food
I must admit, I have a love-hate
relationship with hotdogs. The
thought of a greasy sausage topped
with oily onions and a dollop or two
of mustard and ketchup stuffed into
a bun certainly does have its appeal.
Until now, I believed this was the
only kind available, until I was told
about Japadog, a curious fusion
of Japanese- and Canadian-style
hotdogs. I was intrigued.
Japadog first started in 2005
when an ambitious Japanese couple
began selling regular hotdogs on
the streets of Vancouver, as a man
known simply as Hide, Japadog's
hotdog stand manager, explained.
With a flair for creativity and ambitious dreams, it was their homeland,
Japan, which inspired the couple to
add a tempting twist to an all-time
favourite street food: traditional
Japanese flavours. Tastes such as
terimayo were fused with local
BC ingredients, buns and sausages
were especially crafted to suit the
unique Japanese hotdog, and so, the
Japadog was born.
UBC's Japan Association (JA) is
celebrating its 50th anniversary this
year by hosting a food festival from
March 10 to 14 in conjunction with
Japadog. While the festival is aimed
at foodies, it's the JA's philanthropic
spirit that shines.
"We wanted something big and
fun that would also raise awareness,
so we are collecting donations for
the 3/11 earthquake that happened
three years ago in Japan. Part of
the profits that we earn will go
towards the recovery and some of
the programmes that are involved
with helping the people that are still
affected," said Mio Tomisawa, of
the JA.
Tomisawa said more than
100,000 people continue to be
affected bythe Tohoku earthquake,
living in temporary housing due to
the damage caused by the tsunami.
Life continues to be a daily struggle
for many in Fukushima, despite the
earthquake having occurred three
years ago.
To help out, students could
savour Japadogs including the juicy
kurobuta terimayo, listed on the
menu as "one ofthe must-eat items
in the world," or alternatively, enter
an instant raffle to win popular
Japanese snacks such as Pocky.
"The reason why we still wanted
to support the Tohoku people was
ILLUSTRATION INDIANAJOELJTHE UBYSSEY
The Japan Association was selling Japadogs outside of the Abdul Lhada building this
week, until the operation was shut down by CU PE 116.
the fact that JA believes in continual support for when these kind of
natural disasters happen," Tomisawa said. "Any little [bit] helps;
small things can go a long way, just
like Japadog."
Japadog has one big goal: to
make the best hotdog in the world.
With enticing tangy flavours,
salty seaweeds fused with classic
teriyaki sauces and a touch of
EDITOR'S NOTE
Japadog removed from campus
after request of CUPE 116
We had originally planned to
publish the above article in order
to draw the public's attention to the
presence of a Japadog on campus
for the remainder of the week.
However, during our production
process we learned CUPE 116
had requested thatthe Japadog
vendor be shut down, due to the
union's previous grievance with the
business in 2009.
"The union objected because
we had jurisdiction forthe food
services on campus, it's unionized, and we had our own hot dog
stand," said Colleen Garbe, the
president of CU PE 116. "We settled
to the satisfaction of both parties
quite a fewyears back."
During the negotiation process
forthefundraising event, theJapan
Association proposed bringing in
a vendorspecializing in traditional
Japanese cuisine, but neglected
to specify that this vendor would
be Japadog.
"There was some sort of
misunderstanding between the
Japanesestudent association and
UBC's CUPE 116, and when we
talked about inviting vendors onto
campus, CUPE [116] mentioned
cheese, rice or noodles, Japadog is
a hotdog with an edge — a fusion
of east meets west.
"When Japadog started out,
it was only a small cart, and now
they have places in New York and
all over Vancouver," Hide said.
"Japadog wants to show that if
they can start something from
such a small cart and make it so
big, then anyone can dream." tJ
that there was some past offence
with Japadog and they might've
had problems with that," said Kathy
Li, the culture head forthe Japan
Association. "They were okay with
any other vendor, but Japadog
might've been an issue, and we
weren't aware of that, so that was
essentially the misunderstanding."
According to Garbe, CUPE 116
was explicit in their demand that
Japadog notcometocampus —
but she recognizes that multiple
lines of communication may
have led to confusion. Due to the
potential loss in maintenance
fees and funds raised forthe 3/11
earthquakestemming from the
premature removal of Japadog
from campus, CUPE 116 members
agreed yesterday to donate $500
to the Japan Association's relief
fund. "We're opposed to vendors
coming onto campus for normal
sales and business that would take
away business from our business
operation," said Garbe, "[but] we
have no problem with discussing and coordinating with other
student groups that are bringing in
people to do fundraisers, to help
society and stuff like that, and we
are always open to discussion with
any student groups on that."
Currently, there are no other
hotdog vendors on campus.
THEATRE»
Fighting for death
Euthanasia debated on stage
Mariam Barry
Contributor
We all take our time, until time at
last takes us.
