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The Ubyssey Sep 12, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
is e
crime
Vol. L, No. 2
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12,  1968
224-3916
PROTESTING LIBEL CHARGE against newspaper Georgia Straight, pickets paraded in front of
Vancouver police station for more than an hour Wednesday morning. Preliminary hearing
opened and continues today with magistrate James Bartman likely deciding whether case
goes to higher court for trial. Last criminal libel case in Canada was in 1938.
 *        : x-—"::? ■•* .- .—-
Controversy over Arts 1
still unresolved at SFU
By NATE SMITH
Simon Fraser University does not know yet
whether it will give credit for the Arts I program to students who transfer from UBC.
SFU associate registrar Douglas Meyers said
Wednesday his office wants more information
about the program to pass on to SFU's senate.
"Our admissions office, on its own initiative,
'.has started negotiations with the UBC registrar's office," said Meyers.
However, UBC registrar Jack Parnall said
he had not been approached regarding such
negotiations.
"It's the first I've heard of it," said assistant registrar Ken Young.
Arts I co-chairman Brian Mayne labelled
the SFU position "nonsense" Wednesday.
"I really can't see why they can't accept
it," said Mayne.
Mayne said that if SFU believes in a lib
eral education, as it claims, it should recognize
Arts I as the best method yet found.
"Arts I is three courses in one, with one
mark for all three," Meyers said.
"We require an individual mark for each
course."
Mayne replied that if that is the only problem they could divide 450 by three.
Although the SFU administration is undecided, the university's English department
says it will accept Arts I as a prerequisite for
second year courses.
In a letter to Dr. Ian Ross, former Arts I
co-chairman, SFU English department head
R. J. Baker said: "I am recommending to our
registrar that students who have passed Arts I,
with the appropriate standing, be given credit
at Simon Fraser for any two of English 101,
102 and  103."
Only one Arts I student has applied to SFU.
Meyers said she has been registered on a
conditional basis pending a final decision by
the registrar.
Residence dwellers freed
by late leave abolition
Late leave restrictions for resident students
have been abolished, says housing director
Leslie Rohringer.
i*. Last year, first year women students under
21 years were permitted at most four 4 a.m.
leaves and four 3 a.m. leaves, and second year
students under 21 years at most seven 4 a.m.
leaves and two 3 a.m. leaves per month.
Third and four year students and students
over 21 years had unlimited 4 a.m. leaves. Only
women were expected to sign out.
Interviewed Monday, Rohringer said a new
system has been established by a sub-committee
of the housing advisory committee.
"The new system is a positive approach,"
he said.
"All students regardless of age or sex, will
have to sign out for late leaves.
"Sign-outs are for the dons to note any pattern which indicates a problem, academic or
emotional."
Asked about late leaves Rohringer referred
to a form addressed to parents of residence
students.
The form was headed: "Parents are requested to read this information carefully before
accepting this assignment for residence."
He emphasized two sentences. One read:
"Newly entering students who are 18 years of
age or under, normally are expected to be in
by 2 a.m."
The second says: "The time at which students over 18 years of age return to the residences is left to the judgment of the student."
Libel decision on
GS due today
The criminal libel case against the Georgia Straight and
two of its staff members enters its second day today with the
future of the newspaper in the hands of a Vancouver magistrate.
Observers say the decision as to whether or not the case
against Georgia Straight Publishing Ltd., editor Dan McLeod
and writer Bob Cummings goes to high court trial will be
decided today by magistrate James Bartman.
The prosecution alleges the Straight committed defamatory
libel against city magistrate Lawrence Eckhardt in an article by
Cummings in its July 26-Aug. 8 edition.
The article, announcing Eckhardt winning the Pontius Pilate
Certificate of Justice, held that the magistrate "by closing his
mind to justice, his eyes to fairness and his ears to equality" had
proved the law not only blind, but deaf, dumb and stupid.
Preliminary hearing proceedings to determine whether the
evidence warrants a trial began Wednesday following a legal
argument between defence counsel John Laxton and prosecutor
John Hall.
Laxton told the court that the charge read in the courtroom
was not the same as the charge quoted in the summons received
by his clients.
COURT CHARGE CHANGED
He said a quotation of the allegedly libellous material had
been added to the prosecutor's charge and that the charge before
the court specified an intent to insult as the basis of the libel.
Neither detail was in the summons received by McLeod and
Cummings, Laxton said.
Laxton asked that Bartman instruct the prosecutor to make
clear his position on the two charges and explain how he intended to proceed with them.
After several adjournments and legal wrangles, Bartman
said he could only deal with the prosecutor's present charge and
prelijminary proceedings began.
> Testifying for the Crown, detective Robert Welsh told the
court that on Aug. 6 he attended the offices of the Georgia
Straight at 217 Carrall where he spoke to McLeod and Cummings.
He said when he asked Cummings what the purpose of the
article was, Cummings replied: "I meant to to be a spoof or
a joke."
Welsh said Cummings also said: "It's a follow-up on the
town fool award of fool of the month. It's a joke."
After the Crown had established the details of the Georgia
Straight's   ownership,   printing   and   distribution,   Laxton   presented the first part of the defence case.
'CROWN MUST PROVE INTENT*
He said he would set out to prove that the intention to insult
Eckhardt could not be proved and that the statement was not
defamatory.
"The Crown must prove the intent to insult," he said.
(There are two types of criminal libel specified in the Criminal Code. One concerns the damaging of a reputation by holding
an individual up to hatred, ridicule or contempt. The other concerns the intentional insulting of an individual.)
Laxton maintained that the statement by Cummings that
the article was meant to be a joke disproved prosecution claims
to intentional insult.
To Page 3, See "GEORGIA"
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Senate opens
for first 30
UBC's Academic Senate Wednesday voted to open its
meetings to visitors for the first time.
By a 35-24 vote, senate decided to allow 30 people on
a first-come, first-serve basis for each meeting.
