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The Ubyssey Mar 31, 1987

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 49
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 31,1987
— dan andrews photo
WE'D WRITE A funny caption for this picture of the University Christian Ministries street mimes from Western Washington University performing outside SUB last Friday, but our
regular outline writer tried writing one and was immediately rained upon with sulfer and   brimstone and went immediately to Hell, so . . .
Minister to increase student aid
By EVELYN JACOB
Sweeping changes to the student
assistance program announced by
Advanced Education Minister Stan
Hagen Friday have been hailed by
educators and student groups, but
some say the program leaves behind
debt-ridden students who need help
the most.
Hagen promised to increase student aid by $50 million a year over
the next three years, representing a
major shift away from the restraint
policy of the Bennett era.
He has also said his government
is committed to curbing debt loads
of graduating post-secondary
students by limiting their student
loans to $12,000. Anything beyond
that will be paid for by the provincial government, he said.
But critics complain that the new
program ignores a "lost
generation" of students who have
already accumulated massive debts,
some as high as $40,000.
Marg Fartaczeck, chair of The
Canadian Federation of Students
Pacific Region, was generally pleased with the new program, but said
she is disappointed it was not
retroative for those students
graduating between 1984 and 1986
who did not benefit from the grant
program.
"The government has done
nothing to deal with that (students
with huge debt loads) and we're
unhappy about it," she said.
But Byron Hender, UBC's director of financial awards and services,
applauded the new program, saying
needy students will receive more
grant money in the first two years
of their education than under the
old grant program.
"B.C. is seeing students graduate
with higher debt loads than other
provinces and the government has
recognized it's unfair," said
Hender, one of the 10-member Advisory Committee to the Student
Aid Program which made a series
of recommendations to the
ministry.
The program — which will be
phased in over the next three years
— will apply to students graduating
this year.
First and second year students
living away from home will not be
permitted to borrow more than
$3,000 a year and will receive
equalization payments to help offset living expenses.
Because the new program stresses
"personal responsibility," students
must find summer employment or
do volunteer work, and complete
full yearly course loads to be eligible
for the remission program and
equalization payments.
"I don't believe in free lunches,"
Hagen said at a press conference
Friday when asked why a full-grant
system was not reinstated.
Eligible students are also required
to complete their education in five
years.
Some of the major highlights of
the program are:
• An increase in the maximum
assessment for student assistance to
reflect the current cost of living
• A reduction of the student debt
load to $12,000 for students who
successfully   complete   a   post-
secondary education
• Equalization funds to assist
first and second year students who
live away from their families
• Funds up to $1,000 for Adult
Basic Education students at colleges
and for Special Needs students
Tax breaks for parents' education savings
• Provision for financially needy
students with summer employment
vouchers to be matched by
employers in order to increase the
amount of savings for their education
• Matched private donations to
scholarship and bursary endowments
Vanessa Geary, a member of The
Coalition for Accessible Education,
welcomed the student aid program,
but like Fartaczek, she stressed the
program does not provide for some
students who are "stranded" with
huge debts and no relief in sight.
A third year law student, John
Humphries, with a current debt
load of $27,650, said the new program discriminates against students
who did not benefit from grants.
"There's no help in this for me,"
he said.
And Hender says it's not likely
the government will introduce
retroactive assistance.
John Waters, head of the College
Educators' Institute, also had four
major criticisms of the program:
• That it should be phased in immediately to help students and not
over three years
• That   the   debt   ceiling   of
$12,000 will continue to deter
students from attending post-
secondary institutions
• That the loan remission program is based on completion of a
degree, making college students
who complete only two years ineligible for assistance
• That if stringent guidelines are
placed on the summer work or
volunteer system some students
may be blocked out of the program
But Waters, who made a submission to the Student Aid Advisory
Committee last December, said
Hagen's program represents an improvement in the overall student aid
package.
"It recognizes the needs of interior students," he said. "There is
See page 2: STUDENT
World focuses on Pacific rim
By GREG SCOTT
UBC's future growth is directly
linked to business and cultural exchanges with Pacific rim nations
said UBC's president Thursday.
Speaking to the UBC Pacific rim
club David Strangway said Japan is
now this country's second largest
trading partner and that Canada's
trade with  Japan is three times
UBC reaps math honor
la the 1986 William LoweD
Putnam Mathematical Competition for undergraduates in North
American universities the UBC
team received an Honorable
Mention for ranking in the top
10.
The UBC team consisted of
Wayne J. Broughton, Marek
Radzikowski, and Russet Wong,
and was coached by Professor
Rajiv Gupta.
The top five ranking teams
were from Harvard, Washington
University in St. Louis,
Berkeley, Yak and MIT. The
other honourable mention teams
were from Cattech, Princeton,
Rice University in Houston, and
Waterloo. A total of 2094
students from 358 institutions
participated.
greater than its trade with Europe.
He said UBC has agreements for
faculty and student exchange with
universities in 14 other Pacific rim
countries.
Strangway said UBC has applied
to the Fund for Excellence in
Education to establish a Pacific
Rim Studies Program. He said the
emphasis of the university's connection with the Pacific rim should be
academic but that business, trade
and tourism are all important to
UBC and graduating students looking for jobs.
"UBC's Pacific rim connections
have served to increase our prestige
and reputation internationally. We
have alumni and former students all
over Asia and when they think of
Canada and trade they think of
UBC and Vancouver," said
Strangway.
Tony Roberts, vice president of
the Pacific rim club, agrees with
Strangway's view of the university's
role in the Pacific rim relationship
and said the club should provide for
an exchange of ideas and opportunities.
Roberts said, "without a doubt,
the focus of the world is shifting
towards the Pacific rim and as
Canadians we will have to accept
the challenge of Asia."
"I unfortunately see a lot of people out there who view Asia as
simply a place to succeed on an entirely materialistic level with little
regard for the complexities of those
societies," he said.
Roberts said the club should be
more open and accessible to those
who have other interests besides
making money.
"I'd like to stress the importance
of seeing those countries with a
cultural insight. We should realize
that Asia has an incredible diversity
of cultural traditions and modes of
communications so different from
our own," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 31, 1987
Student grants back
From page 1
substance there."
Another limitation of the program, said Fartaczek, the time limit
placed on students to complete their
degrees. She said students with
families who have commitments, or
students who fail a course may not
Ooooops
In the Friday, March 20 issue of
The Ubyssey, it was reported that
the student-run sexual harassment
clinic is located in SUB 230. The
correct room number is SUB 130.
benefit from the program.
Hender said students may experience "some additional strain"
in taking on greater course loads,
but said most students would be
able to meet the requirement.