The notion of limited time
lies at the heart ofthe dilemma
gracing the Cultch stage this
month in Whose Life Is It Any way?,
which invites audiences to witness
the trials facing a sculptor who
becomes paraplegic after a car accident and subsequently fights for
his right to die. Written by Brian
Clark, the Tony award-winning
play raises poignant questions
about where to draw the line between medical ethics and human
dignity.
The show is being staged by Real-
wheels Theatre, a Vancouver-based
company which strives to deepen
the audience's understanding ofthe
disability experience. This is done
by staging productions in which
disability itself is not the focus, but
rather the landscape in which universal issues are debated onstage.
James Sanders, Realwheels
founding artistic director, first encountered the play in its film version
during his recovery from a spinal
injury in 1990 which rendered him
quadriplegic. "New to the world of
disability, this play was a gift that
inspired me to carry on," said Sanders, who, almost 25 years since his
accident, now sees the play in a new
light — a shift in perspective which
lead to his desire to stage the show.
As a man "in midlife, married and
with kids, I am now at an age close
to that of Ken Harrison [the protagonist of Whose Life], who I now see
as someone fighting for his right.
Not the right to die, but the right
to make a choice. The play extends
to that ofthe individual and relates
to society in our need to face this
subject as atopic of discussion".
Though first adapted from a
screenplay in 1972 by Clark, the
subject ofthe show is still time-
!
*-#*
ly: right-to-die legislation is once
again being debated in the media.
Last month, Belgium passed a bill
allowing children who suffer from
severe pain due to terminal illness to
voluntarily receive euthanasia. With
other countries set to follow suit,
Clark's play aims to provide the first
words in the ensuing global debate.
Sanders had initially planned to
take on the role of Ken Harrison
himself. However, due to health
issues, Sanders eventually decided to relinquish the role and ask
longtime friend and local star Bob
Frazer to take on the part. Frazer
is joined by a stellar cast, which
includes several UBC graduates:
actors Pippa Johnstone and Dawn
Petten, costume designer Carmen
Alatorre and musical accompaniment by cellist Eric Wilson,
the current head of strings at the
UBC School of Music. The show is
directed by John Cooper.
Though heavy in content,
playwright Brian Clark has layered
in numerous comedic moments,
which, according to Sanders, close
"the distance that exists between
people and the disabled by using
humor to remind us that we are
all human.
"Audiences can [therefore] expect to both laugh and shed a tear,
as the script uses humour to put
the hearts ofthe audience into the
hands ofthe actors," he said.
Staged in the open set of a
hospital room with the looming
presence of a doctor's office placed
behind Harrison's hospital bed,
scene changes occur f luidly via the
use of changing light.
And it is with this fluidity that
the cast of Whose Life is it Anyway?
aspire to deliver a gut-wrenching-
ly heartbreaking and beautifully
comedic performance. 'tJ
Whose Life is it Anyway? plays
until March 22 at the Cultch, 1895
Venables St.
1
COURTESYREALWHEELS THEATRE
Whose Life is it Anyway? features the story of a man fighting for the right to die.
You. A Doctor. Naturally.
Thinking ofa career in naturopathic medicine? Attend an upcoming information
session to learn about the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) program.
\
Prospective Student Information Session
5:30 - 7:30 pm, Wednesday, March 19,2014
Student for a Day
9:00 am - 4:00 pm, Monday, April 14,2014
AANMC Virtual Fair
Tuesday, April 15,2014
For more info and to register: www.binm.org
\;  Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine
,   ,{? 435 Columbia Street, NewWestminster, BC
->$&!''   604-777-9981 I www.binm.org
Boucher   Western Canada's Naturopathic Medical School
INSTITUTE THURSDAY, MARCH 13,2014    |    CULTURE    |   7
THEATRE»
LEAPing for life
Arts Centre cultivates UBC
playwrights in local festival
Jenica Montgomery
StaffWriter
Some playwrights have to wait
decades before their work is staged
at a major venue — but that's not
the case for two UBC students.
To celebrate the completion of
another year of LEAP (Learning
Early About Playwriting), the
annual Arts Club-based festival
will be hosting an assortment of
young playwrights this weekend
in Vancouver.
First-year Arts student Avash
Islam and creative writing
graduate Chloe Packer will be
presenting their works as Level 2
and Level 3 LEAP students. The
LEAP program, which is divided
into three levels, was founded
by award-winning playwright
and actor Shawn MacDonald,
and allows students to explore
their creative nature and grow
as writers, regardless of whether the students are interested
in playwriting.
"For anyone that writes
anything, I think it's a fantastic
opportunity to develop yourself and to develop yourself as a
writer," said Islam, "even if you
don't want to go into theatre or
playwriting or something."
The community nature of
LEAP and the emphasis on peer-
to-peer feedback is a way for students to develop their plays, and
as writers. Packer, the only Level
3 student, works independently
with the help of MacDonald and
an assistant.