Motions to bar newsmen and non-students were defeated. However, prospective visitors must pick up tickets
from the secretary of the senate at least 24 hours in advance of a meeting.
Only restrictions on the visitors are that they be bound
by general rules of legislative conduct, and in event of
disturbances senate may bar individuals from further attendance.
Senate also decreed that by a simple majority they
may declare any portion of their meeting in camera and
clear the gallery.
UBC president Kenneth Hare served notice that he will
meet with the agenda committee of senate to discuss moving senate meetings to a larger chamber so that more
visitors may be accommodated.
To Page 3. See "COUNCIL"
r-'Xd*
*?*>,.&*■ Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 12, 1968
Park up
or shut up
Oil up your fingers, all you
who press your parking privileges past posted time limits.
You'll need them to rub the
chalk off your tire when the
new RCMP traffic commissioner starts his patrols sometime
this week.
An RCMP spokesman said
the new man, due to start work
at least by Monday, will work
full time enforcing parking
regulations.
RCMP jurisdiction covers all
areas on university endowment
lands but not on the campus,
including the two-hour parking section on Marine Drive.
Pretty yellow tickets ordering offenders to put up $5 or
show up in court decorated almost every car along that
stretch (opposite Fort Camp)
Tuesday and Wednesday.
RCMP law-enforcement technique is to mark each car with
a chalk line on the back tire,
usually around 9 a.m., then
distribute tickets to those still
around at noon.
Law-evading techniques are
the oily finger method or
move-your - car - forward - two -
paces-before-noon strategy. An
alternate suggestion — not recommended — is to remove
our rear tires.
Kiview boys
need help
The Kiview Boys Club needs
volunteers, male or female, to
help with their sport, game
room and photography programs.
Interested students can call
Don Main  at  879-5108.
NEARLY-COMPLETED   BELL  TOWER   rears   it   egregious
head (face?) into the midst. Former BoG member Leon
Ladner donated the money, specifying it be used towards
a bell tower. At least the university will have a focal point,
who can miss an eyesore?
Difficulties in computer
responsible for delay
By ERIK  BRYNJOLFFSSON
Computing difficulties have
caused a delay in compiling the
results of the Alma Mater Society housing survey, says the
programmer of the study.
Jim Slater released first results of the housing study Wednesday. It was organized last
spring by student senator Don
Munton.
"We had hoped to have the
data processed by early August," Slater said in an interview.    "But    we    found   that
UBC's computer was not big
enough.
"This difficulty caused a delay of a month."
Last spring 7000 questionnaires were sent to UBC students. Slater said he was "extremely pleased with the return."
"Student response has been
•excellent. There was a 55 per
cent return.
"I think this indicates the
problem that students were
having regarding housing during the last session."
"Munton now has the first
results that have come out of
the computer,"  Slater said.
Munton, in an interview
Wednesday, said he plans to
report on the study to the AMS
in two or three weeks.
"My report will be centred
on what I find to be the really
important things, but the data
will always be available for
studies," he said.
"We may have to take the
data back to the computer for
further correlation."
Campuses opt for close liaison
OTTAWA (CUP) — Three more campuses
joined Canada's student representation game
over the summer. The players: The universities
of Alberta, Lethbridge and Toronto.
In June, the board of governors at the University of Alberta announced a new policy intended to provide for more direct communications with the student body. The board invited
two members of the students' council (or their
nominees) to attend meetings of the board as
"student  consultants".
Marilyn Pilkington, president of the U of A
students' union, called the move a "significant
step forward".
Last month Dr. Sam Smith, university president at Lethbridge, announced 25 students
would be "directly involved in the administration of the university."
This includes 11 representatives on the gen
eral faculty council and two on the university
senate. .
On Aug. 10, the students' administrative
council at the University of Toronto voted to
accept seats on the president's council, the university's senior policy advisory body.
However, SAC set three conditions for
acceptance tof the seats:
• Students must have equal representation with faculty.
• Council must meet in public.
• SAC must be the body to decide on the
manner of selection of student representatives.
Steve Langdon, SAC president, commented,
"We should accept, with skepticism, because
we can't get more information about how the
university operates and can confront the administration with our view of what the university and the society should be."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
.«_-•>.-?..
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liiPII
"SIGNS OF ANARCHY," screamed Ann Arky. "Wait'll I tell
Uncle Dave about this sacreligious blasphemy. He can read
'*   the writing on the wall."
.Georgia Straight in court
From Page One
In attempting to prove the article non-defamatory, the
defence counsel maintained that, under certain circumstances,
magistrates are forced to ignore human considerations, justice,
.fairness and equality in order to serve the law.
"Many judges have said 'It is my job to enforce the law as
it is'," Laxton said.
-OTHER CASES SHOW LAW 'ABSURD'
He quoted from previous legal cases in which judges maintained a particular law to be absurd or unjust but found themselves bound to enforcing it nonetheless.
"In fact, in the courthouse fountain loitering case, Mr.
Eckhardt himself said he was forced to apply an unjust law,"
he said.
"The article in question only said what Mr. Eckhardt
himself said. It is not, therefore, defamatory."
Throughout the court proceedings, more than 30 pickets
paraded outside the Public Safety Building at 312 Main.
TrlARCHERS PROTEST CHARGE
The marchers held signs reading: Free Speech—Why Can't
We Criticize The Courts? and We Are Aware Of The Facts.
The actions of the pickets and the Georgia Straight are
supported by the Alma Mater Society, which Monday passed
the following motion:
"We feel that this action (of the Crown) is an infringement
of the right of free speech. We therefore support the demonstration . . . held in front of the Public Safety Building."
The court resumed the action against the Straight at 10 a.m.
this morning.
Math faculty divides
over course revisions
By FRANK FLYNN
Mathematics department faculty are sharply divided on the subject of proposed math
curriculum revisions to be submitted to students
this fall.