Over one-third of UBC students
currently receive some form of student assistance. First and second
year students who qualify for the
projected 87-88 maximum student
loan of about $5,900 will have
anything over $3,000 paid for by
the provincial government. Hender
said the grant portion of the program applies to both Canada and
B.C. loans.
The grant portion of the program
does not apply to third and fourth
years of study, but any debt incurred over $2,000 can be remitted.
Students who applied for financial
assistance last year were forced to
borrow up to $5,560, with no grant
relief.
Hagen also announced the creation of a Standing Committee on
Student Assistance to provide ongoing advice to the ministry.
Qoin Ufis. tlllkjiizy
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UBC GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
AMUAL GEIKALIVIEETING
Wednesday, April 1, 1987—4 p.m.—
Graduate Student Centre Dining Room
AGENDA
1. Report of Council.
2. Introduction of new executive.
3. Accepting the 1986 financial statements as audited.
4. Reappointment of the Auditor-General of B.C. as the Society's auditor.
5. Motions: Special resolutions (these require a 75°7o vote in favour and quorum).
I. CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE TO QUALIFY FOR SPECIAL TAX STATUS:
i) To amend section #2 of the Constitution of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre Society so as to read as follows:
"The purposes of the Society are:
a) to promote & serve the academic, social, intellectual, cultural & recreational interests of its members, the University of B.C. and persons associated
therewith, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, in particular, to promote inter-departmental activities wilhin the University.
b) to promote the principle and practice of graduate student representation at all levels of decision making at the University of B.C. and at all agencies
or other bodies with deliberate on the affairs of graduate students,
c) to provide, maintain and operate the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre as a centre for the recreation and convenience of members of
the Society and their guests,
d) to do everything incidental and necessary to promote and attain the foregoing purposes, "and
e) to carry out the foregoing without purpose of gain for its members, and
f) to use any and all profits or accretions to the Society for the promotion and attainment of the foregoing purposes. "
II. FEE RESOLUTION
To amend Bylaw 2.9 (a) to read: "Fees for ordinary members may be set from time to time by ordinary resolution of the ordinary members through
referendum and subject to the approval of the Board of Governors of the University.
III. EXTERNAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR
To amend the Bylaws to add as Bylaw 6,6 (g), "The External Affairs Director shall:
i) be the chairperson of the External Affairs Committee,
ii)  be responsible for the representation of the Society to external organizations,
iii)   develop and maintain contacts with organizations that deliberate on the affairs of graduate students, and
iv)    perform such other duties as directed by the Council or members.
AND to add to the list of officers in Bylaw 6: Officers
g) External Affairs Director
IV. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES REPS.
a) "To amend the Bylaws to add the following as voting member of the Council:
5.2 a) v) the graduate student representatives in the Faculty of Graduate Studies".
V. HOUSE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS:
"To amend the Constitution and Bylaws to add the following items to Bylaw 7, House Committee #2 to read: the House Committee shall:
e) have primary responsibility and authority for capital improvements to the building subject to Council approval.
0 have responsibility for hiring of permanent staff subject to Council Approval".
RECEPTION FOLLOWING
WITH HOSTED BAR Tuesday, March 31,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Salvadoran farmers harassed
By CORINNE BJORGE
"If it's corn, they'll cut it, if it's
dry they'll burn it. They destroy
everything they find," said Roberto
Alfaro, a farm worker, speaking
out against the military forces of
the government of El Salvador.
Sponsored by CUSO and Oxfam,
Alfaro is visiting Vancouver asking
Canadians for economic aid for the
war-torn nation. "My objective is
to tell what life is like in El Salvador
and to explain why people want to
stay in the areas of their origin, and
fight for their right to live there,"
he said.
Alfaro criticized the current
government in El Salvador as a
"puppet" of the United States.
"(President) Napolean Duarte
represents the interests of the
United States," he said.
Grad photos burn
By RICK HIEBERT
Seventeen years of UBC graduate
photos were probably destroyed in
a fire that gutted Amograph
studios, on Broadway, Sunday
morning.
The Kitsilano studio, located at
3343 W. Broadway has taken pictures of UBC graduates since 1969.
It was almost completely destroyed
by the blaze, which demolished
most of the studio's photo equipment, and much of the personal effects of owner Fred Spissinger, who
lived with his wife and younger
children upstairs.
A witness said there may have
been an explosion inside the
building at nine a.m. Sunday morning and that the studio may have
been burning for an hour before the
fire department was called at 10:15
a.m.
When the witness arrived at the
scene around 11 a.m., he said, "it
looked as if everything in the studio
had been destroyed."
"It looked pretty grim," he said.
Three firemen were injured while
fighting the blaze, receiving outpatient treatment in a Vancouver
hospital. Thirty-five firefighters
and 12 fire trucks were required to
combat the blaze. The fire was contained to the studio, leaving the
other buildings on the block
unharmed.
UBC archivist Laurenda Daniells
said graduates who don't already
have copies of their pictures may be
out of luck as the university archives do not have copies of grad
photos presumably destroyed in
Sunday's fire.
The archives have copies of the
student yearbook, Totem, with
grad photos up to 1966 when the
yearbook ceased publication.
Amograph Studios is a private
business with a contract to take
grad photos so the archives doesn't
automatically receive negatives,
said Daniells.
"It's not cheap preserving pictures. Duplication of negatives is an
extremely expensive process, usually only done for the most important
things (in the archives)," she said.
Alfaro comes from the area of
Guazapa, 25 km North of the
capital, San Salvador, one of the
zones the leftist FLMN (Farabunto
Marti National Liberation Front)
guerillas have under control.
The so-called zones of control are
areas throughout the countryside
where the FLMN operates from.
"Already in these zones a new
self-government is forming. The
population has elected leaders to
direct community health care and
agriculture," said Alfaro.
Despite the hardships resulting
from the government-FLMN conflict, Alfaro said his farm is always
willing to sell food to the guerillas.
"The relationship is one of
mutual respect," he said.
He said the government wants to
kick fanners out of the zones
because it has no control over the
population in those areas. And he
said farmers must always be thinking of ways to defend their crops
from government forces.
We usually look for pieces of
land (to farm on) that are hidden,
so that when airplanes pass over
they won't see the plantations," he
said.
According to Alfaro, the government is attempting to remove people from the zones of control and
relocate them in refugee settlements. But once they place
citizens in the camps the government gives no further help.
"The people sleep on the floors
with no medical aid, in unsanitary
conditions, and they're not allowed
to work," he said.
"The camps vary, some are in
houses, some in churches. Much of
the housing is cardboard or plastic.
Some camps are just in guarded
fields."