"It can be tough for me to stay
focused. And what's wonderful
about a program like LEAP is
that it does give you those solid
deadlines so that you don't get
off track, and that's really, really
valuable," said Packer. "Especially for someone who's starting
out sort of at the beginning of
their writing career because
developing that work ethic is so
important."
Islam is presenting a one-act
play about the intricacies of time
and nostalgia.
"It's about a guy who works
in a record store, then his ex
comes and visits out ofthe blue,
and some wibbly-wobbly timey-
wimey stuff happens. It's like
a play about time and nostalgia
and getting stuck in the past
and moving on from that," said
Islam. "I mostly just draw on my
life, what I'm feeling, and then
I write.
"I just try to express myself,
try to express what I'm feeling,
try to communicate, I guess, because that's really all there is and
it's the best way I know how."
IMAGE COURTESY MARK HALLIDAY/ARTSCLUE
The LEAP program allows budding creative minds to spend several months workshopping a play before staging it at a major public venue.
Packer is presenting a full-
length family drama that "has
some very comic elements."
"It's about complacency and
what do you do when you [have]
made decisions based on what was
societally expected of you — how
do those decisions, like marrying
someone because they're a good
catch, how do those decisions
affect you in 20 years?"
Theatre and writing have
always been a part of Islam and
Packer's lives, Packer having
grown up surrounded by theatre
and Islam having known what he
wanted to do since he was six.
"With this exception of, like,
two months when I was six when
I wanted to be a garbage man,
I've been like pretty one track
about, 'Yeah, I'm a writer,' and
even then I think I'd just be like a
garbage man-poet, like Bukowski
or something — garbage man by
day, token poet by night."
Who knows — LEAP attendees
may end up watching the next
George Walker. XI
The LEAP program will be
presented at the Arts Club Revue
Stage, 1601 Johnston St., on
March IS and 16 at 7p.m., and
March 22 at 7:30 p.m. The awards
night, in which all three the
participating playwrights will receive a cash reward, is on March
23 at 7p.m.
THINK YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES TO
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EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
RSDAY, MARCH 13,20
CYCLING »
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
For members of the UBC cycling team, the goals are to attend as many races as possible, attract talented riders to the university and build the cycling community on campus.
The resurgence of the UBC cycling team
Adrienne Hembree
StaffWriter
David Mackay loves cycling.
From talking about cycling
to riding his bike, racing, and
co-organizing the UBC cycling team, Mackay enjoys every
second of pursuing his passion
for the sport.
A second-year psychology
student, Mackay wanted to bring
his love of cycling to the UBC community. "I was playing with the
idea ... that I really wanted to get a
cycling thing going," Mackay said.
"I wasn't even thinking racing."
He was intrigued when the
main organizer ofthe team,
Adrienne Stedford, created a Facebook page during the summer
and sparked interest in forming
a team. Stedford had raced for a
year at Oregon State University
and had such a great experience
that she decided to try to connect
a UBC team with the Northwest
Collegiate Cycling Conference
(NCCC). The NCCC includes 25
universities from Washington,
Idaho, Montana, Oregon and now
B.C. UBC is the only Canadian
school in the conference.
"I immediately messaged her. I
was so on board," Mackay said.
UBC's cycling team is equal
parts resurgence and brand
new development. Regarding
past UBC cycling organizations,
Mackay said there was a cycling club, but he doesn't think
they ever competed. "I think it
was more recreational," he said.
"There's [also] always been a biking club, but they're more geared
toward mountain biking and trail
maintenance."
Both Stedford and Mackay
felt that the idea of a road
cycling team would generate
interest. "Just looking around
[on campus], there's a lot of
people that could probably lean
more towards road cycling,"
said Mackay.
Mackay discovered cycling
several years ago in his hometown of Calgary with the Ride to
Conquer Cancer, a 100-kilometre
charity ride. He was soon hooked
on riding, and began using his
bicycle as his main form of
transportation. This season is
Mackay's first competing in
races. The UBC cycling team has
enabled him to train and race
competitively, but also to build
community with fellow cyclists
of all skill levels.
Stedford and Mackay contacted
the governing body for the NCCC
to race as a member school. "I
think they pulled a few strings
for us to try to make it work," said
Mackay. "But of course they wanted us to come compete. It just adds
to the dynamic."
The competition season
consists of eight weekends of
racing through March and April
followed by a national championship in May. Teams qualify for
spots at nationals by attending
races and scoring points. The
conference has a variety of cat
egories for men and women ranging from A (elite) to D (beginner). Each weekend consists of
three events: a road race, a team
time trial and a criterium.
The
?he main thing is we
want to be a cycling
team. Obviously we
want to compete, but
not so we're exclusive.
David Mackay
UBC cycling team member
The NCCC and the team encourage riders of all skill levels,
racing classes, and abilities. "Almost everyone starts out in D,"
Mackay said. "But people have
been moving up quickly."
UBC's team has 11 racing
members and many more who
express interest each week. From
their first weekend of competition in March, the team has put
together a strong showing.
