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Array 2010.03.22
WEATHER @ UBC
UBC BY NUMBERS 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.03.22
MARCH 22, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N° LI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakejield & Kathy Yan Li:
culture@ubyssey. ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Ian Turner didn't like the ice cream Samantha
Jung bought for him. Beside them, Sarah Chung
and Zoe Siegel were fighting over Justin McElroy,
who was trying to impress Kathy Yan Li by fight-
ng Jonny Wakefield. Alyson Strike had to pull
them apart and the manager Philip Storey threw
them out of The Ubyssey ice cream parlour. Geoff
Lister finished a 20 scoop sundae in two minutes,
and had his photo taken by Kasha Chang. Andrew
Bates took a cab to Kelowna to watch Tara
Martellaro do an ice cream dance. Austin Holm
was stood up by Trevor Becord, who was having
a secret ice cream party with Ashley Whillans.
Katarina Grgic tried to break up with Brendan
Albano, who threw up on Virginie Menard. Paul
Bucci just stood there and laughed
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
OY>
printed on^100%
Vrecycled.paper
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every Sunday
and Wednesday, 2pm, SUB 24.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY
MUSIC & MEAL • Like to play
music? Just want to listen?
Looking for a sense of community? This is for all members of the UBC community who want to have a good
meal and great conversation. All meals are home-
cooked and are vegetarian-
friendly. • Every Monday,
6:30pm-8:30pm, Chapel of
the Epiphany (6030 Chancellor Blvd), for more info e-mail
revnathanwright@mac.com.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Get healthy
and come run or walk. Meeting just outside the doors to
the Student Recreation Centre, the UBC REC Noon Fun
Run, hosted by the UBC REC
& Health Promotions Department takes participants
throughout many of UBC's
most scenic areas on a course
ranging from 3 to 5km. It is
free and open to all students,
faculty and staff. • 12:30pm-
1:30pm, Student Rec Centre.
MONDAY, MAR. 22
UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUS MUN
DEBATE • The recently formed
Model United Nations club
on campus debates on various topics, where each participant represents a country in debating the issue at
hand. This meeting's topic
is about the near-bankruptcy
in Greece. Everyone is welcome. • 6pm-7:30pm, room
155 (Parliamentary classroom), IKBLC.
TUESDAY, MAR. 23
THIRD ANNUAL ELU LEADERSHIP
SUMMIT* Emerging Leaders
UBC (ELU) are holding their
annual leadership summit.
A lineup of distinguished
speakers are attending this
year, including award-winning filmmaker of A Warrior's
Religion, Mani Amar, Surrey
North member of parliament
Penny Priddy and many more.
• 6pm-9:30pm, Henry Angus
098, free for ELU members,
$5 for non members, register at elubc.com.
GREEK WEEK BBQ • The purpose of this event is to promote Greek unity and support the Greek Week 2010
charity. Chapters are encouraged to show their spirit as
a group, and pick up a two
dollar hamburger, hot dog, or
a veggie substitute. Participants are encouraged to advertise around campus and
bring non-Greek friends to
the BBQ. • 11am-2pm, Greek
Village.
COOKIES AND MILK • As part
of the Anthropology Mega
Week, Cookies & Milk presents "UBC Anthropology
Alumni" storytelling, with
free cookies and milk. •
12:30pm-1:30pm, Graduate
Lounge, ANSO Building, 1866
Main Mall, for more info go
to anth.ubc.ca.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 24
OPEN BALLET CLASS • Ballet is
a solid foundation for dance
technique, posture and
strength. Each class is composed of barre work, combinations across the floor and
choreographed adages in the
centre floor. All levels are welcome! • 3pm-4:30pm, SUB
Party Room, $10 drop-in, for
more info go to ubcdanceho-
rizons.com.
SCIENCE CO-OP'S BIRTHDAY • Science co-op will be celebrating it's thirtieth anniversary
with cake, prizes and lots of
tasty goodies. This is a free
event open to all students.
• 12:45pm, Abdul Ladha Science Student Centre.
THURSDAY, MAR. 25
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS
SERIES • Presenting their third
class in the series, The Vanguard Party and the Fight for
Socialist Revolution. • 6:30pm,
SUB 224, for more info contact trotskyist_vancouver@
shawcable.com or call (604)
687-0353.
THE DANCE CENTRE PRESENTS:
DISCOVER DANCE! • Discover
Dance! is a series showcasing diverse province-based
companies, presented by The
Dance Centre, BC's resource
centre for dance. The series
will be showcasing the brilliant footwork and breathtaking virtuosity of flamenco, along with an exhilarating performance by Flamenco Rosario. • 12pm, Scotiabank Dance Centre, 677 Davie
St, $7 students, $10 adults,
tickets can be purchased at
ticketstonight.ca.
MASKED OPERA BALL FUNDRAISER* Tasty cuisine plus entertainment by the Dal Richards
Orchestra and the UBC Opera Ensemble put the "fun"
in fundraising. Each ticket includes a delicious dinner on
the stage of the Chan Centre and entertainment by one
of Vancouver's best-loved
bandleaders. Tickets are limited so don't delay! • 7pm,
Chan Centre, $150 (includes
$100 tax receipt).