Oxfam and CUSO are aiding
those in refugee camps, but Alfaro
said because the government blocks
most aid, it must come through illegal channels.
Flasher exposes
An incident last Thursday where
a man exposed himself on a trail to
a female UBC student is part of a
pattern the past few months, police
said Monday.
UBC RCMP Sgt. Don Schlecker
said there have been several cases of
indecent exposure recently around
UBC.
"We think we know who the
culprit is," said Schlecker, but the
investigation is continuing.
In the incident Thursday afternoon, the student was walking to
the beach on a trail starting near the
social work building. Schlecker said
the woman was shaken but otherwise unharmed. The suspect escaped.
Schlecker advised female
students not to walk alone at night
or on trails and in wooded areas, to
report any cases of indecent exposure immediately, and to try to
take note of the individual's appearance.
While police have a solid suspect,
Schlecker said releasing the
suspect's description to the university community now would thwart
the investigation.
There have been no recent
reports, said Schlecker, of violent
sexual assaults or other attacks
around UBC or the endowment
lands. John Horace Oughton, of
Vancouver, was convicted this year
on several counts of sexual assault,
including one count two years ago
on the endowment lands.
-lenni mott photo
THIS SEEMS TO be an ice cream vendor selling frozen confections to cool the throats of Open House visitors,
but we REALLY know that it is a CIA station chief making a rondezvous with two specially trained midget agents
bringing long haired, bearded suspect into custody.
Students rally in support of banished professor
HALIFAX (CUP) — Students at
Mount Saint Vincent University are
circulating a petition in support of
an assistant business professor who
resigned early this month after
pleading guilty to sending obscene
books and magazines to a Sydney
woman between July 1985 and his
arrest April 1986.
Professor   Lowell   Geddes   was
"very popular" and a very good
professor, says business student
Alex Dow, who signed a petition
questioning Geddes' resignation.
Although he said Geddes was
relieved to resign, Professor Don
Shiner wonders whether a resignation would have occured if Geddes
had been working at an institution
other than a university.
College may be forced to tell land
TORONTO (CUP) — Impending
bankruptcy at St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto
may force the College to turn its
playing fields into a concrete
jungle.
The College has an operating
deficit of $1.2 million for the current fiscal year which, if left unchecked, could lead to bankruptcy. However, the College owns
about an acre of prime real estate
along Bay Street worth $10 to $20
million.
Although the college has a $7.6
million capital fund, St. Mike's
has already had to spend $1
million of its capital to meet costs.
And a recent estimate called for
about $10 million to renovate College buildings up to common standards.
On March 12, St. Mike's
finance committee held a meeting
to discuss the issues with concerned students. Greg Ross, president
of St. Michael's College Student
Union, said he is "becoming more
and more convinced" that the
land should be sold.
Since only about 40,000 of the
100,000 square feet is zoned to be
developed, there would be some
park remaining. "I still think we'd
be able to practice there," said
Ross, who is also a member of the
school football team.
"Other fields are already
crowded enough," said Saint
Michael's student Mary Claire
Kavanagh. "I mean to get (space
for) soccer games for the girls'
team we had to go at seven or
eight in the morning. Where are
the students going to go?" She
said the students do not want the
land to go despite the college's
financial bind.
"What happens in 25 years?"
asked another student at the
March 12 meeting. Greg Ross
agreed  "We're very scared about
doing something this drastic. "
There are at least two other major concerns. They are already
highly developed, and some don't
want St. Mike's to join the concrete jungle. The land is also symbolic of the Basilian affiliation
because it consists of the first four
lots the Basilian Fathers purchased here.
Given these concerns, the college is pondering various ways of
keeping at least nominal control
over the land, any of which would
reduce the immediate cash value.
Their favoured plan is to lease the
land to a developer who would
build high quality condominiums.
At the end of the lease, perhaps in
99 years, the condos would have
to be removed if the college then
wanted the land back.
If condominiums are built, the
committee would like to see the
complex as harmonious with St.
Michael's as possible.
Administration president Naomi
Hersom said Geddes was not forced
to resign. "I think it's fair to say
there was no pressure for him to
resign, but resignation was certainly
discussed."
Geddes, who will be sentenced
March 31, was scheduled to be
sentenced earlier but Supreme
Court Justice William Grant
ordered a delay to allow a check into Geddes' behavior at the Mount.
The university is satisfied that Geddes never bothered students.
According to the Cape Breton
Post, upon his arrest Geddes admitted to sending the Sydney woman,
whom he met at the bank where she
worked, a magazine called Urban
Cowboys, Geddes had pasted
obscene notes inside suggesting the
woman might enjoy sexual relations
with the men in the photos.
Geddes also sent the woman a
magazine called The Story of
Jerome and Ursula, novels called
Lust Story and Digest, as well as
a videotape called Ectasy Girls.
Geddes told the court he felt sad
for causing the woman fear and
said the incidents occurred because
he was experiencing mental illness
brought on by personal problems.
"I knew he was under a lot of
pressure," said Shriner, "but -I was
surprised at how it manifested
itself."
"I'm disappointed for him as a
professional," he added.
Dow says students experienced
disbelief when rumours of Geddes'
behavior started circulating prior to
his resignation.
Dow and Shiner say that Geddes,
who had beem employed at the
Mount for two years, never brought
his personal problems to the
classroom.
Bill the Cat wins election
Bill the Cat clawed his way to the
top last Wednesday in the race for
Arts Undergraduate Society Social
Coordinator.
Bill received over a third of the
ballots cast and overswept the incumbent Social Coordinator, while
denying Rob yet another job.
Bill ran on a platform of capability and the promise to have a tongue
in every mouth.
Bill the Cat is, in fact, a
schizophrenic who has delusions of
being comprised of five dedicated,
fun-loving, hairball choked Arts
Students who aim to make
1987-1988 the best social year ever
experienced by an Arts faculty
legendary for its apathy. Bill Dyson
(no relation) was elected to the position of co-social coordinator.
A Bill the Cat' Fan Club is forthcoming and prospective members
are invited to "cough up" one
dollar and drop by the Arts
Undergraduate Office (Buch A107)
to join. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 31,1987
Chchchanges
Social Credit's fear of education has been timidly discarded by a
suspicious but apparently supportive Vander Zalm government.
The legacy of the Bennett years is of a government that viewed
education as an anti-government institution where pointy-heads
studied literature, bashed business, and remained forever unproductive. That government ended student grants and allowed
students to go as far into debt as their non-business minded heads
took them.
The Vander Zalm government has announced a huge monetary
injection into a student aid program crippled by restraint. Grants,
and loan ceilings have been introduced along with a predictable
rider that students spend their summers doing "real" work. Eligible
students must find employment or do volunteer work in the summer.