"Some riders have taken
[points] in their first races," said
Mackay. "Our men's team won
the team time trial at the University of Oregon Omnium. It's
getting more and more momentum," Mackay said.
Despite their present racing
successes, Mackay stressed that
the central aspect ofthe team is
its open attitude and welcoming
atmosphere.
"The main thing is we want to
be a cycling team. Cbviously we
want to compete, but not so we're
exclusive."
The team represents a diverse
demographic of men and women
from various degree programs
and years of study. Mackay emphasized the community building
the team brings to UBC.
"It's so rewarding for students that have a hard time
finding community at UBC,"
said Mackay. He credits the hard
work, passion and camaraderie of
the team to its strong start.
"People have been really adamant about doing whatever the
next step is to get the ball rolling,"
he said. "It's really cool to see how
much motivation there is."
This season, UBC's goals are to
attend as many races as possible,
increase interest in the team, and
build community by supporting
each other at races and making it
accessible for team members to
compete. Riders are encouraged
to join in any capacity from casual riding to serious racing.
Though the team's future
goals are to become a team that
attracts talented riders to the
university, their more immediate
goals are to build a sustainable
team that lasts when graduating
cyclists leave.
One factor contributing to
the sustainability ofthe team
is funding. UBC Cycling is
self-funded, with support from
sponsors and local bike shops
that provide some equipment
and racing essentials. This year's
sponsors and partners include
Velofix, Prima, Q Energy and
Performance Coaching.
"There is a business side to it,"
said Mackay. The team also cuts
costs by carpoolingto races and
doing homestays while traveling.
Dave Vukets, the founder of
Prima, a local food startup, is
a UBC alum who saw a valuable opportunity to support the
growth of cycling. "He's a recent
grad who ... wishes there had
been a UBC cycling team during
his time, so our story hit home
with him," said Mackay.
The UBC cycling team, built on
teamwork and passion, is pedaling their way towards a promising future. Mackay is constantly
impressed by the dedication ofthe
team. "We are excited to see more
and more UBC students get involved
in bike racing," he said, tl THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014    |    SPORTS + REC
CHARITY »
UBC swimmer joins 5 Days for the Homeless campaign
Natalie Scadden j I I \       Not only does she have a great
sports + Kec hditor : ■ ■ ;  „rou„ 0f teammates watching out
Natalie Scadden
Sports + Rec Editor
Where did you sleep last night?
For UBC varsity swimmer
Brittney "Bon" Harley and nine
others, the answer to that question
is on the sidewalk outside Irving
K. Barber Library. The group
has set up a camp there for the
week as part ofthe 5 Days for the
Homeless campaign.
With no money and no electronics, the aim is to raise awareness
for youth living on the streets.
They're also collecting spare change
and have set a fundraising goal
of $15,000, to be donated to Aunt
Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society, a registered charity that provides guidance, supported housing
and job training to teen moms and
young people in foster care.
£
[My swimming
teammates] just ask me
how it's going and if I
need anything, which is
so awesome. I ve gotten
so much support from
them, like 'Hey Britt, I'll
bring you food', which
is such a kind gesture.
But at the same time
I'm like 'guys this isn't
about me.'
Brittney Harley
UBC swimmer and s Days for the
Homeless participant
"By associating ourselves with
this project, we will not only raise
awareness for youth homeless-
5DAYS.CA/UBC
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEJTHE UBYSSEY
UBC swimmer Brittney "Bon" Harley is one of 10 students sleeping outside Irving K. Barber Library with the 5 Days for the Homeless campaign.
ness in Vancouver, but we can also
directly give back to these children
who are transitioning out ofthe foster care system and are expected to
be fully independent young adults,"
reads the 5 Days UBC website.
For Harley, who recently
wrapped up her five-year swimming career with the Thunderbirds, the campaign was another
challenge she'd been looking forward to. She heard about it in her
third year at UBC and applied to
participate. She even went through
the entire interview process, but
couldn't do it because she was
! spending over 20 hours a week
! at the pool. "They were like, 'We
: love your commitment to so many
i things, but you have to be here
i fully,'" Harley explains of her first
: time applying to participate.
But now that swimming is done,
; she can put her energy into her
i other passions. "Literally the second
| that I knew that I was done my
; season, I looked up this campaign, I
\ got involved, I contacted them, and
I they were just like, 'Obviously this
; is something that's important to you
i because you've tried to do this be-
I fore,'" she says. "It's awesome to be
here. I'm so happy. I haven't stopped
smiling."
Harley is thankful for having
the support of her swim teammates, who think this is "classic
Bon." They've all stopped by to
keep her company and bring her
food and warm drinks. While she's
appreciative of their kind gestures
— rules state that participants
cannot buy food themselves and
can only drink from public water
fountains — she stresses that it's
not about her. "It's youth helping
youth," she says. "If you've got
some change, that's all I want."