FRIDAY, MAR. 26
ASIAN CANADIAN INDIE MUSIC
FESTIVAL* On behalf of the
Asian Canadian Cultural Organization, we are pleased to announce that we will be holding
an Asian Canadian Indie Music Festival, in which we bring
in a diverse range of talented local Asian Canadian performers to showcase their talents! All proceeds support the
Downtown Eastside Worn-
ens' Centre. • 6:30pm-9pm,
Thea's Lounge, Koerner Graduate Student Building, $11.
CFI VANCOUVER PRESENTS: A
TALK WITH PAT O'BRIEN • Pat
has been involved in virtually
every production aspect of
film, television and live theatre. He is a former President of the British Columbia
Humanist Association and
is now an Ambassador for
Atheist Alliance International. • 7:30pm-9pm, room 182,
IKBLC, $4 students, $5 regular, free for CFI members.
SATURDAY, MAR. 27
EWB UBC PRESENTS: BRIDGING
THEGAP* Bridging the Gap is
an upcoming conference put
on by the Engineers Without Borders Vancouver chapter. Discussion topics will
include Aid vs Trade, Agriculture Value Chains, Micro-
finance, Connecting to African Culture, and Climate
Change and Development.
The conference will close
with a keynote address from
Dr Hans Rosling, professor
of International Health in
Stockholm, Sweden. • 8am-
5pm, Life Sciences Institute,
$35 students, $70 professionals, lunch is included.
INDIAN DANCE WITH SUDNYA
MULYE • Sudnya Mulye tells
stories of India through the
classical dance style Bharata
Natyam. Join her at the Art-
Starts Gallery, where kids and
families will explore culture
and tradition through dance,
movement and expression. •
/7am & 1pm, ArtStarts gallery, 808 Richards St (at Robson), free admission.
SUNDAY, MAR. 28
STORM THE WALL 2010 • North
America's largest campus intramural event. Be a part of
Come to our t
Hiring Fair       /
on May 4*
from 12-4pm at
Minoru Cultural Centre,
Richmond     ^^
Find Work You Love!
Connections Youth Resource Centre is a FREE employment centre for people under 30.
Free services for job seekers include:
Resume and cover letter writing
Interview strategies
Career planning
Referrals to skills training programs
Current job postings and more!
100-7900 Alderbridge Way, Richmond
604.271.7600
www.rysa.bc.ca
Follow us on Twitter! @RichmondYautri
[CONNECTIONS-)
* «^Z     "i«IH    RESOURCE   CEHTRE^J
Teach English
Abroad
events@ubyssey.ca
^THEUBYSSEYc
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
* Detailed Lesson Planning
* ESL Skills Development
* Comprehensive Teaching Materials
* Interactive Teaching Practicum
* Internationally Recognized Certificate
* Teacher Placement Service
* Money-Back Guarantee Included
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
the event that defines UBC.
Men's, women's and CoRec
teams of five will compete in
a swim, sprint, cycle and run
relay before storming over
one of two 12-foot walls in
the heart of campus. Individuals may also complete
the entire relay themselves
in the Iron Person categories. • All day until Apr. 1,
$40 team, $10 Iron person,
for more info go to rec.ubc.
ca/events/storm.
TUESDAY, MAR. 30
AMS VOLUNTEER CONNECT FAIR
• Come to the fair at the
SUB South Concourse to
check out volunteer opportunities. Over 30 organizations and on-campus clubs
are participating in this fair.
• 11am-3:30pm, SUB South
Concourse.
BIKE TO SCHOOL DAY* Grab your
trusty steed and cruise up to
campus for a big, warm, friendly Bike Co-op greeting. The
weather is turning from great
to greater, so how better to
celebrate spring than on two
wheels? Free basic bike tune-
ups at our commuter station
tent, as well as free coffee and
free breakfast goodies from
Sprouts! • 7:30am-11am, University Blvd.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 31
US HEALTH CARE REFORM • The
UBC School of Population
and Public Health presents
L'S Health Reform (This Time
for Real?): Prospects and Lessons for Canada. Students,
staff, faculty and the community are welcome to attend this
free public lecture by Dr Elliott
Fisher, Director of Population
Health and Policy at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. • 5pm-
6:30pm, room LSC2, Life Sciences Centre, with a wine and
cheese reception 4pm-5pm
at the atrium, RSVP to the reception at sylvia.froese@ubc.
ca, for more info go to spph.
ubc.ca.
THURSDAY, APR. 1
THE FATE OF URDU: MUSLIMS,
LANGUAGE POLITICS, AND COLONIAL HYDERABAD • This talk
examines the work of Muslim writers, literary critics,
and intellectuals in the southern city of Hyderabad. There
they founded the first vernacular university of modern India, Osmania University, using Urdu as the medium of instruction in all subjects from
History and the Humanities
to Medicine and the Sciences. The work of these intellectuals allows us to rethink
the place of Muslims within
the history of Indian nationalism and the trajectory of
the national language question in modern India. • 4pm-
6pm, Asian Centre 604, 1871
West Mall.
FRIDAY, APR. 2
BLOOD BASH • What happens
when you cross Tarantino,
vampires and Shakespeare?