Remnants of Social Credit suspicion remain in the five year limit
placed on students completing their degrees. And students are required to finish their degrees to be eligible for loan remissions and
equalization payments.
This increase in government spending marks an important
change in attitude. It was Vander Zalm who commissioned the
study which proposed these changes. He recognized public
dissatisfaction with the aid program which a string of Socred
universities ministers had proudly defended. The new program has
problems but it also reflects Vander Zalm's promise that the Bennett era of confrontation is over.
We are cautiously optimistic about student aid's future because
the need has been recognized and the structure has finally
been put in place. It is easier to argue with the government about
the amount of funding than it is to convince them of the principles
behind it.
Wanting only  to
scare.   the flsh» fritz.
FELT THE" FUUL   B'RUNT
OF  THE   M**C-.ER    Al*iT>
FUSTP-*"n0M   OF   A
FISH   TOSHER Tg?
Sikhs  not sole heirs of Punjab culture
I am excited to read (Ubyssey
March 20) that finally the federal
government is going to give the long
delayed approval for funds for
establishing at UBC a chair in Sikh
history and Punjabi language and
literature.
While I have no qualms about
Sikh history as a topic of study, I
assume that it will be in the English
medium with all historical sources
for study. I have mixed feelings
about the teaching of Punjabi
language and literature.
The concern is the assumption
that Sikhs are the sole representatives or the inheritors of the Punjabi  language  and  literature  and
that India is the only country that
has Punjabi speaking people. Of
course the most important point is
that Punjabi script is "one" universally accepted by the Punjabi-
speaking community.
The boundary allocation of
British India divided Punjab into
two nation-states, with a large
percentage of Punjabi-speaking
people in what is now called
Pakistan; further demarcations of
Indian Punjab has left that territory
a mere one-third of the original
Punjab. The point is that not only
has the territory of Punjab been
divided into two countries, but the
shift in the boundaries have also
TRIUMF a waste
Regarding proposed funding to
upgrade TRIUMF: I question the
value of this type of project.
The previously spent $200 million
seems an exhorbitant price to
discover that subatomic "W" particles rotate to the left. Is this the
only human benefit physicists can
claim from previous funding? Are
we paying for cerebral atomic
theories and physicists' Mercedes?
The economic argument seems
silly: that 5,000 direct and indirect
jobs will be created. I could create
an equally silly program with $500
million: pay 5,000 people $20,000
per   year   for   five   years   to   do
nothing. Alternately, pay all UBC
students' tuition for the next 12
years. More realistically, fund projects that directly benefit humanity
such as hospitals, community
shelters and education or programs
in the Third World supported by
organizations such as Oxfam whose
costs are measured in hundreds of
dollars rather than 100's of
millions.
Let affluent and nationalistic nations like the U.S. compete for
physics kudos and commit social
suicide. Let Canada be known for
its program of humanism.
Mark Classen
Artsl
resulted in a division of Punjabi-
speaking people.
Another problem is that the
Punjabi-speaking people belong to
three major religious groups; a large
majority belong to the Islamic faith
and are Muslims, a majority of
them are in Pakistan; then there are
the Sikhs and Hindus which are in
India, they are in even numbers.
The main problem is that of
which script to use when writing in
Punjabi language. Currently, the
Pakistani-Punjabi people use the
Persio-Arabic script with a few
modifications; while the Indian-
Punjabi people using a modification of the Devanagri (Hindi)
script, called Gurmukhi. Here we
see that Punjabi language is divided
into three religious faiths, between
two nations and each using different scripts.
Current assumption that Punjabi
language uses one script is incorrect, as it was the case in history.
The Sikh faith came to the Punjab
as an organized faith in the early
16th Century. Punjabi language
and literature goes back to at least
the llth Century.
The script historically used for
the Punjabi language and literature
has been the Persio-Arabic script.
Except for the Sikh religious books
and pseudo-religious literature,
Punjabi language has been in the
Persio-Arabic script. The Sikhs
started using the Gurmukhi script
only for religious discourse, or for
their religious texts. The majority
of the "educated" or "scholars"
used the Persian script and
language as a medium of expression.
It was only in the 1960s that Gurmukhi script ws used in the Punjab
belonging to India; the masses of
Indian Punjabi people are still not
familiar with the Gurmukhi script.
The point in here is that there
seems to be an apparent connection
between the Sikh faith and the Pun-
jabi language and literature.
Historically and even today that is
not the complete picture. It would
be inaccurate to assume that
Sikhism and Punjabi language and
literature are synonymous.
If the UBC will be teaching the
Punjabi language in the Gurmukhi
script then that should be clarified
from the beginning. I wonder what
kind of literature will be scanned in
this Punjabi literature if it only
covers the Gurmukhi script. A vast
amount of Punjabi literature is in
the Persio-Arabic script.
Will that be ignored just because
the community donations came
from the Sikh community, or that
there will be Sikh members on the
advisory committee or they can't
find a suitable candidate. Shall we
then say that UBC will teach Sikh
history and the Gurmukhi script of
Punjabi? Charn-Jeet S. Sangha
social work 5
Society   alienated  young   drunks
THE UBYSSEY
March 31, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily
those of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial, 228-2301/2305. Advertising, 228-3977.
With spring comes the appointed time for the annual Ubyssey purge and show trial. Evelyn Jacob,
Svetozar Kontic, David Ferman and Michael "Entertainment Commissar" Groberman were executed
out of hand as symbols of the old, reactionary order. A new triumvirate of Corinne Bjorge, Chew Wong
(infamous for crushing the 1956 Hungarian revolution by force feeding the leaders dehydrated oatmeal)
and Jeffrey Swartz had thrust itself into power (Jennifer lurks in her dacha planning a putschl.
People's advocate Patti Flather joyfully railroaded Steve Chan, Greg "Super Scissors" Scott and Neil
(he of the sphincter) Lucente to the Siberia Club Med, run by Commandant Ross McLaren. Dan Andrews and Jennt Mott waited in line to buy baby booties as the trial condemned the trotskyite-wrecker-
bourgeois agent-imperialist running dog-pig Rick Hiebert to be summarily executed for activities
against the Revolution and consorting with The Enemy.
"Please forgive me," he pleaded as they put the blindfold over his face, "I think Stalinism's wonderful. Swear to God."
It was a sunny Tuesday afternoon. I was sunbathing on the
Wreck Beach cliffs behind the
Museum of Anthropology when
four scrubby men in their twenties
came over the fence. They were
drinking beer. From the way they
talked about lack of money, lack of
jobs and lack of girlfriends, and
also from the way they used four-
letter words and threw empty bottles over the cliff, I concluded that
they must be socially alienated.