Dr. Maurice Sion, co-ordinator of the proposed curriculum changes, explained in an interview Tuesday that all mathematics courses
and programs within the university will be
revamped, but the greatest changes will occur
within the majors and honors math programs.
Sion stated that a student-faculty committee
on the undergraduate program consisting of
three professors and two students each from
the faculties of arts, science and engineering
has been meeting since July to consider the
proposed curriculum.
Sion released a 13 page report last spring
outlining the proposed programs and describing the courses in them.
A major feature of the new curriculum is
discontinuation of the present math 120 course
and replacement of it with three separate
courses.
But faculty curriculum committee chairman
Dr. Nathan Divinsky indicated Tuesday that he
is opposed to this plan.
Many others in the department feel as I do,
Divinsky said.  "And we are better organized
this year than when preliminary approval was
given to the program last year."
Divinsky also said the new curriculum will
undergo extensive study in the faculty curriculum committee.
He claimed that the honors mathematics
program is one of the best in North America
and that he can see no good reason to drastically* change something that is working so well.
But both Sion and Divlinsky agreed that student opinion of the new curriculum will heavily
influence its acceptance or rejection.
The committee will distribute within three
weeks an explanation of the new first year
program to all math classes, Sion said.
Accompanying this will be a questionnaire
seeking student opinions of the proposed
changes and asking how, why, and when students selected their courses and programs.
A second brief, outlining the remainder of
the curriculum, will be distributed later, and
once again students will be asked to give their
reactions.
Sion indicated that the committee will submit a report to the department as soon as results of the first questionnaire are known. He
hopes the revisions can proceed through the
mathematics department, the science faculty
curriculum committee and UBC's senate in
time to begin implementation by next fall.
Faculty committee to choose
new Arts dean by December
UBC could have a new dean
of arts by the end of December.
"We have set the end of December as a tentative, though
not rigid, deadline," said Dr.
M. W. Steinberg in an interview Wednesday.
Steinberg is chairman of the
faculty committee responsible
for choosing the new dean.
Other   committee   members
Council
From Page One
The 30 visitors allowed to
each meeting will not include
any invited specifically by the
senate.
Student senator Mark Waldman hailed the move as a major   advance for students.
"The vote tonight is a direct
reversal of senate's position
last year," he said.
Ubyssey editor Al Birnie,
however, disagreed.
"Senate meetings have effectively been open since the
first student senators were
elected, as they reported quite
freely to us on senate proceedings," he said.
"This move in no way increases student participation or
control over the functioning of
the university, the major question students are concerned
with today."
are French department head
Lawrence Bongie; music department head Weldon Marquis; academic planner Robert
Clark; assistant dean of graduate studies Ben Moyls; William
Willmott, anthropology; Ross
M a c k a y , geography; Peter
Remnant, philosophy, and
James Winter, history.
"We advertised for applications and invited suggestions
from the faculty, the administration and the Alma Mater
Society," Steinberg said.
He  said  the  committee has
recevied between 60 and 70 replies to the advertisements and
between 40 and 50 suggestions.
Steinberg said he regretted
the resignation of the only student, Don Munton, from the
committee.
Munton resigned on the
grounds that the students
should name their own representative.
"There is a place for students on this committee," said
Steinberg, "And I believe Mr.
Munton would have made a
fine contribution."
Demonstrations out
for U. of S. students
SASKATOON (CUP) — Saskatchewan premier Ross
Thatcher has threatened to close down the University of
Saskatchewan campuses if Simon Fraser-style demonstrations occur here, according to U of S student leaders.
Eric Olson, student president, said Thatcher made his
threat at a meeting last June 20.
Olson said the premier talked of demonstrations at
Simon Fraser and Columbia and told students he would
"close it (the university) down just like that" if there were
similar events at Saskatchewan.
He claimed Thatcher banged his fist on the table to
emphasize his point.
Deputy premier D. G. Stuart said in Regina: "I don't
believe those students, although I don't know them. I know
the premier would not make a statement like that because
he knows .the university is not his to close."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 12, 1968
Justice I
Huey Newton, convicted Sunday of killing a white
policeman, will live, but only because America is unwilling to admit openly that it's courts are as racist
as the rest of society
American society is racist, even a president's commission agreed. It follows logically that the courts and
the laws reflect the standards of the society.
The police, human beings employed to ensure by
any means necessary that others obey every letter of the
law, carry the standards even be*yond the law.
The police will do openly what they did on the
streets of Chicago, what will they do where there are
few, if a.ny, witnesses.
They struck again against Newton ,but were unable
to kill him on the street. They hoped that, missing
their chance, the courts would do the job for them, but
oublicity was too heavy, too large a section of the
black and white community rallied around Huey, and
the conviction was only for manslaughter, two to 15
years.
Huey will live .but only because enough people
applied pressure and the power structure was willing
to bend a little.
Justice 2
How is the law working in our society. ?
The Georgia Straight is pretty harmless. Or is it ?
Certain people are out to get it, and. if they don't
this time they will the next.
The Straight today is only criticising certain features
of the law, like magistrates it claims are blind to fairness. Pretty mild criticism, compared to what could be
said*
But this frightens a lot of people.
In Canada, too, the very basis of society is law.
Law is for a particular purposes, essentially to maintain
the balance and values of society as they now stand.
On such things as pot, the law seems to be lagging
far behind what a large segment of the population feel
is right.
What if institutions like the Straight are allowed to
criticize effectively small manifestations of the law such
as this ?
It could set a bad precedent. Where could it lead?