You get Taranampspeared in
the most GORIFYING Halloween Party of April. So dress
up as your favourite bloody
characters (i.e. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Hannibal Lecter,
Freddy Kreuger, etc.) • 19+
event, 8pm-12am, SUB Party Room, $5 in advance, $7
at the door, to purchase tickets call Andrew Lynch at (604)
839-4316 or Genevieve Bolduc at (604) 338-2805. 2010.03.22/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
l\
EWS
OVERHEARD
"I've been a target from the government because 1 speak up. And in my life since
1 never kept quiet in 1994 during the genocide. I never see myself today being silent. During that time we were almost in a kind of sea of fire....[We have to] speak
out. Talk. Tell the world. I can't see myself keeping quiet."
—Paul Rusesabagina on criticism he has received for his actions (Reuters 2007)
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
Revisiting the Rwanda genocide
International Week speaker raises hackles of attendees
ZOE SIEGEL
Contributor
Paul Rusesabagina's visit to UBC
last Wednesday caused a stir
amongst attendees, who called
into question his motives and actions during the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
Rusesabagina shared his experiences with a full crowd at
the Chan Centre as the Global
Keynote Speaker of International Week.
"Watching him standing here
defined my life," said Jean deDiu
Hakizimana, a survivor of the
genocide who stayed behind and
spoke against Ruesesabagina.
"[What] the heck were we chosen to die for? Rusesabagina only
provides the sanitized version of it.
"I am living testimony of these
victims."
Rusesabagina served as the
manager of the Hotel des Mille
Collines in Kigali, Rwanda and
risked his life to shelter Hutus
and Tutsis during the genocide
that resulted in the death of an estimated 800,000 people. The film
Hotel Rwanda was made about
his actions during that period
of time, but has been accused
of being historically inaccurate.
Although the film surrounds
his experience at the hotel,
^^■*  ^^^
£ jp[x
\                  1
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t_\
\                 &sS
Critics accuse Rusesabagina of war profiteering during the
Rwandan genocides. GERALD DEO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Rusesabagina explained that
he began by hiding a smaller
group of people in his home.
As a result of his position at
the hotel, the group eventually
moved there, and the number
of refugees in the hotel grew to
just about 1200.
Rusesabagina concluded his
speech with a message: "Ladies
and gendemen, I am urging everyone to get involved. These disasters are taking place in many
other places like in the Congo. All
of us are guilty—we are fueling
this mineral war."
The question and answer period following the event provoked
an interesting discussion that
ended before all the questions
could be answered. When students asked him why he risked
his life to help others, Rusesabagina said that he didn't realize
it right away. "You never realize
what you are doing, it happens
slowly," he said.
Some, though, did more than
just question his motives for his
actions both during and after the
genocide. They were very critical
of Rusesabagina and wanted to
use this time to critique his motives for his actions both during
and after the genocide. Critics
say that he engaged in war profiteering during the genocides in
Rwanda and defends genocide
criminals today.
Rusesabagina now fives in Texas and tours the world speaking on behalf of his foundation,
The Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation, to share the lessons he learned from the Rwandan genocide.
There will be an event to unpack and debrief the issues
brought up during the event on
Monday from 5pm to 7pm at the
International House in the Upper Lounge. Everyone is invited
to attend, tl
QUOTE THIS
Rusesabagina
only provides
the sanitized
version. I am living
testimony of these
victims.
JEAN DEDIU HAKIZIMANA
SURVIVOR OF RWANDAN GENOCIDE
These disasters
are taking place
in many other
places like in the
Congo. All of us
are guilty—we
are fueling this
mineral war.
PAULRUSESABAGINA
SPEAKER
UBCVotes: Undergrad elections still up in the air
Full results to
be announced
today
JUSTIN MCELROY
jmcel roy@ubyssey. ca
Official results for many undergraduate faculty society elections were put on hold Friday
night as paper ballots were unable to be counted due to privacy issues.
UBCVotes, an initiative between the Arts, Science, Engineering and Human Kinetics
undergradute societies to harmonize voting, announced that
only "partial results" would be
announced on Friday night and
that full results would be available on Monday.
Concerns over the validity
of paper ballots motivated the
decision.
"We can't evaluate whose ballots should be invalidated from
the paper ballots until we have
those student numbers. And [university administration] don't
work after 5pm on Friday," said
Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS)
Elections Administrator Matthew
Naylor. "We could have done this
[tonight] with the AMS system."
UBCVotes was
unable to verify
if those who cast
paper ballots did
not also vote online.
Some results were given via phone. JUSTIN MCELROY PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
The paper ballots are estimated
to make up 2 5 per cent of total
votes, according to a statement
on the UBCVotes website.
UBCVotes switched its voting
system to the WebVote system
administered by UBC weeks ago
due to concerns over the program
created by the AMS, which has
come under scrutiny because of
the voting fraud that occurred
during their elections.
The switch meant UBCVotes
was unable to independently
verify if those who cast paper
ballots did not also vote online.
That task would fall to the UBC
Registrar's office. Since voting
closed at 5pm Friday, ballots will
be verified Monday morning.