I got up and walked over to them.
"Do you think", I asked, "that
throwing beer bottles over the cliff
is a good idea?"
They laughed. One of them, who
had all the unkemptness of a loser
about him, planted himself close to
me and smashed a bottle right at my
feet.
"Now", he said, "what are you
gonna do about it?"
My first impulse was to push the
fellow over the cliff, but in the
presence of his muscle-flexing buddies that seemed unwise. So I did
the philosophical thing: I retreated
into thought.
What if I were one of these
fellows - what if I had a dismal
education and no decent job prospects, no female companionship,
next to no self-esteem and just
enough welfare money to buy beer?
How would I get rid of my accumulated frustrations on sunny
weekday afternoons?
Nonsense, I told myself, someone
like me couldn't possibly be such a
loser in this land of opportunity.
Even if there are lots of applicants
for every job, someone with my
abilities can always outcompete
most others and carve out a cozy
middle-class niche in society.
Suddenly I had second thoughts.
Is there nothing rotten about a
society in which good jobs are increasingly reserved for people who
are smart, highly educated, aggressively competitive or well-
connected? Should not a just society provide reasonably congenial
work for all willing workers?
Deprive the average person of
work and everything work means -
a decent livelihood, social respect,
self-esteem, a bit of power and
responsibility, constructive diversion, social contacts at the
workplace and perhaps a chance for
self-realization in a social role - and
you deprive that person of the
likelihood of a good life.
It is surely a serious social injustice to deprive someone of the
likelihood of a good life. Why
should victims of such serious injustice feel bound to respect the
laws and institutions of society
rather than sabotage them at every
turn? Why not break into houses
and cars, mug tourists in downtown
alleys, loot stores or poison
aquarium fish?
It's absurd to expect a sense of
moral responsibility from people
who are seriously victimized by
social injustice. Seen in this light,
even throwing beer bottles over the
Wreck Beach cliff seems like not
such a bad idea. After all, it gives
these alienated young men, if not
lasting self-esteem, at least some
temporary relief of frustrations.
Kurt Preinsperg
philosophy grad student
All letters must be typed, triple-
spaced, on a 70 character line.
Please keep letters to under 500
words. Letters will be edited for
spelling, grammar, and brevity.
Letters must be brought, in person, to The Ubyssey office, SUB
241k, and presented with a piece of
identification that suggest the writer
is the person delivering the letter. Tuesday, March 31,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page5
Taiwanese  protest choice of speaker
This letter is written in regard to
the upcoming special seminar, "Recent Social and Economic
Developments in Taiwan", scheduled to be given by Dr. Ko-wang Mei,
President, Tunghai University,
Taiwan, on Thursday, April 2,
1987, 12:30 p.m., Room 604, Asian
Centre.
We, the undersigned, wish to
protest the scheduling of this event
and, at the same time, to express
our grievance which has been occasioned through this invitation extended to Dr. Mei on the part of the
administration of the University of
British Columbia. The UBC administration will, we assume,
acknowledge this grievance and prevent similar events from arising in
the future.
Our protest of this event rests on
the following grounds:
1.) that prior to his appointment
as agent of Tunghai University, Dr.
Ko-wang Mei is a former agent of
the Bureau of Intelligence, Ministry
of Interior, Taiwan and Chief of
Police Academy which are the
Taiwanese equivalent of the KGB.
As a graduate himself of the Police
Academy, Dr. Mei's career has consisted solely of functionary in the
Taiwan secret police;
2.) that Dr. Ko-wang Mei is part
of a system of surveillance of
students in the post-secondary
educational institutes in Taiwan
which abrogates basic student rights
such as freedom of organization,
press and participation in social and
political affairs;
3.) that since 1949 all post-
secondary educational institutes in
Taiwan have been stationed with
military-political officers who administrate indoctrination and harrassment of the student body. This
sometimes leads to student expulsion or arrest. In his capacity as
former head of Intelligence and
high-ranking Police Officer, Dr.
Ko-wang Mei is responsible for
maintaining such a system of student control;
4.) that currently in Taiwan,
students are holding demonstrations on campuses across Taiwan
and in the Legislative Yuan to protest the presence of the military-
political officers on campus and are
striving to reclaim their rights as
mentioned above;
5.) that the topic of Dr. Ko-wang
Mei's speech is "Recent Social and
Economic Developments in
Taiwan", but that such
developments have come about only through the stringent efforts of
the Taiwanese people and the suppression of constitutional and
human rights through the imposition of Martial Law since 1949. The
elimination of human rights on
Taiwan has been accompanied by
serious ecological devastation
brought about by lack of concern
and planning on the part of the
Kuomintang Government which
still espouses the myth of "Return
to the Mainland".
BUI Jan, chairman,
Inter-Collegiate Taiwan-
Canadian Society, AMS
Walter Chen, chairman
Taiwan Canadian Association
Formosan Association of Public
Affairs
Taiwanese Foundation
Taiwan Democratic Progressive
Party Supporters
Taiwanese Canadian Women's
Association
When all else fails .
An Academic Prayer:
O' Lord (and professors) hearken
unto my voice.
Hear me in my hour of distress
and day of need.
For this task you set upon
me is great.
O' Lord, master and creator of the
universe,
Four exams in the first three
days of the testing period,
is certain academic death.
My pleas have fallen unto the deaf
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49
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ears of my professors.
The cheeks of the devils at the
registrar glow with glee.
My power is nothingness compared
to your all encompassing might.
Save me from these wicked
elements;
That seem intent on dooming me.
And that which I have vowed
to you I will pay, for
salvation is of the Lord.
Harris Silver
arts 2
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Premier Showing
"ECLIPSE OF REASON"
By Dr. Bernard Nathanson
Former abortionists discuss abortion
12:30-1:30
Friday, April 3rd
SUB 207
Sponsored by Campus Pro-Life
Chair of the board
FOR A DAY!
I he Nation,
launching its
the Board for
i ontest is opi
residents het
and 19. The
have the privilege ol becoming Chair
of the Board of the National Bank of
Canada for a day.
Again this year, the contest will be held
m three stages and will consist of written
and oral competitions. Winners will be
chosen by a jury.
3ITIONS OF ENTRY
In the first stage of the contest,
participants send a typed essay of a
maximum of three (3) pages to their
nearest National Bank of Canada branch,
explaining: "How do you envision an
ideal society and what can today'syouth
do to help achieve it?" The essays judged
the most interesting will be retained
and their authors will be invited to meet
with the jury for the second stage of
the contest: the regional semi-finals of
the oral competitions. The regional
semi-final winners will then be invited
to the Banks Head Office on |une 24
^all expenses paidl to meet with the jury
for the final of the oral competitions.