Huey Newton:
The soul of the black struggle against colonial oppression
Reprinted from   the  Peace  and  Freedom  Party's
National Organizer
Huey P. Newton, the Minister of Defense of the
Black Panther Party, formerly the Black Panther
Party for Self-Defense, was one of the two founders
of what has become the leading black militant organization in America. Huey is presently standing
trial in the Alameda County Superior Court, charged
with the murder of an Oakland police officer. Black
people in America, from Carmichael and Foreman
to Bobby Seale and the last Panther, have promised
that if Huey dies in the gas chamber of San Quentin
because of the frame-up by the Oakland police department, then "The sky is the limit" against the
Oakland power structure.
To tell you about the Panthers, we quote Black
Panther Chairman and co-founder, Bobby Seale:
"To explain to you who Brother Huey P. Newton
is in his soul, I've got to explain to you also your
soul, your needs, because that's Huey's soul.
"Huey learned the need for black people to develop a perspective and an understanding of our
oppressive conditions. Now, when we first organized
the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense Huey said,
Bobby, we're going to draw us a basic platform, just
basic, that black people can read. He said we don't
want to go real elaborate, with all those essays and
dissertations and all that stuff, 'cause the brothers
are going to look at that and say Man, I don't have
time for that, I gotta go and see what I can do for
myself. Just a basic platform that the mothers who
struggle hard to raise us, that the fathers who work
hard to feed us, that the young brother in school who
comes out of school before he should, semi-illiterate,
can read and understand. He said we want a basic
platform to outline black people's basic political desires and needs.  So we sat down.
'FREEDOM, JUSTICE, PEACE'
"Huey said first we want freedom, we want
power to determine the destiny of our black communities.
"Two, we want full employment for our people.
"Three, we want housing fit for shelter for human
beings.
"Four, we want all black men to be exempt from
military service.
"Five, we want decent education for our black
people in our communities that teaches us the true
nature of this decadent, racist society, that teaches
the black people and our young black brothers and
sisters their place in society, because if they don't
know their place in society and in the world, they
can't relate to anything else.
"Six, we want an end to the robbery by the white
racist businessman of black people in their community.
"Seven, we want an immediate end to police brutality and murder of black people.
"Eight, we want all black men held in city, county, state and federal jails and prisons to be released
because they have not had a fair trial because they've
been tried by all-white juries, and that's just like a
Jew being tried in Germany.
"Nine, we want black people when brought to
trial to be tried by members of their peer group, a
peer being one who comes from the same economic,
social, religious, historical and racial background;
that, in fact, if the United States government and
local courts did this they would have to choose some
of those mothers who have been working 20 years
in Miss Anne's kitchen, scrubbing floors like my
mother has done. They'd have to choose some of
those brothers who stand on the block out there
wondering where they're going to get a gig (job).
They're going to choose these black people.
"And ten, Huey said, Let's summarize it: We want
housing, we want clothing, we want education, we
want justice and we want peace.
"This, brothers and sisters, is a basic platform. In
case you never knew it, all the things you've heard
in the press, of all the derogatory statements that
have been made in the press about Brother Huey P.
Newton and I, all that was to guide you away from
seeing this basic platform that Huey was talking
about for our people. We have got to learn to look
through the white press. We have to learn to see
what's going on.
GET THE OPPRESSORS OUT
"Now, out of this platform Huey realized that
it was necessary for us to start working practically
on these points, these ten points. Remember number
seven, 'We want an immediate end to police brutality and murder of black people?' That's very important. And here, whether you know It or not, is
where yoti start dealing with the black revolution.
Huey said, Let every black man put a shotgun in
the house. And once we let The Man know, we say
look, we're armed from block to block, we're going
to patrol you from our windows and we're not going
to have you brutalizing none of our people in the
streets. Do you realize what kind of power black
people have then? Because then you begin to neutralize that police force, because them cops are going
to start riding shakey and scared. In fact, we're in a
position then to demand that they withdraw from
our community because they occupy our community just like a foreign troop occupying territory. It's
very important to understand.
"The Vietnamese have had political decisions
made upon them and their country and they have
disagreed with them. So they said, No, we're going
to defend ourselves right here on our own land and
we want you to withdraw from our land. Now, we
can parallel that situation when we see all these
fascist cops off in our community the way they are.
That is only point number seven of the program but
here is the key in terms of dealing with what real
power is. Power starts here. Huey.brought it down
to a practical level for us to try to understand. When
Huey organized these brothers he didn't just run
them out in the street with zero understanding. Huey
sat those brothers down and talked to them.
WE ARE NOT ANTI-WHITE
"When a man walks up to me and says that we
are anti-white, I scratch my head, I say "anti-white?"
What does he mean by that? He says, Well, I mean
you hate white people. I say, Me, hate a white person? Wait a minute, man, let's back up a bit. That's
your game, that's the Ku Klux Klan's game. To hate
me and murder me because of the colour of my skin.
I wouldn't brutalize a person or murder him because
of the colour of his skin. Yeah, we hate something
allright. We hate the oppression we live in. We hate
. cops beating black people over their heads and murdering them. That's what we hate. If you got enough
energy to sit down and hate a white persons because,
of the color of his skin, you're wasting a lot of energy. You'd better take some of that same energy and
put it in some motion and start dealing with those
oppressive conditions and then you're gonna find out
just what you hate — and what you gonna stop!"
A large segment of the general public has had a
chance to evaluate  and  agree with the  Panther's
charges against the law enforcement agencies of the _
Bay area: "They are attempting to liquidate, liter- _
ally,  the  entire   leadership  of -the   Black   Panther
Party."
BLACK 'NATIONAL CONSCIOUSNESS'
The political perspective of the Panthers revolves *.
around what Eldridge Cleaver calls "national consciousness". Black people, Mexican-Americans,
Puerto Ricans, and Indians, he says, are American
citizens only on paper; they are really separate na- "
tions who as such are systematically excluded from
American society. It is largely to develop the 'national consciousness' they seek that the Panthers
have formed their, working alliance with the Peace
and Freedom Party, which in several districts is .
running Panthers for Congress of the State Assembly. In registering black people into the PFP the
Panthers see a chance to get them out of the Democratic and Republican parties, both of which they
feel are inextricably tied up in the racism of Ameri-
can society. They have sharply attacked black Democratic party politicians whom, they say, have generated the further enslavement of their own people
by using white tokenism for personal gain.