"I didn't have prior contact
with the Registrar's office. That
was Alex's thing," said Naylor, referring to Science Undergraduate
Society (SUS) Elections Administrator Alex Lougheed, who was in
Edmonton for the weekend at a
debate tournament.
Despite the delay, many races
were able to be announced. In
the Engineering Undergraduate
Society presidential race, Amanda Li defeated Julian Ritchie and
Sina Sahami, with turnout in the
election at 32.5 per cent with
1159 voters. In the SUS race,
Sumedha Sharma, running unopposed, was elected president,
and incumbent councilors Maria Cirstea and Iggy Rodriguez
looked set to be re-elected to
their positions.
The picture in the AUS was
not so clear. With 115 paper ballots still to be counted, many races were too close to call. In the
race for the fifth and final AMS
representative position, Jordan
Moore trailed joke candidate Admiral Ackbar by 2 9 votes. In the
presidential race, only 11 votes
separated third place Mike Sil-
ley from first place Brian Piatt.
With 517 students voting, turnout for the AUS elections was only
five per cent. That is an increase
of nearly 66 per cent from last
year's elections, although some
critics point out that the tens of
thousands of dollars spent by
the AUS to promote the elections
barely caused a ripple.
"It's hard to be happy with a
five per cent turnout, it's also
unfortunate that we didn't have
more candidates run," said Elections Committee member Will
Davis. "But it's better than in previous years^so it's a blessing in
disguise." \3 4/UBYSSEY.CA/PARALYMPICS/2010.03.22
Curling team has golden swagger
Skip Jim Armstrong and company take out Korea for gold
DORIAN GEIGER 5& A' K^9 Vfe*!   tf, ___*?Tm_____W_\
DORIAN GEIGER
sports@thesheaf.com
It's not always about the personal landmarks of athletic careers
when it comes to gold medals
for Canada's Olympic and Paralympic athletes—often it's about
raising the profile of the sport
that an athlete has so passionately dedicated his or herself to.
It was just this that Jim Armstrong, skip of Canada's Paralympic gold medal-winning wheelchair curling team, aimed to
achieve over the course of Vancouver's 2010 Paralympics. And
after defeating Korea 8-7 in eight
ends at Vancouver's Paralympic Centre on March 20, it was
clear by the thousands of people
that filled the venue that wheelchair curling has made a home
in Canada.
"The big thing—and I truly
think it's going to speak volumes
for wherever we're going in the
future—was the fans. This place
was packed—it was rockin!" exclaimed the ecstatic Armstrong.
"I think it's a new breed. Able-
bodied [curling], we saw it, and
be damned, we saw it here too,"
added Armstrong, referring to
Canadian counterpart curler Kevin Martin's gold medal win during this year's Olympic Games.
Armstrong, a BC native, was
an able-bodied curler for much
of his life and is no stranger to
the curling rink. His six Brier
appearances over the course
of his lengthy career and the
key role he played in getting
the concept of curling officiating off the ground have made
Armstrong a successful curler
in both able-bodied and wheelchair curling.
Now 5 8-years-old, Armstrong
competed in his last Brier in
1992 and transitioned to wheelchair curling in 2007 after knee
and back injuries made it too
painful to walk. While still in the
process of adjusting to his new
way of life, Armstrong lost his
wife Carleen to a batde with cancer in the fall of 2009 and since
has found peace hurling rocks
down sheets of ice.
Armstrong said
his deceased wife's
spirit was indeed
present for his
achievement.
The Canadian wheelchair curling team celebrates their Paralympic win. GERALD DEO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
After being draped in his Paralympic gold medal, Armstrong
said his deceased wife's spirit
was indeed present for his and
Canada's superb achievement.
"[Carleen] was here," he said
after accepting his medal. "Last
spring when she was diagnosed
as terminal, there were two
things she wanted. She wanted
one more Christmas—and today.
I know she was here today."
Fresh off a cameo at Canada's bronze medal sledge hockey game on March 19, Prime Minister Stephen Harper was again
in attendance at the Paralympic
Curling Centre for Armstrong
and company's golden moment.
"[Harper] says there's an election coming and I best vote for
him," Armstrong joked.
"No he didn't—but I will [vote]
anyway," he added with a smile.
Armstrong's roots extend back
to Rosetown, Saskatchewan, just
south of Saskatoon. Judging by
other grassroots Saskatchewan
support for Canadian athletes,
the residents of Rosetown were
likely celebrating well into the
night of Armstrong's gold medal.
"An Armstrong is an Armstrong is an Armstrong," Armstrong said. "I'm sure they'll remember my dad—and with that,
they'll remember me. Over the
years I've had a lot of people pulling for me because of my roots."
Since Canada's sledge hockey team folded in the bronze
medal game to Norway, Canada's wheelchair curling team will
become the Paralympics' newest
gold medal poster child, as the
gold medal marked the conclusion ofthe Paralympic Games in
Vancouver.
Darryl Neighbour, third on
team Canada, gushed about
the amazing fan reaction and
treatment he and his team had
been receiving in the Paralympic Village.
"I've never been treated so
well...we're literally being treated like royalty," said Neighbour,
who has won bronze, silver and
gold over the duration of his career at the National Wheelchair
Curling Championships.