/ESCRIPTION OF PRIZES
obtained at any National I
branch.
ONTEST DATES
I
n addition to becoming Chair of the
Board of the National Bank ol Canada
for a day. the grand prize winner oi the
final in Montreal will receive shares of
the National Bank of Canada ^orth
$2.000). Prizes of $ 1,250 and $650 will
1 he contest opens February 25, 1987
and essays must be received by the Bank
before midnight. April 12. 19S7.\\\
entry form and birth certificate must be
enclosed with the essay for the first
(written! stage of the contest.
Name:
ADDRESS:
Postal Code:
Tl 1.1 PHONE:
Age (birth certificate
REQCIRIP)
L.WC.l ACL OF
[NTR\:
Address of branch to which voc
\K1
SENDING NOl R 1 SSAV
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 31, 1987
tween dosses
TUESDAY
SUBFILMS
"An American in Paris?' starring Gene Kelly and
Leslie Caron, 7:00 p.m., SUB auditorium. Also,
"Easter Parade," starring Fred Astaire and Judy
Garland, 9:30 p.m.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Edmonds College Symphonic Choir from Seattle, Wash., Richard Asner, director, free admission, 3:30 p.m., UBC School of Music Recital
Hall.
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Petition  drop-off  and  meeting,   all  welcome,
noon. Graduate Student Centre Garden Room.
TODAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM meeting, worthwhile. Expansion projects,
byelections for external affairs and social coordinator. Come and vote, noon, SUB 205. Also,
Amiga meeting, byelections for external affairs
and social coordinator, noon, SUB 111.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
MUSLIM STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture, "Moses, Jesus and Mohammed, the
prophets of Islam, noon-1:30 p.m., Buch B313.
WEDNESDAY
CITR-UBC RADIO
Tape-A-Mania, four local bands play live on the
radio so you can record your own do-it-youreelf
cassette project. It's simple: they play, you tape.
6:00 p.m.. Terminal City; 7:30 p.m.. Red Herring; 9:00 p.m.. The Hip Type; 10:30 p.m.. Stubborn Blood. FM 101.9, cable FM 100.1. Also, 100
per cent Van Can. Over six continuous hours of
the best and worst of Vancouver underground
music, 5:30 p.m.-midnight. Also, celebrity DJ
bash, members of Vancouver's favorite
underground bands will be host D.J.'s, 1:00-5:00
p.m.
STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Table (tickets for Morganthaler at John Oliver
High School), 12:00 p.m.-2:00, SUB concourse.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Workshop: students and tenant's rights with
David Lane and Joanne Banks of The Tenant's
Rights Action Centre, noon, Graduate Centre
Garden Room.
SUBFILMS
Film: "Equus," starring Richard Burton, 7:30
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari meeting, 4:30 p.m.. SUB 212A.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THURSDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Final meeting, elections and summer plans,
noon, Hennings 301.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Last practice night for the '87 school year. Will
have a brief meeting concerning details for the
summer shooting times, places, 6:30 p.m., SUB
Ballroom.
NEWMAN CLUB
End of the year luncheon, noon, St. Mark's College, music room.
STAMP CLUB
Steve's final clearance sale, noon. International
House, Boardroom 400.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Michael Green will speak on "Expanding Your
Vision," noon. Wood 4.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
General meeting and elections, this is your
chance to become part of the A.I. executive,
everyone welcome, noon, SUB 211.
STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Table (tickets to Morganthaler at John Oliver
High School), 12:00-2:00 p.n\, SUB concourse.
INTERCOLLEGIATE TAIWAN
CANADIAN SOCIETY
Protest against scheduled seminar, "Recent
Social and Economic Development in Taiwan,"
by Ko-wang Mei, please come, 12:00 p.m., in
front of the Asian Centre.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest speaker, George Emery, "Transcendent
Consciousness and the Toilet Paper Roll," noon.
hot flash
The Canada Employment Centre
for students has announced changes
to the locations of the centres for
student summer employment.
Listed are five centres in the Metro
Vancouver area.
North Vancouver Centre 986-3404
Sinclair Centre 666-6626
Fraser Street 327-6626
Burnaby 437-3761
'Richmond 273-6431
Jack Daniel Distillery Named _ National Historic Place by the United States Government
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, you
can taste for yourself why our whiskey is so
uncommonly smooth.
As soon as you sip the water we
use, you can tell it's
something special.
That's because it flows,
pure and iron-free,
from a limestone
spring located deep
under the ground.
At Jack Daniel
Distillery,we've used this iron-free
water since our founder setded here
in 1866. Once you try our whiskey,
we believe, you'll know why we
always will.
Iron free  trom an underground spring
A man who has navar gone to school may Meat from a freight car. but if ha ha* a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.
— Theodore Roosevelt
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
jmgt* Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van,, B.C. V6T 2A5
*lp9 Charge Phono Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
VOTE ROB REGAN for April Fool Now.
The Job for Rob!!
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
(Possibly lead to part-time work in Fall)
Looking for people with sales experience
& those who would like to gain sales training.
Come to an info meeting
Thurs.. April 2—1:00 p.m.
BUCH B212
876-9473 BUYWISE
WINDSURFERS
Australia's Top Selling
Boards Now In Canadal
TYRONSEA
• revolutionary NEW hull shapes
• hard rails & dble concaves
• RAF sails (Neil Pryde)
Limited Time Offer by Importer.
All boards (fully rigged) at Dealer
cost (save $500-$600).
DEMOS AVAILABLE
Steve at 733-8474
20 - HOUSING
Ghent
1913
Star of Excellence
Brussels
1954
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION - Beta
House, 2140 Wesbrook Mall. Close to
classes, full kitchen, inexpensive. Apply
Now!! Phone 222-3186.
$155/mth. Beautiful, Shaughnessy home
with 3 furn. br, 2 full bathr, microwave,
laun. facil., Ige yard, near 41st & Granville.
We need a female UBC student to share
main floor with same in mixed house.
266-2636 eves, wknds or leave message for
Lisa or Tom.
MONTREAL — Downtown. Lge, furnished
studio apt. near McGill, Concordia. Avail.
May 3-Aug. 31. Rent negot. For more info
call 732-1432.
ROOMS FOR RENT - Furnished rms on
W. 19th Ave. near Arbutus, convenient
location, rent $200-250. Ph 731-8702.
SUBLET: April 17-Sept. 1. Furn., 1 b.r. top
fl. of hse. Pvte. ent., pkg., carpeted, comfortable, clean & bright. $230/mo. & util.