Not only does she have a great
group of teammates watching out
for her, she also made an instant
connection to her fellow participants. "We actually all just met for
the first time [Monday] night and
the second we saw each other it
was like I'd known them forever,"
Harley says.
In order to stay warm overnight, the group cuddled up to
share body heat. "I don't think
there's anything that can stop you
from being friends after spooning all night," she says. "It was
awesome."
Harley believes that being involved in high performance sport
gave her the confidence she needs
to approach people in public and
talk to them openly. "Swimming
has taught me to love the things
I love and strive for them, you
know, like do everything you can,
put everything into the things you
enjoy," she says. "That definitely
comes out in this because you
realize who you are through sport,
and then you can spread that to
the community."
Having an athlete involved has
also brought increased attention
to the campaign, something the
entire group is happy about. "We
actually almost hit the money
amount they got last year [on
Monday], and that was the start of
the campaign," Harley explains.
But there's one thing that
swimming couldn't prepare Harley for: raccoons. "Raccoons are
the devil. I'm so scared of them.
I don't want raccoons in my bed,
that's what I'm nervous about." XI
To donate to the S Days for the
Homeless campaign and read participant blogs, visit www.Sdays.ca/
ubc. Or, as Harley said, "Come stop
by. We like friends."
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
#13
BRAEDEN
ALLEMANN
Baseball
CHRIS
HOWE
Volleyball
JAIME
HILLS
Basketball
1. Why did you choose jersey number 13?
2. What's your biggest superstition?
3. What's the most unlucky thing that's happened to you?
4. What's your spirit animal?
Honestly, I didn't choose
the jersey. Thejersey
chose me. In other words,
the coaches just gave me
one.
Right before left. Right
sock then left. Right
shoe then left. Right
catcher's leg guard
before left. It just feels
wrong otherwise.
Hmmmitwasmore
unfairthan unlucky. I'd
rather not talk about it.
#saveus
Well, mypatronusisa
horse according to a
BuzzFeed quiz. And
BuzzFeed doesn't lie.
I'm a rookie. Limited options resulted in myjersey
number.
refuse to step on the
foul line.
Wore a foul tip off the
jock... and it was caught
on camera.
Cow. Hard to explain,
though people close to
me know why.
I heard they might be
doing a sport number
targeting review and
that number 13 is
rumoured to receive
enhanced support.
Eating Parmesan
cheese after my games,
because a protein shake
just doesn't cut it.
Of all the athletes at this
school, I'm dating a guy
on the men's hockey
team.
Sid the Sloth because
look like him when
laugh. Eitherthatora
Thunderbird, duh.
My favourite number
was three as a kid, but
our T-Ball jerseys were
numbered according to
sizesolendedupal3.
Delayed flights are a bad
omen.
Athieffoundourteam
room open and unoccupied and my bag -with
my phone, wallet and
laptop-wasunlucky
enough to be one ofthe
three grabbed.
I'd be a pelican. I'm long
and awkward, and I'm
in thewarm part ofthe
ocean eating all day with
no predators!
Originally because no one
elseeverwanteditandl
liked proving the unlucky
numberl3 wrong. Then I
kept wearing it in memory of
Quinn Keast.
always have to make my
last shot before I ever leave
the gym. I would just be
scared I'd be cursed if
didn't do it.
I fell on a treadmill one time
and gave myself some serious road rash -1 still have the
scars. That was bad enough
but it was also Christmas Eve
and I was in Hawaii, so that
made it even worse.
Is Tigger a spirit animal?
5.The NewSUBstill doesn't have a name.
What do you think it should be called?
Margaritaville.
UnderConst ruction.
Ididn't know theold SUB
had a nameotherthan
just being called the
SUB...
CallittheSPUD:Students
Procrastinating Under
Distress.
The Kevin Durant Pavilion.
It might attract him to come
visit. II Opinions
LAST WORDS
YOUR UNIVERSITY
HAS COMMITMENT
PROBLEMS
UBC needs to start following
through on their commitments.
UBC says that no formal
agreement was ever reached
with Metro Vancouver regarding
their $l-million commitment to
the Annacis Wastewater Centre,
but some commitment must have
been expressed for this figure to
have been included in the budget
for four years during the planning of the centre.
Sure, some of this was Metro's
fault — a deal struck in 2011
should not have been news to
them in 2013. But now, UBC
hopes to renegotiate the deal
again, and that's just not cool.
An agreement signed by VP
Research John Hepburn and the
CAO of Metro Vancouver committed UBC to providing $90,000
per year over six years, starting
in 2011. UBC has finally decided
to pay up, but according to Iain
Evans, who is negotiating the deal,
UBC hopes to change this, making
the payments retroactive to 2013.
Even if the research happening at the centre in 2011 wasn't
worth $90,000, as Evans says,
UBC should follow through on
their word if they want to be
taken seriously in their future
dealings. Next time, they should
just not commit to something
they either can't or won't pay. A
institution that renegotiates all
its commitments won't be viewed
as credible.