Neighbour was injured on a
construction site in 2000 where
he lost the use of his legs. After a
lengthy period of rehabilitation,
he began playing wheelchair tennis, which resulted in his transition to curling.
Without a doubt, the popularity of wheelchair curling will
grow exponentionally in years
to come, til
CURLING FACTS
• Wheelchair curling teams must
be co-ed.
• There are eight ends as opposed to ten in the Olympics.
• Players don't sweep in wheelchair curling, but all other regulations apply.
• Instead of sliding and releasing the rocks, wheelchair curlers
use a thin metal pole to throw
their rocks.
• It is only open to those who
can walk short distances or are
notable to walk at all.
• The first wheelchair curling
World Cup took place in Switzerland in January 2000.
• The sport is currently played
by athletes in over 24 countries
worldwide.
• Wheelchair curling first made
it to the Paralympic Games as a
sporting event in Torino in 2006.
PARALYMPIC BRIEFS
OBAMA GIVES HARPER
AN EXTRA CASE OF BEER
Barack Obama gave Stephen
Harper a 24-pack of Molson Canadian after a bet that was made
over the outcome of the Olympic
men's gold medal hockey game
between Canada and the US.
Harper won the bet when
Canada beat the US 3-2.
David Jacobson, the US ambassador to Canada, delivered
the case of beer on behalf on
the US president to Harper,
along with an additional case
of Yuengling, an American beer
that Obama wagered in his bet.
A spokesperson for the Prime
Minister said that the beer would
be donated to the Hockey Hall
of Fame.
W00LSTENCR0FTLEAVES
BEHIND PARALYMPIC LEGACY
North Vancouver native Lauren Woolstencroft has become
the first female to win five gold
medals at a Winter Paralympic
Games.
"I never thought I would actually win the five medals," she
said. "The biggest challenge
here was to ski your best, day
after day."
All of Woolstencroft's medals are gold for para-alpine skiing. She took home the gold for
Canada in the downhill, super-
G, slalom, super combined and
giant slalom events.
SWEDISH CURLER BANNED FOR
TWO YEARS FOR DOPING
Glenn Ikonen, a Paralympic
wheelchair curler from Sweden,
has been banned from the Paralympics for two years after he
failed a doping test, reported
USA Today.
He said that he did not know
his blood pressure medication was on the list of banned
drugs.
MOSHER FIGHTS COLD
DURING 10KM
Canadian Paralympian Tyler
Mosher had a cold on Thursday when he raced in the men's
nordic 10km standing final. However, he didn't think it affected
his performance.
"[I'm] not worried at all," he
said after his race. "You can only
do your best, and I did my best
and I'm really happy.
"[The cold is] not heavy in
my chest—I don't think it affected me."
Mosher placed 23rd at Whistler Paralympic Park, in front of
competitors Zorig Enkhbaatar
and Sukhbaatar Nyamaa of Mongolia and Oleg Syssolyatin of Kazakhstan. Fellow Canadian Mark
Arendz placed -\2th.U
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THE T-BIRDS'ROAD TO SILVER
QUARTERFINALS SEMIFINALS
VS LAKEHEAD
WIN,79-58
VS CALGARY:
WIN, 77-63
FINALS
VS SASKATCHEWAN:
LOSS, 91-81
Thunderbirds settle for silver
Men's basketball team loses in finals to Saskatchewan Huskies
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubyssey.ca
After five months, 22 wins and a
3500-kilometre flight to Ottawa,
the UBC men's basketball team
are bridesmaids once more.
The T-Birds lost to the Saskatchewan Huskies 91-81 in
the CIS gold medal game Sunday
evening, dashing UBC's dreams
of winning their first national
championship since 1972.
Josh Whyte and Kamar Burke
each had 16 points in a lost
cause for the T-Birds. UBC gave
up a 14-0 run late in the first
quarter and was unable to recover against the No. 5 Huskies, who upset the No. 1 ranked
Carleton Ravens to advance to
the final.
The loss was doubly heartbreaking for UBC, who had not
only lost to the Huskies in the
Canada West semifinal, but also
lost in last year's championship
game, a 87-77 loss to Carleton,
It wasn't supposed to be this
way. After qualifying for the CIS
championships with the No. 3
seed, UBC was serenaded with
honours upon arriving in Ottawa. Josh Whyte, who led the team
in points, assists and steals was
named CIS MVP, and Kevin Hanson was given his second Coach
of the Year award.
UBC followed that up with easy
victories over Lakehead in the
quarterfinals (79-58) and Calgary in the semifinals (77-63).
Despite this, the T-Birds had no
answer for Saskatchewan's speed
and skill. Guard Showron Glover,
the leading scorer in the CIS this
year, had 28 points, ten assists
and six assists and the Huskies
forced UBC into 18 turnovers.
Down at one point by 17 in the
third quarter, the T-Birds continued to claw back, cutting the lead
to five points on a number of occasions in the fourth quarter.
But the Huskies responded
each time, and a three-pointer
by Michael Linklater gave Saskatchewan a 84-78 lead. It was
the nail in the T-Birds' coffin,
leaving the crowd of 125 or so
that had packed Mahoney and
Sons to watch the game filing out
with a bitter taste in their mouths.