Clark & E. 12th Ave. Bryan, 876-3055.
ROOMS AVAILABLE from May to August in
shared house, only 5 minute walk from
SUB. Single rooms from $220 per month,
incl. furnishings, color TV and utilities.
Phone Colin at 224-9119 after 6 p.m. or
leave message.
JOBS
It you d like a booklet about Jack Daniel s Whiskey write us a letter here in Lynchburg Tennessee 37352 USA
MARINE BIOLOGIST Lab. Tech: Job
continuous to B.Sc. degree, $10/h, wknds
& holidays, Sept.-April. Full time summer.
1st or 2nd yr. Biology/Oceanography
students call 685-3364. Dr. Marliave.
WE ARE LOOKING for enthusiastic
people (female preferred! for full-time summer employment at University Golf Club.
Successful applicants will enjoy working
with the public in roles traditionally held by
males. Golf background helps but not mandatory;. Send brief outline of qualifications
to: Jim McLaughlin, Golf Professional,
P.O. Box 46138, Station G, Vancouver,
B.C. V6R 4G5.
EARL'S ON TOP is looking for hot, summer
staff. Interviews: Thursday, April 2, 3-4
p.m. 1185 Robson St.
REO RAFTING ADVENTURES needs
white-water paddle rafting guides, adventure coordinators, photographers. UBC info meeting Thur. April 2, 12:30 P.M. SUB
Lower Level Plaza North. Call 684-4438 or
687-7611 for more info.
30 - JOBS
11 - FOR SALE - Private
81 DATSUN 310, H.B., 4 sp.,
FWD, regularly maint. AM/FM cassette, 2
new all-season radials, rear brakes, muffler.
2 snows on rims. $2950. 228-3977 days.
Great Car!
TAKECARE
Quality condoms. Shop in the privacy Et
convenience of your home. Discretion
guaranteed. Prices/box of 12(7% p.s. tax
incl.): Sheik non-lub. $6.50, Sheik lub.
$6.50, Ramses Sensitol $7.50, Ramses
regular $7.50, Ramses Fiesta $8.00; Add
$1.50 shipping each box. Cheque or money
order payable to: TakeCare Personal Products, Dept. U.B. P.O. Box 7520, Victoria,
B.C. V9B 5B8.
BACKYARD GARAGE SALE. Everything
imaginable. Rain or shine. April 4, 5, 10-4.
2425 West 7th Avenue.
PERMANENT PART-TIME typist/receptionist/bookkeeper req. immed. for physician's
office. Approx. 30 hrs/wk. Flexible hrs.
$9.62/hr. Call 224-7769.
EARL'S PLACE, West 10th Ave. is looking
for energetic cooks for part-time work. Interviews: Tuesdays, bet. 3-5 p.m.
WANTED: ONE UBC STUDENT to work as
a part-time driver (1 or 2 shifts/wk.l for the
AMS Storeroom. Applicants must have
their own truck. Applications will be taken at
the AMS Storeroom Mon.-Fri., 3-4 p.m.
Lower Level, 6138 SUB Blvd., UBC.
SUMMER JOBS
FOREMAN ft PAINTERS
EARN $9000 to $0000 this summer
(Vane, fl* Okmnmgmn anms)
Painting exp. preferred but not necessary
Apply at CEC - Brock Hall
or ph. 732-7273
 TRIPLE A STUDENT PAINTERS
JAPANESE SPEAKING
TOUR GUIDES
We are looking for people who can work
as tour guides in Greater Vancouver and
Victoria from early May to end of August.
Applicants   must   be   fluently   bilingual
(Japanese-English) and be able to work in
Vancouver & take short trips to Victoria.
Experience is a plus, but we will train promising applicants. Send resume to:
TOURLAND TRAVEL LTD.
200 - 900 W  Georgia St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C2W6
Resumes should be written in native language of
applicant but follow traditional Canadian resume
format.
35 - LOST
LOST CCH TAX GUIDE 86/87 in lounge in
Commerce Bldg. Phone Doug at 876-3197 or
leave it in Angus 19.
40 - MESSAGES
1000 APLOGIES to Martin D. from Greg Davis.
I thought you wuz Christian.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 55 228-5496
50% OFF FIRST MONTH
Economical heated units.  Monitored burglar
alarm & sprinklers. 325-5400.
KEEP SAFE MINI STORAGE
1680 B Southeast Marine Drive
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Professional editing for clarity, readability,
organization. Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547
or 327-4761.
DATA-CORE
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Reasonable rates
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READ
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, March 31, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
r:s-***-   --3L
MARGOLIN, GAINES, FIDLER . . . captivating
bnan gieblehaus photo
First class performances
in Playhouse finale
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
I'm Not Rappaport is easily the
finest Vancouver Playhouse production since Amadeus in April
1984.
stage
I'm Not Rappaport
By Herb Gardner
Directed by Keith Digby
The Vancouver Playhouse
until April 25
The star is Herb Gardner's
clever, captivating script, here
capably supported by the excellent
performances of the two lead actors.
Stuart Margolin, Angel on The
Rockford Files, is Nat, an eighty-
year-old New York Jew, a communist from the thirties, who will
spout doctrine or fascinating lies
about his life to anyone who will
listen. "Sometimes the truth
doesn't fit. I take in here, I let out
there."
Sonny Jim Gaines (Midge), imported for this production from
New York, is an equally old black
man, the superintendent of an
apartment building that's about to
go co-op, and Nat's irritated, impatient one-man audience.
The two meet and talk in Central
Park every day. Nat does most of
the talking. In fact the play opens
with Midge refusing to listen
anymore, because it's all lies. But
he does listen, and so does the audience.
When Danforth, the chairman
of the new tenants committee of
Midge's building, comes to the park
to   tell   Midge   he's   fired,-   Nat
assumes the role of a lawyer,
nicknamed "The Cobra". He
threatens Danforth with a general
strike. "The name Danforth will
begin to mean something. You'll
become an adjective, my friend."
Midge doesn't want trouble, and
quietly begs Nat to stop the
charade. Nat, loudly, in disbelief,
to Midge: "You're asking The
Cobra not to strike?"
Midge pays a street punk three
dollars a day to walk him home.
The punk, upon meeting Nat,
demands Nat pay for protection
too. Nat, the communist, insists the
youth recognize the real enemy is
the rich, and hits him with a cane.
Nat is knocked to the ground. We
next see him with a bandaged head,
walking with a walker.
These two are lonely, afraid, life-
loving, and indominatable. They
refuse to be prisoners, and suffuse
the audience with their grudging
love of each other's company, and
of their own lives.