ROB FORD COMES TO AMS
COUNCIL
Harsev Oshan, who lost a close
AMS presidential election to Tanner Bokor earlier this year, nobly
chose to stay involved in student
politics. Kind of.
Oshan ran in the Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS) elections
for the student society's AMS
Council seat — but he appeared on
the ballot as "Rob Ford." It is hard
to tell whether voters knew they
were voting for Oshan, as he easily
could have won either way. Still,
we've said it before and we'll say it
again: it's nice to see joke candidates in these student elections because, as Winnie Code showed us
during January's AMS elections, it
makes things way more fun.
Our main message on this front
really has to be that Oshan should
not use crack or assault other
council members. It's all fun and
games until we get our own Toronto-crack-mayor on council. (Just
kidding, that would be fun.)
But also, frankly, Ford's antics
are now so over-the-top that the
joke has run its course. We're glad
Oshan will be sitting as Oshan and
not a silly pretend Ford.
CUPE 116'S BEEF WITH
JAPADOG
Let's play "What Should the
On-Campus Union That Wants to
Stay on Students' Good Side Do?"
Here's the scenario: A popular
food stand pops up on campus to
serve students hotdogs for a week
ILLUSTRATION JETHROAU3THE UBYSSEY
When news slows down at the end of the year, it's always good to know you can get some awesome food on campus — for a while.
and raise money for a club's charity
drive. Your union doesn't operate
a hotdog stand, but it did once and
at that time you aggressively kept
other hotdog vendors off campus.
The club got your approval to
have its food stand on campus
beforehand, but you didn't know it
was the same hotdog vendor you
had clashed with in the past back
when you had your own stand.
Do you:
A) Do nothing. The club already
got your permission, students are
loving the hotdogs and it's not
directly competing with any of
your unionized operations. Plus, it's
only here for a week and it's raising
money for charity.
B) Force the non-unionized
vendor off campus and give the
club some cash to make up for
being a dick.
CUPE 116, the campus service
workers union that took extensive
job action in 2012, decided to go
with option B) and force Japadog
off campus.
It was nice ofthe union to donate
money to the charity, but for the
Japanese Association, the hotdog
stand was a way to raise awareness and help out students. For the
reasons listed above, CUPE 116
shouldn't have felt threatened and
they should have realized it was
not as if the club could have found a
unionized Japanese hotdog vendor
to come instead of Japadog.
Everyone should just remember
that next time they complain about
not being paid enough. XI
Where is home? Problems discussing Chinese international students
JANE SHI
Op-Ed
On Monday afternoon, I found
myself looking at the cover of The
Ubyssey: a gigantic panda with
sternly crossed arms, wearing a
Chinese flag pin, overlooks what
appears to be ethnically Chinese
students learning at UBC. Noting
instantly the allegory of Chinese
students studying under the control ofthe Chinese government, I
could not help but anticipate the
kind of article that will be written
about "Chinese international
students."
Mainstream journalism has
treated issues pertaining to the
"rising Asian power" and, specifically, Chinese people in Canada
with xenophobia and insufficient
nuance (see Maclean's infamous
"Too Asian?" article). Thus I am
not surprised that "Going home:
Chinese international students
and democracy," is so uncritical of
the "western liberal democracy"
that exists here on Turtle Island
(an indigenous name for North
America). Nor am I surprised
that the article repeatedly frames
Chinese international students
as inseparable from the Chinese
government's relationship to the
West. Like so many other articles written on the topic, "Going
home" implies the superiority
of western systems, as well as
the necessity of writing about
non-western nations from a western perspective.
Rosenfeld spends several paragraphs explaining how "UBC very
China lies
TIBETANS DIE
=HOTO COURTESY KICK_START/FLICKR
Jane Shi argues a better question to ask is whether Tibet activism on campus will extend
to other issues.
gently poked China in the eye"
with the visit of Lobsang Sangay,
Tibetan prime minister in exile.
Then, arguing that this event
"serves to highlight" the larger
issue of "Chinese students travelling] abroad to attend university
in western democracies," he directly links Chinese international
students attending school in the
West to the political situation in
China and in particular "causes
like Tibetan autonomy," which
the Chinese government directly opposes. By asking whether
these students will or will not
import democracy to China, the
piece rhetorically forces "Chinese
international students" into the
Chinese government's geopolitical
role in the world.
My critique of "Going home"
stems from an objection to this
rhetorical framing, because it
presumes The Ubyssey's readership would find it intuitive that
western democracy can influence
international students in any significant way, even if their studies
and interests do not lie in politics,
and it further assumes that these
international students have political influence within China.
Further, "Chinese international
students" is used here to refer only
to those of Chinese nationality,
holding Chinese passports. But
this framing presumes that the
term "Chinese international students" necessarily excludes ethnic
Chinese students from Hong
Kong, Taiwan and other regions,
who would instantly be alienated
from this article's discussion even
if they self-identify as a "Chinese
international student."