CONCESSIONS ARENT ENOUGH
The following is   a  paragraph from  a Panther  **-
position paper:
"High-placed, hand-picked Negroes have been
given high-placed, hand-picked jobs as a concession
to the pressure of the masses for dramatic social
change — but what good does a black Supreme
Court justice do when the entire legal system is
racist and is dedicated to denying black people
justice? The rash of black elected officials in several
cities comes on the heels of two years of violent
ghetto rebellions — but the conditions which provoked the people to revolt remain virtually the ^
same."
Because of the nature, the character of their
organization — its tremendous degree of political
sophistication, the willingness of its members to
literally put their lives on the line, the increasing
success with which it is organizing the ghetto, and,
perhaps most significantly, its refusal to be bought
off as every significant social movement in America
to date has been bought off — the Black Panther
party will do much to achieve a decent human society in which all peoples can live together in harmony, justice, and brotherhood. Thursday, September 12, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
A power shift is happening
*VV*^
By STAN PERSKY
I think the Administration and Faculty are
"winning".
I think the two recent issues of UBC Reports is convincing students that the problem
of "student unrest" (their term) is being met
reasonably and seriously. Arnie Myers, a friend
of mine, is the guy responsible for UBC Reports. He's hired by the administration to do,
among many many things, the job of presenting the administration's viewpoint.
I predict that the result of all these negotiations about student representation will result
in students being represented on every committee and every legislative body in the university, and I feel that this representation will
not change the character of the university in a
good way. By good way, I mean: make the university more personal, exciting, warm, etc. I
think this will produce a change in form only.
I think Ken Hare knows all this. I believe
he's primarily interested in faculty power. I
predict he's going to try and make sure that
the faculty ends up with a larger say in the
running of the university. I think he will try
to decentralize as much of his power as he can
and give it to the faculty. I'm not sure this will
affect students in any way, though it might.
This program of Hare's will create for him a
power base among the facutly, and this, I think,
will give him greater security in pursuing
whatever course of action he wants. This
course of action may or may not be good. This
description, I feel, is closer to political reality
than what students have been reading about in
UBC Reports or other city newspapers.
I don't understand how this will really
change the quality of life in this university,
or what kind of citizens will emerge from it.
The only value I feel this analysis contains is
that it makes a distinction between faculty
power and student representation. It helps to
clarify where our interests are similar and
where they are divergent. It suggests that perhaps these two different positions (or places)
have been confused up to now and that it's
important for students to know where they
stand in all this.
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Tho Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23;  advertising,  local  26.  Telex  04-5224.
SEPTEMBER 12, 1968
ZAP
Now that we're all back in
our isolated, tree-lined playpen
on Point Grey, we are free to
revile the boring, manual-
labour type jobs we had all
summer, and free to forget the
few million Canadians who
work at those jobs all their
lives.
The bright new fad of law-
breaking has gotten so far that
the other day we were treated
general
irreverence
to the interesting spectacle of
two rather ordinary students
sunk in deep reverie, trying to
think of somebody they know
who doesn't smoke pot.
But now that grass has been
smoked in the Pacific Press
cafeteria and trafficked in the
courthouse and the junior high
kids are turning on, its all old
hat.
Chairman of Publicity
Wanted
for C.U.S.O. Committee
APPLY BOX 18 - BROCK HALL
Leave Name, Address and Phone Number
QcVtsfhssi dimvaiian
Weekly Charters
Commencing December 21st- by CPA to
WAIKIKI for oil inclusive cost of $315.00
Includes:
Round trip Air Fare by C.P.A. 14 nights Hotel
accommodation (share basis) HOLIDAY VILLAGE
HOTEL.
Transfers in Waikiki.
Hotel Taxes.
For complete details, come in and chat with
Mrs. Rogers and Ben Belen.
5700  University  Boulevard
WORLD-WIDE
INTERNATIONAL
Ph.  224-4391
on CAMPUS
•»<•■-!      '       •-* < *— -•"     -
EDITOR:  Al  Birnie
City Desk   Paul  Knox, Mike Finlay
News   John Twigg
Managing    Mike Jessen
Photo       Fred  Cawsey
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Eo many new faces in the old rag. A
lot of frosh eager to donate a year (or
more if they get hooked) of their lives
to Canada's greatest newspaper. Among
those who stuck their angelic faces in
the door for the first or second time
were Ulf Ottho. Nate Smith, Nader
Mirhady, Karen Loder, Erik Brynjolffs-
son, James Conchie, Campbell Stewart,
Liisa Rullo, Elaine Tanwell. John Gibbs
and Dale Wik.
The old-timers were Kirsten Emmot.
Norman Gidney, Frank Flynn and Irene
Wasilewski.
Also present was our glorious sports
photographer Dick Button.
TINY TIM
TOGETHER WITH
COUNTRY JOE
AND THE FISH
THE COLLECTORS
AT THE COLISEUM - SEPT. 21st
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE, 630 HAMILTON
EATON'S STORES AND TOWNHOUSE ELECTRONICS
CUP THIS AND SAVE
UBC Film Services
SHOWINGS
196S-1969
Sept. 26
Elmer Gantry-FREE SHOW
Oct. 3, 4
The Deadly Affair and the Spy Who
Came in From the Cold
Oct. 10, 11
B low-Up
Oct. 17, 18
In the Heat of the Night
Oct. 22 (Tues.)
A Fine Madness
Oct. 24, 25
A Man For All Seasons
Oct. 31
Triumph of the Will
Nov. 5 (Tues.)