Margolin and Gaines have a
beautiful rapport that is the centre
of this captivating show.
The supporting cast, Ross
Stephanson, C. J. Beckingham,
Brent Fidler, Robert Ramsay Collins, and Marion Eisman, all provide weak, stilted performances.
Eisman plays Nat's caring, loving daughter, deeply frustrated at
her father's refusal of help. The
role, as she plays it, with
dramatically swinging arms and inexplicable bellowing, is reminiscent
of Leon Pownall's equally odd performance in January's Master
Class.
Collins' drug-pusher cowboy,
wearing a stereotypical fringed
brown leather coat, storms about
the stag ; like he just stepped off a
horse, a parody of McLeod.
Both are too big, too overt, too
amateur in their characterizations.
And they stand out as typical
Playhouse fair next to the subtle
professionalism of the leads. Fortunately, these supporting roles are
very small.
Director Keith Digby, of Victoria's Bastion Theatre, has cast
two first class actors and given them
the artistic freedom to make this
their play. But his casting of the
supporting cast, and his inability to
begin to carve off their awkward
edges, indicates the success of his
production might have little to do
with him.
Sheila Haley, returning to design
after over a year's absence, has
created an amazingly real on-stage
park. The large hill, which is the
back of the set has had a set of
cracked, mossy stone stairs imbedded in a carved trail which meanders
up the side to a jogging trail and
overpass bridge. A tunnel, through
the hill, opens onto the main acting
area where the two old park benches sit.
The tunnel, complete with graffiti, looks like the underpass tunnel
at Second Beach. This attention to
detail is superb, and refreshing.
It is interesting that the best
Playhouse production in three years
is the last minute replacement for
former artistic-director Walter
Learning's Elvis musical.
Now, with the departure of Learning, and Elvis, to Charlottetown,
new artistic director Guy Sprung
finds himself in the unenviable position of heading a Vancouver theatre
which has inadvertently presented a
very good show. Vancouver audiences will expect more than Noel
Coward next season.
UBC
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738-5298
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UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
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Over 50 years of dependability Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 31, 1987
UBC administration dodges bullet
By PATTI FLATHER
Ah, spring again at UBC. The
petals on the cherry blossoms are
beginning to fall to the ground,
students are sick of school and
eager for summer, and the stodgy
university administration is up to its
time-honored tricks.
'ii^fe_ai-g)
The campus brass are leaving two
very important student issues hanging — sexual harassment and
athletics fees — as classes end this
week and The Ubyssey stops
publishing.
The university's Baffle 'Em With
Bulls-t Strategy goes as follows:
Ignore Contentious Important
Issue as long as possible. When no
longer politically feasible to ignore,
appoint committee. Have committee work so diligently on Contentious Important Issue that it
couldn't possibly finish recommendations by end of term. In summer,
when almost no one is on campus
and student newspaper publishes infrequently, either shove issue under
carpet or railroad recommendations
through. In September, new student crowd enters in blissful ignorance.
This process isn't democratic, obviously. It works wonderfully well
at a university, where the student
population is always changing.
Most students don't start feeling
comfortable, and vocal, at a large
campus like UBC's until their
senior years, and then they
graduate.
On the sexual harassment issue,
UBC president David "Big Dave"
Strangway (who recently won the
Simon Seshadri lookalike contest)
appointed an ad hoc committee last
summer to look into implementing
sexual harassment procedures.
Currently complainants have no
official recourse within the university. Students especially are
vulnerable dealing with their professors.
The issue is contentious, particularly within the faculty association and the administration. An
earlier committee disbanded in protest when the administration under
Knud G. Pedersen told members to
investigate only harassment of
students by students.
Our lovely new committee, appointed in the summertime lull by
Big Dave with no student or union
representatives, has tried to appear
open by accepting numerous submissions. When their December
report deadline passed, it was no
big deal because input was still being accepted.
However, it's almost April and
becoming ridiculous. Is it just coincidence that Big Dave receives the
report at the end of the term? April
Fools, folks! This is how UBC
operates.
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Some of the committee members,
people whom I respect, may protest
at this cynicism. I swear I won't
complain if I'm proven wrong, and
Big Dave ensures that procedures
aren't railroaded through in the
summer, without widespread input.
Once procedures are in place,
they'll be difficult to change. Let's
get it right the first time.
Athletics fees are just as much
fun. To refresh your memory: two
years ago the administration imposed a $32 athletic fee, breaking a
1968   agreement   with   the   Alma
was set up, with student representation, to oversee athletics spending.
The AMS agreed to this, and dropped its lawsuit plans. The administration agreed to spend more
of our money updating facilities.
But the council met infrequently,
athletics services for students
haven't really increased (for example, using the War Memorial gym
weight room costs students $40 a
year), and the apalling three-to-one
inequity between funding for men's
and women's athletics has not been
addressed.
In summer, when almost no one is on campus and
student newspaper publishes infrequently, (UBC
administration) either shove issue under carpet
or railroad recommendations through.
Mater Society stipulating that
students had to vote on such increases. UBC itself was cutting
athletics funding drastically, and
preferred making students pay, to
cutting varsity programs and upsetting the Boys Club Alumni.
A   University   Athletic   Council
The administration had had the
nerve to suggest another $5.50 increase, even though the men's
athletic council couldn't provide a
budget in January. (Women's
athletics administrators have not
had this problem). As well, varsity
events often are poorly publicised
and few students attend.
In the face of student protest, Big
Dave acted predictably, by appointing a review committee. It's due to
submit its report on the tangled
mass of the UBC Athletic Empire,
(run by Bob "Oh, those grass tennis
courts are beautiful" Hindmarch),
to Big Dave today.
Will this report be made public?
Will it be made public while
students are around to see it? Will
Big Dave postpone the board of
governors vote on athletics fees until the fall, after students can see
how their money is spent? Don't
count on it.
And to the recent chorus of angry
varsity athletes: the issue is financial
accountability of student athletic
funds and if you can't support that
you don't deserve any money.
Stay tuned, all you returning
students, for the 1987-88 rerun of
the UBC Baffle 'Em Strategy.
Darn, I won't be able to see it. I'm
graduating.
Patti Rather is a former Ubyssey
editor deeply concerned with the
deep, dark and occult mysteries of
UBC's administrative juggernaut.
DISPLAY YOUR
CHARACTER.
Kinko's self-service
typewriters and copy
creation centers give your
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the clean and impressive
professional look they
deserve.
kinkcs
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^Copyright American Express Canada, Inc 1987 All rights reserved. American Express Company is Ihe owner of Ihe trade mark(s) being used by American Express Canada. Inc as a registered user

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