Two weeks ago, after UBC lost
to Saskatchewan in the Canada
West semifinals, coach Hanson
invoked Canada's performance
in hockey at the Olympics.
"If we're fortunate enough
to get [into the nationals]...we
can look at the Olympics where
Canada lost to the US in the first
round," he said. "It would be a
great scenario for us to have that
same chance in two weeks."
Indeed, the scenario unfolded as Hanson predicted—except
that in this version, Ryan Kesler
scored in overtime for the US.
"It doesn't matter if you score
20 points or how well you play
if you lose," Kamar Burke said.
"We didn't get it done. We're really upset right now." ^J
Brent Malish finished with nine points for UBC. COURTESYOFMURRAYMCCOMB
amS Insider weekly
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LOOKING
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Contact the Internship Office
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Email: intemship@ams.ubc.ca,
or drop by the office at
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Travelling late at night?
Afraid of going alone?
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UBC's wings are clipped in rugby
T-Birds wracked by injuries as they prepare for World Cup matchup against California
IAN TURNER
turner@ubyssey.ca
It may not have an Olympic
scope, but the 'World Cup,' the
annual two-game rugby series
between UBC and the University
of California, comes to Thunderbird Stadium this Wednesday.
Beginning in 1921, the annual game at UBC is always a fierce
and heavily-attended contest, but
thisyear's match is somewhat an-
ticlimactic. With UBC's 39-7 loss
to the California Golden Bears
last month, they'll need to win by
33 points or more to take home
the Cup—which will be difficult,
as with nine starters injured, UBC
will field their second team, the
Braves, instead.
"I am very disappointed that
I will not play as it was one of
the big reasons why I came back
to UBC," said team captain Ben
Jones, who is completing a one
year engineering-based masters
program. Jones blew out his left
ACL in November 2009, and will
be out until the summer time-
doubly disappointing because
he blew out his right ACL in January 2009 and was out for that
year's World Cup games as well.
For most UBC players, the Cal-
UBC games are the most important of the year. Cal has won 2 4 of
the 30 collegiate national championships in the US since 1980,
while UBC is considered to have
one of the strongest rugby programs in the country. "This is
the biggest game of the year as
it is considered to be Canada vs.
USA," Jones said.
Unlike the Olympics, Canada
hasn't come out well in these
The T-Birds were left chasing the Golden Bears in last month's 39-7 loss to California. GERALD DEO FILE PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
contests—UBC has lost ten ofthe
last 13 World Cups, including the
last three and with UBC's loss to
Cal last month, it looks to become
four in a row.
"I was a litde amazed," UBC
head coach Spencer McTavish
told The Daily Californian, pulling
no punches.
"We went through plenty of
film and were pretty well prepared coming into the game. In
the first five minutes, we were
down already and we screwed
up repeatedly. I don't know what
was going through our heads,"
he added.
"We probably had about seven or eight good opportunities.
I counted four in the first half.
Those were tries that went begging. With more patience, we
might have come away with four
tries."
Jack Clark, Cal's head coach,
agreed. "The score didn't in any
way reflect the match. We scored
every chance we had, lucky really. UBC botched at least four good
scoring opportunities they had
earned for themselves," he said.
"They did something right to
camp out on our goal line a half
dozen times, they just didn't push
them across. In reality, it was a
normal Cal-UBC match where
one team should have won by a
few points."
And that's the perspective the
Cal players also have. They realize Canada has developed high-
school rugby programs which
gives UBC a strong advantage.
Even with their strong run, they
continue to cherish every victory.
After Cal's most recent win, senior full back James Bailes was
very content when talking to The
Daily Californian. "It was one of
the most incredible moments of
my life," he said. ^J
ATHLETE
OFTHEWEEK
TEAM Wl ISSUE
GEOFFUSTERPHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
TAYLOR DAZIEL
A local Vancouverite from the
rugby pitch, Taylor Dalziel performed brilliantly this past weekend, earning himself the singular Athlete of the Week spot. A
third-year centre, this six-foot-
three biochemistry major is a
veteran ofthe under-20 national
team, proving he has more than
just brains as he takes down opponents left, right and centre
while simultaneously getting a
few tries each week, tj
—The Athlete of the Week is
selected by the Thunderbirds
Athletic Council
Want to take on this job
next year? We're hiring
in April—e-mail us for
more details.
Justin mcelroy | sports@ubyssey.ca
TRANSPORTATION^
CONSULTATION o
(phrase)   around campus. If it were up to
me, the buses would be located    (place)
ATTEND OR PRESENT AT THE IDEAS FAIR
Present your idea on your own or as part of a team in under ten minutes to the UBC
community and a panel of judges. Or you can simply attend and join in the group
discussions after the presentations are made. Two $500 prizes and one $1,000 prize
will be awarded to the most creative and innovative presentations. An additional
student prize of $1,000, sponsored by Dr. Lawrence Frank, UBC Bombardier Chair in
Sustainable Transportation, will also be awarded.
NEED HELP DEVELOPING YOUR IDEA?
Come to a workshop where experts will be on hand to help out.