Viva Maria
Nov. 7
Funeral in Berlin and the Jokers
Nov. 14, 15
The Family Way
Nov. 21, 22
The Taming of the Shrew
Nov. 28, 29
Cool Hand Luke
Jan.  16, 17
King of Hearts
Jan. 30, 31
Wait Until Dark
Feb. 6, 7
America, America
Feb. 13, 14
Warrendale
Mar. 13, 14
Bonnie & Clyde
Watch for "How I Won the War", "Marat/Sade",
"The  Whisperers",   and   others   in   the   Spring   term.
SHOWS WILL BE IN THE OLD AUDITORIUM AND IN THE NEW SUB THEATRE
WHEN WE MOVE IN. CONSULT UBYSSEY, POSTERS, BANNERS, ETC., FOR
TIMES AND LOCATIONS.
ADMISSION  IS ONLY 50 CENTS! Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 12, 1968
SFU UNREST COMMEMORATED BY PLAQUE
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
BURNABY — Simon Fraser
University students unveiled
an academic freedom plaque
Tuesday afternoon which commemorates an incident that ignited the most successful rise
of student power in Canada.
The bronze plaque in the
university's main mall marks
the reinstatement of five teaching assistants fired in March,
1967.
The five were fired in the
spring semester of 1967 for
prompting students at a Vancouver high school to confront
their administration and demand reinstatement of another
high school student.
Simon Fraser dean of arts,
T. B. Bottomore, protested the
firing of the five TA's by the
then SFU president Dr. Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan.
The dean asked students to
let him handle the problem.
STRIKE THREATENED
The restless students soon
by-passed the arts dean and issued an ultimatum to the board
of governors: either unconditionally and fully reinstate the
five   TA's   or,   threatened   the
BUSY"B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
students,    "we    will    go    on
strike".
The board, after a marathon
12-hour meeting, gave in to the
student ultimatum but ignored
a SFU faculty request for a
stand on the issue of academic
freedom.
ROLE UNDEFINED
The board has still not defined its role in academic matters.
But time js running out. Simon Fraser's increasingly militant joint-faculty is pressing
the board hard on the academic
freedom question and students,
in turn, are pressing joint faculty for action.
Dr. Kenneth Strand, appointed acting president August 1
by the board on the recommendation of joint faculty, has
asked that a spirit of intellectual reasoning replace confrontation factors.
COMMITTEE APPOINTED
The board recently appointed a committee to meet with
any interested parties to determine procedures  for  selecting
a new permanent president for
the university.
Orientation week here has
been quiet as student and faculty leaders find new students
mora concerned with lost classrooms than they are with university politics.
But student elections during
the next two weeks will likely
spark renewed student demands for greater student participation in decision making
bodies of SFU.
Graduate student Geoffrey
Mercer, one of the TA's fired
one year ago, told students at
the unveiling ceremony that
joint faculty had  now shown
itself no more trustworthy than
the board.
The plaque reads: "Freedom
Square: So named in commemoration of the rallies held here
March 17-20, 1967. And of the
students, teaching assistants
and faculty who gave of themselves in the cause of academic
freedom."
GRAND PRIX
MOTORS LTD.
'SPORTS CARS ARE OUR
BUSINESS"
TRIUMPH
SPITFIRE-TR250-1300
SALES   AND   SERVICE
Special  Consideration
to U.B.C. Students
Local   &   Overseas   Deliveries
1162 SEYMOUR
682-7185
Now Operating
lAnws/i&lfy,
CABS
224-5025
Radio Dispatched in the
Point Grey Area
Technical Faculty Rep.
Wanted
for C.U.S.O. Committee
APPLY BOX 18 - BROCK HALL
Leave Name, Address and Phone Number
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
SOCCER
UBC Thunderbirds
vs North Shore
Saturday - Sept. 14 - 2 p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
Free Admission to Students
on Presentation ot AMS Card
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
A\
^
THEATRE EXCITEMENT
The  Homecoming
By HAROLD PINTER
A BIZARRE COMEDY
Winner of INew York Critics' Award
With Robert Clothier, Al Kozlik, Lillian Carlson,
Lee Taylor, Edward Greenhalgh, Graeme Campbell
SEPTEMBER 20-28
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
STUDENT SEASON'S TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 20-28 "The Homecoming" by Harold Pinter
Nov. 8-16 "Man is Man" by Berrolt Brecht
Jan. 17-25 "Loot" by Joe Orton
Mar. 7-15 "The Miser" by Moliere
BOX OFFICE-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre — It Is For You
X£
rr
rS9 Thursday, September 12, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Queen's beats UBC,
now plays B.C.'s best
— dick button photo
FOOTBALL has started again, and the teams are holding regular practices at Wolfson field.
Coach Frank Gnup, now entering his fourteenth season as head coach, is still looking for
players. If you're interested, contact him in War Memorial Gym.
They're good and they've
proved it.
In a women's field hockey
game Tuesday, Queen's University defeated the University
of British Columbia 4-0. This
was just another in a long
string of victories.
The team began its tour of
Canada and the United States
on August 12 and has arrived
at UBC with only one loss so
far.
Ranked second in the British
and displays good teamwork.
Queen's    will   play   another
match    today,    6:15    p.m.,    at
Wolfson    field    against   B.C.'s
first team.
'-iiC.. JTTyy.'*!
VAt &AJ*
EAT IN • TAKE OUT- DELIVERY
,, Rugby Birds flying high
This could be a bright year
for rugby fans.
With 13 of the 15 players on
last year's team returning
there should be no problem in
surpassing last year's record
of 10 wins, 3 ties and 11 losses.
"We should do really well
this year," said coach Donn
Spence,who as usual, is very
enthusiastic about the team's
propects.
September sees the kickoff
in West Vancouver while the
Birds'    first    home    game   is
scheduled for Oct. 12 here in
Thunderbird stadium against
the Kats, last year's champions.
From March 27-29, UBC will
play host to the annual World
Cup rugby competition.