I also challenge the article's
premise that either China, Canada
or the U.S. are entities that can be
personified through the popular
opinions of their citizens, using
imperialistically derived labels
such as "Canadians," "Americans,"
or "Chinese." The article suggests
that "Canadians and Americans"
might be surprised that "many of
the returning students don't really
want China to change." I am a
Canadian, yet I am not surprised.
Too often, "Canadian" and
"American" are used in this
context to refer to upper-middle
class whites in those countries
who find rising Asian superpowers threatening. Just as it is
not useful to speak about "Chinese
international students" as limited
to those holding Chinese passports, speaking of Canadians and
Americans without acknowledging an array of possible identities
and relations to other parts of
the world highlights the article's
faith in western democracy and
imperialism. As an example, I was
born in mainland China and have
relatives who live there now who
would be labelled "Chinese international students" if they come to
attend school on Turtle Island. In
"Going home," the investigation
into the question of democracy
promotion in China leads into
the fact that these students are
economically privileged.
While the article does articulate the realities of capitalism, it
decidedly does not frame the issue
of "Chinese international students" as a class issue. By observing that western degrees "boost
job prospects," but saying that
despite this, subservience to the
Chinese government and political
networking are required to get
high-paying corporate positions
in China, the piece opens up a
discussion about our world's elite
classes and their relationship to
national interests. But it does not
frame this as the article's central
focus.
What do students and faculty
reading this article learn about
what it means to be a Chinese
international student? Personally, I learned very little. I
already know that the meaning
of "Chinese" cannot be reduced
to citizenship of mainland China,
that the system ofthe People's
Republic of China is repressive,
and that it's difficult to have
political inclinations that do not
cater to China's national interest if
you have grown up in that system.
But what do students who do not
have a visceral sense of that reality
learn, other than that there are
more reasons to alienate international students from mainland
China and to judge their upbringing and motives? If the questions
the article asks about these international students have to do with
their nationality and not their
class privilege, what does this
discussion serve but to maintain
the legitimacy of different forms
of nationalism?
If we are to have an honest discussion of Chinese international
students, a more interesting question to ask would be: will access
to information about the situation in Tibet, and other regions
which the Chinese government
represses, compel stronger activist
movements around this and other
human rights issue? XI // Scene
OUR SUPER ACCURV&SmtEDICTIONS ON WHO
WILL BE THE NEXT UBC PRESIDENT
So this Arvind Gupta guy is
the new president of UBC,
but we had some candidates of our own. Although
it looks like none of them
will be taking the helm any
time soon, they do fit the
candidate profile the search
committee had set out — to
some extent. — Ming Wong,
Managing Editor, Print
Illustrations by Samantha So.
winning Grammys
counts, right?
The Blueprint? <
Core Requirements for the Role
winning Emmys and People's
Choice count, right? And
University of New Orleans for
one semester!
mentoring Kanye West
hasn't been easy
Party whip much?
Candidates must have excellent rerord-nfadministrativp
and academic achievement, with significant contributions to research, teaching, and mentoring.
Candidates must demonstrate strategic vision and broad-4
based executive leadership skills, including guiding
and inspiring a strong senior management team and
collaborating in a collegial manner with faculty, staff, and
students on key academic and operational issues. .
may not be
the "highest"
characteronthe
show, but getting
there
Candidates should be capable of operating in a complex
system with a combination of strong leadership qualities
and commitment to the principles of shared governance.
J
Harvard, y'all?
producer of her
'own show
is current
-• president of
UofT
the music industry
is very competitive,
veryinternationa
SHAWN "JAY-Z" CARTER
Current job: rapper
Pros: Hip-hop veteran with an
entrepreneurial spirit.
Cons: llluminati-connections.
Candidates must be ofthe highesfcharacter and integrity, possess inherent capabilities to inspire rolleap-nps anf]
stakeholders, and be able to earn the confidence ofthe
University and broader communities^.
International context: Candidates should have a clear
understanding ofthe international context in post-secondary education as well as demonstrated experience
working successfully in the highly competitive international environment in which the world's top-ranked
institutions operate.
Candidates must display a readiness to embrace the
imperatives of cultural diversity and-its^ssential role in
creating globally inclusive learning and research environments, and be eager to strengthen and enhance a wide
range of international partnerships..
ELLEN DEGENERES
Current job: Talk show host
Pros: Charismatic. Sense of humour. Will increase the "just have
fun" factor.