Walk in with an idea and leave with a presentation. To get started,
download the Transportation Consultation Workbook at
planning.ubc.ca/consultations.
For more information: planning.ubc.ca/consultations
a place of mind
Campus+
Community
Planning
IDEAS FAIR
Tuesday, March 30, 2010 from 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. in SUB 207 Dinner provided!
Please register by March 24th
at planning.ubc.ca/consultations
WORKSHOP
Monday, March 22, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Centre for Student Involvement, Main
Floor, Brock Hall Dinner provided!
Registration is closed for the
workshop, please email Stefani Lu
if you would like to attend,
stefani.Iu@ubc.ca 10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.03.22
1
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "CANDIDATES FRUSTRATED BY SCANDAL [MARCH 8, 2010]":
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
Students taking their cue from the business world,
which is corrupt and amoral.
—stu [March 18}
So did anyone call the cops?
—Durgan [March 19}
OK,  tWs   \'S>   Wtirdl £>r
PAUL BUCCI GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
UBC: THE POWER IS YOURS!
A massive parcel of forest that is ecologically important and of significance to BC First Nations is in danger of being split into small
parcels and turned into housing. That is, unless UBC has something to say about it.
Yes, that's right, UBC, well known for its rampant on-campus development, could be instrumental in saving 10,000 hectares of forest
on Vancouver Island from being logged off and developed. The shoe
feels a litde weird on the other foot, doesn't it? The land, currendy
owned by Western Forest Products (WFP), was formerly under a tree-
farming licence. Lastyear, UBC attempted to purchase it for $50 million, but were shut down; WFP wanted more than double that amount.
The university plans to use the land for research, teaching and
light forestry which would be conducted alongside First Nations
groups—if they get it. For some, UBC's plan is the best bet for the
area; the Dogwood Initiative, a forestry reform group, have called
the plan "visionary."
UBC students stand to gain in the long run if this land is bought.
Think of it as a resource something like the UBC Farm, only many
times larger and focused on sustainable solutions for logging instead of farming. It isn't just an ecologically smart move; it will benefit UBC's role as an academic institution.
If that land matters to you, tell UBC VP External, Legal and Community Relations Steven Owen what you think, because he'd be glad
to know that support exists. There is also the option of attempting to
convince the provincial government to chip in for the purchase—lobbyists have already been trying to do this.
But remember to act quickly if you do anything. Some of the land
has been saved by the Capital Regional District, but the rest could
very easily get sold off to any number of companies with questionable intent, vl
UBCVOTES HAD LITTLE BANG FOR BIG BUCKS
Due to a miscommunication with UBC, undergraduate society
election results won't be fully announced until later today. But the
promoting, campaigning and voting is over and we can safely say
that UBCVotes has increased interest and discussion about faculty societies.
It's also been a tremendous mess and a waste of money.
Part of the problem is that the Arts faculty ponied up most of the
money for this. The number bandied about for how much the AUS
spent on this is $60,000. If true, that's about $6 per arts student.
UBC student politics blogs haven't said too much about the cost of
this thing. It's probably because the majority of them are in a massive
conflicts of interest. The Radical Beer Tribune, UBC Insiders and AMS
Confidential all had an editor running the elections, and UBC Speca-
tor had editors running for office. And that money for voter-funded
media came direcdy from the AUS elections committee. Those people abstained from blogging during the election and they won't collect any money, but it places their co-editors in an impossible spot
and the lack of critical coverage showed.
So, where did the AUS money go? A St Patrick's day party at the
Museum of Anthropology that packed the house. A complete flop of
a bash at the Chan Centre with the band Said the Whale. $ 1500 for
voter-funded media. Your regular run-of-the-mill promotions. Nothing amazing that happened this year, but at least many more people voted, right?
Nope.Just over 500 students voted. The AUS spentmore than $ 100
per vote. That's a tremendous waste of money, no matter which way
you look at it. tl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
HEY TOO SEXY,
Lately, my sex drive hasn't been
itself. In the warmer summer
months, I was persistently filled
with passion and lust, and was
constantly in the mood for some
lovin'. These days I haven't really
been interested in sex and intimacy. I have a hard time getting
in the mood, thinking and fantasizing about sex. Why is this
happening to me? And do you
have any suggestions for helping me boost my libido and get
back in the mood?
Thanks,
—Girl's Absent Sex Mood
HEYGASM,
Thank you for your letter. It's
rare that we have such a good
question accompanying such
a fine acronym (acronym retrospective forthcoming). Your
question is a hard one to answer. There could be any number of reasons that could have
caused you to lose your libido:
stress, mood or quality of prospective partners come to mind
offhand.
For the purposes of this letter, we'll assume that this situation is distressing you. But before we go on, we'd like to make
a pitch that this might not be a
huge deal.
Your problem is thatyou want
to want sex, but you don't want
sex. But that doesn't mean that
there is something wrong with
not wanting to have sex. There
can be a lot of social pressure to
maintain a "normal sex life," but
the reality is that sometimes our
desires take alternate paths. If
you're stressed or tired or whatever else, the solution to your
problem may be as simple as
taking some time off, getting into
yoga, getting some exercise or
just meeting some new people.