If you want to play, come
out to Wolffson field on Tuesday and Wednesday at 5:30
p.m. or Thursday at 2:30 p.m.
Spence would like to field
five teams this year if enough
interest is shown.
Each of these teams would
play   in   top-ranking   leagues.
Weekends are wild at . . .
Jke Palm*
Birch Bay, Wash. — 6 mi. So. of Blaine
featuring the soul music of
Chuck Stanford and Roger Laybourn
for your listening and dancing pleasure
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Licensed premises . . . bring your I.D.
Contact   $AQ 50
Lenses        "T m
Any Color - ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY!
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us . . . AND REALLY SAVE I
?
OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES —
Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These  Locations Only
VANCOUVER
677 Granville — Opp. The Bay — 681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
657 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale - 987-2264
Formal
Wear
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS   -  DINNER   JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size  Range
Latest Styles
10%  UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
YOU ARE
tVe/co/ne
TO BE OUR GUEST AT
AN ORIENTATION MEETING
of the
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
SEE
• The amazing power of a trained memory
• How to quickly develop more poise and self-confidence
• How to get along even better with people
• How to communicate more effectively when speaking to
individuals, groups, using the telephone or writing letters
BOTH MEN AND WOMEN INVITED
NO COST OR OBLIGATION
Tims., SEPT. 12th-7:30 P.M
H0LIDA Y INN
Presented by "Thorfie" Thorfinnson
LEADERSHIP TRAINING COURSE
1110
HOWE STREET
DALE CARNEGIE
No. 212-535 W. Georgia St. Ph. 683-1945 (24 hr*-.) FOUNDER (R)
HAVEN'T YA HEARD
•   •   •
FOR NEW & USED
BOOKS
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACKS
• MAGAZINES
MONARCH NOTES Am
STUDY GUIDES
& COLES NOTES
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE — 224-4144
VANCOUVER 8, B. C. Thursday, September 12, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 8
TWEEN CLASSES
AQUA SOC
Organizational meeting today noon, Bu. 100 — Come
see your club in action.
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
All girls interested in playing an intercollegiate sport
should sign the lists posted
in the Buchanan Building,
the Women's gymnasium, or
the Memorial gymnasium.
Everyone is welcome to try
out.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
There is a meeting for all
managers in the lecture room
of the Women's gym on
Thursday, Sept. 12 at 12:30
p.m. Schedules of the year's
sports will be distributed.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl    Burau   (Experimental
***•■ College).  On University Re
form. Today, 12:30 p.m. Bu.
100.
EDUCATION U.S.
Student orgy today in Education Lounge. Free coffee
and donuts.
mm
mn
EAT IN -TAKEOUT. DELIVERY
The Psychedelic \
Shop i
2081 West 4th Ave I
(in the rear) .
POSTERS I
RECORDS I
BOOKS I
PIP ES AND PARAPHERNALIA!
->           Phone 736-6177 |
Tiies. till Sat. 1-6 and 7-9 p.m. ?
-   r-s-*-**?'
GRAND PRIX
MOTORS LTD.
SPORTS CARS ARE OUR
BUSINESS"
PEUGEOT
ALL MODELS
SALES  AND  SERVICE
Special Consideration
to U.B.C. Students
Local   &   Overseas  Deliveries
1162 SEYMOUR
682-7185
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGS & CORSAGES A
SPECIALTY
• GREETING CARDS & GIFTS
TBUFIORA
W(M1)C_U7«M»
"Flovers By Wire"
10%  STUDENT DISCOUNT ON
PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short  Blocks  From   UBC   Gates
4427 W. 10th Ave.   224-1341
Under  New  Management
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
"Flights of Fancy", A series
of films to be shown at International House at 7 p.m.
Sept. 12. Joachim Foikis, the
Town Fool and two N.F.B.
films, Sept. 19, four N.F.B.
films and speaker, Sept. 26—
Come and See.
HILLEL HOUSE
Schara Tzedeck Synagogue
welcomes all students to attend the High Holidays Services. For seat reservation
please contact Rabbi M. Hier,
Director of Hillel House.
THUNDERBIRD
NEWMAN CENTER
Hard Times Dance. St.
Mark's College, Friday, Sept.
13, 9 p.m. 75 cents per person.
NEWMAN  CENTER
General Meeting, Bu. 212,
Noon — All Welcome.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
• KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her first year or equivalent and is a fully registered
student for the 1968-69 academic year. Candidates must
have attained in the previous sessional examinations an
average of no less than 60% for 15 units or more, and
65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wed., Sept. 25, 1968
and will close at 12 noon Thursday, Oct. 3, 1968. Voting
will take place Wed., Oct. 9, 1968.
Elections for the positions of
Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office of
Student Senator:
Three students from the student body at large (including
The Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected by the
student body at large. To be eligible for election to one
of these positions, a student in the academic year most
recently taken prior to the election shall have taken a
full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second class standing; he
shall also be registered as a full time student at this
University.
Terms of Office: 1. Of the students elected by the student
body at large, the candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates
receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations are open immediately. Nominations will
close on Oct. 3, 1968. Voting will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1968.
Nomination forms are available at the AMS office in
Brock Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 55. For further information contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS mailbox number 55.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant will
assume responsibility for running all referenda and AMS
elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications and questions should be addressed to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Elections Committee
Applications are now being accepted for the Elections
Committee. Four members-at-large willbe appointed by
the Student Council. The Elections Committee helps
govern the running of the Alma Mater Society elections
including drawing up rules and checking eligibility.
Applications and questions should be sent to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Puplic Relations Clan
All those presently involved in AMS Public Relations
or those wishing to be, please contact Ruth Dworkin,
Vice President (Internal Affairs) or leave name and
phone number in AMS Box 51, Brock Hall.
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
There will be a sale of science jackets, sweaters, and
scarves in the lobby of the
Henning's Building, at 12:30
p.m., for the rest of this
week and for all of next
week.