Cons: Can't dance away problems.
dealt with many
sketchy Democratic leadership
members
*\
can use some of
his millions to pay
off student loans
Candidates must be prepared to engage with a diverse
range of faculty, staff, students, and alumni(ae) to address
the many rhallenp-es facing post-secondary institutions:
r" financial pressures on the public system, student afford-
numbers83     1   , , ...       ^^~—^—   r,     ., , ,       ,.      ,
to 88 of his 99 -1 /ability, open access, flexible and online learning, engage-
probiems    1/ ment with industry, pressures of addressing job markets,
A"and other socio-economic expectations. Imagination,
/     analytical acumen, and superior problem-solving abilities
S02E01
see: clothing
line, record label,
basketball team,
etc.
ascongresswoman
she is no stranger
to fundraising
will be of utmost importance^/
Knowledge and expertise in government relations,
business and alumni(ae) development, and fundraising: Candidates must be able to articulate to all levels of
government UBC's significance as a key economic driver
for the new economy, and to collaborate effectively with
elected leaders to capitalize on the benefits accruing to
the province and country through UBC's global leadership in learning and research.
Candidates must have a creative and entrepreneurial sen-
sibiljty. Demonstrated success in fundraising and other
development activities, both at the individual level and
with corporate and private organizations, is essential.
Current job: Democratic party whip
on the Netflix show House of Cards.
Pros: "Ruthless pragmatism." She
will find a way to combat decreasing
provincial funding without resorting to
illegal orsketchy political trades. (Well,
except that one time.)
Cons: Fictional.
S02E01
concrete jungles
where dreams are
made of
'"'Ability to motivattQnspire^nr'. unite: The next President will be ajireless cnampion orTWUniversity's many
achievements and aspirations. She or he will enp-age the --
university community in the process of developing a clear
and cohesive vision of UBC's current and future values,
priorities, and objectives. Candidates must therefore
have exceptional interpersonal and communication skills
required to motivate, interact, and consult widely with
faculty, staff, students, and alumni(ae).
very inspirational
selfie
.e.g. Hollywood?
is current
I _.   president of
UofT
variety of guests
on hershowfrom
Bieberto Obama
1
I
1
is current
president of
UofT
J
Sept. 2011: UBC
announces $1.5
billion fundrais-
ing campaign.
Nov.2011, UofT
announces$2 billion campaign—
probably knows
howtofundraise
MERICGERTLER
Current job: University of Toronto
president
Pros: We can do a wife swap-style
thing since Toope is going to U of T
anyway.
Cons: Doesn't wear glasses like
Toope's.
did we mention
the Oscar selfie
already?
\
engage via
dancing, also
good at talking
with key players
of Hollywood,
shouldtransferto
universitysetting
RAPPING 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 13,2014
CROSSWORD
ACROSS
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2
3
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1
5
6
7
8
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11
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13
14
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17
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20
21
■ 22
23
■ 24
■ 25
2G
27
2S
II
30
31
32
33
■ 34
■ 35
36
■ 37
■ JS
39
■ in
II
42
43
■ 44
■ 45
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47
43
49
■ so
51
52
53
54
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56
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SS
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El
°
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1-Trudge
5-Thick slices
10-Ohio nine
14-Green land
15-Resembling a web
16-Winglike parts
17-SingerSedaka
18-Collect
19-Arrived
20-French Protestant
22-Followed
24-Type of gun
25-Small plateau
26-Goblin
29-Anonymous
33-Not dead yet
34-Actress Braga
35-One circuit
36-Strike out
37- Eye-related
38-Dame Everage
39-Proverb ending?
40-Inner self (Jung)
41- Entreaties
42-Toothless
44- Fast day after Ramadan
45-Scottish Gaelic
46-Math branch
47-Subordinate ruler
50-Ramp
54- Hgt.
55-Dig find
3UZZLEC0URTESYBESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
57-Uncle Remus title
58-Queue
59-Elicit
60-Lo-cal
61-P.M. times
62- Fragrant compound
63-" quam videri" (North Carolina's motto)
DOWN
l-Phnom_
2-In of
3-Notadup.
4- Deceptive
5-River of song
6-Yellowish citrus fruit
7-Blind as__
8-Air rifle ammo
9- Affecting the whole body
10- Pertaining to skin color
11-Airline to Tel Aviv
12-Matron
13-Bird feed
21-Novel ending
23-On the ocean
25-Craze
26- Hawkins of Dogpatch
27- Beg
28-Lunarvalley
29-Words of denial
30- Like some statesmen
31- Capital city of Yemen
32- Muscle contraction
34-III will
37-Carousing
38-Qualified
40-Gillette brand
41-Discharged a debt
43- The communication system of
the body
44-Stiff drink
46-Instant
47-Actress Ward
48-First Arabic letter
49- Canvas shelter used on camping trips
50-Oversupply
51- Greek goddess of strife
52-Devices forfishing
53-Hammock holder
56-Begleyand Bradley
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FROM THE DIRECTOR OF PRISONERS     based   o n .t h e   w o r l d w i d e   b e s t s e l l e r
AN EPIC MIND-SCREW.
TRAVIS HOPSON, EXAMINER.COM
JAKE GYLLENHAAL
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V SCENES, NUDITY
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IN THEATRES MARCH 14
IN THEATRES AND I MAX' MARCH 21
ENTERTAINMENT ONE

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