When you really start to want sex
again, you might find that you
have no trouble getting your engine running.
We don't know why your
sex drive is lowering—we really don't have enough information to hazard a guess. That being said, there are a few ways to
get a litde boost. Although addressing whatever underlying
issues would probably be the
more successful, a litde push in
the right direction never hurts.
So here's a few things you could
try, along with a brief word or
two relating to our perceptions
of their effectiveness. Like most
good things in life, some of these
require a partner and even the
ones that don't...well, a partner
couldn't hurt.
THE FOOD OF LOVE
Word on the street is that certain
foods—like oysters and chocolate—can increase sex drive. Try
looking online to find a more
comprehensive list of aphrodisiac foods. We kind of doubt they
make much of a difference, but
we decided to include this in
the list because even the worst-
case scenario for trying this is
thatyou and a partner get to eat
some tasty food while thinking
about sex.
MASSAGE
Take a class, or find a passionate amateur. Affectionate touch
not only reduces stress, it also
leads to intimacy and, on occasion, sweaty all-nighters. Even
just getting some time with another human body in an intimate, non-judgmental way can
work wonders not only on your
libido, but also your relationship with that person.
PICK UP A NEW HOBBY
Trying something new, something
different or something you've always thought about but never had
time to do can always add some
spice to your life—both in and
out ofthe bedroom/dorm room/
broom closet. Try painting, skateboarding or anything else that
gets your blood coursing. If this is
about desire, you might as well do
whatever drives you crazy.
A NIGHT OUT
It's not for everyone, but it
doesn't take a genius to see
that mixing alcohol, great lighting, and dance music is a pretty damn good recipe for a wild
night of passion. Take a friend
and have a fun time. Nothing
makes people want to have sex
more than feeling happy, carefree and wild.
PORNOGRAPHY (NUFF SAID)
NEW PROSPECTS
Meet some new people. Maybe
the problem isn't so much with
your libido, but rather with the
fuel being consumed by it. Expand your social circle and see
if you like what you see.
DRFEELGOOD
If worst comes to worst, try seeing a doctor. I wouldn't worry to
much about it (sometimes folks
just don't feel like sex), but if
there's some kind of hormone or
circulation issue, you might find
your fix here. There is also the
option of going to therapy, if a
medical doctor can't help you. tl
Anyways, that's it for this week.
Send your letters to toosexy®
ubyssey.ca or our anonymous
webform at ubyssey.ca/ideas.
HUMOUR: HOROSCOPES
TREVOR RECORD
& ANDREW BATES
deas@ubyssey.ca
ARIES (MARCH 21 TO APRIL 19)
You're hoping that we tell you
that some new romance or business opportunity is in store this
week? Tough luck, Aries. Your
motives for reading horoscopes
daily are paper thin and you'll
be eating fast food to forget about
your loneliness as usual.
TAURUS (APRIL 20 TO MAY 20)
Against all odds, your rag-tag
band of little-league orphans
will triumph over the rich kids.
But those rich kids will ultimately win when their parents go
ahead and bulldoze the children's hospital to make way for a
squash court, despite your win.
GEMINI (MAY 21 TO JUNE 20)
An exciting new individual will
enter your life. Calling himself
an "auditor," you'll be delighted
when he takes a personal interest in you, asking detailed questions. Be careful, though—the
white lies you tell about your job
to impress him may be mysteriously used against you.
CANCER (JUNE 21 TO JULY 20)
The words of a child wise beyond
their years will open new doors.
They'll introduce you to fantastic vistas through The Wizards
ofWaverly Place.
LEO (JULY 21 TO AUG. 20)
This week you'll be lucky, but not
uncommonly lucky. If you lose
your wallet you'll get it back,
but not before getting carded
at the bar.
VIRGO (AUG. 21 TO SEPT. 20)
As Jupiter and Saturns paths converge this week, your life be affected in exciting ways. How, you
ask? Er, hard to say. Magic... relating to the weak gravitational
pulls of celestial bodies. Yeah...
LIBRA (SEPT. 21 TO OCT. 22)
You'll finally get around to starting that diet when your grandmother calls you fat today (based
on a true story).
SCORPIO (OCT. 23T0 NOV. 21)
The ascendant venus in the
house of Scorpio suggests romance. Unfortunately, it's scorpion romance, which is the most
stingy kind.
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22 TO DEC. 21)
You'll post a tweet complaining
about a rude person on the bus.
Somewhere, an adult will be fired
from a Baskin Robins by a teenager. Your naive belief that the
stars predict any of these things
will persist unabated.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22 TO JAN. 19)
Your knack for getting in and out
of sticky financial situations will
characterize the coming week.
Even if you do get any money
back from taxes, you won't be
able to get it back in time to pay
rent. Time to start eating ketchup in hot water again.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20TO FEB. 18)
As Venus enters the house of
Sagittarius, you'll find yourself
building up far too much of your
hopes on the lies you read in a
newspaper horoscope column.
PISCES (FEB. 19 TO MARCH 20)
Don't be surprised when your
friends bail out on your road
trip. They're just critical of your
planning abilities; Speedy Gonzales is a cartoon character,
which makes visiting his gravestone in Mexico too difficult, va  WITH
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