SWIMMING TEAM
First meeting to be held Friday, Sept. 13 at 12:30 p.m.,
War Memorial Gym. ALL interested   please   attend.
PAINTED & UNPAINTED
FURNITURE
Directly from the Factory
Delivered  to your  Residence
Student desks   from $19.00
Bed side tables ..  $12.00
Chests of drawers   $16.00
Book cases   $17.00
Furniture Refinishing
For complete information —
Phone BILL GODDING-437-5424
8:00 a.m. — 6:00 p.m.
BILL FRIESEN-435-3841
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston ' Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6721.
MIX AND DANCE TO THE WIGGY
Symphony Fri., Sept. 13th, War
Memorial Gym,  8:30-12:30.
SPLASH 'N DANCE SWIM IN THE
Empire Pool, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Dance
to the Soul Unlimited, 8:30 p.m. -12
midn. $1.25 per person. Sat., Sept.
14.  Tickets  at the door.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST BUCH. LOUNGE, BLUE H.R.
motorcycle helmet. Reward offered.
Call Rick at 224-6460.
LOST DURING REGISTRATION.
Briefcase initialed J-H-G. Contains
Chinese  book.   Reward.  736-4704.
REWARD POR RETURN OP MY
green suede hat, last seen Buchanan
Building.  E.B.  228-2304  (daytime).
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED RIDE TO UBC PROM
vicinity of North Vancouver Gen-
eral  hospital,   call  Fred  at  988-2572.
DRIVERS AND RIDERS WANTED
from Oak and 62nd area. Call 321-
8142, Barry.
NORTH VAN. EAST OP 2nd NAR-
rows Bridge for 10:30 classes, Mon-
days and Thursdays. Phone 929-4006.
RIDE   NEEDED  FROM   CAPILANO
Highland    area,    North    Vancouver.
Please call Nancy at 987-8079
NEED RIDE PROM VIC. KINGSWAY
and Earls Rd. for 8:30's Mon. thru
Fri.   Call  Jim,  434-9779.
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST VAN.
Glenmore. Will join carpool of 4.
Phone Del, 922-3581.
RIDE NEEDED PROM 26th & NEL-
son, West Van. will pay. Phone 922-
7625.
RIDE WANTED FROM NEW WEST-
minster for 8:30 classes M.-F. Phone
Tan  521-9254.
DRIVERS NEEDED IN NORTH
Van. carpool. Call George 7-10 at
987-6781.
Special Notices
15
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
DIVERS AND WOULD BE'S! PAR-
ticipate in the sport of the space
age with Aqua Society. Learn with
a N.A.U.I. approved course. For in-
fomation phone John Smith, 434-
5143  or  Dave Tingey,  922-8181.
WOULD    YOU   BELIEVE   THE   13th
day is Fri., Sept. 13th?
INSTRUCTION
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please  call 277-5640.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 435-0882.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE Requires part-time female clerk-typist,
app. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Mon.-Fri. This
is an interesting job for the right
girl. Apply to Publications Office,
Brock Hall.
ATTRACTIVE STUDENT FOR
part-time Fri. & Sat. work In Ski
Shop. Must know skiing, but store
experience   not   necessary.    Contact
Varsity Ski Shop, 4510 West 10th Ave.
morning before noon or call 224-
6414.
Help Wanted—Male
52
DRIVER    WANTED.    MUST
own    care.    $2.00   per   hour.
Baker Drugs, 888 Granville.
HAVE
Apply
Male or Female
53
RELIABLE BABY SITTER REQUIR-
ed  4  days  a  week,  3-6  p.m.  Phone
263-6838 after 6.
Work Wanted
54
Instruction Wanted
61
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58 PONTIAC, 4 DR., 6, STAND. $350
or best offer. Call 988-8500 after
5 p.m.
'65 AUSTIN A60. EXCELLENT CON-
dition  $1,300.  Call  738-8131.
'66 V.W. MUST SELL. A. CHRISTIE,
5785  Agronomy Rd.  Phone  224-9684.
'58 HUMBER HAWK, AUTO. TRANS.
Outstand. condition and very reli-
able. Private, 261-2826.
1957 RENAULT, NEW CLUTCH RE-
built motor, transmission. Must sell.
$250. Phone George after six, 263-
0337.
POR SALE 900-15 M & H RACE-
master racing slicks $100.00. Cash.
Phone   Bruce  at  224-6794  eve.
VOLVO 1966 PV544 MICHILEN-X
radial ply tires. Phone 228-8408. Ask
for Wayne.
'61 VALIANT 4 DR.. 6, AUTO. 4
new tires (2 snow). 224-9088 (Vinay)
or 738-8119.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  &   Copying 32
Miscelleous
33
DAY NURSERY AT ALMA HOUSE,
(children 3-6 yrs.) 1712 Alma Road
is planned to help working parents.
For  information  call  738-6960.
GRAB A PARTNER AND SHAKE
it up with the Wiggy Symphony
Fri., Sept. 13th at War Memorial
Gym.   8:30-12:30.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR STUDENT TELEPHONE
directory. Buy pre-sale tickets for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office, Brock Hall.
PENTAX SPOTMATIC NEAR NEW.
Price with case and gadget bag
$160. Phone 224-9706. Ask for Tom
Knorf.
ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANICA 1966
with 67 & 68 Yearbooks & case. Call
738-4509.
THE ONLY WAY TO WAKE UP—
with a clock radio. Well used but
well worth $25. R.  Shaw, 224-9660.
STUDIO COUCH CONVERTS TO
double bed, $20. Ph. 733-5677 after 5.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL, 21 WOULD LIKE ONE OR
two girls to share 2 bdrm. apt. 3517
W.  3rd Ave.
Unfurrt. Houses & Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses For Sale
86
Other Cities
87
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6622 ,
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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